ARCHIVE: November 2003 to Present

 

H-2: SEQUENTIAL UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE

Procedure:

When a student starts a second (sequential) Penn State undergraduate degree, only the grades earned in courses taken after admission to candidacy for the second degree are included in the calculation of grade point average. Credits for courses taken under the first degree, which are acceptable in the subsequent degree program, should be included on the same basis as transfer credits from another institution. This applies whether the first degree is an associate degree or a baccalaureate degree. (Ref: Senate Policy 51-50)

Approved: ACUI (11-20-75)


G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Introduction:

Recognizing the importance of academic integrity to the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction, represented in the procedures that follow, is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Each campus or academic college at University Park, shall interpret and apply Academic Integrity Procedures consistent with University policy.

Campus or college committees maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.
 
Procedures:

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected:

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegation while taking into account the confidential nature of the information and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning.

2. When evidence suggests that an academic misconduct has occurred, the faculty member will enter the charge and the academic sanction on the campus or college’s Academic Integrity Form, will sign the form, and then convey the charge and sanction to the student for his or her signature (in person or through other methods if necessary).

3. After reviewing the allegation of academic misconduct with the student, the faculty member may provide the student with an additional period of time (determined by the campus or college procedures) before the student has to make a decision and sign the Academic Integrity Form as to whether or not to accept the academic sanction. A student’s failure to sign and return the Academic Integrity Form, by the specified deadline, consistent with campus or college procedures, will be construed as not contesting the charge or sanction.

4. Normally, it is preferable to settle issues between faculty and students, relying on the assignment of grades and course-related sanctions to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional University-level disciplinary sanctions. However, where integrity violations are considered to be extreme, the faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with both the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Judicial Affairs. A more detailed and comprehensive listing of the types of sanctions faculty may assign to students can be found in the document Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, the authority to administer academic sanctions remains the responsibility of the instructor (or AI Committee) when the case is managed and closed at the campus or college level. In situations where the allegation is referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs, the application of academic sanctions will be carried out by Judicial Affairs, but only in consultation with the Academic Integrity Committee of the campus or college.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic dishonesty is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process. Any drop or withdrawal from the course during this time will be reversed. A student who has received an academic sanction as a result of a violation of academic integrity may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time. These drop actions include regular drop, late drop, withdrawal, retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. This drop policy may be superceded in exceptional circumstances with the approval of Judicial Affairs (i.e. trauma drop).

NOTE: The following statement shall appear on all campus and college Academic Integrity Forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course to avoid a sanction for a violation of academic integrity. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures."

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the Academic Integrity Form by the specified deadline, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.
 
B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form, then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Judicial Affairs for recording, it is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. If a prior record is discovered after the student has admitted responsibility and accepted the academic sanction(s), a new academic sanction will be considered by the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee while affording the student his or her institutional rights (including the right to contest the violation and/or new academic sanctions). Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing academic sanctions or deciding whether disciplinary action is also warranted.

4. When a prior record of academic misconduct is discovered, the Academic Integrity Committee, in consultation with Judicial Affairs, may consider also recommending University-level disciplinary sanction(s). If University-level sanction(s) do apply, the Academic Integrity Form, along with other relevant documents, will be sent to Judicial Affairs for review and case management.

5. If the faculty member recommends University-level disciplinary sanctions, and the Academic Integrity Committee is in agreement, then the student is informed that the case will be referred to Judicial Affairs. If the case is referred to Judicial Affairs, jurisdiction for assigning all sanctions, academic and disciplinary, is the responsibility of that office, after consideration of the recommended academic sanction of the faculty member and of the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee.

6. Upon final disposition of the case, Judicial Affairs will communicate the outcome to the Academic Integrity Chair and/or appropriate Associate Dean or designee at the campus or college.

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form indicating that the charge or sanction(s) is being contested and then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. It is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. When disciplinary sanctions have not been recommended, and the student does not have a record of previous academic integrity violations, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee will conduct a hearing in accordance with their respective procedures.

During the hearing, if the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee finds that the student violated standards of academic integrity the Committee may elect to: uphold the original charge(s) and sanction(s); uphold charges, but modify sanction(s); apply no sanction(s).

4. When the instructor and Academic Integrity Committee are in agreement that a disciplinary sanction(s) may be warranted, or the Academic Integrity Committee finds that a record of prior academic misconduct is present, then the case is forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

When this occurs, the Academic Integrity Committee will not manage the case, but will simply conduct a preliminary review before referring the case to the Office of Judicial Affairs. All formal fact-finding and hearing procedures will be conducted by Judicial Affairs in accordance with normal University operating procedures.

At the conclusion of the case, in which the student is found responsible for violating the Academic Integrity Policy, the Office of Judicial Affairs may assign University-level disciplinary sanctions and contact the Academic Integrity Committee at the campus or college for the assignment of any recommended academic sanctions.

D. Disciplinary Sanctions:

1. Faculty may assign a wide range of sanctions to a student found responsible for violating academic integrity. Most faculty may choose to utilize academic sanctions (the modification of grades due to misconduct), but when referring cases to Judicial Affairs, faculty have the option to also recommend a full range of disciplinary sanctions available to Judicial Affairs such as: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Temporary, Indefinite or Permanent Expulsion; or the "XF" transcript notation (see Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations and Explanations for Disciplinary Sanctions).

2. "XF" sanctions are assigned only after consultation with the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Assigning an "XF" notation to a student’s transcript should be a rare occurrence and is reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity which may include repeat misconduct.

3. In any instance in which the instructor believes an "XF" sanction is warranted, whether or not the student has admitted responsibility, the case is forwarded to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee which will determine in consultation with the involved faculty member, whether the case should be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs for appropriate fact finding and judgment.

4. The campus or college Academic Integrity Committee must include, with any recommendation to Judicial Affairs for an XF grade, those conditions (if any) under which it would approve the removal of the "XF" sanction from the transcript. Judicial Affairs will consider this recommendation when deciding upon the length of time that the “XF” notation will remain on the student’s transcript. When the conditions are met for removal of the “XF”, an academic “F” will remain on the transcript. Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.
 
E. Schreyer Honors College Students:

1. For honors courses, as with all other courses, the campus or college delivering the course maintains responsibility for reviewing and issuing academic sanctions and/or referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a college finds that a Schreyer Honors College student has committed an academic misconduct, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.
 
F. Students Involved in Other University Related Academic Activities or Programs:

Students involved in other University related academic activities or programs (e.g. World Campus, Cooperative Education, internships, study abroad programs, etc.) are subject to the University Academic Integrity Policy as implemented by the appropriate campus or college responsible for delivering the program or course/activity.

G. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate Associate Dean or designee is responsible for forming Academic Integrity Committees and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They are also responsible for seeing that all cases are reported to Judicial Affairs. The specific information reported to Judicial Affairs should include: a) a copy of the signed Academic Integrity Form, and b) other supporting documents that were established or reviewed while managing the case.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for the central record keeping and disclosing of student discipline records at the University, including academic dishonesty cases. Judicial Affairs will disclose student disciplinary records of academic dishonesty to third parties when those records include University-level disciplinary sanctions assigned by the Office of Judicial Affairs. Judicial Affairs will disclose student discipline record information to third parties in accordance with federal law (FERPA) and the University policy on managing Student Discipline Records (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/pdf/stu_dis_records.pdf).

 

Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)
Revised: ACUE (9-1-05)


 

K-1: RE-ENROLLMENT AS A DEGREE CANDIDATE

Former students wishing to re-enroll must complete a re-enrollment request form available at any campus Registrar’s office or on the Web at www.psu.edu/registrar/. The completed form and the non-refundable re-enrollment application fee are to be returned to the Registrar’s office at the campus where the student wishes to enroll.

The campus Registrar will first use screen ARISBD before recording the re-enrollment request. This inquiry screen will provide an early answer to the student’s re-enrollment request by indicating whether the request will be immediately approved or forwarded to the appropriate college for further consideration.

The campus Registrar will record the re-enrollment request on screen ARUSBE and deposit the application fee following approved cash handling procedures. Students eligible for re-enrollment according to Senate Policy will receive a re-enrollment confirmation from the campus Registrar. All other students will receive notification that their request is being reviewed by the appropriate college or DUS. After the college or DUS notifies the Registrar’s office of its decision, the Registrar’s office notifies the student of the decision.

Students are always expected to meet with their designated academic adviser or appropriate advising center personnel to plan a course of study before registration. In some cases re-enrolled students must also obtain academic advice from their college regarding program requirements and future entrance to major.

Colleges may request the Registrar’s office to automatically place a registration hold after the re-enrollment request has been approved to insure that proper advising occurs. A registration hold will prevent the student from registering for courses but will not impede the re-enrollment process.

The re-enrollment process allows a student to request a campus other than the campus of last enrollment, provided that the student’s requested major is offered at the requested campus. If the re-enrollment is approved, the new campus location is also approved. All requested changes to the University Park Campus automatically result in a Dean’s review.

A former Penn State student who has attended another accredited college or university must arrange to have a transcript sent to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. The external transcript will be evaluated and appropriate credits will be added to the Penn State record.

Non-degree conditional students desiring to return to degree status must be reinstated. See policy I-2.

Special accommodations are extended to adult learners. An adult learner does not need to re-enroll if:

(a)
The period of non-enrollment has been less than three years, and;

(b)
The major has been authorized by the academic college to be eligible for this accommodation. Those programs that have been authorized are on the Web at www.psu.edu/registrar.

If an adult learner satisfies these two conditions but withdrew from the last enrolled semester, re-enrollment is not required, however, the campus registrar must contact the University Registrar’s office so that the registration will be permitted for the student.

If an adult learner is seeking re-enrollment into a different major, the normal rules of re-enrollment apply.

Approved: ACUI (11-16-78)

Revised: ACUE (7-30-97)
Revised: ACUE (8-4-05)



G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Introduction:

Recognizing the importance of academic integrity to the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction, represented in the procedures that follow, is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Each campus or academic college at University Park, shall interpret and apply Academic Integrity Procedures consistent with University policy.

Campus or college committees maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.
 
Procedures:

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected:

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegation while taking into account the confidential nature of the information and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning.

2. When evidence suggests that an academic misconduct has occurred, the faculty member will enter the charge and the academic sanction on the campus or college’s Academic Integrity Form, will sign the form, and then convey the charge and sanction to the student for his or her signature (in person or through other methods if necessary).

3. After reviewing the allegation of academic misconduct with the student, the faculty member may provide the student with an additional period of time (determined by the campus or college procedures) before the student has to make a decision and sign the Academic Integrity Form as to whether or not to accept the academic sanction. A student’s failure to sign and return the Academic Integrity Form, by the specified deadline, consistent with campus or college procedures, will be construed as not contesting the charge or sanction.

4. Normally, it is preferable to settle issues between faculty and students, relying on the assignment of grades and course-related sanctions to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional University-level disciplinary sanctions. However, where integrity violations are considered to be extreme, the faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with both the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Judicial Affairs. A more detailed and comprehensive listing of the types of sanctions faculty may assign to students can be found in the document Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, the authority to administer academic sanctions remains the responsibility of the instructor (or AI Committee) when the case is managed and closed at the campus or college level. In situations where the allegation is referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs, the application of academic sanctions will be carried out by Judicial Affairs, but only in consultation with the Academic Integrity Committee of the campus or college.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic dishonesty is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process. Any drop or withdrawal from the course during this time will be reversed. A student who has received an academic sanction as a result of a violation of academic integrity may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time. These drop actions include regular drop, late drop, withdrawal, retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. This drop policy may be superceded in exceptional circumstances with the approval of Judicial Affairs (i.e. trauma drop).

NOTE: The following statement shall appear on all campus and college Academic Integrity Forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course to avoid a sanction for a violation of academic integrity. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures."

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the Academic Integrity Form by the specified deadline, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.
 
B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form, then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Judicial Affairs for recording, it is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. If a prior record is discovered after the student has admitted responsibility and accepted the academic sanction(s), a new academic sanction will be considered by the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee while affording the student his or her institutional rights (including the right to contest the violation and/or new academic sanctions). Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing academic sanctions or deciding whether disciplinary action is also warranted.

4. When a prior record of academic misconduct is discovered, the Academic Integrity Committee, in consultation with Judicial Affairs, may consider also recommending University-level disciplinary sanction(s). If University-level sanction(s) do apply, the Academic Integrity Form, along with other relevant documents, will be sent to Judicial Affairs for review and case management.

5. If the faculty member recommends University-level disciplinary sanctions, and the Academic Integrity Committee is in agreement, then the student is informed that the case will be referred to Judicial Affairs. If the case is referred to Judicial Affairs, jurisdiction for assigning all sanctions, academic and disciplinary, is the responsibility of that office, after consideration of the recommended academic sanction of the faculty member and of the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee.

6. Upon final disposition of the case, Judicial Affairs will communicate the outcome to the Academic Integrity Chair and/or appropriate Associate Dean or designee at the campus or college.

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form indicating that the charge or sanction(s) is being contested and then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. It is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. When disciplinary sanctions have not been recommended, and the student does not have a record of previous academic integrity violations, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee will conduct a hearing in accordance with their respective procedures.

During the hearing, if the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee finds that the student violated standards of academic integrity the Committee may elect to: uphold the original charge(s) and sanction(s); uphold charges, but modify sanction(s); apply no sanction(s).

4. When the instructor and Academic Integrity Committee are in agreement that a disciplinary sanction(s) may be warranted, or the Academic Integrity Committee finds that a record of prior academic misconduct is present, then the case is forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

When this occurs, the Academic Integrity Committee will not manage the case, but will simply conduct a preliminary review before referring the case to the Office of Judicial Affairs. All formal fact-finding and hearing procedures will be conducted by Judicial Affairs in accordance with normal University operating procedures.

At the conclusion of the case, in which the student is found responsible for violating the Academic Integrity Policy, the Office of Judicial Affairs may assign University-level disciplinary sanctions and contact the Academic Integrity Committee at the campus or college for the assignment of any recommended academic sanctions.

D. Disciplinary Sanctions:

1. Faculty may assign a wide range of sanctions to a student found responsible for violating academic integrity. Most faculty may choose to utilize academic sanctions (the modification of grades due to misconduct), but when referring cases to Judicial Affairs, faculty have the option to also recommend a full range of disciplinary sanctions available to Judicial Affairs such as: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Temporary, Indefinite or Permanent Expulsion; or the "XF" transcript notation. Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations and Explanations for Disciplinary Sanctions can be found at (website under development).

2. "XF" sanctions are assigned only after consultation with the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Assigning an "XF" notation to a student’s transcript should be a rare occurrence and is reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity which may include repeat misconduct.

3. In any instance in which the instructor believes an "XF" sanction is warranted, whether or not the student has admitted responsibility, the case is forwarded to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee which will determine in consultation with the involved faculty member, whether the case should be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs for appropriate fact finding and judgment.

4. The campus or college Academic Integrity Committee must include, with any recommendation to Judicial Affairs for an XF grade, those conditions (if any) under which it would approve the removal of the "XF" sanction from the transcript. Judicial Affairs will consider this recommendation when deciding upon the length of time that the “XF” notation will remain on the student’s transcript. When the conditions are met for removal of the “XF”, an academic “F” will remain on the transcript. Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.
 
E. Schreyer Honors College Students:

1. For honors courses, as with all other courses, the campus or college delivering the course maintains responsibility for reviewing and issuing academic sanctions and/or referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a college finds that a Schreyer Honors College student has committed an academic misconduct, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.
 
F. Students Involved in Other University Related Academic Activities or Programs:

Students involved in other University related academic activities or programs (e.g. World Campus, Cooperative Education, internships, study abroad programs, etc.) are subject to the University Academic Integrity Policy as implemented by the appropriate campus or college responsible for delivering the program or course/activity.

G. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate Associate Dean or designee is responsible for forming Academic Integrity Committees and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They are also responsible for seeing that all cases are reported to Judicial Affairs. The specific information reported to Judicial Affairs should include: a) a copy of the signed Academic Integrity Form, and b) other supporting documents that were established or reviewed while managing the case.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for the central record keeping and disclosing of student discipline records at the University, including academic dishonesty cases. Judicial Affairs will disclose student disciplinary records of academic dishonesty to third parties when those records include University-level disciplinary sanctions assigned by the Office of Judicial Affairs. Judicial Affairs will disclose student discipline record information to third parties in accordance with federal law (FERPA) and the University policy on managing Student Discipline Records (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/pdf/stu_dis_records.pdf).

 

Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)
Revised: ACUE (9-1-05)


D-2: ENTRANCE TO MAJOR AND UPPER DIVISION LOCATION

Recording and Use of Major Preference Data

1.   Colleges are encouraged, but not required, to accept into major status students from outside of the college. Students indicating major preferences outside of their common year college are informed of the decision regarding their acceptance accordingly.

2.   Each student may identify up to three major preferences. Student major preferences are initially collected from the admissions application and recorded in the admissions file in ISIS. At the time the student accepts the admission offer (paid accept status) the major preferences move to the Freshman Academic Information file in ISIS. These major preferences can be further modified by the student through the Educational Planning Survey distributed by the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS).

Students have opportunities to modify their major preferences at any time prior to entering a major. Major preferences can be changed by informing the student's academic adviser at advising sessions; ISIS screen ARUEA is used to update major preferences. The eLion Entrance to Major application can be accessed directly by the student to modify major preferences.

3.   Each college must provide information to their freshmen and advisers relevant to gaining entrance to the college's majors, in order to assist students in their selection of major preferences. All colleges must make this information available to all University students and advisers.

4.   Colleges that have received authorization to have administrative controls imposed on the number of students who may be granted entrance to a major each year must inform students about these controls and the procedures for gaining entrance to a controlled major.

5.   The major preference data is used to review entrance to all majors, regardless of whether the major is controlled or not. Students generally enter a major after their first year and before their third year. The specific timing depends on the requirements of the college and major.

6.   Each college is responsible for reviewing freshmen expressing preferences for controlled majors. The Registrar's office provides a report to support the colleges with this process. All students expressing preferences for controlled majors are to be informed of alternative majors that they might explore.

 

Designation of Selection Pools

1.   All baccalaureate degree candidates are assigned a specific selection pool. The assigned selection pool should be such that following the time of entry to a major, the student would be ready to begin enrolling in major-required courses with the next semester of registration. Entering freshmen are assigned a selection pool as appropriate for their preferred major. For controlled majors, the selection pool designation is normally the spring of the sophomore year.

2.   The college is responsible for notifying freshmen in the college and appropriate students in DUS of their specific assigned individual selection pool designations.

3.   Under exceptional circumstances, the college dean may designate an alternative selection pool for a student.

4.   The college dean assigns the selection pool designation for advance standing-students at the time of admission to the college.

5.   All selection pool designations are entered into the ISIS system. The Registrar's office will provide support for batch entry of these data. Entries to individual student records are made by the college using ISIS screen ARUES.

Student Entrance to Majors And Upper Level Locations

 

The Registrar's office, on behalf of the college, will notify each student in the designated selection pool. This notification will:

a.   Instruct students to confirm their three major preferences.

b.   Instruct students that changes to their major preferences can be made using eLion, by contacting their adviser, or by contacting their college dean's office. A deadline change date will be specified.

c.    Inform the student of the upper division location(s) at which each of the three major preferences is offered.

 

Selection of Students from the Pool

1.   The Registrar's office will provide all colleges with Major Decision Reports. The report identifies students requesting the identified major preference. In addition to the report, the Registrar's office will identify whether or not the students have satisfied the academic requirements for entrance to the major.

2.   Students shall be reviewed for selection eligibility by the college. Eligibility will be determined on the basis of approved and published criteria.

3.   The college will assign eligible students requesting non-controlled majors to those majors within the college.

4.   Eligible students with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 or higher are guaranteed entrance to controlled majors. The college will assign remaining students in order of descending cumulative grade-point average until all controlled spaces are assigned.


Notification to Students

1.   All students in a specific pool are to be notified by the college performing the selection of their status after selections have been made. Notification is to occur prior to the beginning of the registration period for the next fall semester. The notification will indicate whether the student was considered eligible for selection and, if so, whether the student was selected for the major.

2.   Students actually selected are to be informed that they have been granted entrance to a specific major and upper-level location effective the next semester of enrollment. For those students who have not yet completed the course entrance requirements but are currently enrolled in such courses, or those students with marginally competitive grade-point averages, the entrance to major is conditional pending appropriate current semester performance.

3.   The status of all students selected into the major is to be recorded using the ISIS system. The Registrar's office will provide appropriate support services to all of the colleges.

 

Advising of Students Who are Declared Ineligible or Who Were Not Selected for Majors

1.   All students in the selection pool who are either declared ineligible or not selected are to be notified by the college performing the selection. The college performing the selection will also notify the student's common year college if these two colleges are different.

2.   The college performing the selection is not required to advise ineligible or non-selected students if the student has a common year designation in a different college. The college in which the student is currently enrolled will provide the advising.

 

Calendar

1.   The Office of the University Registrar will publish an annual Entrance to Major calendar with specific dates and events.

2.   Entrance to non-controlled majors may occur each semester. Entrance to controlled majors occurs only during the spring semester.

 

Entrance to Major Outside of This Process

 

The college dean has the authority to allow a student to enter a major as an exception. Such approvals are entered using ISIS screen ARUES.

 

 

Approved:       ACUE (1-8-98)
Revised:        Editorial (9-6-01)


D-3: CHANGE OF MAJOR

Baccalaureate-to-Baccalaureate and Associate-to-Associate 

1.   Each college dean shall establish procedures for assisting students in the change of major process. These procedures should include where forms may be obtained, how forms are sent to the new college dean, and how students are notified of the decision.

2.   When processing changes of major, the University-approved Change of Major form will be used. The student completes the form and forwards it to the new college dean for review. If the requested change is approved, the new college dean updates the major on ISIS using screen ARUSAD. The new dean notifies the current dean and the student of the outcome.

 

Baccalaureate-to-Associate 

1.   The procedures for obtaining approval of the change of major are the same as outlined in section 1 above. In addition, the new college dean notifies the Registrar's office.

2.   The Registrar's office will re-calculate the student's cumulative  agrade-pointverage in accordance with University Faculty Senate policy.

 

Associate-to-Baccalaureate 

1.   Students Enrolled in an Associate Degree Program

a.   Requests from students who were clearly admissible to a four-year program at the time of their initial enrollment should be handled as if the change is from one baccalaureate program to another and will be at the discretion of the receiving college dean.

b.   Requests from students who were not admissible to a four-year program at the time of their initial enrollment will be handled on an individual basis by the college dean involved. No commitments for a change of major should be made until authorization has been obtained from the appropriate college dean.

c.    The procedures for obtaining approval of the change of major from associate-to-baccalaureate are the same as outlined in section 1 above. In addition, the new college dean notifies the Registrar's office.

d.   The Registrar's office will re-calculate the student's cumulative a grade-pointverage in accordance with faculty senate policy.

e.   If the associate-to-baccalaureate change is approved, the approving college will notify the student, assign a selection pool, and identify the student's previously completed credits that will apply to the baccalaureate degree program.

2.   Students Who Have Completed an Associate Degree Program

a.   Entrance to a baccalaureate degree program for a student who has completed an associate degree is processed as a re-enrollment. The student initiates the re-enrollment request with the campus Registrar.

b.   Approval will be based on the student's associate degree record and other pertinent information. Students should not be advised that they would be automatically re-enrolled in a baccalaureate degree program after satisfactorily completing the requirements for the associate degree.

 

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)


 

D-1: ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE AND LOWER DIVISION LOCATION

Senate Policy: 37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study

College Common Year Designation and Initial Campus Assignment

1. Students may be admitted to the University as first-semester baccalaureate or associate degree candidates at a university location as long as the location offers course work appropriate to normal degree progress for the student's academic program of admission.

2. Regardless of location, first-semester baccalaureate students are normally admitted into a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS), assigned a college common year designation code, and enrolled in course work consistent with normal degree progress for the academic majors in that college. Each college and DUS has only one college common year designation code for this purpose.

3. First-semester baccalaureate and associate degree students will be assigned to a location only if that location can provide at least two semesters of normal progress toward the baccalaureate or associate degree program selected by the student.

4. Normally, baccalaureate and associate degree students are expected to complete two full years of academic work at their location of admission. At the end of two years, an associate degree candidate will normally graduate and a baccalaureate degree candidate may have to change to a University location that offers the upper level course work required in the student's major. Relocation to University Park during the first two years of academic work is only to occur under exceptional circumstances.

5. The dean for each college will be responsible for establishing procedures to accomplish each of the following objectives:

1. Inform each baccalaureate student (in the college) of the policies and procedures governing relocation to another campus.
2. Identify the course requirements to maintain normal academic progress for the student's major preference.
3. Identify the probable semester of relocation for a student based on major preference.
4. Assure that relocation does occur consistent with the current course requirements of a student's major preference, the student's actual course experience, and the planned course offerings of the campus over the next several semesters.

6. Students may enroll at any location during the summer session and return to the regularly assigned location for the fall semester.

Student-Initiated Change of Location Request

1. A student may request a change of location in order to maintain normal degree progress toward the preferred major. Under special circumstances, requests for other reasons may be approved as exceptions.

2. Student-initiated change of location requests are considered on a space-available basis and must have the approval of the receiving change of location administrator.

3. Students declaring majors that require early change of location are expected to remain in that major and to schedule courses consistent with the major.

4. The sending change of location administrator should:

1. Determine that the student is currently registered in either a baccalaureate or associate degree program. Students not meeting this criterion should be directed to the campus admissions or re-enrollment counselor and treated as new admissions to degree candidacy or re-enrollments.
2. Using the student's major preference and semester, determine if the student can obtain a course schedule that will permit the student to maintain normal academic progress at the present location.

5. To initiate a change of location request, the sending change of location administrator enters appropriate student information on ISIS screen ARUSBC and also notifies the receiving change of location administrator of the request by e-mail. The receiving administrator enters the approval/denial decision on screen ARUSBC and also notifies the sending administrator of the decision through e-mail. The Registrar's office notifies the student if the request is approved. The sending administrator notifies the student if the request is not approved.

6. The campus Registrar at the receiving location is responsible for providing the student with appropriate registration instructions.

Cancellation of an Approved Location Change

3.1. The student may elect to cancel an approved change of location. Upon notification by the student, the sending change of location administrator cancels the approved change using screen ARUSBC. The Registrar's office confirms this cancellation by notifying the student.

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)


L-5: WORLD CAMPUS COURSES FOR GRADUATION

Procedure:

When a grade for an eight-month World Campus course is needed for graduation, all lessons and examinations must be received three weeks prior to graduation and/or prior to the course ending date, whichever comes first. Graduating students enrolled in World Campus courses that have set start and end dates must notify World Campus to ensure grades are assigned prior to the academic college's graduation deadlines.

Approved: ACUI (8-5-76)
Effective: September 1, 1976
Revised: ACUI (2-22-79)
Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)
Procedure:

Degree students needing a maximum of six credits for graduation may be permitted to enroll for six credits through the World Campus, subject to approval by the student's college dean.

Approved: ACUI (2-22-79)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-04)


 

K-2: RE-ENROLLMENT WITH ACADEMIC RENEWAL

Procedure for Former Degree Students (Ref: Senate Policy 58-60):

A student who has had an interruption of his/her studies at the University for a period of at least four calendar years may request re-enrollment with academic renewal in the Registrar's office.

The student must complete a Request for Re-enrollment form and submit it to the Registrar's office. This request may be entered at any campus location in the Registrar's office, though final action will be taken in the Registrar's office at University Park because there are notations that must be entered on the student's academic record.

In the event the student's grade point average is at least 2.0, and the student is not requesting an administratively controlled academic area, the Registrar's office may take action on the renewal request.

In cases where the grade point average is less than 2.0, a request for support for renewal will be sent to the requested college. If the college supports the renewal, the Registrar's office will take appropriate action.

The earlier academic record will remain on the transcript. Total credits completed will be recalculated based on prior courses with a grade of C or higher. The number of late drop credits will be refreshed and the new grade point average will begin with the next registration.

Retroactive academic renewals are possible and may be initiated at any campus location in the Registrar's office, though final action will be taken in the Registrar's office at University Park because there are notations that must be entered on the student's academic record.

The Registrar's office will inform the student about the decision and will make database notations as appropriate.

Procedure for Former Provisional or Nondegree Students (Ref: Senate Policy 15-50):

A provisional or nondegree student who wants to return to the University after an interruption of no fewer than four calendar years may request provisional re-entry with academic renewal through the Registrar's office. The student may not have enrolled in any Penn State credit courses during this period and must be seeking to return either in a degree program or in provisional status. In rare instances a student may request renewal as a nondegree student.

Former provisional or nondegree students who want to return to provisional status must submit a provisional re-entry request form to the Registrar's office. Support from the Division of Undergraduate Studies will be sought for these students.

Former provisional or nondegree students asking for admission into a degree program with academic renewal must file an application for degree status with the Undergraduate Admissions Office. If approved for admission into a degree program, the Registrar's office is to be notified so the appropriate notations can be recorded on the database and on the educational record. Total credits completed will be recalculated based on prior courses with a grade of C or higher. The number of late drop credits will be refreshed and the new grade point average will begin with the next registration.

Retroactive academic renewals are possible and may be initiated at any campus location in the Registrar's office, though final action will be taken in the Registrar's office at University Park because there are notations that must be entered on the student's academic record.

The Registrar's office will inform the student about the decision and will make database notations as appropriate.

 

Approved: ACUI (10-25-84)

Revised: ACUE (10-3-96)


K-1: RE-ENROLLMENT AS A DEGREE CANDIDATE

Procedure:

To request re-enrollment, a former degree candidate must submit a Request for Re-enrollment form to the Registrar's office or they may call the Registrar's office to request re-enrollment via telephone or they may contact the Registrar's office via the Web at www.psu.edu/registrar. It is recommended the request be submitted at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester/session in which re-enrollment is sought. (Ref: Senate Policies 58-20, 58-50)

A former Penn State student who has attended another accredited college or university and wants to re-enroll with advanced standing must arrange to have a transcript sent to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. The transcript will be evaluated and appropriate credits will be added to the Penn State record.

NOTE 1: In most cases, re-enrollment requests may be processed by the Registrar's office. However, in some cases additional approval may be required. (Ref: Senate Policy 58-50).

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)

Revised: ACUE (7-30-97)

NOTE 2: Re-enrollment procedures do not apply to degree candidates admitted to extended access programs who interrupt continuous enrollment by not enrolling in credit courses for one semester.

Approved: ACUI (11-16-78)

Revised: ACUE (7-30-97)


I-2: REINSTATEMENT

Procedure:

A student who has been dropped from the University for unsatisfactory scholarship may request reinstatement from the dean of the college in which reinstatement is sought.

In accordance with Senate Policy 14-00, a nondegree conditional student should, as part of the initial reinstatement process, consult with a designated representative of the college in which reinstatement is sought. The college representative clarifies the specific conditions for reinstatement which must be met and assists the student with course selection.

NOTE 1: Commonwealth Campus students consult with the Director of Academic Affairs to determine the appropriate college representative.

A student is eligible to seek reinstatement if the following criteria are met:

1. At least one-half of the grade point deficiencies accumulated at the time of the drop action must be eliminated.

2. The grade point deficiency must be reduced below the point at which the student would be subject to drop action again.

3. Any additional requirements specified by the sponsoring college, such as stricter grade point deficiency reduction or attainment of a cumulative grade point average consistent with entrance to college and major standards in effect at the time of reinstatement.

A student who believes the above requirements have been met requests verification from the dean of the college in which reinstatement is sought and submits a Request for Readmission form (FORM K-1) to the Undergraduate Admission Office at least 30 days prior to registration for the semester for which reinstatement is sought. The college dean issues the student an Authorization of Reinstatement form (FORM I-1) and enters the reinstatement request on the AIS via screen ARUSBR. If the three reinstatement standards have been met, the college dean approves the request and forwards a copy of the Authorization of Reinstatement form to the Undergraduate Admissions Office for readmission consideration. The college dean also enters the reinstatement action on ARUSBR and informs the student of the reinstatement action.

If the student has not met the three reinstatement standards, but expects to meet them pending the outcome of coursework in progress, the college dean asks the student to return for verification after grades have been issued for such courses.

NOTE 2: Students may be reinstated and readmitted to the Division of Undergraduate Studies only upon recommendation of the college dean and subject to the approval of the director of the the Division of Undergraduate Studies. In such cases, the college dean forwards to DUS the Authorization of Reinstatement form for review and consideration for approval at least 20 days prior to registration for the semester for which reinstatement is sought. The director of DUS informs the college dean of the decision, enters the reinstatement action on ARUSBR, sends a copy of the approved Authorization of Reinstatement form to the Undergraduate Admissions Office, and informs the student of the action.

NOTE 3: Behrend College students request reinstatement information from the Behrend College Associate Provost's Office.

NOTE 4: Capital College students request reinstatement information from the Capital College Admission Office.

NOTE 5: Commonwealth campus students forward the Authorization of Reinstatement form to the dean of the college in which reinstatement is sought. and submit a Request for Readmission form to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. If DUS is recommended, the college dean follows the procedure in NOTE 2. The college dean or the director of DUS also writes to the student concerning the reinstatement action.

NOTE 6: Reinstatement and readmission are two separate actions. See Section K-1 for readmission procedures.

(Ref: Senate Policies 54-80, 54-80, 58-20)

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (5-5-83)

Revised: ACAS (5-8-87)


G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Introduction:

Recognizing the intrinsic nature of academic integrity as a linchpin of the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction represented in the procedures that follow is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move from the realm of faculty and students to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

The associate dean or campus director of academic affairs maintains and makes available to students and faculty the academic integrity procedures adopted by the college's Academic Integrity Committee.

College Committees maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.

 

Procedures:

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegations while taking into account the need to respect each student's privacy and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learn

2. The faculty member next conveys to the student the grade or grade and disciplinary action to be taken and asks the student to sign the college's academic integrity form.

3. The faculty member may provide a cooling-off period after confronting a student with the allegation that she or he violated academic integrity.

4. The faculty member may opt also to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with the College Academic Integrity Committee and Judicial Affairs. Normally, however, it is preferable to settle issues between faculty and student, which means relying on the awarding of grades and course-related activities to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional disciplinary sanctions.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, grading authority remains the responsibility of the instructor.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic dishonesty is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process, and a drop or withdrawal from the course will be reversed. A student whose grade has been adjusted or assigned as a result of a violation of academic integrity, may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time (includes regular drop, late drop, withdrawal. retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal). Any such drop action of the course will be reversed.

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the academic integrity conduct disposition form, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by college procedures.

NOTE: The following statement to students being accused of academic misconduct shall appear on all college academic integrity conduct disposition forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course to avoid a sanction for a violation of academic integrity. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by college procedures."

 

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction

1. The faculty member has the student sign the college's academic integrity form. This closes the academic sanction element of the case. The form is forwarded, through the appropriate associate dean, to the Office of Judicial Affairs for record keeping.

2. When the student has a history of two or more previous academic integrity violations, or the faculty member recommends an Office of Judicial Affairs consideration of disciplinary sanctions, the student is informed at this time and it is indicated on the form that the disciplinary issues remain open.

3. The signed admission of responsibility is forwarded to the associate dean for administrative review of:

a) An instructor recommendation that a disciplinary sanction be applied by the Office of Judicial Affairs. The associate dean forwards the case to the College Academic Integrity Committee for review (without formal fact finding) of the faculty disciplinary sanction recommendation. When the College Academic Integrity Committee feels it is appropriate, the request for a disciplinary sanction is forwarded to the Office Judicial Affairs for review.

b) The existence of past academic integrity violations. When a record of such violations exists (the dean checks with the Office of Judicial Affairs, which is the only body that maintains such university-wide records), the case will be forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs, which may levy a disciplinary sanction based on the cumulative record of repeat offenses.

 

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation

1. The instructor forwards the case to the College Academic Integrity Committee.

a) When the instructor has not recommended disciplinary sanctions, and the student does not have a record of two or more previous academic integrity violations, the College Academic Integrity Committee conducts fact finding in accordance with due process procedures. If the Committee finds that the student violated standards of academic integrity, the Office of Judicial Affairs is notified for record-keeping purposes. The College Committee notifies the faculty member to carry out academic sanction, as approved.

b) If after administrative review, which does not include formal hearings or the questioning of witnesses, the committee finds (1) a record of two or more previous violations of academic integrity, and (2) the instructor and the committee are in agreement that a disciplinary sanction may be warranted, then the case is forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs, which conducts formal fact finding and seeks relevant input from the instructor and College Academic Integrity Committee.

c) Office of Judicial Affairs will notify the faculty member to (1) carry out the proposed academic sanction if the Judicial Affairs finding warrants, or (2) grade the student based on a finding that no violation of academic integrity has occurred.

 

D. The "XF" Grade

1. An "XF" grade is a formal University disciplinary sanction.

2. "XF" sanctions are only awarded with the concurrence of the instructor, the College of Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Reliance on the "XF" should be a rare occurrence and reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity.

3. In any instance in which the instructor believes an "XF" sanction warranted, and whether or not the student has admitted responsibility, the case is forwarded to the College Academic Integrity Committee for review and then to the Office of Judicial Affairs for appropriate fact finding and judgment.

4. The College Academic Integrity Committee must include with any recommendation of an "XF" grade to Judicial Affairs, conditions under which itwould approve the removal by Judicial Affairs of the "XF" sanction from the transcript (with an academic F remaining). Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the college academic integrity committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.

 

E. Schreyer Honors College Students

1. The college with authority for courses, including those designated Honors courses, in which an alleged violation of academic integrity occurs maintains responsibility for issuing academic sanctions and referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a college finds that a Schreyer Honors College student has violated academic integrity, then the Schreyer Honors College will be notified and may invoke its own sanctions.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.

 

F. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate assistant or associate dean is responsible for convening Committees of Academic Integrity and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They also are responsible for seeing that all cases handled on the college level, in which a student is found responsible for dishonesty, are reported to Judicial Affairs.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for central record keeping of all academic dishonesty cases.

3. A Committee on Academic Integrity or dean may request information from Judicial Affairs on whether students found responsible for academic dishonesty have previously been sanctioned for other acts of academic dishonesty. This information may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing sanctions or deciding whether disciplinary action is warranted.

 
Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)


O-2: GRADUATION POLICIES -- ASSOCIATE DEGREE

Policy:

All associate degree students, irrespective of the location at which their degree requirements are completed, will receive the appropriate diploma at the end of the semester in which all degree requirements are completed. Such students may subsequently return to the campus at which the degree requirements were fulfilled and participate in the next graduation exercises.

University Park shall include associate degree students in graduation exercises each time they are held, contingent on their having satisfied all of the degree requirements and notified appropriate University officials of their intent to participate in such exercises sufficiently in advance of the date of graduation exercises to allow for the inclusion of names in the commencement program.

Students who complete the requirements for an associate degree at a Commonwealth Campus/Behrend College/Hershey at a time other than when graduation exercises are held at that location, may participate in the next commencement held at University park after they have (a) been certified by the appropriate college faculty that all requirements have been satisfied, and (b) notified the University Registrar of their desire to participate in graduation exercises at University Park. The University Registrar shall immediately inform the pertinent campus official of the student's desire.

 
Endorsed: ACUI (1-23-75)
Approved: Provost Larson (2-10-75)
Effective: Summer Term 1975
Revised: ACUI (5-21-81)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Procedure:

1. Permission to attend commencement exercises and receive a diploma at University Park or to receive a diploma at the end of a semester when no commencement exercises are held at a campus and with the option to return to participate in the next scheduled exercises may be obtained by completing a Request for Alternate Commencement Site (Associate) form (FORM O-2). These forms are automatically supplied to all associate degree candidates who file for graduation in accordance with Senate Policy 86-00 for Fall Semester and Summer Session.

2. Copies of the approved form will be forwarded to the student and the campus location involved by the University Registrar.

 
Approved: ACUI (5-15-75)
Revised: ACUI (5-21-81)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)


O-1: GRADUATION POLICIES -- BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

Policy:

Students who have completed the requirements for a baccalaureate degree and who have been certified by the appropriate faculty at University Park, but who for appropriate reasons desire to attend the graduation exercises and be recognized by receiving their diplomas at a Commonwealth Campus or Behrend College Provost/Dean shall immediately be informed of a student's desire by the University Registrar. Ample notice must be given in advance of the date of the graduation exercises to allow for the inclusion of names in the commencement program.

 
Approved: Provost Larson (2-10-75)
Effective: Summer Term 1975
Revised: ACUI (5-21-81)

Procedures:

Procedure: 1. Permission to attend commencement exercises and receive a baccalaureate degree diploma at a campus location other than University park may be obtained by completing a Request for Alternative Commencement Site (Baccalaureate) form (FORM O-1).

2. If approval is granted to attend commencement at an alternative site, the University Registrar will forward the completed form to the campus involved. That campus must provide the student with instructions concerning the commencement ceremony.

3. If the request to graduate at an alternate site is not approved, the University Registrar will notify the student and the appropriate campus to that effect.

NOTE: This form is not used by students receiving baccalaureate degrees in Behrend College majors or in Capital Campus majors.

Approved: ACUI (5-29-75)
Revised: ACUI (5-21-81)


G-1: GRADE REPORTING
 
Procedure:
Grade reporting deadlines are set accordingly so that 1) grades for graduating seniors are available to allow sufficient time for checking the final semester's work to assure that graduation requirements have been met and 2) students who are academically dropped for unsatisfactory scholarship can be notified of that fact prior to registration for the next semester. Grade reporting instructions and Grade Reporting Forms are distributed to the appropriate departments and campuses for transmission to the instructors.
 
Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
 
Procedure:
The Registrar's office will establish deadlines in the grade reporting instructions distributed to the college and department offices. The deadlines announced will be, by agreement with all colleges, set at no more than four hours after the deadline by which the Registrar's office would expect to receive the grades from the college deans. The instructions will clearly indicate that the published deadline is that grades are due in the college dean's office 48 hours after the final exam.
 
Approved: ACREP (4-29-71)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)


G-5: CORRECTED GRADES
 
 Procedure:
When a change in grade is deemed appropriate, the instructor will request a Grade Change Authorization form from the instructor's college dean or campus executive officer. After completing the form, assigning the corrected grade, signing the form, and removing the department/instructor copy, the instructor returns the form to the college dean or campus executive officer for signature verification and submission to Registrar's office. The dean's/campus executive officer's copy of the form is retained in the dean's/campus executive officer's office.
The Registrar will process the change and return a report of the change to the instructor's college dean or campus executive officer, and the instructor via academic department or campus registrar. A grade report is also sent to the student by the Registrar to notify the student that a change of grade has been made (Ref: Senate Policy 48-30)
The grade change to the student record will be verified by both the department/instructor and the office of the college dean or campus executive officer by comparing the retained copies of the grade change authorization forms with the report of grade change provided to the offices.
 
Approved: ACUI (4-1-76)
Effective: Fall Term 1976
Revised: ACUI (2-26-81)
Effective: Summer Term 1981
Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)
Revised: ACUE (10-3-96)
 
NOTE: No grade change can be made more than one year after the end of the semester in which the course was taken.


A-1: FRESHMAN
Senate Policy 05-80:  Freshman Admission as a Baccalaureate or an Associate Degree Candidate  
 
Procedure: Application
1. An application form, available from the Undergraduate Admissions Office in September for the following admissions year, should be submitted at the earliest possible date. Although there is no deadline for filing the application, the September-November period is recommended since applications with complete credentials are processed as they are received beginning in September and many academic programs and campus locations are filled early by qualified applicants.2. A nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application.3. Applications with complete credentials received by the admissions office before December 1 of each year, with SAT scores from the junior or earlier year test, have priority for consideration of campus locations and academic programs. Complete credentials must include (a) secondary school record showing grades received for all courses completed beyond the eighth grade; (b) senior schedule of courses; (c) required courses completed (or scheduled) for area of enrollment (college choice); (d) SAT, SAT I, or ACT  assessmentscores (applicants are encouraged to submit the results of the junior year SAT or ACT); (e) record of any courses taken at other colleges or universities.


Evaluation:
1. An evaluation index is computed for each applicant. The evaluation index is based on a combination of the following factors: (a) grades in applicable courses completed in grades nine through eleven (if the student has graduated from high school at the time he or she applies to Penn State, the ninth through twelfth grade record is used); (b) the verbal and math scores of the SAT/SAT I or English and mathematics scores of the ACT; (c) participation in honors-type courses.2. Applications are processed as they are received in the following manner:

Eligibility levels, in terms of the evaluation index, are established for campus locations, and for certain programs, based on the number of students who can be admitted. Applicants who are clearly eligible for admission to the campus of their first choice are offered admission until spaces are committed. Applicants who are eligible for admission to the University, but not eligible for the campus of their first choice, are offered admission to an alternative campus. Applicants who are not eligible for admission to baccalaureate degree programs are advised of other possibilities for study at the University.
Because of uncertainty of the number of students who can be accepted for some campuses and programs, it may be necessary to delay the admission decision for some applicants. These applicants will be notified of this and given the option of making an alternative choice of location and receiving an admission decision promptly or waiting until a decision can be made on their first choice of location. 

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)
Revised: ACUI (1-20-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-25-85)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)


G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 49-20, Academic Integrity

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Introduction:

Recognizing the intrinsic nature of academic integrity as a linchpin of the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction represented in the procedures that follow is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move from the realm of faculty and students to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

The associate dean or campus director of academic affairs maintains and makes available to students and faculty the academic integrity procedures adopted by the college's Academic Integrity Committee.

College Committees maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.

Procedures:

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegations while taking into account the need to respect each student's privacy and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learn

2. The faculty member next conveys to the student the grade or grade and disciplinary action to be taken and asks the student to sign the college's academic integrity form.

3. The faculty member may provide a cooling-off period after confronting a student with the allegation that she or he violated academic integrity.

4. The faculty member may opt also to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with the College Academic Integrity Committee and Judicial Affairs. Normally, however, it is preferable to settle issues between faculty and student, which means relying on the awarding of grades and course-related activities to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional disciplinary sanctions.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, grading authority remains the responsibility of the instructor.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic dishonesty is suspected, a drop or withdrawal from the course will be reversed.

 

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction

1. The faculty member has the student sign the college's academic integrity form. This closes the academic sanction element of the case. The form is forwarded, through the appropriate associate dean, to the Office of Judicial Affairs for record keeping.

2. When the student has a history of two or more previous academic integrity violations, or the faculty member recommends an Office of Judicial Affairs consideration of disciplinary sanctions, the student is informed at this time and it is indicated on the form that the disciplinary issues remain open.

3. The signed admission of responsibility is forwarded to the associate dean for administrative review of:

a) An instructor recommendation that a disciplinary sanction be applied by the Office of Judicial Affairs. The associate dean forwards the case to the College Academic Integrity Committee for review (without formal fact finding) of the faculty disciplinary sanction recommendation. When the College Academic Integrity Committee feels it is appropriate, the request for a disciplinary sanction is forwarded to the Office Judicial Affairs for review.

b) The existence of past academic integrity violations. When a record of such violations exists (the dean checks with the Office of Judicial Affairs, which is the only body that maintains such university-wide records), the case will be forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs, which may levy a disciplinary sanction based on the cumulative record of repeat offenses.

 

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation

1. The instructor forwards the case to the College Academic Integrity Committee.

a) When the instructor has not recommended disciplinary sanctions, and the student does not have a record of two or more previous academic integrity violations, the College Academic Integrity Committee conducts fact finding in accordance with due process procedures. If the Committee finds that the student violated standards of academic integrity, the Office of Judicial Affairs is notified for record-keeping purposes. The College Committee notifies the faculty member to carry out academic sanction, as approved.

b) If after administrative review, which does not include formal hearings or the questioning of witnesses, the committee finds (1) a record of two or more previous violations of academic integrity, and (2) the instructor and the committee are in agreement that a disciplinary sanction may be warranted, then the case is forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs, which conducts formal fact finding and seeks relevant input from the instructor and College Academic Integrity Committee.

c) Office of Judicial Affairs will notify the faculty member to (1) carry out the proposed academic sanction if the Judicial Affairs finding warrants, or (2) grade the student based on a finding that no violation of academic integrity has occurred.

 

D. The "XF" Grade

1. An "XF" grade is a formal University disciplinary sanction.

2. "XF" sanctions are only awarded with the concurrence of the instructor, the College of Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Reliance on the "XF" should be a rare occurrence and reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity.

3. In any instance in which the instructor believes an "XF" sanction warranted, and whether or not the student has admitted responsibility, the case is forwarded to the College Academic Integrity Committee for review and then to the Office of Judicial Affairs for appropriate fact finding and judgment.

4. The College Academic Integrity Committee must include with any recommendation of an "XF" grade to Judicial Affairs, conditions under which it would approve the removal by Judicial Affairs of the "XF" sanction from the transcript (with an academic F remaining). Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the college academic integrity committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.

 

E. Schreyer Honors College Students

1. The college with authority for courses, including those designated Honors courses, in which an alleged violation of academic integrity occurs maintains responsibility for issuing academic sanctions and referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a college finds that a Schreyer Honors College student has violated academic integrity, then the Schreyer Honors College will be notified and may invoke its own sanctions.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.

 

F. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate assistant or associate dean is responsible for convening Committees of Academic Integrity and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They also are responsible for seeing that all cases handled on the college level, in which a student is found responsible for dishonesty, are reported to Judicial Affairs.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for central record keeping of all academic dishonesty cases.

3. A Committee on Academic Integrity or dean may request information from Judicial Affairs on whether students found responsible for academic dishonesty have previously been sanctioned for other acts of academic dishonesty. This information may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing sanctions or deciding whether disciplinary action is warranted.

Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)

Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)

Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)


L-6: MINORS - ENTRANCE AND CERTIFICATION

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 59-00, Requirements for the Minor

Procedure:

1. Students may apply for entrance to a minor by completing and submitting an Application for Entrance to a Minor to the person in charge of the minor.

Students approved for entrance to a minor who terminate degree enrollment and subsequently return to degree status through the re-enrollment process must reapply for entrance to a minor, if desired.

2. Application for minors will be accepted anytime after the student has achieved at least fifth semester classification, but not later than 5:00 p.m. on the day before commencement of the student's final semester. A copy of the approved application form will be provided to the student, and a copy will be retained by the person in charge of the minor. The person in charge of the minor* will enter the student's minor into ISIS screen path ARUSAN.

3. The person in charge of the minor* will be responsible for monitoring the academic progress (i.e., minimum g.p.a.) required for retention and graduation.

4. During the seventh week of the student's final semester, copies of the Degree Audit Report for students accepted into minors will be forwarded from the Registrar to the appropriate college dean for distribution to the persons in charge of the minors.

5. By 5:00 p.m. on the day before commencement of the student's final semester, the person in charge of the minor* is responsible for certifying the student's successful completion of the requirements for the minor by adding an approval indicator on ISIS screen path ARUGB.

6. The Office of the University Registrar will prepare a minor certificate for each student approved, by the appropriate academic unit, to graduate in the minor program. The certificate will include the signature of the President of the University and the College Dean that is responsible for the minor program. The minor certificate will be presented to the graduate along with the diploma.

7. The Registrar will be responsible for recording on the student's academic record the successful completion of the minor program at the time the baccalaureate degree is conferred.

NOTE: A minor may be awarded retroactively through the following process: The academic department is to certify that the student met the requirements for the minor at the time of graduation and forward this information to the college associate dean, who will endorse the request and send it to the University Registrar in writing. The Registrar will see that the appropriate notation is added to the student's transcript and that the certificate for the minor is produced.

Approved: ACUI (4-7-83)

Revised: ACAS (6-10-88)

Revised: ACAS (9-8-89)

Revised: ACUE (11-2-95)

Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (1-21-99)

Revised: ACUE (3-2-00)


R-4: RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS

Policy:

In preparing the calendar for an academic year, the University makes every effort to avoid conflicts with religious holidays. However, when conflicts are unavoidable, efforts are made to make special arrangements for the students affected.


M-11: SCHREYER HONORS COLLEGE

Senate Policy 65-00:  Schreyer Honors College


Procedure:

Additions and amendments to Schreyer Honors College academic requirements must be approved by the Administrative Council on Undergraduate Education.   Proposals for academic additions and amendments should include a record of consultation with appropriate parties, including the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs and the University Faculty Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education.

The Dean of the Schreyer Honors College, who is advised by a faculty advisory committee, a student council, and an external advisory board, shall also consult with the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs on issues pertaining to credit requirements, curricula, and academic standards of admission and retention.


1. Students typically will be offered admission into the Schreyer Honors College (SHC) through one of two routes:


a. Entering First-year Students: Students typically should have: at least 1350 total SAT scores; excellent records in secondary school as evidenced by measures including but not limited to grade point average, strength of course schedule, extra-curricular and co-curricular activities during the high school years, leadership positions and/or outstanding accomplishments in those activities, and community service. Applicants must complete at least two essays demonstrating excellent writing abilities, creativity and critical thinking skills; submit at least two recommendations from high school teachers, and include a list of extracurricular and co-curricular activities in which the student has participated along with the positions held in those activities. Applications are read and reviewed by members of the Penn State faculty and faculty/staff members of the SHC. The dean's office of the SHC will make the final decisions regarding admission of the first-year applicants to the SHC and will be responsible for determining the level and duration of SHC financial support provided to these students in the form of Academic Excellence Scholarships.


b. Junior-Gate Students: Students who are rising juniors are nominated by their major program, after an appropriate college-specific application process, during the spring semester of their sophomore year.   These students typically must have earned a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.70 through their first three semesters of study at Penn State (i.e., through the completion of Fall Semester of their sophomore year). The dean's office of the SHC will review the nominations and make final decisions regarding admission of the nominees to the SHC. All SHC offers of admission to students nominated by their major program during spring semester are contingent upon their GPA/performance during the fourth semester of study at Penn State.

Faculty, advisors and administrators may also nominate for entrance to the SHC any superior student who has four or more semesters remaining toward the completion of a baccalaureate degree. These special admissions exceptions require a petition; the details of the petition process are available in the SHC dean's office. The criteria and review methods are patterned after the two official admissions windows, described above, and vary depending on the student's semester standing. Upon receipt and review of the completed petition, the dean's office of the SHC will make an admission exception, on a space-available basis, for any qualified student.

2. To remain in the SHC, students who matriculate on or after fall semester 2005 must maintain both a semester and cumulative grade point average of at least at B+ (3.33)[see footnote 1] while maintaining full-time enrollment (minimum of 12 credits), file an Annual Academic Plan approved by an honors adviser, and successfully complete the following course requirements:

a. First-year Scholars must complete a minimum of three (3) honors courses for at least nine (9) honors credits;

b. Sophomore Scholars must complete a cumulative minimum of six (6) honors courses for a total of at least eighteen (18) honors credits;[see footnote 2]

c. Upper division students must complete a minimum of fourteen (14) additional honors credits.

The academic progress requirements for part-time and returning-adult students in the SHC may vary from what is described above. These students are required to work closely with their honors advisor and the administration of the SHC to develop an appropriate specific plan of progress. The explicit GPA requirements and the total honors credits required must still be met by these students.

3. Each student participating in the SHC must prepare an Annual Academic Plan (AAP) in consultation with, and to be approved and signed by his/her honors adviser. Students entering the SHC for the first time will prepare an AAP with his/her honors adviser at the beginning of fall semester. All AAPs must be submitted to the SHC online from the SHC web page. The dean's office of the SHC will review each Plan.

4. To graduate from the SHC, students must complete a thesis. Each thesis must be read, signed and approved by at least two full-time members of the regular faculty at Penn State, including both the thesis supervisor and an honors adviser(s) in the department(s) granting honors.  

5. Students may withdraw from the SHC by notifying the dean of the SHC in writing. Students who withdraw, whether voluntarily or not, will not be penalized for approved modifications in program requirements made while they were Schreyer Scholars. At the time of withdrawal, a summary of program modifications will be sent by the honors adviser to the student's college dean's office.

6. Each semester, the dean's office of the SHC shall be responsible for notifying the University Registrar of the names of the students who have successfully completed the requirements of the SHC. The University Registrar shall make an appropriate notation on the student's official record and diploma.

(Ref: Senate Policies 65-00, 34-58, 88-70, and the Schreyer Honors College Handbook)

[Footnote 1] For students matriculated in the Schreyer Honors College prior to fall semester 2003, the required minimum semester and cumulative GPAs are both 3.20.

[Footnote 2] Students matriculated in the Schreyer Honors College prior to fall semester 2005 must complete a minimum of three (3) honors courses for at least seven (7) honors credits each of the first two years.

Senate Policy 65-00:  Schreyer Honors College

Approved: University Scholars Program (6-9-80)
Endorsed: ACUI (6-19-80)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUE (9-4-03)
Revised:   ACUE (1-6-05)
Revised:   ACUE (2-3-05)


C-2: REGISTRATION

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

Principles Related to the Registration Process

1. Registration System

One registration system registers all students at all locations for credit courses offered through the resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus delivery systems. Non-credit courses follow different registration procedures.

The campus Registrar is responsible for providing semester-by-semester registration instructions to students, advisers, faculty, and staff. Registration instructions are published no later than the publication of the initial Schedule of Courses.

The registration process is continuous in nature. Each student is assigned a "first date to register. " Starting with this first date, the student may initially register and subsequently adjust the registration as appropriate and necessary. The fundamental goal of this process is to finalize course registrations before the first day of the semester.

Students may register for courses using the following options:

·       Using the eLion system  

·       In-person registration at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising center, or continuing education office.

2. Incomplete and Complete Registrations

Students begin the registration process by meeting with their academic adviser and scheduling courses. Registration is completed when the student has paid the appropriate tuition and fees.

Students who have registered for courses receive a statement of tuition and fees from the Bursar's office. This statement includes the amount due as well as possible credits resulting from applicable scholarships, loans, grants, and other forms of financial assistance. In some cases, because of possible financial credits, a student may not be required to make payment to the University. In other cases, a student may be due a refund from the University. In all cases, regardless of amount due, student action is required to complete the registration process.

Failure to complete the registration process by payment of tuition and fees may result in any or all of the following actions:

·       The University will not provide grades for courses attended.

·       Once classes begin, students cannot add courses for the current semester if their tuition and fees have not been paid.

·       Students are ineligible to register for future semesters.

·       The student's Penn State Access Account is suspended.

·       Students receiving student loans may enter repayment status with their lenders.

·       Students receiving student aid may have some of their aid sources cancelled.

·       Students residing in University housing will need to vacate housing.

·       Students receiving Federal Work-Study awards cannot be hired.

·       International students may be out of compliance with SEVIS.

Campus Registrars are responsible for contacting students who have failed to complete the registration process. If a student is earnestly seeking to finalize payment, campus Registrars may allow the student to remain in an incomplete registration status. The campus Registrar has the authority to cancel the incomplete registration of any student.

3. Registration Holds

Authorized University offices may place a hold on a student's record that will prevent registration. Because of the seriousness of this action, the office placing the hold is required to notify the student. Holds are placed because of:

·       Academic issues--placed and removed by college deans' offices;

·       Financial issues--placed and removed by offices such as Parking, Library, Bursar;

·       Disciplinary issues--placed and removed by Student Affairs;

·       Health issues--placed and removed by the Health Center;

·       Administrative issues--placed and removed by the University Registrar.

4. Credit Limitations

Students are not permitted to register for more than 19 credits prior to the first day of the semester. After consultation with their academic adviser, students may register for more than 19 credits during the first ten calendar days of the semester.

5. Registration Calendar

The campus Registrar is responsible for developing a registration calendar for each semester. Consultation should occur among those campus Registrars at campuses where students typically enroll at multiple locations.

The registration calendar is prioritized according to the following scheme:

a.   Students with high priority needs (authorized categories include honor students, disabled students, and student athletes);

b.   Graduate degree students;

c.    Undergraduate degree students (descending order of total credits completed plus currently enrolled credits);

d.   Provisional and nondegree students (register on a space-available basis).  

6. Late Registration

The registration process is to be completed before the first day of the semester. Late registration is defined as a first-time course registration on or after the first day of the semester. The student pays a fee for the privilege of registering late. Students registering late receive a bill from the Bursar's office which displays the date when payment is expected to avoid late payment fees. A student's registration is considered incomplete until the tuition and fees are paid.   Students in an incomplete registration status may not add courses, but are permitted to drop courses.

7. Registration Adjustments--Before the First Day of the Semester

After the initial registration, students may adjust their course registration as appropriate and necessary using any of the methods available for registration.

8. Registration Adjustments--First Ten Days of the Semester

Once the semester begins, students must have completed the registration process in order to add courses. Students with an incomplete registration are not permitted to add courses. Regardless of registration status, students are permitted to drop courses. The student may make these changes using any of the methods available for registration.

A proportionate length of time is provided for summer session courses.


9. Registration Adjustments--After the Tenth Day of the Semester

Adding a course after the tenth day of the semester is a Late Add and requires approval of the course instructor. Students requesting a Late Add should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding missed work. Late Adds must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Add.

Dropping a course after the tenth day of the semester and through the end of the twelfth week of the semester is a Late Drop. For courses offered for less than a full semester, the late drop period ends after 80% of the course has been completed. Students requesting a Late Drop should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding the potential impact of delaying normal progress towards graduation, possible loss of some forms of student aid, and likely ineligibility of coverage on parental insurance policies. Late Drops must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office, or using the eLion system. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Drop.

Students who have not completed the registration process by payment of tuition and fees are not permitted to Late Add nor Late Drop courses.

The time periods for Late Add and Late Drop are pro rated for courses offered for other than a fifteen-week semester calendar.

All Late Drops are subject to the credit limitations established by University Faculty Senate policy. If a provisional or nondegree student becomes a degree candidate, the Late Drop credits used while in provisional or nondegree status are carried forward to the degree program status. If a baccalaureate or associate degree candidate becomes a nondegree student, the Late Drop credits used while in degree candidacy count in the total Late Drop credits available to the nondegree student.

10. Limitation of Retroactive Registration

After the last class day of the semester, registration for that semester is closed. After this date, requests to complete a previously initiated registration are subject to administrative review and may be denied. Retroactive registration is only available for courses for which the student was scheduled during the semester. In other words, this process cannot be used to add courses to the student's schedule after the semester ends.

Requests for retroactive registration must be initiated by the end of the 9th month following the end of the semester for which retroactive registration is being requested.

If the retroactive registration request is approved:

•  Semester tuition and fees will be charged at the current rates effective with the date on which the retroactive registration request was initiated.

•  Full payment of tuition and fees is required before the retroactive registration is recorded. Full payment must be made within one month of approval.

•  All previously scheduled courses will be recorded. Courses may not be added or dropped from the student's schedule.

•  The Registrar's office will contact the course instructor(s) to seek final grades. In the event that a grade for a course cannot be obtained from the instructor, the instructor's department head will provide the grade.

11. Administrative Course Cancellation

The Administrative Course Cancellation procedure is available to correct errors. It is not to be used as an alternative to normal registration procedures.

If a student identifies a course for which registration was not intended, the student must contact the department offering the course. The department staff will initiate an Administrative Course Cancellation form and ask the student to sign the request. The department staff forward the form to the course instructor. If the instructor has no evidence that the student participated in the course and makes this declaration of non-participation by signing the form, the form is returned to the department office, for forwarding to the campus Registrar's office. The campus Registrar will remove the course from the student's academic record. This procedure is available one semester beyond the semester in which the error occurred. After this time, the Faculty Senate must act on the course cancellation request.

12. Multiple Campus Registration

Each student is assigned a home campus at which the student must be registered.

Students who are part of a multi-campus college are expected to first register at their home campus; they may then register at any campus within the college without special permission or restriction.

Students who are not part of a multi-campus college first register for courses offered by their home campus. Permission is required for registration at any other campus. Permission is granted by the college dean or academic department offering the course and processed by the campus Registrar. At least one half of the student's total semester credits must be from courses offered by the home campus.

13. Section Changes

A section change is an administrative change to a student's registration that results in moving a student from one section of a course to another. Section changes may not be initiated directly by the student using eLion. All section changes must be processed by a Penn State staff member using ISIS screens ARURD or ARURG.

Section changes may be processed through the last day of classes. When processing a section change, there is no impact on late drop credits nor are late drop/add fees applicable.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)

Revised: Editorial (9-29-00)

Revised: ACUE (4-7-05)

Revised: ACUE (6-7-07)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop


I-6: LIMITATIONS TO ENROLLMENT AS A NONDEGREE STUDENT

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 14-10, Limitations to Enrollment as a Nondegree Student

Nondegree Conditional Students

Policy:

A student classified as nondegree conditional is permitted to take a maximum of 40 credits in this status. If the student has not reduced his or her grade-point deficiency sufficiently to qualify for reinstatement and re-enrollment to a degree program (as defined by Section 54-82) by the completion of these 40 credits, the student can then no longer enroll in credit courses. However, if the student has earned more than a 2.00 average in the most recent semester, this action does not apply.

Procedure:

Students are notified by the Registrar's office at the point, as specified in the policy, when they are no longer eligible to enroll as nondegree students at Penn State. Future enrollment is prevented by a registration hold. Students may only return to the University under the provisions of academic renewal.

Nondegree Regular Students Who Had at One Time Been Degree Candidates

Policy:

A student in degree candidacy status who has changed to nondegree regular status may continue to take courses for credit (see Section 14-00). A former degree candidate who has accumulated 40 or more credits as a nondegree regular student and has a grade-point deficiency of 18 or more shall then no longer be allowed to enroll in credit courses.

Procedure:

Students are notified by the Registrar's office at the point, as specified in the policy, when they are no longer eligible to enroll as nondegree students at Penn State. Future enrollment is prevented by a registration hold. Students may only return to the University under the provisions of academic renewal.

Nondegree Regular Students Who Were Never Enrolled in Degree Status

Policy:

A student classified as nondegree regular who has never been enrolled in degree status at Penn State is permitted to complete a maximum of 40 credits in this status. At this point, the student must be admitted to degree status to continue taking classes at Penn State. If the student is not qualified for degree status at this point, the student can no longer enroll in credit courses. As a result of this action, the student is dropped from the University and re-entry can only be considered under the academic renewal policy (see Senate Policy 58-60). However, if the student has earned more than a 2.00 average in the most recent semester, this action does not apply. Once the cumulative GPA is 2.00, the student must be admitted to degree status to continue taking courses at Penn State.

Procedure:

The Registrar's office will inform students of the policies through a series of notifications. Warnings will be sent notifying students that they are approaching the limit. Students who are in good academic standing may apply for degree candidacy, or self-identify as "enrichment course takers" (defined as students taking courses who do not intend to earn a degree) by submitting a web form to the Registrar's office. Students who reach the limit and take neither of these actions wi ll be notified by the Registrar's office that they are no longer eligible to enroll in credit courses as a nondegree student. Future enrollment will be prevented by a registration hold.

Students who are not in good academic standing will be dropped from the University and may only return under the provisions of academic renewal.  

Enrichment course takers may continue taking courses in nondegree regular status beyond the 40-credit limit but will be dropped if they accumulate 18 or more grade point deficiencies.

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 14-10, Limitations to Enrollment as a Nondegree Student


E-11: CLASS ATTENDANCE

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 42-27, Class Attendance

Click to access Procedure R-4, Religious Holidays

Procedure:

1. Students who wish to miss a class in order to participate in a regularly scheduled, University-approved curricular or extracurricular activity should present a class absence form signed by the sponsoring agency or university department and should provide it to the faculty member as soon as possible and at least one week in advance of the planned absence. Within reason, the student should have the opportunity to make up missed work.

2. If an instructor believes a requested absence for such events will harm a student scholastically, the instructor should present evidence for necessary action to the head of the department in which the course is offered and inform the associate dean of the college in which the student is enrolled, or to the Division of Undergraduate Studies if the student is so enrolled.

3. Students who believe they have been unfairly denied a make-up opportunity should, after trying to resolve the problem with the course instructor, contact the head of the department for the course in which the student is enrolled.

4. If the problem is not resolved, the student should contact the sponsoring agency or university department (in some instances, this may be the student's college assistant/associate dean for undergraduate programs or the student's campus director of academic affairs) and provide documentation describing the unresolved make-up opportunity. The sponsoring agency or university department should attempt to resolve the problem.

5. If the problem is still unresolved, the sponsoring agency or university department should forward the documentation to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs for resolution.

6. Instructors should provide, within reason, opportunity to make up evaluative events for students who miss class for other legitimate, but unavoidable reasons such as illness, family emergency, or injury. (Religious observance is considered a legitimate reason for absence and is covered under AAPP R-4. Students planning to miss class for religious observance should inform the instructor in a timely manner and should be afforded reasonable opportunity to make up work.)

7. While notifying the instructor in a timely manner is a key expectation, the university does not mandate official documentation of student illness or other unavoidable reasons for absence.

8. Effective Fall 2002, University Health Services will not provide verification of illness forms for minor illnesses or injuries. Verification will be provided only for serious illnesses for which UHS clinicians provided services, or when UHS has received such documentation from outside providers.

9. Claims of legitimate or unavoidable absence based on false claims may be considered violations of the policy on Academic Integrity (Senate Policy 49-20, AAPP G-9).

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 42-27, Class Attendance

Click to access Procedure R-4, Religious Holidays

September 1998: Taken from the 1997/98 Student Guide to University Policies and Rules
Revised: ACUE (9-5-02)


J-2: LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 56-70, Leave of Absence

Procedure:

1. Only students who are baccalaureate or associate degree candidates may file for a leave of absence. A student desiring to take a leave of absence must obtain on a Leave of Absence form (FORM J-2) the approval of the student's college dean, campus executive officer or the Director of the Division of Undergraduate Studies, whichever is appropriate.

2. If the leave is approved by the dean/executive officer/director, the leave is entered, and the form retained in that office. The deadline for filing is the last working day prior to the first day of classes for the semester/session that the leave will begin. Leaves are not required for summer session only.

3. Normally, leaves are not approved for a period longer than one year. Under special circumstances, a leave of absence may be approved to a maximum of two years.

4. A student who has withdrawn as a degree candidate is not eligible for a leave of absence. A student who has been dropped or dismissed from the University is not eligible for leave of absence.

5. A student who fulfills the conditions of an approved leave of absence may register upon return without applying for re-enrollment. The student registers for the returning semester according to the schedule established for that semester.

6. If a student desires to return earlier or later than the semester agreed upon on the leave of absence form as the "returning semester" the student must make application for re-enrollment as a degree candidate.

7. A student who plans to enroll for course work at another accredited institution during a leave of absence should review program plans with the student's academic adviser and the Undergraduate Admissions Office to verify the eligibility for receiving credit.

8. Before commencing a leave of absence, a student is responsible for notifying other appropriate offices, such as the Office of Student Aid. (Ref: Senate Policy 56-70)

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 56-70, Leave of Absence

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)

Revised: ACAS (4-8-88)

Revised: ACUE (6-6-96)


G-8: DEAN'S LIST

Policy:

Undergraduate students who consistently achieve academic excellence are named to the Dean's List in accordance with the following full-time and part-time enrollment criteria: 

1.  Criteria for Full-time Students

     Achievement of a one-semester grade point average of 3.50 or above for enrollment in a course load of 12 or more credits for Fall or Spring or 9 or more credits for Summer.

2.  Criteria for Part-time Students

     Students enrolled for fewer than 12 credits each semester for two or more consecutive semesters are considered part-time students for purposes of Dean's List recognition. Appointment to the Dean's List is made when:

    a. A minimum total of 12 credits are completed; and,

    b. Grades in the courses across these combined semesters result in a grade point average of 3.50 or higher. 

     Dean's List status for part-time students is recorded on the most recently completed semester during which all cumulative criteria were met. Once awarded, the calculation for additional recognition begins anew.

For All Students:

3.  In all cases, Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory courses and Audit courses are not included in the determination of grade point average or credit load.

4.  A list of students eligible for appointment to the Dean's List will be provided by the Registrar each semester to each college and to the Division of Undergraduate Studies.

5.  A Dean's List notation for the appropriate semester will appear on the student's grade report and on the student's academic record.

6.  A student found in violation of academic integrity is ineligible for appointment to the Dean's List for the semester or, for part-time students, the 12-credit cumulative period, during which the violation occurred.

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)
Revised: ACUI (2-7-80)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACAS (2-14-86)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)


R-4: RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS

Policy: Click to access Senate Policy 42-27, Class Attendance
Click to access AAPP E-11, Class Attendance
Click to access link to Holy Days calendar

Policy:

In preparing the calendar for an academic year, it is impossible to avoid conflicts with some religious holidays. As conflicts arise, efforts are made to make special arrangements for the students affected.

Revised: ACUE (4-3-08)


G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Senate Policy:  49-20, Academic Integrity

Introduction:

Recognizing the importance of academic integrity to the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction, represented in the procedures that follow, is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Each campus or academic college at University Park, shall interpret and apply Academic Integrity Procedures consistent with University policy.

Campus or college Academic Integrity Committees shall maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.
 
Procedures:

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected:

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegation while taking into account the confidential nature of the information and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning.

2. When evidence suggests that an academic misconduct has occurred, the faculty member will enter the charge and the academic sanction on the campus or college’s Academic Integrity Form, will sign the form, and then convey the charge and sanction to the student for his or her signature (in person or through other methods if necessary).

3. After reviewing the allegation of academic misconduct with the student, the faculty member may provide the student with an additional period of time (determined by the campus or college procedures) before the student has to make a decision and sign the Academic Integrity Form as to whether or not to accept the academic sanction. A student’s failure to sign and return the Academic Integrity Form, by the specified deadline, consistent with campus or college procedures, will be construed as not contesting the charge or sanction.

4. Normally, it is preferable to settle issues between faculty and students, relying on the assignment of grades and course or program-related sanctions to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional University-level disciplinary sanctions. However, where integrity violations are considered to be extreme, the faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with both the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Judicial Affairs. A more detailed and comprehensive listing of the types of sanctions faculty may assign to students on the Academic Integrity Form can be found in the document Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, the authority to administer academic sanctions remains the responsibility of the instructor (or AI Committee) when the case is managed and closed at the campus or college level. In situations where the allegation is referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs, the application of academic sanctions will be carried out by Judicial Affairs, but only in consultation with the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic dishonesty is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process. Any drop or withdrawal from the course during this time will be reversed. A student who has received an academic sanction as a result of a violation of academic integrity may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time. These drop actions include regular drop, late drop, withdrawal, retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. This drop policy may be superseded in exceptional circumstances with the approval of Judicial Affairs (i.e. trauma drop).

NOTE: The following statement shall appear on all campus and college Academic Integrity Forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course to avoid a sanction for a violation of academic integrity. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures."

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the Academic Integrity Form by the specified deadline, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.
 
B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form, then forwards the form to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Judicial Affairs for recording, it is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. If a prior recorded violation is discovered after the student has admitted responsibility and accepted the academic sanction(s), a new academic sanction will be considered by the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee while affording the student his or her institutional rights (including the right to contest the violation and/or new academic sanctions). Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing additional academic sanctions or deciding whether disciplinary action is also warranted.

4. When a prior record of academic misconduct is discovered, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, in consultation with Judicial Affairs, may consider also recommending University-level disciplinary sanction(s). If University-level sanction(s) do apply, the Academic Integrity Form, along with other relevant documents, will be sent to Judicial Affairs for review and case management.

5. If the faculty member recommends University-level disciplinary sanctions, and the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee is in agreement, then he/she will inform the student that the case will be referred to Judicial Affairs. If the case is referred to Judicial Affairs, jurisdiction for assigning all sanctions, academic and disciplinary, is the responsibility of that office, after consideration of the recommended academic sanction of the faculty member and of the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee.

6. Upon final disposition of the case, Judicial Affairs will communicate the outcome to the campus or college Academic Integrity Chair and/or appropriate Associate Dean or designee at the campus or college.

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form indicating that the charge or sanction(s) is being contested and then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. It is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. When disciplinary sanctions have not been recommended, and the student does not have a record of previous academic integrity violations, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee will conduct a review in accordance with their respective procedures.

During the review, if the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee finds that the student violated standards of academic integrity the Committee may elect to: uphold the original charge(s) and sanction(s); uphold charges, but modify sanction(s); apply no sanction(s).

4. When the instructor and campus or college Academic Integrity Committee are in agreement that a disciplinary sanction(s) may be warranted, or the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee finds that a prior recorded violation of academic misconduct is present, then the case is forwarded to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

When this occurs, the Academic Integrity Committee will not manage the case, but will simply conduct a preliminary review before referring the case to the Office of Judicial Affairs. All formal fact-finding and hearing procedures will be conducted by Judicial Affairs in accordance with normal University operating procedures.

At the conclusion of the case, in which the student is found responsible for violating the Academic Integrity Policy, the Office of Judicial Affairs may assign University-level disciplinary sanctions and contact the Academic Integrity Committee at the campus or college for the assignment of any recommended academic sanctions.

D. Disciplinary Sanctions:

1. Faculty may assign a wide range of sanctions to a student found responsible for violating academic integrity. Most faculty may choose to utilize academic sanctions (the modification of grades due to misconduct), but when referring cases to Judicial Affairs, faculty have the option to also recommend a full range of disciplinary sanctions available to Judicial Affairs such as: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Temporary, Indefinite or Permanent Expulsion; or the "XF" transcript notation (see: Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations and Explanations for Disciplinary Sanctions).


2. "XF" sanctions are assigned only after consultation with the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Assigning an "XF" notation to a student’s transcript should be a rare occurrence and is reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity which may include repeat misconduct.

3. In any instance in which the instructor believes an "XF" sanction is warranted, whether or not the student has admitted responsibility, the case is forwarded to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee which will determine in consultation with the involved faculty member, whether the case should be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs for appropriate fact finding and judgment.

4. The campus or college Academic Integrity Committee must include, with any recommendation to Judicial Affairs for an XF grade, those conditions (if any) under which it would approve the removal of the "XF" sanction from the transcript. Judicial Affairs will consider this recommendation when deciding upon the length of time that the “XF” notation will remain on the student’s transcript. When the conditions are met for removal of the “XF”, an academic “F” will remain on the transcript. Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.
 
E. Schreyer Honors College Students:

1. For honors courses, as with all other courses, the campus or college delivering the course maintains responsibility for reviewing and issuing academic sanctions and/or referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a college finds that a Schreyer Honors College student has committed an academic misconduct, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.
 
F. Students Involved in Other University Related Academic Activities or Programs:

Students involved in other University related academic activities or programs (e.g. World Campus, Cooperative Education, internships, study abroad programs, etc.) are subject to the University Academic Integrity Policy as implemented by the appropriate campus or college responsible for delivering the program or course/activity.

G. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate Associate Dean or designee is responsible for forming Academic Integrity Committees and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They are also responsible for seeing that all cases are reported to Judicial Affairs. The specific information reported to Judicial Affairs should include: a) a copy of the signed Academic Integrity Form, and b) other supporting documents that were established or reviewed while managing the case.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for the central record keeping and disclosing of student discipline records at the University, including academic dishonesty cases. Judicial Affairs will disclose student disciplinary records of academic dishonesty to third parties when those records include University-level disciplinary sanctions assigned by the Office of Judicial Affairs. Judicial Affairs will disclose student discipline record information to third parties in accordance with federal law (FERPA) and the University policy on managing Student Discipline Records (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/pdf/stu_dis_records.pdf).

Approved: ACUE (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)
Revised: ACUE (9-1-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)


C-2: REGISTRATION

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration
Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration
Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add
Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

Principles Related to the Registration Process

1. Registration System

One registration system registers all students at all locations for credit courses offered through the resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus delivery systems. Non-credit courses follow different registration procedures.

The campus Registrar is responsible for providing semester-by-semester registration instructions to students, advisers, faculty, and staff. Registration instructions are published no later than the publication of the initial Schedule of Courses.

The registration process is continuous in nature. Each student is assigned a "first date to register. " Starting with this first date, the student may initially register and subsequently adjust the registration as appropriate and necessary. The fundamental goal of this process is to finalize course registrations before the first day of the semester.

Students may register for courses using the following options:

·       Using the eLion system  

·       In-person registration at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising center, or continuing education office.


2. Incomplete and Complete Registrations

Students begin the registration process by meeting with their academic adviser and scheduling courses. Registration is completed when the student has paid the appropriate tuition and fees.

Students who have registered for courses receive a statement of tuition and fees from the Bursar's office. This statement includes the amount due as well as possible credits resulting from applicable scholarships, loans, grants, and other forms of financial assistance. In some cases, because of possible financial credits, a student may not be required to make payment to the University. In other cases, a student may be due a refund from the University. In all cases, regardless of amount due, student action is required to complete the registration process.

Failure to complete the registration process by payment of tuition and fees may result in any or all of the following actions:

·       The University will not provide grades for courses attended.

·       Once classes begin, students cannot add courses for the current semester if their tuition and fees have not been paid.

·       Students are ineligible to register for future semesters.

·       The student's Penn State Access Account is suspended.

·       Students receiving student loans may enter repayment status with their lenders.

·       Students receiving student aid may have some of their aid sources cancelled.

·       Students residing in University housing will need to vacate housing.

·       Students receiving Federal Work-Study awards cannot be hired.

·       International students may be out of compliance with SEVIS.

Campus Registrars are responsible for contacting students who have failed to complete the registration process. If a student is earnestly seeking to finalize payment, campus Registrars may allow the student to remain in an incomplete registration status. The campus Registrar has the authority to cancel the incomplete registration of any student.

3. Registration Holds

Authorized University offices may place a hold on a student's record that will prevent registration. Because of the seriousness of this action, the office placing the hold is required to notify the student. Holds are placed because of:

·       Academic issues--placed and removed by college deans' offices;

·       Financial issues--placed and removed by offices such as Parking, Library, Bursar;

·       Disciplinary issues--placed and removed by Student Affairs;

·       Health issues--placed and removed by the Health Center;

·       Administrative issues--placed and removed by the University Registrar.

4. Credit Limitations

Students are not permitted to register for more than 19 credits prior to the first day of the semester. After consultation with their academic adviser, students may register for more than 19 credits during the first ten calendar days of the semester.

5. Registration Calendar

The campus Registrar is responsible for developing a registration calendar for each semester. Consultation should occur among those campus Registrars at campuses where students typically enroll at multiple locations.

The registration calendar is prioritized according to the following scheme:

a.   Students with priority needs (authorized categories include honor students, students with disabilities, and student athletes);

b.   Graduate degree students;

c.    Undergraduate degree students (descending order of total credits completed plus currently enrolled credits);

d.   Provisional and nondegree students (register on a space-available basis).

The process for determining priority needs categories of students is as follows:

1) Requests for priority registration shall be endorsed by a university dean or delegate.
2) Requests for priority registration shall be in writing and submitted to the University Registrar.
3) The request shall specify:

a. the group of students for whom priority registration is requested,
b. the rationale for priority registration status and how the request meets the criteria guidelines (see below),
c. the number of students in the group,
d. the requested time frame for implementation.

4) The University Registrar will bring new requests to the Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid (ARSSA) Committee of the Faculty Senate for review.
5) The requestor, or designee, will come to present their request to ARSSA at a regularly scheduled committee meeting.
6) ARSSA will deliberate in closed session, make a determination, and notify the requestor of the decision.
7) Guiding principles used in considering requests:

a. Compelling Scheduling Need - some factor of the group restricts the times that the group may take classes.
b. Overall benefits outweigh detriment to the university community at large.

8) The ARSSA Committee shall report annually to the Faculty Senate on the status of Priority Registration.

6. Late Registration

The registration process is to be completed before the first day of the semester. Late registration is defined as a first-time course registration on or after the first day of the semester. The student pays a fee for the privilege of registering late. Students registering late receive a bill from the Bursar's office which displays the date when payment is expected to avoid late payment fees. A student's registration is considered incomplete until the tuition and fees are paid.   Students in an incomplete registration status may not add courses, but are permitted to drop courses.

7. Registration Adjustments--Before the First Day of the Semester

After the initial registration, students may adjust their course registration as appropriate and necessary using any of the methods available for registration.

8. Registration Adjustments--First Ten Days of the Semester

Once the semester begins, students must have completed the registration process in order to add courses. Students with an incomplete registration are not permitted to add courses. Regardless of registration status, students are permitted to drop courses. The student may make these changes using any of the methods available for registration.

A proportionate length of time is provided for summer session courses.


9. Registration Adjustments--After the Tenth Day of the Semester

Adding a course after the tenth day of the semester is a Late Add and requires approval of the course instructor. Students requesting a Late Add should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding missed work. Late Adds must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Add.

Dropping a course after the tenth day of the semester and through the end of the twelfth week of the semester is a Late Drop. For courses offered for less than a full semester, the late drop period ends after 80% of the course has been completed. Students requesting a Late Drop should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding the potential impact of delaying normal progress towards graduation, possible loss of some forms of student aid, and likely ineligibility of coverage on parental insurance policies. Late Drops must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office, or using the eLion system. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Drop.

Students who have not completed the registration process by payment of tuition and fees are not permitted to Late Add nor Late Drop courses.

The time periods for Late Add and Late Drop are pro rated for courses offered for other than a fifteen-week semester calendar.

All Late Drops are subject to the credit limitations established by University Faculty Senate policy. If a provisional or nondegree student becomes a degree candidate, the Late Drop credits used while in provisional or nondegree status are carried forward to the degree program status. If a baccalaureate or associate degree candidate becomes a nondegree student, the Late Drop credits used while in degree candidacy count in the total Late Drop credits available to the nondegree student.

10. Limitation of Retroactive Registration

After the last class day of the semester, registration for that semester is closed. After this date, requests to complete a previously initiated registration are subject to administrative review and may be denied. Retroactive registration is only available for courses for which the student was scheduled during the semester. In other words, this process cannot be used to add courses to the student's schedule after the semester ends.

Requests for retroactive registration must be initiated by the end of the 9th month following the end of the semester for which retroactive registration is being requested.

If the retroactive registration request is approved:

•  Semester tuition and fees will be charged at the current rates effective with the date on which the retroactive registration request was initiated.
•  Full payment of tuition and fees is required before the retroactive registration is recorded. Full payment must be made within one month of approval.
•  All previously scheduled courses will be recorded. Courses may not be added or dropped from the student's schedule.
•  The Registrar's office will contact the course instructor(s) to seek final grades. In the event that a grade for a course cannot be obtained from the instructor, the instructor's department head will provide the grade.


11. Administrative Course Cancellation

The Administrative Course Cancellation procedure is available to correct errors. It is not to be used as an alternative to normal registration procedures.

If a student identifies a course for which registration was not intended, the student must contact the department offering the course. The department staff will initiate an Administrative Course Cancellation form and ask the student to sign the request. The department staff forward the form to the course instructor. If the instructor has no evidence that the student participated in the course and makes this declaration of non-participation by signing the form, the form is returned to the department office, for forwarding to the campus Registrar's office. The campus Registrar will remove the course from the student's academic record. This procedure is available one semester beyond the semester in which the error occurred. After this time, the Faculty Senate must act on the course cancellation request.

12. Multiple Campus Registration

Each student is assigned a home campus at which the student must be registered.

Students who are part of a multi-campus college are expected to first register at their home campus; they may then register at any campus within the college without special permission or restriction.

Students who are not part of a multi-campus college first register for courses offered by their home campus. Permission is required for registration at any other campus. Permission is granted by the college dean or academic department offering the course and processed by the campus Registrar. At least one half of the student's total semester credits must be from courses offered by the home campus.

13. Section Changes

A section change is an administrative change to a student's registration that results in moving a student from one section of a course to another. Section changes may not be initiated directly by the student using eLion. All section changes must be processed by a Penn State staff member using ISIS screens ARURD or ARURG.

Section changes may be processed through the last day of classes. When processing a section change, there is no impact on late drop credits nor are late drop/add fees applicable.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)

Revised: Editorial (9-29-00)

Revised: ACUE (4-7-05)

Revised: ACUE (6-7-07)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)

Revised: ACUE (6-5-08)


P: CURRICULAR PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES

Preface

Penn State University's baccalaureate and associate degree programs are offered by its colleges. Academic program authority may be lodged in a single college or shared among several. A single program may be offered jointly by several colleges. Program delivery may be accomplished through traditional single-college residence-based instruction, joint college and campus instruction, and World Campus. New technologies, learning assessment, the full involvement of university-wide disciplinary communities, and increasingly sophisticated approaches to learning itself encourage an openness to experiment with delivery protocols and recognition that program outcomes are the primary basis of formative and summative academic assessment. In all cases, the University's academic degree programs must receive administrative authorization granted by the Provost through the Office of Undergraduate Education and by the University Faculty Senate. The principles, guidelines and procedures that follow provide the authorization protocols to offer, deliver, and terminate academic programs.

I. Curricular Principles and Guidelines

Curricular programs should reflect disciplinary integrity across all campuses of the University.

Curricular integrity requires planning and implementation that reflects quality among units with common curricular interests, regardless of location or delivery mode.

Decisions regarding undergraduate programs, majors, options, and minors require both academic and administrative review and approval.

The Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education serves as the Provost's designee and may review curricular proposals on the Provost's behalf.   In this capacity, the Office of Undergraduate Education is available for curricular consultation involving programs and may facilitate arbitration among colleges and other units.

Academic review and approval is conducted by the faculty through the University Faculty Senate. Academic review ensures adherence to the University's standards of academic quality and curricular integrity.

Administrative review and approval is conducted by the Office of the Provost. Administrative review ensures consideration and fulfillment of the broader University mission, enrollment management, local needs, and resource availability and use, as well as overall academic quality and curricular integrity.

New programs must be justified by considerations of quality, cost, enrollment, impact upon availability of senior faculty to engage in lower division instruction, implications for other programs and courses; program duplication: university, college, and campus mission; market need and demand; and resource feasibility.

Unique new majors, minors, and options should be proposed only when the variation from existing curricula is substantial, and when the program fulfills a demonstrable demand by students that is likely to continue.

Proposals for academic programs, program amendments, and program terminations are developed in consultation with disciplinary communities and administrative units and reflect strategic as well as academic deliberation.

The initial intention to develop a program proposal must be shared across the University utilizing an ACUE Prospectus, a process which must be completed prior to submission of a P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal.

All proposals to add or drop programs must reference common criteria (see below, V: Common Program Justification Criteria).

The Provost informs the Board of Trustees when proposals to add or drop programs are authorized. Administratively authorized new programs, program drops, and changes in the names of programs are implemented only after the Board of Trustees has been informed of the curricular action.

The authorization to implement new and amended programs is issued by the Office of Undergraduate Education to the dean of the proposing college and disseminated to the university community, including Undergraduate Admissions, University Registrar, the Provost, University Faculty Senate, and others.

II. ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus for New Academic Programs, Delivery of Academic Programs at Additional Campuses, and Phase-Out of Academic Programs

The Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education facilitates ACUE's consideration of new academic majors, options, minors, substantial program amendment likely to carry implications for other colleges or delivery units, program name changes, and the delivery of existing academic programs at additional campuses during the pre-proposal germination period.  Accordingly, a curricular program prospectus must precede development and submission of formal P-1 (New Undergraduate Major, Option or Minor), P-3 (Moving/Discontinuing Degree Programs), and P-6 (Academic Program Phase-Out) proposals.  The curricular program prospectus process is based upon the 2005 recommendations from the Joint Committee on Curricular Integrity appointed by the Provost and University Faculty Senate. The prospectus must identify strategic considerations and issues of academic quality associated with new program offerings. Prospectuses initiate effective preliminary consultation within disciplines and across the breadth of the University utilizing the ACUE membership.

World Campus must be considered as an additional campus for purposes of P-1, P-3 and P-6 program proposals and the prospectuses that precede them. Accordingly, a college offering an existing program that wishes to move the program to World Campus, or to deliver the program through World Campus as well as through residence instruction, must treat World Campus as an additional location. As World Campus is a delivery unit, rather than an independent academic unit, all programs delivered through the World Campus must be authorized for delivery through an academic college. P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals and prospectuses for World Campus program delivery must be submitted jointly by the authorized college and World Campus.

The curricular program prospectus requires three steps:

Step One: The college associate dean in which the proposed academic program will be housed must submit a brief curricular program prospectus utilizing the on-line submission form. The information collected should enable ACUE membership to engage in a collegial conversation centered on the need for the program, resource availability, and impact on other academic units across the University. Unlike a fully developed P-1, P-3, or P-6, the prospectus is intended to generate early consultation at ACUE and to identify or flesh out issues that must be addressed in the full P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal.

Prospectuses submitted by a college's associate dean a minimum of one week before the next ACUE meeting will be vetted at that meeting. Arrangements may be made under extraordinary circumstances for proposals submitted during the summer.

Step Two:  Curricular program prospectuses will be distributed electronically by the Office of Undergraduate Education to ACUE membership, including the Office of the University Faculty Senate, prior to each ACUE meeting.  ACUE members should use this opportunity for formative consultation with appropriate colleagues in their college, across the University, and with the originating college.

Step Three:  Following discussion of the curricular program prospectus at ACUE, an ACUE committee consisting of the ACUE chair, the University College associate dean who serves on ACUE, the chair of the Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs and an Office of Undergraduate Education associate dean will review the prospectus. The ACUE committee may also invite others as appropriate to add expertise. The ACUE committee will provide a brief recommendation to the submitting college, taking into consideration the ACUE discussion, curricular integrity, and strategic university considerations such as physical, fiscal, and faculty resources.

Upon receipt of the ACUE recommendations, a full P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal, including evidence of consultation and attention to ACUE recommendations, may be submitted to the University Faculty Senate (P-1, P-6) or to the Office of Undergraduate Education (P-3) as appropriate. P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals must include a copy of the ACUE recommendations.

III. P-1, P-3, P-6 Authority and Expectations

The Provost, as chief academic officer, maintains authority for the Academic Administrative Policies and Procedures that govern the undergraduate curriculum and may, in consultation with faculty, deans, and other appropriate offices, make exceptions to them.

Colleges and departments are required to engage in formal consultation when proposing new (P-1) undergraduate majors, options, and minors; or when moving or discontinuing degree programs among colleges or college locations, including World Campus (P-3); and academic program phase-out (P-6).

P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals from the non-University Park campuses must be submitted by the appropriate Chancellor to the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses (VPCC) for consultation and endorsement prior to their entry into the University Faculty Senate and Office of the Provost approval paths described elsewhere in P: Curricular Principles and Procedures.  In each case, the VPCC and the Office of Undergraduate Education will consider relevant academic and strategic factors, including those listed below in V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

It is important to distinguish between program phase-out (P-6), which refers to procedures by which degree programs are dropped, and department phase-out, the procedures by which academic departments are discontinued. When proposing the phase-out of a department, reference should be made to the "Faculty Senate Guidelines for Review of the Establishment, Reorganization, or Discontinuation of Academic Organizational Units" (http://www.psu.edu/ufs/guide/reviewacadunits.html).

It is necessary to complete separate proposals, and to receive separate approvals, to phase out a program and a department in which it resides. A department may be phased out without discontinuing programs, which may be moved to alternative departments or colleges. The P procedures do not pertain to departmental phase-out.

IV. Consultation

Consultation provides the foundation of disciplinary continuity and scholarship and a basis for principled collegial faculty governance. Evaluative analyses and assessments are accepted as contributions toward a common goal of academic coherence and achievement and do not in and of themselves restrict the development, alteration, or phasing out of programs.

Consultation should be conducted via electronic media such as those employing summary e-mail statements with detailed attachments or web links. It must be possible to forward attachments and/or links to appropriate colleagues without passwords or similar limitations.

ACUE deans are the primary academic conduit among Penn State schools and colleges for purposes of consultation. A current ACUE roster is maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Education and is available for purposes of consultation as a LISTSERVE.

Consultation must include those likely to have a common interest in a proposed curricular action and include any faculty group or program that would reasonably and predictably offer courses or programs that seek academic outcomes similar to the proposed program. This includes all ACUE deans, academic units within the college in which the proposal is made, other colleges in which the proposed program/major, minor, or option is offered or will be offered or will in any way be directly affected.

Consultative comments, and responses to them, must be included in proposals sent to the University Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs, which will forward the correspondence with the proposal when it is delivered to the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education for further review.

Consultation is conducted with an expectation of timeliness that includes a minimum of ten business days in which consultative responses may be returned electronically. Reasonable extensions should be provided at the request of an ACUE dean.

The proposing unit should respond electronically and in a timely manner to those who have submitted concerns, objections, or exceptions to proposals.

V.   Common Program Justification Criteria

P-1 and P-3 proposals must include current, localized data and information relevant to several academic and strategic elements. These include, but may not be limited to:

1. Relationship of proposal to university and college mission.

2. Learning quality indicators such as:

         A. On-going availability of a minimum of three or more standing faculty;

         B. Program leadership by senior-level faculty;

         C. Availability of a standing faculty cohort academically and disciplinarily aligned with the proposed program;

         D. Ability to move student program cohorts through in a timely manner;

         E. Impact on the University's preference to utilize, whenever possible, standing or tenure track senior level faculty in lower division undergraduate courses;

         F. Availability of faculty to deliver currently authorized, as well as new programs;

         G. Availability of a sufficient number of program electives within the discipline and in supporting area of study;

         H. University-wide curricular integrity that includes disciplinary community engagement and the avoidance of curricular drift;  

          I. Ability to minimize the need for core course substitutions and explicit rationale for, and justification of, necessary core substitutions.

4. Impact on Penn State college and campus enrollments and flow of students among campuses;

5. Market need and demand documented by current, valid, and reliable evidence;

6. Physical and fiscal resource availability;  

7. Strategic and academic approval and support demonstrated by the sign-off of the appropriate chancellor and/or dean;

8. Disciplinary community and administrative consultation.

Approved: ACUE (9-5-02)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-04, 10-7-04)
Revised: Editorial (10-26-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)
Revised: ACUE (3-2-06)
Revised: ACUE (7-6-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)


C-2: REGISTRATION

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration
Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration
Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add
Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

Principles Related to the Registration Process

1. Registration System

One registration system registers all students at all locations for credit courses offered through the resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus delivery systems. Non-credit courses follow different registration procedures.

The campus Registrar is responsible for providing semester-by-semester registration instructions to students, advisers, faculty, and staff. Registration instructions are published no later than the publication of the initial Schedule of Courses.

The registration process is continuous in nature. Each student is assigned a "first date to register. " Starting with this first date, the student may initially register and subsequently adjust the registration as appropriate and necessary. The fundamental goal of this process is to finalize course registrations before the first day of the semester.

Students may register for courses using the following options:

·       Using the eLion system  

·       In-person registration at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising center, or continuing education office.

2. Incomplete and Complete Registrations

Students begin the registration process by meeting with their academic adviser and scheduling courses. Registration is completed when the student has paid the appropriate tuition and fees.

Students who have registered for courses receive a statement of tuition and fees from the Bursar's office. This statement includes the amount due as well as possible credits resulting from applicable scholarships, loans, grants, and other forms of financial assistance. In some cases, because of possible financial credits, a student may not be required to make payment to the University. In other cases, a student may be due a refund from the University. In all cases, regardless of amount due, student action is required to complete the registration process.

Failure to complete the registration process by payment of tuition and fees may result in any or all of the following actions:

·       The University will not provide grades for courses attended.

·       Once classes begin, students cannot add courses for the current semester if their tuition and fees have not been paid.

·       Students are ineligible to register for future semesters.

·       Students receiving student loans may enter repayment status with their lenders.

·       Students receiving student aid may have some of their aid sources cancelled.

·       Students receiving Federal Work-Study awards cannot be hired.

·       International students may be out of compliance with SEVIS.

Campus Registrars are responsible for contacting students who have failed to complete the registration process. If a student is earnestly seeking to finalize payment, campus Registrars may allow the student to remain in an incomplete registration status. The campus Registrar has the authority to cancel the incomplete registration of any student.

3. Registration Holds

Authorized University offices may place a hold on a student's record that will prevent registration. Because of the seriousness of this action, the office placing the hold is required to notify the student. Holds are placed because of:

·       Academic issues--placed and removed by college deans' offices;

·       Financial issues--placed and removed by offices such as Parking, Library, Bursar;

·       Disciplinary issues--placed and removed by Student Affairs;

·       Health issues--placed and removed by the Health Center;

·       Administrative issues--placed and removed by the University Registrar.

4. Credit Limitations

Students are not permitted to register for more than 19 credits prior to the first day of the semester. After consultation with their academic adviser, students may register for more than 19 credits during the first ten calendar days of the semester.

5. Registration Calendar

The campus Registrar is responsible for developing a registration calendar for each semester. Consultation should occur among those campus Registrars at campuses where students typically enroll at multiple locations.

The registration calendar is prioritized according to the following scheme:

a.   Students with priority needs (authorized categories include honor students, students with disabilities, and student athletes);

b.   Graduate degree students;

c.    Undergraduate degree students (descending order of total credits completed plus currently enrolled credits);

d.   Provisional and nondegree students (register on a space-available basis).

The process for determining priority needs categories of students is as follows:

1) Requests for priority registration shall be endorsed by a university dean or delegate.
2) Requests for priority registration shall be in writing and submitted to the University Registrar.
3) The request shall specify:

a. the group of students for whom priority registration is requested,
b. the rationale for priority registration status and how the request meets the criteria guidelines (see below),
c. the number of students in the group,
d. the requested time frame for implementation.

4) The University Registrar will bring new requests to the Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid (ARSSA) Committee of the Faculty Senate for review.
5) The requestor, or designee, will come to present their request to ARSSA at a regularly scheduled committee meeting.
6) ARSSA will deliberate in closed session, make a determination, and notify the requestor of the decision.
7) Guiding principles used in considering requests:

a. Compelling Scheduling Need - some factor of the group restricts the times that the group may take classes.
b. Overall benefits outweigh detriment to the university community at large.

8) The ARSSA Committee shall report annually to the Faculty Senate on the status of Priority Registration.

6. Late Registration

The registration process is to be completed before the first day of the semester. Late registration is defined as a first-time course registration on or after the first day of the semester. The student pays a fee for the privilege of registering late. Students registering late receive a bill from the Bursar's office which displays the date when payment is expected to avoid late payment fees. A student's registration is considered incomplete until the tuition and fees are paid.   Students in an incomplete registration status may not add courses, but are permitted to drop courses.

7. Registration Adjustments--Before the First Day of the Semester

After the initial registration, students may adjust their course registration as appropriate and necessary using any of the methods available for registration.

8. Registration Adjustments--First Ten Days of the Semester

Once the semester begins, students must have completed the registration process in order to add courses. Students with an incomplete registration are not permitted to add courses. Regardless of registration status, students are permitted to drop courses. The student may make these changes using any of the methods available for registration.

A proportionate length of time is provided for summer session courses.

9. Registration Adjustments--After the Tenth Day of the Semester

Adding a course after the tenth day of the semester is a Late Add and requires approval of the course instructor. Students requesting a Late Add should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding missed work. Late Adds must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Add.

Dropping a course after the tenth day of the semester and through the end of the twelfth week of the semester is a Late Drop. For courses offered for less than a full semester, the late drop period ends after 80% of the course has been completed. Students requesting a Late Drop should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding the potential impact of delaying normal progress towards graduation, possible loss of some forms of student aid, and likely ineligibility of coverage on parental insurance policies. Late Drops must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office, or using the eLion system. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Drop.

Students who have not completed the registration process by payment of tuition and fees are not permitted to Late Add nor Late Drop courses.

The time periods for Late Add and Late Drop are pro rated for courses offered for other than a fifteen-week semester calendar.

All Late Drops are subject to the credit limitations established by University Faculty Senate policy. If a provisional or nondegree student becomes a degree candidate, the Late Drop credits used while in provisional or nondegree status are carried forward to the degree program status. If a baccalaureate or associate degree candidate becomes a nondegree student, the Late Drop credits used while in degree candidacy count in the total Late Drop credits available to the nondegree student.

10. Limitation of Retroactive Registration

After the last class day of the semester, registration for that semester is closed. After this date, requests to complete a previously initiated registration are subject to administrative review and may be denied. Retroactive registration is only available for courses for which the student was scheduled during the semester. In other words, this process cannot be used to add courses to the student's schedule after the semester ends.

Requests for retroactive registration must be initiated by the end of the 9th month following the end of the semester for which retroactive registration is being requested.

If the retroactive registration request is approved:

•  Semester tuition and fees will be charged at the current rates effective with the date on which the retroactive registration request was initiated.

•  Full payment of tuition and fees is required before the retroactive registration is recorded. Full payment must be made within one month of approval.

•  All previously scheduled courses will be recorded. Courses may not be added or dropped from the student's schedule.

•  The Registrar's office will contact the course instructor(s) to seek final grades. In the event that a grade for a course cannot be obtained from the instructor, the instructor's department head will provide the grade.

11. Administrative Course Cancellation

The Administrative Course Cancellation procedure is available to correct errors. It is not to be used as an alternative to normal registration procedures.

If a student identifies a course for which registration was not intended, the student must contact the department offering the course. The department staff will initiate an Administrative Course Cancellation form and ask the student to sign the request. The department staff forward the form to the course instructor. If the instructor has no evidence that the student participated in the course and makes this declaration of non-participation by signing the form, the form is returned to the department office, for forwarding to the campus Registrar's office. The campus Registrar will remove the course from the student's academic record. This procedure is available one semester beyond the semester in which the error occurred. After this time, the Faculty Senate must act on the course cancellation request.

12. Multiple Campus Registration

Each student is assigned a home campus at which the student must be registered.

Students who are part of a multi-campus college are expected to first register at their home campus; they may then register at any campus within the college without special permission or restriction.

Students who are not part of a multi-campus college first register for courses offered by their home campus. Permission is required for registration at any other campus. Permission is granted by the college dean or academic department offering the course and processed by the campus Registrar. At least one half of the student's total semester credits must be from courses offered by the home campus.

13. Section Changes

A section change is an administrative change to a student's registration that results in moving a student from one section of a course to another. Section changes may not be initiated directly by the student using eLion. All section changes must be processed by a Penn State staff member using ISIS screens ARURD or ARURG.

Section changes may be processed through the last day of classes. When processing a section change, there is no impact on late drop credits nor are late drop/add fees applicable.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)

Revised: Editorial (9-29-00)

Revised: ACUE (4-7-05)

Revised: ACUE (6-7-07)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)

Revised: ACUE (6-5-08)

Revised: Editorial (1-28-09)


E-1: PROFICIENCY (PLACEMENT) EXAMINATION

Senate Policy:  42-50.2, Credit by Undergraduate Proficiency Examination

Procedure:

Notification of credits granted after successful completion of proficiency (placement) examinations is made to the Registrar's office by departments and by the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Blank Undergraduate Proficiency Examination Grade Cards are obtained from the Registrar's office. These cards are completed with the student and course information, the symbol "S" circled, authenticated by the department head, and returned to the Registrar's office . (Ref: Senate Policy 42-50)

 

Approved: ACUI (5-13-76)

Effective: Summer Term 1976 except English and Chemistry to be effective Winter Term 1977

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)


P-11: AUTHORIZATION TO OFFER COURSES

Based on a review of the Senate Guide to Curricular Procedures, including Section One (C) Courses; (D) Senate Policies and Procedures Concerning Courses; Provost John Brighton's memo of October 11, 1996; and Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Education John Cahir's memo of March 24, 1997, the following principles and procedures are identified to clarify policies relevant to the authorization to offer courses within the context of the restructured University:

• New courses are developed with consultation among peers and represent a mix of individual and collaborative creativity and scholarship, disciplinary adherence, and principled application of teaching practices appropriate to the bodies of knowledge the faculty embrace.

• Authority to offer courses rests within the degree-granting colleges. The School of Information Sciences and Technology, like the colleges, maintains independent curricular authority, including the authority to offer courses.

• Deans and/or their designees exercise this authority, taking into account the expertise of their faculty, local resources, and the relevance of the course to programs offered by the college.

• General Education courses are University-wide courses. They may be offered at any University location.

For Pre-Existing Courses

A. Lower Division Courses:

• Courses offered at multiple locations carry common numbers wherever they are taught and should be available at all college locations as required for students to make normal degree progress.

• Offering colleges are responsible for assigning instructors and ensuring content and quality and are expected to engage in meaningful consultation with the college in which the course originated to enable updating and reasonable consistency. Consultation of this nature, which does not involved major substantive revisions, may be informal and collegial.

• Major revisions to a course may be proposed through the Faculty Senate curricular process by, or with the agreement of, the originating academic unit and must include meaningful consultation.

B. 300-Level Courses and Above:

• When a college wishes to use pre-existing courses, originating in another college, as part of a new degree program, it first will consult with the originating department on issues of quality, content and consistency; and then will follow Faculty Senate guidelines and procedures.

New Courses

• New courses may be proposed by any degree-granting college, which then becomes the originating academic unit. Once a course is approved, any formal, substantive changes must be proposed through the Faculty Senate curricular process by, or with the agreement of, the originating academic unit.

Approved: ACUE (11-2-00)


C-3: UNDER-ENROLLED SECTIONS

1.   Under-enrolled sections are defined as:

--0 through 399-level course with an enrollment of fewer than fifteen students;
--400-level course with an enrollment of fewer than eight students;
--500-level course with an enrollment of fewer than five students.

Under-enrolled criteria do not apply to the following courses:

--600-level courses;
--foreign studies courses;
--courses numbered 0--499 with an 'H', 'I','J', 'M', or "T" alpha suffix ;
--courses numbered X94, X95, X96, 199, 300, 399, or 499.

2.   Under-enrolled sections should not be offered except under exceptional circumstances. Exceptional circumstances that permit the offering of an under-enrolled section include:

--the section is essential for normal degree progress for specifically identified students.
--learning space in essential classrooms or laboratories for a section is limited.

3.   To assist academic units in identifying under-enrolled sections, the campus Registrar will provide appropriate informational reports.

4.   Sections that are to be dropped because of under-enrollment should be dropped in a timely manner such that registered students have sufficient time to register for other appropriate courses. Academic units should carefully analyze the section offerings each semester and annually review the causes for under-enrolled section offerings. Patterns should be monitored and appropriate steps taken to minimize the number of under-enrolled sections.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)


F-2: FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Senate Policy:  44-10, General Examination Policy

Procedure:

For those courses in which the traditional final examination is required in accordance with Senate Policy 44-20 the times and places for such examinations are determined by the Registrar's office on the basis of requests submitted by department heads approximately the first week of a given semester. Final examination periods are 110 minutes in length. Detailed information pertaining to the schedule of final examinations for a given semester is published in the Schedule of Courses and the final schedule is available on the Registrar's office Home Page (via the Penn State Home Page).

Faculty members are requested to announce in class the time and place of the regularly scheduled final examination. (Ref: Senate Policies 44-10 and 44-20)

Senate Policy:  44-10, General Examination Policy

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)


P-3: MOVING/DISCONTINUING DEGREE PROGRAMS AMONG COLLEGES AND CAMPUSES

P-3 proposals are the basis of the administrative review and approval process that enable a second college or multiple colleges to deliver programs already authorized in another college; that enable a college to deliver an existing program at an additional campus within its purview or through the World Campus; that authorize the closure of a program in a college or campus so long as that program will continue to be offered elsewhere at the University; and that, under extraordinary circumstances, may authorize the delivery of extended degrees. Note that a P-6 proposal is required to terminate a program when doing so will completely remove it from the University's offerings. As with P-1 and P-6 proposals, P-3 proposals must be preceded by submission of an ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus.

P-3 Proposals

One or more colleges may be authorized to offer degree programs. This authorization has sometimes been referred to as academic program sponsorship or program sponsorship transfer. The Provost is responsible for administratively authorizing the moving, sharing, and discontinuance of academic sponsorship of existing degree programs for all colleges and campuses. The University Faculty Senate does not take part in this authorization.

Two types of sharing and transferring of sponsorship may occur:

(1) Joint sponsorship in which, in addition to the original sponsoring college, one or more additional colleges also are awarded authority to offer the existing program. Graduates in these programs belong to and are certified for graduation by the college in which they are enrolled.

(2) Handoff sponsorship in which the authority to offer an academic program is transferred from one college to another. Here, an original sponsoring college withdraws its academic authority for a program and another college or group of colleges is awarded authority in its place.

In every case in which a program is transferred or shared, every effort must be made to insure curricular integrity by minimizing the number of core course substitutions at the newly offering campus or college. Disciplinary communities are nonetheless encouraged to consider the development of program options beyond the core that reflect local expertise, student demand, and market need.  

There is a third type of shared program referred to as an "extended degree." Based upon extraordinary circumstances, such as specialized licensing and/or accreditation requirements, a single college may offer its programs by extending their availability to additional campuses. In this arrangement, only the "extending" college has the authority to award the program degree, although the degree may be delivered at multiple campuses. A college must secure written approval from the Provost before submitting a P-3 proposal to the Office of Undergraduate Education. Extended degree status shall be reviewed every five years by the Office of Undergraduate Education to determine whether it has become appropriate to grant shared authority to offer the program.

Deans retain the authority to move a degree program within a college. When such actions are taken, the College must notify the Office of Undergraduate Education, which will then inform other offices as appropriate.

Following the completion of the prospectus process, a P-3 proposal may be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Education. It must address all relevant strategic and academic issues, including those outlined in Academic Administrative Policy P, Section V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

P-3 Timeline

•  Preliminary college and disciplinary consultation and consultation between appropriate campus chancellor(s) and Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses

•  Submission of prospectus to ACUE by College Associate Dean

•  ACUE Prospectus deliberation and written response to submitting college

•  College development of formal proposal, including appropriate consultation, data collection, and research

•  Submission of P-3 proposal by College Dean to Office of Undergraduate Education

•  Office of Undergraduate Education review

•  Provost review of Office of Undergraduate Education action

•  Office of Undergraduate Education memo to implement distributed to appropriate offices

•  Implementation the following semester or later

Approved: ACUI (10-25-79)
Approved: Provost Eddy (12-5-79)
Approved: Provost Brighton (8-25-97)
Approved: Provost Erickson (9-20-00)
Revised: Editorial (4-18-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)


F-2: FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Senate Policy:  44-20, Final Examination Policy

Procedure:

For those courses in which the traditional final examination is required in accordance with Senate Policy 44-20 the times and places for such examinations are determined by the Registrar's office on the basis of requests submitted by department heads approximately the first week of a given semester. Final examination periods are a maximum of 110 minutes in length. Detailed information pertaining to the schedule of final examinations for a given semester is published in the Schedule of Courses and the final schedule is available on the Registrar's office Home Page (via the Penn State Home Page).

Faculty members are requested to announce in class the time and place of the regularly scheduled final examination. (Ref: Senate Policies 44-10 and 44-20)

Senate Policy:  44-20, Final Examination Policy

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (12-4-08)


R-1: TEXTBOOKS LISTS -- UNIVERSITY PARK

Procedure:

1. Departments are to list all courses offered in a given semester when submitting textbook lists, whether or not a textbook is required. (A sample format, FORM R-1, is available in the appendix.)

2. Complete and accurate information is required when submitting the lists. To facilitate locating and ordering books, please include the following information: author, title, ISBN, publishing company and editor.

3. If different textbooks are required by instructors teaching different sections of the same course, the textbooks for these sections must be included in the textbook list by section.

4. If additional books (especially paperbacks) are used as supplemental reading, they should be included as recommended text on the lists.

5. Departmental textbook lists, completed according to the prescribed format, are to be forwarded to the Penn State Bookstore.

6. The department office will furnish completed lists to the Penn State Bookstore (four copies) no later than April 15 for textbooks to be used in the Fall Semester, October 15 for textbooks to be used in the Spring Semester, and April 1 for Summer Session.

7. Changes in textbook lists must be reported using the prescribed format for amended textbook lists.

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (9-8-83)

Revised: ACUE (3-4-93)


R-2: TEXTBOOK LISTS -- COMMONWEALTH CAMPUSES/PENN STATE ERIE, THE BEHREND COLLEGE/PENN STATE HARRISBURG

Procedure:

1. Individual faculty members at each campus will be responsible for consulting with their departments concerning any special departmental requirements for textbooks for specific courses. (A sample format, FORM R-1, is available in the appendix.)

2. Individual faculty members will be responsible for handling to the manager of their campus bookstore a list of the textbooks (with estimated numbers required) for the courses they will teach in the forthcoming semester.

3. Such textbook lists must be in the hands of the campus bookstore managers no later than April 15 for textbooks to be used in the Fall Semester, October 15 for textbooks to be used in the Spring Semester, and April 1 for textbooks to be used in the Summer Session.

4. Campus bookstore managers will consolidate lists and order textbooks from publishers.

Approved: ACUI (6-12-75)

Revised: ACUI (9-8-83)

Revised: ACUE (3-4-93)


L-6: MINORS - ENTRANCE AND CERTIFICATION

Procedure:

1. Students may apply for entrance to a minor by completing and submitting an Application for Entrance to a Minor to the person in charge of the minor.

Students approved for entrance to a minor who terminate degree enrollment and subsequently return to degree status through the re-enrollment process must reapply for entrance to a minor, if desired.

2. Application for minors will be accepted anytime after the student has achieved at least fifth semester classification. In those instances where a minor has an entry fee associated with it, however, in order to give the Bursar's Office time to assess and collect the fee in accordance with the semester billing cycle, the student must apply and be accepted before the end of the regular add/drop period of the student's final semester. In all other instances, the student must apply and be accepted no later than the end of the late drop period for full-semester courses of the student's final semester. A copy of the approved application form will be provided to the student, and a copy will be retained by the person in charge of the minor. The person in charge of the minor* will enter the student's minor into ISIS screen path ARUSAN.

3. The person in charge of the minor* will be responsible for monitoring the academic progress (i.e., minimum g.p.a.) required for retention and graduation.

4. During the seventh week of the student's final semester, copies of the Degree Audit Report for students accepted into minors will be forwarded from the Registrar to the appropriate college dean for distribution to the persons in charge of the minors.

5. By 5:00 p.m. on the day before the student graduates, the person in charge of the minor* is responsible for certifying the student's successful completion of the requirements for the minor by adding an approval indicator on ISIS screen path ARUGB.

6. The Office of the University Registrar will prepare a minor certificate for each student approved, by the appropriate academic unit, to graduate in the minor program. The certificate will include the signatures of the President of the Board of Trustees, the President of the University, and the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University. The minor certificate will be presented to the graduate along with the diploma.

7. The Registrar will be responsible for recording on the student's academic record the successful completion of the minor program at the time the baccalaureate degree is conferred.

NOTE: A minor may be awarded retroactively through the following process: The academic department is to certify that the student met the requirements for the minor at the time of graduation and forward this information to the college associate dean, who will endorse the request and send it to the University Registrar in writing. The Registrar will see that the appropriate notation is added to the student's transcript and that the certificate for the minor is produced.

*or their designee

Approved: ACUI (4-7-83)

Revised: ACAS (6-10-88)

Revised: ACAS (9-8-89)

Revised: ACUE (11-2-95)

Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (1-21-99)

Revised: ACUE (3-2-00)

Revised: ACUE and editorial (1-8-04)

Revised: Editorial (4-9-07)


N-1: UNIVERSITY POLICY ON CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS

Preamble:

The Pennsylvania State University collects and retains data and information about students for designated periods of time for the expressed purpose of facilitating the student's educational development. The University recognizes the privacy rights of individuals in exerting control over what information about themselves may be disclosed and, at the same time, attempts to balance that right with the institution's need for information relevant to the fulfillment of its educational missions. The University further recognizes its obligation to inform the student of his/her rights under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA); to inform the student of the existence and location of records as well as to define the purposes for which such information is obtained; to provide security for such material; to permit student access to, disclosure of, and challenge to this information as herein described; and to discontinue such information when compelling reasons for its retention no longer exist.

Student Record Policy:

The University will disclose information from a student's educational record only with the prior written consent of the student, except that educational records may be disclosed without consent to University officials having a legitimate educational interest in the records and to third parties specifically authorized by FERPA, as referenced under Policies on Disclosure of Student Records.

"University officials" are University employees with general or specific responsibility for promoting the educational objectives of the University or third parties under contract with the University to provide professional, business and similar administrative services related to the University's educational mission. Individuals whose responsibilities place them within this category include teachers; faculty advisers; admissions counselors; academic advisers; counselors; employment placement personnel; deans, department chairpersons, directors, and other administrative officials responsible for some part of the academic enterprise or one of the supporting activities; administrative and faculty sponsors of officially recognized clubs, organizations, etc.; members, including students and alumni, of official college (university) committees, non-exempt staff personnel employed to assist University officials in discharging professional responsibilities; and persons or entities under contract to the University to provide a specific task or service related to the University's educational mission. Access by these officials is restricted where practical, and only to that portion of the student record necessary for the discharge of assigned duties.

"Legitimate educational interests" are defined as interests that are essential to the general process of higher education prescribed by the body of policy adopted by the governing board. Legitimate educational interests would include teaching, research, public service, and such directly supportive activities as academic advising, general counseling, therapeutic counseling, discipline, vocational counseling and job placement, financial assistance and advisement, medical services, and academic assistance activities. In addition, the University officially recognizes appropriate co-curricular activities that are generally supportive of overall goals of the institution and contribute generally to well-being of the entire student body and specifically to many individuals who participate in these activities. These activities include varsity and intramural sports, social fraternities, specific interest clubs, and student government.

Records originating at another institution will be subject to these policies.

Student Educational Records:

Student educational records are defined as records, files, documents, and other materials that contain information directly related to a student and are maintained by The Pennsylvania State University or by a person acting for the University pursuant to University, college, campus, or departmental policy.

Student educational records do not include records of instructional, supervisory, and administrative personnel and ancillary educational personnel that are in the sole possession of the maker and that are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a substitute.

Other exclusions include:

a. Notes of a professor/staff member concerning a student and intended for the professor's/staff member's own use are not subject to inspection, disclosure, and challenge.

b. Records of the Police Services Records Division, except in instances where they are transmitted within the University for administrative purposes.

c. Records relating to an individual who is employed by an educational agency or institution not as a result of his/her status as a student that:

1. Are made and maintained in the normal course of business;

2. Relate exclusively to the individual in that individual's capacity as an employee; and

3. Are not available for use for any other purpose.

However, employment records relating to University students who are employed as a result of their status as students are considered educational records.

d. Records on students that are made or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, or other recognized professional or paraprofessional acting or assisting in that capacity are not subject to the provisions of access, disclosure, and challenge. Such records, however, must be made, maintained, or used only in connection with the provision of treatment to the student and are not available to anyone other than the persons providing such treatment or a substitute. Such records may be personally reviewed by a physician or other appropriate professional of the student's choice.

e. Application records of students not admitted to the University; however, once a student has enrolled in an academic offering of the University, application information becomes a part of the student's educational records.

f. Alumni records.

Definition of Student:

For the purpose of this policy, a student is defined as an individual currently or previously enrolled in any academic offering of the University.

This definition does not include prospective students (applicants to any academic program of the University).

Public Information Regarding Students:

The following is a list of directory items that may be made available to the public regarding students of the University without their prior consent and is considered part of the public record of their attendance:

1. Name

2. Address (local and permanent and electronic mail)

3. Telephone number

4. Date and place of birth

5. Major

6. Student activities including athletics

7. Weight/height (athletic teams)

8. Dates of attendance

9. Enrollment status (full-time, part-time, or not enrolled)

10. Date of graduation

11. Degrees and awards received and where received

12. Most recent educational institution attended

13. Name and address of parents, guardian, spouse

The student is entitled to request that these directory items not be made publicly available. Such a request must be made in writing to the Registrar. Requests filed within ten days after the first day of class for fall semester will normally block directory items from appearing in directories and other annual publications and will block the release of directory items in response to inquiries made to the University by the public after the receipt of the request. Requests filed after the first ten days of the fall semester will block only the release of directory items in response to inquiries made to the University by the public after the receipt of the request. The block will remain in effect until such date as designated by the student in written instructions filed with the Registrar.

University Officers Responsible for Student Records:

The following University officers are designated as responsible for student records within their respective areas: The Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education; the Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Administration; the Senior Vice President and Dean of the Commonwealth Educational System; the Senior Vice President for Research and Graduate Education; Vice President and Dean for Continuing and Distance Education; the Vice President for Student Affairs; the Budget Officer of the University; the Corporate Controller; the Senior Vice President for Finance and Business; the Deans of the Colleges; the Campus Executive Officers; and the Provost/Deans of Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, Penn State Harrisburg and The College of Medicine at The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Each of these officers is responsible to make available a listing of student records within his/her area of responsibility indicating the purpose, storage, security, and disposition of each student record.

Policies on Disclosure of Student Records:

The following guidelines will be utilized with respect to the disclosure of student records:

NOTE: In no case will letters of recommendation and other information obtained or prepared before January 1, 1975, that were written on the assumption or expressed promise of confidentiality to the authors, be available for inspection, disclosure, or challenge. Letters of recommendation and other information written and/or compiled after January 1, 1975, are available to students in accordance with guidelines that follow.

a. Disclosure to the student: The student has the right to inspect and review his/her educational records, and may do so by making an oral or written request to the University official responsible for the specific record desired. The official must respond within forty-five days of the request by sending the student a copy of the requested record, or by arranging an appointment for the student to review it. The student has the right to an explanation of any information contained in the record.

Educational records of the student, or the contents thereof, will not be released to the student, his/her parents, or any third party so long as a financial indebtedness or serious academic and/or disciplinary matter involving the student remains unresolved. This limitation does not preclude the student from having personal access to the records, merely from obtaining the release of the information. The student may not have access to the confidential financial statement of parents or any information contained in such statements.

A student may waive his/her right to access to confidential letters of recommendation that he/she seeks for admission to any educational agency or institution; for employment; or for application for an honor or honorary recognition. The student must be notified on request of all such individuals furnishing recommendations, and the letters must be solely for the stated purpose for which the student was notified and for which he/she waived his/her right of access. Such waivers may not be required as a condition for admission to, receipt of financial aid from, or receipt of any other services or benefits from such agency or institution.

Where any such records, files, or data contain information relative to a third person, the student is entitled to be informed of only the portion of that record as pertains to himself/herself. Each record-keeping unit of the University will establish procedures for accommodating requests for access to student records. An administrative charge not exceeding the actual cost to the University of providing access may be initiated in certain areas for access to record information.

The student is entitled to copy privilege as regards his/her records, files, and data at a reasonable administrative cost.

b. Disclosure of information to third parties: Disclosure of information contained in student records, files, and data is normally controlled by the student.

Such disclosures will be made to someone other than a University official having a legitimate educational interest in the records only on the condition that prior written consent is obtained from the student. The third party is to be reminded that he/she should not permit additional access to the information by an additional person without further written consent of the student prior to such an additional transfer of information.

When information on a student must be shared outside the University, all persons, agencies, or organizations desiring access to the records of a student shall be required to sign a written form to be kept permanently with the file of the student indicating specifically the legitimate educational or other interest in seeking this information. This form will be available solely to the student and to the University officer responsible for the record as a means of auditing the operation of the record system. Exceptions to this are c. through i., below.

c. Disclosure to other educational institutions: Disclosure of appropriate academic records may be made to officials of other educational institutions to which the student has applied and where he/she intends to enroll.

d. Disclosure pursuant to judicial order: Information concerning a student shall be released if properly subpoenaed pursuant to a judicial, legislative, or administrative proceeding. Effort will be made to give advance notice to the student of such an order before compliance by the University.

e. Disclosure pursuant to requests for financial aid: Necessary academic and/or financial student records may be disclosed without the student's prior consent in connection with the student's application for, or receipt of, financial aid.

f. Disclosure to federal and state authorities: This policy shall not preclude access to student records by authorized federal and state officials in connection with the audit and evaluation of federally supported education programs, or in connection with the enforcement of federal and state legal requirements that relate to such programs. Except when collection of personally identifiable data is specifically authorized by federal and state law, any data collected and reported with respect to an individual student shall not include information (including Social Security number) that would permit the personal identification of such student.

g. Disclosure under emergency conditions: On an emergency basis, information about a student may be released by a designated officer of the University when that information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student.

h. Disclosure to educational agencies or institutions: Information that will not permit the individual identification of students may be released to organizations of educational agencies or institutions for the purpose of developing, validating, and administering predictive tests and measurements. Similarly, information may be released to accrediting organizations in order to carry out their accrediting functions.

i. Disclosure to parents of dependent students: Information concerning a student who is a dependent, within the meaning of Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, may be released to that student's parents. The Internal Revenue Code defines a dependent student as one who has attended an educational institution full time for any five calendar months of a tax year and who was provided more than one-half of his/her support as claimed by the parents on their income tax statement. For purposes of this policy, the assumption, unless individually certified to the contrary under the criteria above, will be that University students are not dependents within the meaning of the Internal Revenue Code.

Challenge of Record Entry:

The student is entitled to challenge and/or add to the factual basis of any record entry contained in records, files, and/or data. The purpose of this challenge is to ensure that such entries are not inaccurate or misleading, or in violation of his/her privacy or other rights as a student, and to provide an opportunity for the correction or deletion of any such inaccuracies, misleading or otherwise inappropriate data contained therein. The substantive judgment of a faculty member about a student's work, expressed in grades and/or evaluations, is not within the purview of this right to challenge.

The University will provide, on request by the student, an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of the student's record(s). The request should be submitted to the appropriate University officer (see section titled "University Officers Responsible for Student Records") in whose area of responsibility the questioned material is kept. The University officer is authorized to rectify the entry and so notify the student in writing. The designated officer will provide the student with an opportunity to place in the records a statement commenting upon the challenged information in the educational records that will be kept so long as the contents are contested. The contents of the student's challenge will remain a part of the student's records regardless of the outcome of any challenge.

If a records entry question has not been satisfactorily resolved by this informal procedure, the student is entitled to a hearing on the matter. The hearing must be held within a reasonable time after the request, and the student notified as to the time, date, and place of the hearing in a reasonably advanced time of the hearing as to make his/her presence practical.

A hearing officer will be designated by the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education and the student will be afforded a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues of record entry validity. The student may be assisted or represented by an adviser of his/her choice including, at his/her own expense, an attorney. The student will be furnished, within a reasonable time following the hearing, a written decision from the designated hearing officer. In addition, the student is entitled to receive in writing a summary of the evidence and the reasons for the decision.

An adverse decision may be appealed in writing by the student to the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University, and finally, to the President of the University.

The student has the right to file a complaint with the Department of Education concerning alleged failures of the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

 

Approved: President Oswald (10-19-76)

Revised: Exec Vice President and Provost Richardson (1-6-88)

Revised: Exec Vice President and Provost Brighton (8-11-95)


C-4: SPECIAL COURSE REGISTRATION CONTROL

1.   It is recognized that enrollments in majors sometimes increase faster than the academic unit's ability to respond with course offerings. As a result, it may not be possible to accommodate all students wanting to register for a particular course. Consequently, it is sometimes necessary to place registration controls on courses. These controls serve a number of valuable purposes in the registration process:

•  Controls guarantee course availability to students so they may maintain normal academic progress towards graduation.
•  For courses in which enrollments must be limited because of field experiences, laboratory limitations, or reasons of liability, controls allow academic units to evaluate each student before permitting the individual to enroll.
•  In some instances, certain groups of students may be ineligible for a particular course. Course registration controls effectively prevent their registration.

2.   The application of a course registration control is a serious matter and should only be requested as a last resort. An academic unit seeking authorization to use a Special Course Registration Control must prepare a request well in advance of the intended effective semester and provide:

•  An identification of the course and semester for which the Special Course Registration Control is to be applied.
•  A justification for the control indicating why the Special Course Registration Control is necessary. Reference should be made as to why alternative actions for increasing the course limits do not meet demands.
•  An impact statement of how this control would likely affect other students and academic units.
•  An indication of the type of control desired: schedule only, prevent scheduling, or prevent all.
•  An outline of the criteria for the selection of students to be scheduled into the course, detailing the college or colleges of enrollment, the majors, and semester classifications of eligible students.
•  The effective date of the registration control, and when it is to be removed. Controls should be removed as early in the semester as possible.

3.   In preparing this proposal, the academic unit should reference enrollment data from previous semesters and, if applicable, the current semester, and identify the impact the request would have on meeting student enrollment requests.  

4.   To request a registration course control, academic units access the online form through the Registrar's Web page, https://www.our.psu.edu/scheduling/crscontrol.cfm.

At University Park, the department completes the form and sends it to the resident instruction dean. At other locations, the form is sent to the identified senior administrative officer.

5.   Special Course Registration Controls are initiated by the academic units, approved by the college dean, and implemented by the campus Registrar. Because of the significant nature of restricting registration, a right of reversal is provided to the vice provost and dean for enrollment management and administration and the vice provost for undergraduate education and international programs.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)
Revised: ACUE (4-7-05)


F-3: CONFLICT FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Procedure:

The Registrar's office is responsible for establishing the final examination schedule. Every effort is made to establish a final examination schedule that is free of conflicts. Invariably, some conflicts arise. Any student with a direct final examination conflict (two or more examinations scheduled at the same time) must file a request for a conflict examination. Any student with an overload final examination conflict (three or more examinations scheduled on any one calendar day, or three final examinations scheduled on consecutive exam periods) may file a request for a conflict examination. The filing period will be three weeks in length. The beginning and ending dates of the filing period will be determined as necessary, by each campus registrar and published through the Registrar's home page and in the Schedule of Courses.

Students must file a conflict final examination request during the designated time period and at the place specified by the campus Registrar. Conflict final examination requests will not be accepted after the close of the three-week filing period.

Academic departments are notified by the Registrar's office of the time and place for the conflict final examination, together with the names of the students who have been assigned to the conflict examination. Faculty members are requested to announce in class the time and place of the conflict final examination, if any, and to identify the students assigned thereto.

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)
Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (5-6-99)


F-4: CONFLICT NON-FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Procedure: Student Guidelines

1. Students should review their scheduled absences with instructors (faculty) at the beginning of each semester. Every effort should be made to identify conflicts as soon as possible to allow maximum resolution time.

2. At the beginning of the semester, the student should obtain a letter or the Class Absence form from the sponsoring unit/department that delineates all anticipated excused absences for the semester. This should be given to the instructor no later than one week in advance of the proposed absence.

3. Students who are issued the approved Class Absence form from the sponsoring unit/department should use this form to confirm previously discussed absences with faculty. The form should be shared with instructors prior to the absence.

4. Students should discuss with their instructors any unanticipated absences as soon as they become aware of such events.

Faculty Guidelines

1. When presented with the Class Absence form (or other appropriate documentation), faculty should provide the student with a make-up opportunity that ensures the promotion of learning. By providing evaluation similar to that given in the scheduled class or evening exam, faculty do not penalize the student who has a legitimate reason for being absent.

2. Faculty who may have difficulty scheduling an evening and/or non-evening conflict examination or quiz should contact their own department for assistance in locating an appropriate facility and/or proctor.

Procedure

1. Students should obtain a letter or the Class Absence form from the sponsoring unit/department delineating the semester's anticipated excused absences. This must be presented to the respective faculty member at least one week in advance of the University-approved activity in order to provide the faculty member adequate time to prepare make-up opportunities. Unanticipated absences should be brought to instructors' attention as soon as the student becomes aware of such events.

2. Students who believe they have been unfairly denied a make-up opportunity should, after trying to resolve the problem with the course instructor, contact the head of the department for the course in which the student is enrolled.

3. If the problem is not resolved, the student should contact the sponsoring unit/department (in some instances, this may be the student's college assistant/associate dean for undergraduate programs or the student's campus director of academic affairs) and provide documentation describing the unresolved make-up opportunity. The sponsoring unit/ department should attempt to resolve the problem.

4. If the problem is still unresolved, the sponsoring unit/department should forward the documentation to the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education for resolution. If the problem involves a Capital College course, documentation should be forwarded to the Provost and Dean, Penn State Harrisburg.

(Ref: Senate Policy 44-35)

Approved: ACAS (4-6-90)


G-1: GRADE REPORTING

Procedure:

Grade reporting deadlines are established so that:

1. Grades for graduating seniors are available in sufficient time to allow for checking the final semester's work to assure that graduation requirements have been met and;

2. Students who are academically dropped for unsatisfactory scholarship can be notified of that fact prior to registration for the next semester.

Two grade-reporting options are available to faculty:

1. Faculty are encouraged to use the Web based grading services offered through eLion. To use this service, the faculty member must be assigned a SecurID card.

2. Faculty may use paper-based grade rosters, where either department staff or Registrar office staff using the ISIS system will perform the recording of grades on behalf of the faculty.

The Office of the University Registrar is responsible for distributing grade reporting instructions to the faculty, academic department, college, and campus offices. Faculty will be notified through use of the Penn State e-mail system when their course is ready to be graded. Courses may be graded starting the day following the defined calendar end-date of the course. Grades are to be recorded no later than two business days after the final examination or final course assessment.

Approved: ACREP (4-29-71)
Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: Editorial (9-4-03)


C-1: DEVELOPING THE COURSE OFFERING

Principles Related to Developing the Course Offering

1. Responsibilities

Developing the course offering is a shared responsibility of the academic units and the Office of the University Registrar. The academic units are responsible for determining which courses they will offer, section size and the number of offered sections, and the assignment of teaching faculty. The Registrar's Office is responsible for assigning general-purpose classrooms, recording college/department-controlled learning space, and publishing the Schedule of Courses. A joint responsibility is to distribute the assigned times such that courses and sections are appropriately distributed across the days of the week and periods of the day. This is required to maximize scheduling opportunities for students and to maximize the scheduling of learning space.

It is recognized that the size of the campus will lead to procedural differences among the various locations of the University. However, the principles presented within apply equally to all locations of the University.

2. Planning

The course offering process is an on going analysis of past, current, and future course demand, whereby the academic unit determines what courses should be offered in future semesters. This analysis should focus on the several different types of courses the academic unit may offer:

--general education;
--courses required for majors, electives;
--special interest courses.

Faculty staffing issues such as proposed sabbatical leaves and pending research contracts that include released time and graduate assistant availability must also be considered.

The Office of the University Registrar is available to assist in the planning process by providing course offering, program summary, and student enrollment data to the academic unit.

3. Call for Courses

While the exact process may vary from location to location, each semester every academic unit will submit new course offering plans to the Registrar at its location. At University Park, the Registrar's office provides to each academic unit forms to be used in the preparation of the new course offering. Departments submit their course offering plans through the college dean before returning them to the Registrar's office.

Academic units should give consideration to the following guidelines in establishing their course offering:

--Schedule courses required in the major.
--Schedule general education courses.
--Schedule other regular elective courses.
--Schedule special interest courses on a faculty- and space-available basis.
--As soon as possible, ideally at the time of the initial offering, assign faculty to all offered courses and sections.
--Identify courses that should not be scheduled in time conflict with other courses.
--Identify specific classroom characteristics needed to support instruction, such as the need for technology.
--Specify course characteristics that will be helpful to students during registration.
--Where possible, set higher section limits for typically over-demanded courses.
--Avoid offering courses with histories of being under-enrolled.

4. Publication Review

Upon completion of the room assignment process, the Registrar's office prepares a draft version of the campus course offering. This is distributed to each academic unit department for final review and approval before the course offering is published. This review is intended to correct any minor discrepancies and to make necessary adjustments to the course offerings before publication.

Academic units are strongly encouraged to complete their course offering as fully as possible starting with the initial publication. This action insures that the complete course offering is available to the largest number of students, advisers, and faculty.

At University Park, the department head signs the Semester Course Publication review form and submits the form through the college dean before returning it to the Registrar's office.

5. Publication of the Schedule of Courses

The course offering for a given semester is published approximately three months prior to the semester for which that offering is intended. The official University publication is on the World Wide Web and is updated every 24 hours. Included in the Web publication are all resident instruction delivered courses offered at all locations of the University. The campus Registrar is responsible for identifying the calendar date to start including the resident instruction courses. Also included in the Web publication are those continuing education delivered courses that are designated as "public" by the campus Registrar. These "public continuing education courses" may be offered on or off campus.

Each location is authorized to publish a paper-based Schedule of Courses. It is recognized that some students may not have access to the World Wide Web. The paper document serves as a reasonable substitution for such students.

6. Coordinated and Concurrent Courses

Some courses are to be scheduled concurrently with other courses or as a set of coordinated courses. Academic units offering coordinated or concurrent courses should clearly identify these courses to their campus Registrar. The campus Registrar will place the appropriate designation in the course characteristic field of the course offering.

7. Distribution by Meeting Periods and Days

In an effort to provide maximum scheduling opportunities for students and to maximize utilization of the classroom and other learning facilities, each location is encouraged to develop a course-scheduling matrix. This matrix is required at University Park. The course-scheduling matrix appropriately distributes the course offering among the class meeting periods per day and days of the week.

Both the initial course offering and subsequent adjustments to the initial course offering must maintain the integrity of this distribution. Registrars at all locations are encouraged to use a course-scheduling distribution matrix appropriate for their location.

The academic unit recommends course-scheduling patterns. The campus Registrar has the final authority for determining the meeting times for all courses and for the assignment of general-purpose classrooms.

Academic units are permitted to schedule courses during the evening hours and on weekends.

8. "By Appointment" Courses

All courses that will have regular class meetings throughout the semester shall be scheduled in advance, at specific meeting periods, in specific classrooms, and so announced in the Schedule of Courses.

Those courses that do not meet on a regular schedule, such as independent study courses, research, or thesis preparation courses, may be scheduled as "by appointment." Room numbers listed for courses scheduled by appointment refer to the office number and building of the instructor or the head of the academic unit offering the course.

Class meeting times later arranged must be agreeable to all concerned and may not conflict with other scheduled courses.

9. Credit Courses of Less Than Full Semester Duration

Credit courses are normally scheduled for a full semester. Courses that are shorter than a full semester can be scheduled with the approval of the appropriate academic unit. The distribution of time between in-class activities and outside preparation varies from course to course. To earn 1 credit, the normal expectation is for the student to spend at least forty hours of work per semester. This work is planned and arranged by the faculty.

There are a number of issues to be considered when an academic unit desires to offer a credit course or combination of courses on a less than full semester basis.

--The student population who will be expected to schedule the course;
--Scheduling the part-semester course should not prevent students from being able to schedule a normal load of full semester courses;
--The academic and resource implications of offering the part-semester course;
--A justification of why the course(s) cannot be offered on a full-semester basis.

Upon approval of the college dean, the course request is forwarded to the campus Registrar.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)


J-2: LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Procedure:

1. Only students who are baccalaureate or associate degree candidates may file for a leave of absence. A student desiring to take a leave of absence must obtain on a Leave of Absence form the approval of the student's college dean, campus executive officer or the Director of the Division of Undergraduate Studies, whichever is appropriate.

2. If the leave is approved by the dean/executive officer/director, the leave is entered, and the form retained in that office. The deadline for filing is the last working day prior to the first day of classes for the semester/session that the leave will begin. Leaves are not required for summer session only.

3. Normally, leaves are not approved for a period longer than one year. Under special circumstances (e.g. military deployment), a leave of absence may be approved to a maximum of two years.

4. A student who has withdrawn as a degree candidate is not eligible for a leave of absence. A student who has been dropped or dismissed from the University is not eligible for leave of absence.

5. A student who fulfills the conditions of an approved leave of absence may register upon return without applying for re-enrollment. The student registers for the returning semester according to the schedule established for that semester.

6. If a student desires to return earlier or later than the semester agreed upon on the leave of absence form as the "returning semester" the student must make application for re-enrollment as a degree candidate.

7. A student who plans to enroll for course work at another accredited institution during a leave of absence should review program plans with the student's academic adviser and the Undergraduate Admissions Office to verify the eligibility for receiving credit.

8. Before commencing a leave of absence, a student is responsible for notifying other appropriate offices, such as the Office of Student Aid. (Ref: Senate Policy 56-70)

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)

Revised: ACAS (4-8-88)

Revised: ACUE (6-6-96)

Revised: Editorial (9-5-08)


M-5: INTERCOLLEGE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Policy:

1. The four types of Intercollege Undergraduate Programs are:

a. Degree programs utilizing regular courses of several colleges and not requiring special course offerings or teaching assignments. Special faculty involvement is addressed only to program advising and to monitoring of program content and quality.

b. Degree programs involving special required courses for the major from departments or divisions of two or more colleges and requiring specific teaching assignments. Faculty involved teach the required courses, monitor the program content and quality and advise students.

c. Nondegree programs that emphasize thematic or integrated studies involving courses offered regularly by particular departments or divisions from two or more colleges. Faculty involved may teach the courses included as part of their regular departmental or divisional assignments but they are expressedly responsible for student advising and for monitoring academic program content and quality.

d. Nondegree programs having emphasis on thematic or integrated studies that require special course offerings identified separately from the departments and divisions of participating colleges. Faculty involved are generally responsible for determining and monitoring the program content and quality and for establishing criteria for faculty teaching in the program.

2. For all types of Intercollege Undergraduate Programs, a program committee shall be appointed by the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs, with members nominated by the participating college deans. In matters concerning the Intercollege Undergraduate Program, the chairman reports to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs.

3. Each Intercollege Program Committee is responsible for:

a. Developing, implementing and reviewing the academic program.

b. Offering recommendations to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs, the participating colleges and the Senate.

c. Determining policies and criteria for selection and certification and provide for advising when degrees or certificates are involved.

d. Developing courses, selecting and reviewing the teaching faculty when courses are to be offered separate from regular departments/divisions.

4. Support for Intercollege Undergraduate Programs is provided jointly by the participating colleges and by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs.

(Ref: Intercollege Undergraduate Program Policy Statement, August 1974 and revised August 1983)

Approved: Provost Larson (8-17-74)

Revised: Exec VP Bartoo (8-83)

Vice President Dunham (8-83)

Revised: Editorial revision (2-19-98)


R-1: TEXTBOOKS LISTS

Procedure:

1. Complete publication information is required when compiling textbook lists. To facilitate locating and ordering books, the following information must be included: author(s), title, ISBN, publisher, year of publication, edition and editor.

2. If different textbooks are required by instructors teaching different sections of the same course, the textbooks for these sections must be included in the textbook list by section.

3. If additional books are recommended supplemental reading that is not required, they should be noted as recommended texts on the lists. If materials other than books are required for a course, as much information about the materials should be provided, including an estimate of total additional cost.

4. Completed textbook lists must be furnished to the campus Penn State Bookstore no later than March 1 for textbooks to be used in the Fall Semester, September 1 for textbooks to be used in the Spring Semester, and February 1 for textbooks to be used in the Summer Session. If no information is available about textbooks or other materials required for a class, "Not Available" should be submitted until a selection is made, at which time the information will be provided. If required materials for a class will be provided during the first week of classes (such as a list of readings on electronic reserve), "To Be Announced" should be submitted.

5. Changes in textbooks and other materials should be reported to the campus Penn State Bookstore as soon as possible.

 

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (9-8-83)

Revised: ACUE (3-4-93)

Revised: ACUE (11-5-09)


A-4: NONDEGREE

Procedure: Resident Instruction

1.   To enroll in the University as a nondegree-regular student, a person who has not been dropped as a degree or provisional student for poor scholarship must complete an Undergraduate Nondegree Student - Credit Enrollment Data Form (form C-5) and a Registration/Drop/Add form. To enroll for subsequent semesters, only the Registration/Drop/Add form is required each semester a student registers.

2.   Students who have been dropped for poor scholarship and wish to enroll as nondegree-conditional students must obtain on the Registration/Drop/Add form the signature of the adviser/counselor designated for nondegree-conditional students in the academic unit to which admission or reinstatement and re-enrollment is desired.

3.   All nondegree students are accommodated in credit courses on a space available basis.

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (10-28-82)

Revised: ACUI (3-10-83)

Editorial: (5-6-85)

Revised: ACAS (4-8-88)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Procedure: Continuing and Distance Education

To enroll in credit courses through Continuing Education, a nondegree student must complete the appropriate Continuing Education registration forms. The registration forms serve as an application for admission and may be obtained from any Continuing Education office throughout the Commonwealth.

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Procedure: Implementation

1.   A person dropped as a degree or provisional student for poor scholarship may enroll as a nondegree-conditional student in accordance with Senate Policy 14-00. A student may enroll for a maximum of 12 credits per semester while in nondegree-conditional status.

NOTE 1: In determining the total credit load per semester for nondegree-conditional students, all resident instruction, continuing education and World Campus courses already in progress at the time of the drop action will not be included in determining the maximum credit load.

2.   The Registrar's office will monitor the registrations of nondegree-conditional students previously dropped from degree or provisional status. If students are found to have exceeded the restrictions contained in paragraph 1 above, the Registrar will notify the appropriate academic administrator. The academic administrator will assist the student in making a decision about which course(s) will be cancelled. The academic administrator will notify the Registrar, by means of a memorandum, to cancel one or more courses to reduce the student's schedule to the maximum limit. The Registar's office will notify the Fee Assessor to effect a full refund for courses cancelled because of invoking the provisions of Senate Policy 14-00.

NOTE 2: Cancellations will not be made retroactively, i.e., if the student who is exceeding the limit completes a course undetected, and the grade is recorded, the course will not be cancelled.

Approved: ACUI (11-16-78)

Revised: ACUI (3-10-83)

Effective: Fall Semester 1983

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)


G-4: DEFERRED GRADES -- REMOVAL

Procedure:

At the end of the fourth week of a semester, cards are distributed to the department or instructor with instructions deemed appropriate by the dean or executive officer.

At the end of the sixth week of the subsequent semester to which a grade was deferred, the deans or executive officers close out receipt of the cards or extensions and submit cards.

 

Approved: ACREP (3-1-73)

Revised: ACUI (2-6-75)

Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)

NOTE: A deferred grade which is not changed to a passing grade by the instructor before the end of the prescribed period shall automatically become an F unless an extension has been granted.


D-1: ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE AND LOWER DIVISION CAMPUS

College Common Year Designation and Initial Campus Assignment

1. First-semester baccalaureate and associate degree candidates admitted to the University will be assigned to a campus only if that campus can provide at least two semesters of normal academic progress toward the baccalaureate or associate degree program selected by the student.

2. Regardless of campus, first-semester baccalaureate degree candidates are normally admitted into a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS), assigned a college common year designation code, and enroll in course work consistent with normal academic progress for the academic majors in that college.

3. A student is expected to remain at his/her campus of admission until he/she achieves fifth semester standing. At this point, a baccalaureate degree candidate may have to change to a University campus that is authorized to deliver his/her major.

4. The dean for each college is responsible for establishing advising procedures to accomplish each of the following objectives:

a. Inform each baccalaureate degree candidate in the college of the policies and procedures governing relocation to another campus.

b. Identify the course requirements to maintain normal academic progress for the student’s major preference.

c. Identify the probable semester of relocation for a student based on major preference.

d. Assure that relocation does occur consistent with the current course requirements of a student’s major preference, the student’s actual course experience, and the planned course offerings of the campus over the next several semesters.

5. Students may enroll at any campus during the summer session. However, this will not change their regularly assigned campus for the fall semester.

Early Change of Campus Request Procedure

1. A student is expected to remain at his/her campus of admission until he/she achieves fifth semester standing. A student may request an early change of campus in order to maintain normal academic progress when he/she is unable to obtain a full schedule of relevant (i.e., to his/her major) courses at his/her current campus. Students requesting an early change of campus because of academic reasons are expected to remain in their current major and schedule courses consistent with that major at the new campus.

2. Student requests for an early change of campus because of personal reasons may be considered. However, the student must document that there are clear and compelling reasons why an early campus change should be considered.

3. Both the sending campus and the receiving campus have the authority to deny the student request.

4. A currently enrolled student initiates an early change of campus request through the change of campus contact at the student’s current campus.

5. The student’s current campus will:

a. Determine if the student can obtain a course schedule that will permit the student to maintain normal academic progress at the present campus. This will be determined by the Associate Dean/DAA or designate at the campus.

b. If normal academic progress toward the student’s major preference can be maintained at the present campus, the Associate Dean/DAA or designate notifies the student that the request is denied.

c. If normal academic progress cannot be maintained at the student’s current campus, the change of campus contact forwards the request to the receiving campus for consideration (see 5.e below).

d. If the student’s request is based on non-academic reasons, the Associate Dean/DAA at the campus will make an informed decision based on available facts. If the request is not supported, the Associate Dean/DAA notifies the student that the request is denied. If the request is supported, the change of campus contact forwards the request to the receiving campus for consideration (see 5.e below).

e. To initiate an early change of campus request (for either academic or non-academic reasons), the sending change of campus contact enters the appropriate student information and reason for the request on ISIS screen ARUSBC. This action provides email notification to the receiving change of campus contact.

6. If the receiving campus is a non-UP location, the receiving campus will:

a. Review the request to determine if the student can obtain a course schedule that will permit the student to maintain normal academic progress at the receiving campus and determine if space is available. This review should be accomplished by the Associate Dean/DAA or designate.

b. The change of campus contact at the receiving campus will enter an approval/denial decision on screen ARUSBC. This action provides an email message to the sending change of campus contact.

c. The Registrar’s office notifies the student if the request is approved. If the request is denied, notification to the student is initiated by the sending change of campus contact.

d. If approved, the campus Registrar at the receiving campus is responsible for providing the student with appropriate registration instructions.

7. If the receiving campus is University Park:

a. The college change of campus contact will review the request.

b. If approved, the college will enter an approval decision on screen ARUSBC. This action provides an email message to the sending change of campus contact and generates a notification to the student.

c. If denied, the college will enter a denial decision on screen ARUSBC. This action provides an email message to the sending change of campus contact, who then notifies the student.

Cancellation of an Approved Campus Change

The student may elect to cancel an approved change of campus. Upon notification by the student, the receiving change of campus contact cancels the approved change using screen ARUSBC. The Registrar’s office confirms this cancellation by notifying the student.

If a student's schedule of courses is not consistent with the reason that an early change of campus was approved, the change of campus approval may be rescinded and the student may be required to return to his/her original campus for the semester immediately following.

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)
Approved: ACUE (10-6-05)
Approved: ACUE (6-7-07)


P: CURRICULAR PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES

Preface

Penn State University's baccalaureate and associate degree programs are offered by its colleges. Academic program authority may be lodged in a single college or shared among several. A single program may be offered jointly by several colleges. Program delivery may be accomplished through traditional single-college residence-based instruction, joint college and campus instruction, and World Campus. New technologies, learning assessment, the full involvement of university-wide disciplinary communities, and increasingly sophisticated approaches to learning itself encourage an openness to experiment with delivery protocols and recognition that program outcomes are the primary basis of formative and summative academic assessment. In all cases, the University's academic degree programs must receive administrative authorization granted by the Provost through the Office of Undergraduate Education and by the University Faculty Senate. The principles, guidelines and procedures that follow provide the authorization protocols to offer, deliver, and terminate academic programs.

I. Curricular Principles and Guidelines

Curricular programs should reflect disciplinary integrity across all campuses of the University.

Curricular integrity requires planning and implementation that reflects quality among units with common curricular interests, regardless of location or delivery mode.

Decisions regarding undergraduate programs, majors, options, and minors require both academic and administrative review and approval.

The Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education serves as the Provost's designee and may review curricular proposals on the Provost's behalf.   In this capacity, the Office of Undergraduate Education is available for curricular consultation involving programs and may facilitate arbitration among colleges and other units.

Academic review and approval is conducted by the faculty through the University Faculty Senate. Academic review ensures adherence to the University's standards of academic quality and curricular integrity.

Administrative review and approval is conducted by the Office of the Provost. Administrative review ensures consideration and fulfillment of the broader University mission, enrollment management, local needs, and resource availability and use, as well as overall academic quality and curricular integrity.

New programs must be justified by considerations of quality, cost, enrollment, impact upon availability of senior faculty to engage in lower division instruction, implications for other programs and courses; program duplication: university, college, and campus mission; market need and demand; and resource feasibility.

Unique new majors, minors, and options should be proposed only when the variation from existing curricula is substantial, and when the program fulfills a demonstrable demand by students that is likely to continue.

Proposals for academic programs, program amendments, and program terminations are developed in consultation with disciplinary communities and administrative units and reflect strategic as well as academic deliberation.

The initial intention to develop a program proposal must be shared across the University utilizing an ACUE Prospectus, a process which must be completed prior to submission of a P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal.

All proposals to add or drop programs must reference common criteria (see below, V: Common Program Justification Criteria).

The Provost informs the Board of Trustees when proposals to add or drop programs are authorized. Administratively authorized new programs, program drops, and changes in the names of programs are implemented only after the Board of Trustees has been informed of the curricular action.

The authorization to implement new and amended programs is issued by the Office of Undergraduate Education to the dean of the proposing college and disseminated to the university community, including Undergraduate Admissions, University Registrar, the Provost, University Faculty Senate, and others.

II. ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus for New Academic Programs, Delivery of Academic Programs at Additional Campuses, and Phase-Out of Academic Programs

The Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education facilitates ACUE's consideration of new academic majors, options, minors, substantial program amendment likely to carry implications for other colleges or delivery units, program name changes, and the delivery of existing academic programs at additional campuses during the pre-proposal germination period.  Accordingly, a curricular program prospectus must precede development and submission of formal P-1 (New Undergraduate Major, Option or Minor), P-3 (Moving/Discontinuing Degree Programs), and P-6 (Academic Program Phase-Out) proposals.  The curricular program prospectus process is based upon the 2005 recommendations from the Joint Committee on Curricular Integrity appointed by the Provost and University Faculty Senate. The prospectus must identify strategic considerations and issues of academic quality associated with new program offerings. Prospectuses initiate effective preliminary consultation within disciplines and across the breadth of the University utilizing the ACUE membership.

World Campus must be considered as an additional campus for purposes of P-1, P-3 and P-6 program proposals and the prospectuses that precede them. Accordingly, a college offering an existing program that wishes to move the program to World Campus, or to deliver the program through World Campus as well as through residence instruction, must treat World Campus as an additional location. As World Campus is a delivery unit, rather than an independent academic unit, all programs delivered through the World Campus must be authorized for delivery through an academic college. P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals and prospectuses for World Campus program delivery must be submitted jointly by the authorized college and World Campus.

The curricular program prospectus requires three steps:

Step One: The college associate dean in which the proposed academic program will be housed must submit a brief curricular program prospectus utilizing the on-line submission form. The information collected should enable ACUE membership to engage in a collegial conversation centered on the need for the program, resource availability, and impact on other academic units across the University. Unlike a fully developed P-1, P-3, or P-6, the prospectus is intended to generate early consultation at ACUE and to identify or flesh out issues that must be addressed in the full P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal.

Prospectuses submitted by a college's associate dean a minimum of one week before the next ACUE meeting will be vetted at that meeting. Arrangements may be made under extraordinary circumstances for proposals submitted during the summer.

Step Two:  Curricular program prospectuses will be distributed electronically by the Office of Undergraduate Education to ACUE membership, including the Office of the University Faculty Senate, prior to each ACUE meeting.  ACUE members should use this opportunity for formative consultation with appropriate colleagues in their college, across the University, and with the originating college.

Step Three:  Following discussion of the curricular program prospectus at ACUE, an ACUE committee consisting of the ACUE chair, the University College associate dean who serves on ACUE, the chair of the Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs and an Office of Undergraduate Education associate dean will review the prospectus. The ACUE committee may also invite others as appropriate to add expertise. The ACUE committee will provide a brief recommendation to the submitting college, taking into consideration the ACUE discussion, curricular integrity, and strategic university considerations such as physical, fiscal, and faculty resources.

Upon receipt of the ACUE recommendations, a full P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal, including evidence of consultation and attention to ACUE recommendations, may be submitted to the University Faculty Senate (P-1, P-6) or to the Office of Undergraduate Education (P-3) as appropriate. P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals must include a copy of the ACUE recommendations.

III. P-1, P-3, P-6 Authority and Expectations

The Provost, as chief academic officer, maintains authority for the Academic Administrative Policies and Procedures that govern the undergraduate curriculum and may, in consultation with faculty, deans, and other appropriate offices, make exceptions to them.

Colleges and departments are required to engage in formal consultation when proposing new (P-1) undergraduate majors, options, and minors; or when moving or discontinuing degree programs among colleges or college locations, including World Campus (P-3); and academic program phase-out (P-6).

P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals from the non-University Park campuses must be submitted by the appropriate Chancellor to the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses (VPCC) for consultation and endorsement prior to their entry into the University Faculty Senate and Office of the Provost approval paths described elsewhere in P: Curricular Principles and Procedures.  In each case, the VPCC and the Office of Undergraduate Education will consider relevant academic and strategic factors, including those listed below in V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

It is important to distinguish between program phase-out (P-6), which refers to procedures by which degree programs are dropped, and department phase-out, the procedures by which academic departments are discontinued. When proposing the phase-out of a department, reference should be made to the "Faculty Senate Guidelines for Review of the Establishment, Reorganization, or Discontinuation of Academic Organizational Units" (http://www.psu.edu/ufs/guide/reviewacadunits.html).

It is necessary to complete separate proposals, and to receive separate approvals, to phase out a program and a department in which it resides. A department may be phased out without discontinuing programs, which may be moved to alternative departments or colleges. The P procedures do not pertain to departmental phase-out.

IV. Consultation

Consultation provides the foundation of disciplinary continuity and scholarship and a basis for principled collegial faculty governance. Evaluative analyses and assessments are accepted as contributions toward a common goal of academic coherence and achievement and do not in and of themselves restrict the development, alteration, or phasing out of programs.

Consultation should be conducted via electronic media such as those employing summary e-mail statements with detailed attachments or web links. It must be possible to forward attachments and/or links to appropriate colleagues without passwords or similar limitations.

ACUE deans are the primary academic conduit among Penn State schools and colleges for purposes of consultation. A current ACUE roster is maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Education and is available for purposes of consultation as a LISTSERVE.

Consultation must include those likely to have a common interest in a proposed curricular action and include any faculty group or program that would reasonably and predictably offer courses or programs that seek academic outcomes similar to the proposed program. This includes all ACUE deans, academic units within the college in which the proposal is made, other colleges in which the proposed program/major, minor, or option is offered or will be offered or will in any way be directly affected.

Consultative comments, and responses to them, must be included in proposals sent to the University Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs, which will forward the correspondence with the proposal when it is delivered to the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education for further review.

Consultation is conducted with an expectation of timeliness that includes a minimum of ten business days in which consultative responses may be returned electronically. Reasonable extensions should be provided at the request of an ACUE dean.

The proposing unit should respond electronically and in a timely manner to those who have submitted concerns, objections, or exceptions to proposals.

V.   Common Program Justification Criteria

P-1 and P-3 proposals must include current, localized data and information relevant to several academic and strategic elements. These include, but may not be limited to:

1. Relationship of proposal to university and college mission.

2. Learning quality indicators such as:

         A. On-going availability of a minimum of three or more standing faculty;

         B. Program leadership by senior-level faculty;

         C. Availability of a standing faculty cohort academically and disciplinarily aligned with the proposed program;

         D. Ability to move student program cohorts through in a timely manner;

         E. Impact on the University's preference to utilize, whenever possible, standing or tenure track senior level faculty in lower division undergraduate courses;

         F. Availability of faculty to deliver currently authorized, as well as new programs;

         G. Availability of a sufficient number of program electives within the discipline and in supporting area of study;

         H. University-wide curricular integrity that includes disciplinary community engagement and the avoidance of curricular drift;  

          I. Ability to minimize the need for core course substitutions and explicit rationale for, and justification of, necessary core substitutions.

4. Impact on Penn State college and campus enrollments and flow of students among campuses;

5. Market need and demand documented by current, valid, and reliable evidence;

6. Physical and fiscal resource availability (please include the official Faculty Senate costing analysis form as well as other relevant information);  

7. Strategic and academic approval and support demonstrated by the sign-off of the appropriate chancellor and/or dean;

8. Disciplinary community and administrative consultation.

Approved: ACUE (9-5-02)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-04, 10-7-04)
Revised: Editorial (10-26-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)
Revised: ACUE (3-2-06)
Revised: ACUE (7-6-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)
Revised: Editorial (2-4-09)


B-6: COLLEGE, CAMPUS, AND ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS

Policy:

The patterns of academic advising information and administrative support services provided to students are to be consistent across locations and among colleges and be clearly visible to and easily accessible for both students and advisers (see Academic Administrative Policies and Procedures under D which contains rules on Entrance to College and Lower Division Location, Entrance to Major and Upper Division, and Change of Major).  Regardless of location, colleges are responsible for providing advising information and assessing the effectiveness of advising services provided to students enrolled in both the college common year and specific majors.  Similarly, regardless of college or major, locations are responsible for providing advising information and assessing effectiveness of advising services provided to students enrolled at their location.  All student actions regarding college of admission, college common year designation, location of enrollment, preferred major designation, course registrations, and actual major are recorded in the Integrated Student Information System (ISIS).

Access to advising information may be provided to students and advisers by campuses and colleges via advising centers and advising Web pages.  College, campus, and university-wide administrative offices are responsible for identifying the persons whom students and advisers should contact if they wish to ask specific questions or if they want to implement academic actions regarding choice of major, course registrations, or change of location assignments.

Procedures:

The following procedures will guide the assignment of responsibilities among colleges, campuses, and administrative units for advising information and communications regarding admission to college and lower division location, entrance to major and upper division, and change of major.

1.   All colleges are to appoint a College Contact Person (CCP) and to develop and disseminate advising information related to its majors and any requirements related to entering or changing majors or changing location assignment.  This information must be made available via the Web; the
Web site must identify an office in the college that individual students or advisers at other locations may contact directly for clarifying information.  The CCP is to maintain a working relationship with the network of persons designated at campuses as the College Contact and Referral Representatives (CCRR) (see #2 below).  The University Park colleges should conduct at least one meeting per year for their CCRRs, with expenses shared by the college and locations.  The other colleges should collaborate in arranging at least one annual meeting.

2.   Each campus is to identify a CCRR for each University Park-based college and one CCRR to represent all other colleges.  Among other responsibilities, the CCRR at the campus is to:  a) maintain contact with the CCP; b) keep abreast of college advising information; c) monitor the campus advising Web site to assure the college’s advising information is available to local students; and d) be responsive to queries from local students about requirements for college majors and change of location assignments.

3.   Advising Web sites should be developed in accordance with guidelines established by the University Advising Council.

4.   Annually, each college and each campus is to assess the effectiveness of its advising information network across and among locations of the University and incorporate improvement steps in its advising plans.

5.   All CCRRs and CCPs must have ready access to the Internet.

6.   Academic administrative support offices, including Undergraduate Admissions and the University Registrar, are to maintain Web-based systems to inform and guide students as they take academic actions relating to admission to their college and location, registration for courses, monitoring academic progress, and petitioning for entrance to a major or a change in location assignment.  All academic administrative support offices and colleges maintaining Web-based information systems should provide a link to eLion to take advantage of centrally supported advising information resources and procedures.

Approved: Vice President/Dean, CES (12-7-89)
Approved: Vice Provost/Dean, Undergrad Ed (12-7-89)
Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)


B-2: THE NATURE OF THE UNIVERSITY ADVISING PROGRAM

Senate Policy:  32-20, The Nature of the University Advising Program

Policy:

Senate Policy 32-20 prescribes the nature of the University's advising program, with each academic unit to establish an academic advising system designed to meet the goals (Senate Policy 32-00) of: helping advisees identify and achieve their academic goals; promoting intellectual discovery; and encouraging students to take advantage of both in- and out-of-class educational opportunities and to become self-directed learners and decision-makers.

The unit's academic advising system is to address nine elements: policy, structure, support, training, delivery, first-year students, frequency of consultations, recognition and reward, and assessment.

Procedure:

1.   Each academic unit is to develop its own advising program, consistent with the University Faculty Senate's policy.

2.   Descriptions of the academic unit's advising program and instructions on how students and advisers are to use it are to be part of the unit's orientation for new faculty and students and should be readily available in Web- and paper-based publications.

Approved: ACUE (4-2-98)


B-5: ACADEMIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

Senate Policy:  32-20, The Nature of the University Advising Program

Policy:

The University maintains the Web-based eLion system to provide general and individual information needed by advisers and advisees in fulfilling their responsibilities under Senate Policy 32-20. eLion is accessible at all locations of the University.

Colleges maintain academic information systems, including Web-based communication channels and publications, as part of their advising programs.  Their information systems may include details of their unit's own policies, procedures, and practices in implementing academic advising programs.

Approved: ACUI (4-15-76)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (4-2-98)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)


B-3: RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADVISERS AND ADVISEES

Senate Policy:  32-30, Responsibilities of Advisers and Advisees

Policy:

Senate Policy 32-30 specifies Responsibilities of Advisers and Advisees.  The advisee's unit of enrollment is to provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser as well as with information needed to plan the chosen program of study and referrals to other specialized resources.  The college or department also will monitor the progress of its advisees towards satisfactory completion of all graduation requirements and inform students of their status each semester.

 Both advisers and advisees share responsibilities for the advising relationship to succeed.  Advisers are to encourage advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning.  Advisees will routinely contact their advisers each semester and will assume final responsibility for course scheduling, program planning, and the successful completion of graduation requirements.

Procedure:

1.   Providing all enrolled students with a primary academic adviser (see Senate Policy 32-40 and B-4) is to be accomplished in a systematic way that includes informing both the advisee and adviser of their assignments.  Information and referrals needed to plan the advisee's chosen program of study are to be made easily accessible by the academic unit, including both Web- and print-based publications.

2.    Monitoring of advisees' progress and informing them of their status are to be accomplished by procedures established by the enrollment college and department.  eLion and the Degree Audit system provide direct access for students and advisers to this information and should be incorporated into the college and department procedures.

3.    Advisers are to develop their own individual procedures to fulfill their responsibilities in implementing the academic unit's advising program.  eLion's "Advisers" section and the Center for Excellence in Academic Advising are available to support the adviser.

4.    Advisees are to consult with their adviser at least once a semester.  They are to develop their own individual procedures to fulfill their responsibilities within the academic unit's advising system.  eLion includes several applications to support the student in her or his relationship with the adviser as well as in the student's own academic planning and assessment activities.

Senate Policy:  32-30, Responsibilities of Advisers and Advisees

Approved: ACUE (4-2-98)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)


G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Senate Policy:  49-20, Academic Integrity

Introduction:

Recognizing the importance of academic integrity to the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction, represented in the procedures that follow, is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Each campus or academic college at University Park, shall interpret and apply Academic Integrity Procedures consistent with University policy.

Campus or college Academic Integrity Committees shall maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.

Procedures

A. When Academic Misconduct is Suspected:

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegation while taking into account the confidential nature of the information and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning.

2. When evidence suggests that academic misconduct has occurred, the faculty member will enter the charge and the academic sanction on the campus or college’s Academic Integrity Form, will sign the form, and then convey the charge and sanction to the student for his or her signature (in person or through other methods if necessary).

3. After reviewing the allegation of academic misconduct with the student, the faculty member may provide the student with an additional period of time (determined by the campus or college procedures) before the student has to make a decision and sign the Academic Integrity Form as to whether or not to accept the academic sanction. A student’s failure to sign and return the Academic Integrity Form, by the specified deadline, consistent with campus or college procedures, will be construed as not contesting the charge or sanction and the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.

4. Normally, it is preferable to pursue academic sanctions with the campus or college, relying on the assignment of grades and course or program-related sanctions to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional University-level disciplinary sanctions. However, where integrity violations are considered to be extreme, the faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with both the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Judicial Affairs. A more detailed and comprehensive listing of the types of academic sanctions faculty may assign to students on the Academic Integrity Form can be found in the document Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, the authority to administer academic sanctions remains the responsibility of the instructor and the campus or college AI Committee, as appropriate. In situations where a disciplinary sanction is requested and referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs, the application of academic sanctions will be carried out by the campus or college, while the application of any disciplinary sanctions will be carried out by the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee, in consultation with the Academic Integrity Committee of the campus or college.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic misconduct is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process. The Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for notifying the Office of the University Registrar when academic misconduct is suspected in a course. Any drop or withdrawal from the course during this time will be reversed. A student who has received an academic sanction as a result of a violation of academic integrity may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time. These drop actions include regular drop, late drop, withdrawal, retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. This drop policy may be superseded in exceptional circumstances (i.e. trauma drop). In these cases, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will confer with the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative to determine if the drop is warranted.

NOTE: The following statement shall appear on all campus and college Academic Integrity Forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course to avoid a sanction for a violation of academic integrity. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures."

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the Academic Integrity Form by the specified deadline, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.

8. The Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for ensuring that the process outlined in this document and the specific campus or college procedures are followed. If either the student or the faculty member involved in the instance of alleged academic misconduct thinks that there has been a procedural problem, then he/she should bring that concern to the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative for resolution.

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form, then forwards the form to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Judicial Affairs for recording, it is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. If a prior recorded violation is discovered after the student has admitted responsibility and accepted the academic sanction(s), this additional information should be reviewed and a new academic sanction may be considered by the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges in consultation with the faculty member. Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing additional academic sanctions. If the sanction is to be changed, a new form should be provided to the student and he/she should have the opportunity to accept or contest the charge given the increase in sanction. If the student accepts, the academic sanction will be assigned and the case will be closed and sent to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee. If the student chooses to contest, refer to section C. If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to maintain the original sanction, the case will be closed and sent on to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee for record keeping.

If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to maintain the originally assigned academic sanction but now add disciplinary sanction(s) the College will assign the academic sanction and send a recommended disciplinary sanction to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee along with the Academic Integrity Form and other relevant documentation. The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will meet with the student and review the recommendation, as well as precedent guidelines in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign.  If the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, he/she must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to modify the originally assigned academic sanction to a more serious academic sanction, as well as add a disciplinary sanction, a new form should be provided to the student and he/she should have the opportunity to accept or contest the charge given the increase in sanction.  If the student accepts, the academic sanction will be assigned and a recommended disciplinary sanction will be sent to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee along with the Academic Integrity Form and other relevant documentation.   The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will review the recommendation, as well as precedent guidelines in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign.  If the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, they must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

4. Upon final disposition of the case, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will communicate the outcome to the campus or college Academic Integrity Chair and/or appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative.

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form indicating that the charge or sanction(s) is being contested and then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. The campus or college Academic Integrity Committee will conduct a review in accordance with their respective procedures.

3. If the student is found responsible for the alleged misconduct by the Academic Integrity committee, the committee will then be informed if the student has prior Academic Integrity violations. This information will be obtained from Judicial Affairs by the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative but not made available to the Academic Integrity Committee until the determination of responsibility occurs. With this information, the AI Committee will determine the sanction to be assigned. If the sanction is only an academic sanction, the Academic Integrity Committee will assign the final charge and sanction and close the case. The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will be notified of the outcome for record-keeping. If the Academic Integrity committee determines that disciplinary sanctions should be considered, the student is notified by the College that he/she has been found responsible for the charge, and that the academic sanction will be put into place. In addition, the student's case will be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee for consideration of a disciplinary sanction. The Academic Integrity committee will also send their recommendation for a disciplinary sanction.

4. When communicating with a student who has been found responsible by an Academic Integrity Committee and has been recommended for disciplinary sanctions, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will review precedent guidelines, as well as the Academic Integrity Committee's recommendation, in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign. If the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, they must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

5. If the student is found not responsible for the alleged misconduct by the Academic Integrity committee, the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for notifying the Office of the University Registrar that academic misconduct has not occurred in the course. The student may drop or withdraw from the course at any time.

D. Sanctions:

1. Faculty may assign a wide range of sanctions to a student found responsible for violating academic integrity. Most faculty may choose to utilize academic sanctions (the modification of grades due to misconduct), but when referring cases to Judicial Affairs, faculty have the option to also recommend a full range of disciplinary sanctions available to Judicial Affairs such as: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Suspension, Indefinite Expulsion or Expulsion; or the "XF" transcript notation (see: Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations and Explanations for Disciplinary Sanctions).


2. "XF" sanctions are assigned only after consultation with the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Assigning an "XF" notation to a student’s transcript should be a rare occurrence and is reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity, which may include repeat misconduct.

3. With any recommendation to Judicial Affairs for an XF grade, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee must include those conditions (if any) under which it would approve the removal of the "XF" sanction from the transcript. Judicial Affairs will consider this recommendation when deciding upon the length of time that the "XF" notation will remain on the student's transcript. When the conditions (if any) are met for removal of the "XF", an academic "F" will remain on the transcript. Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.

4. Through the Judicial Affairs process the student will be able to request a sanction review for the disciplinary sanction assigned, but not for the academic sanction assigned. Once the student is found responsible in the process, the academic sanction recommended by the faculty and/or the Academic Integrity Committee will be put into place. The only exception occurs when the academic sanction assigned by the faculty member or the Academic Integrity Committee is a dismissal from the academic program. On those occasions, students may request a sanction review from the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative.  A student assigned any level of disciplinary sanction will have the right to request a sanction review from the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee.

E. Schreyer Honors College Students:

1. For honors courses, as with all other courses, the campus or academic college delivering the course maintains responsibility for reviewing and issuing academic sanctions and/or referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a college finds that a Schreyer Honors College student has committed an academic misconduct, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.

F. Students Enrolled in Intercollege Majors or Minors:

For intercollege programs, the Dean of the College (UP), the Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee responsible for approving the course instructor for the course in which the alleged violation occurred will determine and manage the appropriate Academic Integrity procedures. These responsibilities will include communicating with the Office of Judicial Affairs or Judicial Affairs designee and the sanction review process, when applicable.

G. Students Enrolled in Other Credit-bearing Activities or Programs:

Students enrolled in other Penn State credit-bearing academic activities or programs (e.g. World Campus, Continuing Education, Cooperative Education, internships, study abroad programs, etc.) are subject to the University Academic Integrity Policy as implemented by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP), Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee who has academic responsibility for the program, course or activity.

H. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate Dean of the College (UP), Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee is responsible for forming Academic Integrity Committees and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They are also responsible for seeing that all cases are reported to Judicial Affairs. The specific information reported to Judicial Affairs should include: a) a copy of the signed Academic Integrity Form, and b) other supporting documents that were established or reviewed while managing the case.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for the central record keeping and disclosing of student disciplinary records at the University, including academic dishonesty cases. Judicial Affairs will disclose student disciplinary records of academic dishonesty to third parties when those records include University-level disciplinary sanctions assigned by the Office of Judicial Affairs or Judicial Affairs designee. The Office of Judicial Affairs will disclose student discipline record information to third parties in accordance with federal law (FERPA) and the University policy on managing Student Discipline Records (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/studentdisciplinaryrecords.shtml).

Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)
Revised: ACUE (9-1-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)
Revised: ACUE (5-1-08)

Senate Policy:  49-20, Academic Integrity


A-11: ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS

Introduction:

University Faculty Senate legislation (3-31-98) identifies policies to guide the development, implementation, and maintenance of articulation agreements with other institutions. Articulation agreements bypass normal admission procedures and are generally understood to involve agreements between Penn State and another institution to admit students to Penn State, to agree to transfer courses in a block, or otherwise to encourage movement from the other institution to Penn State.

Articulation agreements between Penn State and other colleges and universities are to be consistent throughout the University and equitable to all constituents, both within and outside the University. An articulation agreement should not have a negative impact on any Penn State program or campus in terms of enrollment or academic quality but should be made from the perspective that it will enhance the University. Students admitted to one of the University's academic programs through an articulation agreement must be held to equivalent entrance and admission requirements as are in effect for Penn State matriculated students.

Articulation agreements should be viewed as a component of Penn State's academic advising system. The agreement is to provide a procedure for students who begin their college studies at some non-Penn State location and then complete them by earning a Penn State degree. The procedure is to include an outline of the most appropriate courses to schedule in pursuing a plan to matriculate at Penn State and complete a Penn State degree program.

Senate Policy on Articulation Agreements (see Senate Agenda, 3-31-98):

1.   The executive vice president and provost is the University officer responsible for administratively authorizing, extending, or terminating articulation agreements with other academic institutions relating to the admission, curricular offerings, enrollments, or awarding of degrees for academic programs and students at all college and campus locations.

2.   Academic deans may propose to enter into, extend, or terminate articulation agreements with external institutions and agencies or with graduate and professional units within the University.

3.   Proposals are to be developed after consultations with appropriate academic and administrative officers within the University, including other deans.

4.   When an agreement is proposed with an institution that is located within the geographic service area of a Penn State campus, the dean/campus executive officer of that campus must be consulted before an agreement is finalized. An articulation agreement should not have a negative impact on any Penn State program or campus in terms of enrollment.

5.   Whenever appropriate, articulation agreements shall include the provision for multiple campuses and colleges of the University to participate in the agreement.

6.   All academic and administrative policies of the University will be honored in the proposed articulation agreement. This includes, but is not limited to, Policy 42-82, Credit by Transfer from Other Institutions:  Accredited U.S. Institutions, which stipulates that course work completed at an accredited college or university may be evaluated for transfer credit if passed with a grade equivalent to A, B, or C at Penn State and useful to the candidate's program of study at Penn State. As such, if an articulation agreement is using a block grant approach, only courses with a C or better will become a part of the student's Penn State academic record. An articulation agreement should not have a negative impact on any Penn State program or campus in terms of academic quality.

7.   When a student is admitted to the University through an articulation agreement, the entrance and admission requirements for enrollment in a college and entrance to a major will be no less than those in effect at the time for Penn State matriculated students.

8.   The Undergraduate Admissions Office will evaluate the application and scholastic credentials for students seeking entry to the University through an articulation agreement.

9.   Articulation agreements involving undergraduate students shall be subject to a review by the Senate Committee on Admissions, Records, Scheduling, and Student Aid (ARSSA) before being authorized by the provost. Articulation agreements involving graduate students shall be subject to a review by the Graduate Council before being authorized by the provost.

10.                 Once established, articulation agreements should be reviewed periodically for viability by the sponsoring unit, approximately every five years.

11.                 A register of authorized articulation agreements will be maintained by the vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education.

12.                 Articulation agreements authorized prior to the approval and implementation of these recommendations shall be reviewed and, if necessary, modified to ensure that they are in accord with this policy.

Administrative Procedures for Articulation Agreements:

1.   All requests for establishing, renewing, or terminating articulation agreements are forwarded to the vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education. The dean sponsoring the articulation agreement includes the proposal and supporting documentation, as well as recommendations resulting from consultations with other units of Penn State.

2.   Proposals are reviewed in terms of:

a.   Rationale for the proposed articulation agreement;

b.   Description of how the agreement may be renewed or terminated;

c.    Estimate of the number of students transferring to Penn State annually;

d.   Admission requirements and transfer of academic credits;

e.   Advising and special services at both the non-Penn State location and at Penn State, if appropriate;

f.     Impact of the agreement, if any, on other programs, colleges, and campuses of the University, including evidence of consultation within Penn State.

3.   The vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education forwards the proposal to ARSSA or the Graduate Council for a review and recommendation.

4.   The vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education forwards a recommendation to the provost for final authorization.

5.   The vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education will maintain an up-to-date Web site of all approved articulation agreements.

Approved: ACUE (3-4-99)


R-6: CLASSROOM ACADEMIC FREEDOM CONFERENCE AND MEDIATION

Senate Policy:  20-00, Resolution of Classroom Problems

Faculty membership carries with it the freedom to bring the breadth and depth of scholarship to the classroom in furtherance of teaching students to (as stated in University Policy HR 64, Academic Freedom, which is the basis of Senate Policy 20-00) "think for themselves" through exposure to appropriate materials and pedagogies. Courses may properly include controversial matters so long as faculty members are of "fair and judicial mind" and "set forth justly, without suppression or innuendo, the divergent opinions of other investigators." Faculty membership also carries the obligation to refrain in the classroom from substituting indoctrination for scholarship. Academic freedom in the classroom applies to scholarship, but does not create a right to give voice to topics or opinions outside of appropriate academic subject matter or curricular objectives or that are irrelevant to a course or beyond the instructor's scholarly charge.

A student who believes that the instructor in a course in which she or he is currently enrolled has acted beyond the limits of academic freedom may seek a faculty conference and mediation in accordance with the following steps:

1. The student should make an appointment to discuss in person, by phone, or relying on another mutually agreeable medium, her or his concerns with the instructor. The student and instructor will try to eliminate misunderstandings in a manner in which each recognizes the value of the other's point of view and in which the goal is to understand the rationale and intended value--and the appropriateness or inappropriateness--of the classroom or teaching and learning event(s) giving rise to the student's concern.  

2. On the rare occasion in which a student is uncomfortable approaching a faculty member directly, or in which a student and instructor fail to resolve the student's concern through informal means, the student may request that the head of the academic program offering the course act as a mediator. The mediator should try to meet personally with the student, face to face, by phone, or in an otherwise mutually agreeable manner, to discuss the issue. At campuses without department, division, or school heads, the director of academic affairs or assistant or associate dean may fill this role. The mediator may bring the student and faculty member together, or may act as an intermediary without instigating an additional student/faculty conference.  

3. A student may initiate a final request to intercede to the campus chancellor or college dean to whom the instructor reports by filing a Classroom Freedom of Expression Mediation Form, which requires the student to provide specific details of the original classroom event(s) giving rise to his or her concern, and explaining why she or he believes the situation remains unresolved. The request may be made only after compliance with steps 1 and 2. The chancellor's office or dean's office will review the student's Classroom Academic Freedom concern. A determination will be made that is final as to whether further mediation between the student and instructor is appropriate. Whether or not the chancellor or dean believe continued mediation is appropriate, the chancellor or dean, or their representative, will meet with the student in person, by phone, or relying on another mutually agreeable medium, to discuss the final disposition of the concern.

Faculty and campus or college administrators should attempt to address student concerns whenever possible with face to face personal meetings, rather than through written communiqués, and to do so in an expedited manner that allows for fairness and prompt resolution, but without endangering the equity and due process necessary to all parties. In no instance may a faculty member take a student's request for a classroom academic freedom conference or mediation into consideration for purposes of grading.  

Approved: ACUE (7-6-06)

Senate Policy:  20-00, Resolution of Classroom Problems


M-9: ACADEMIC PROGRAM CERTIFICATES

Procedure:

1. Application for approval to award certificates for baccalaureate degree programs is made through the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs by the academic program area, using the Committee's Request for issuing an Academic Program Certificate form (FORM M-3). If the authorization to award certificates is to be noted within the program description contained in the University Catalog, the regular BLUE SHEET procedures and forms of the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs should be utilized to accomplish the program description change.

2. Applications to award program certificates that re academically approved by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs will be forwarded to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and International Programs who will act on behalf of the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University regarding administrative approval. The dean will inform the Vice President and Vice Provost of the disposition.

3. Notification of both academic and administrative approval to award certificates will be transmitted by the Vice President and Vice Provost to the academic program area. Notification will also be provided to the University Board of Trustees in cases where information is normally being transmitted regarding additions or changes in academic programs.

4. The certificate to be awarded for the successful completion of a baccalaureate degree program is to be of a standard format and will be provided by the Office of the University Registrar.

5. The awarding of certificates for the successful completion of baccalaureate degree program should be accomplished by the program area at the time of the student's graduation. Verification of the successful completion of the program requirements for a student should be undertake n at the same times the verification of completion of requirements for the awarding of the baccalaureate degree. Each semester, the college or school dean will provide the University Registrar with a listing of students certified as meeting the requirements for each baccalaureate option or minor program which has-been authorized tow award certificates. Per Academic Administrative ProcedureL-6, the listing should be provided by the end of the twelfth week of the semester. Names provided after this date might not have certificates provided until the next semester.

The University Registrar, in turn, supplies the college or school with an authorized baccalaureate option or minor certificate for each student certified by the dean. The authorized certificate will identify the name of the college or school, the name of the option or minor program, the name of the individual student and the effective award date.

The appropriate signatures on the authorized certificates will be provided by the college or school dean, department head and/or program director. The dean makes arrangements for the awarding of certificates to individual students.

The student's academic record will contain notice of successful completion of requirements for baccalaureate degree programs as required by the Senate. (Ref: Senate Record 7-71-75)

NOTE: Does not apply to Certification of Teachers by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Approved: ACUI (10-19-76)

Revised: ACAS (4-14-89)


F-1: GENERAL EXAMINATIONS

Senate Policy:  44-10, General Examination Policy

Procedure:

A written notice of the examination procedures to be used in each section of each course is to be placed with the head of the department or division offering the course at University Park, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, or Penn State Harrisburg or with the director of academic affairs for courses offered at Commonwealth Campuses. These notices will be maintained in a public file for reference by both students and faculty upon request.

Senate Policy:  44-10, General Examination Policy

Approved: ACAS (2-1-91)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)


M-10: BASIC SKILLS PROGRAMS

Policy: Writing

All students entering baccalaureate and associate degree programs will be tested in basic writing skills. those failing to demonstrate adequate preparation for college-level writing will be required to enroll in English 4 prior to scheduling English 15.

Mathematics

All students entering baccalaureate or associate degree programs who are not exempted on the basis of pre-admission experiences will be tested on their basic algebra skills. Results of this test will be communicated to the student and the student's adviser. Students manifesting difficulties with basic algebra skills should be advised that a review of those skills would be appropriate.

Students enrolled in curricula which require college algebra or calculus should be tested to insure that they are adequately prepared in algebra and/or trigonometry. Those who are not adequately prepared should be required to enroll in courses or sections designed to remedy the deficiencies. They should also be counseled by mathematically competent persons concerning the very high failure rate of students whose deficiencies are severe enough to require more than two such courses. Members of the Mathematics Department are encouraged to experiment with, and report on, efforts to improve the remediation/counseling process.

All colleges are urged to include at least on Carnegie Unit in mathematics in their entrance requirements.

Reading

The Division of Undergraduate Studies will revise the Student Profile of Academic Abilities to show a student reading skills assessment. In consultation with appropriately recognized reading faculty of the University, the Division of Undergraduate Studies shall identify an appropriate instrument which measures student reading skills.

When an appropriate instrument has been identified, all students entering baccalaureate and associate degree programs will be tested for reading skills. Results of such tests will be communicated to the student and to the student's adviser.Students manifesting reading difficulties should be encouraged to improve their reading through programs supervised by the recognized reading faculty of the University.

Faculty Monitoring

The Senate Committee on Undergraduate Instruction has responsibility for monitoring the Basic Skills Program.

Use of Basic Skills Credits

Credits earned in English 4 and Math 0 shall be included in the cumulative grade point average. For a baccalaureate degree, these credits shall be included in the total credits earned toward graduation, but shall not substitute for the minimum program requirements designated under the categories of "Baccalaureate Degree Requirements." "Requirements for the Major, " and "Electives." For an associate degree, these credits shall be included in the total credits earned toward graduation, but shall not substitute for the minimum program requirements unless approved by the program faculty. (Ref: Senate Records, 3-1-77, 10-4-77, 5-6-80 and 12-15-81)

Approved: Senate (3-1-77)

Revised: Senate (10-4-77)

Revised: Senate (5-6-80)

Endorsed: ACUI (5-22-80)

Revised: Senate (12-15-81)


D-1: ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE AND LOWER DIVISION CAMPUS

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study

College Common Year Designation and Initial Campus Assignment

1. First-semester baccalaureate and associate degree candidates admitted to the University will be assigned to a campus only if that campus can provide at least two semesters of normal academic progress toward the baccalaureate or associate degree program selected by the student.

2. Regardless of campus, first-semester baccalaureate degree candidates are normally admitted into a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS), assigned a college common year designation code, and enroll in course work consistent with normal academic progress for the academic majors in that college.

3. A student is expected to remain at his/her campus of admission until he/she achieves fifth semester standing. At this point, a baccalaureate degree candidate may have to change to a University campus that is authorized to deliver his/her major.

4. The dean for each college is responsible for establishing advising procedures to accomplish each of the following objectives:

a. Inform each baccalaureate degree candidate in the college of the policies and procedures governing relocation to another campus.

b. Identify the course requirements to maintain normal academic progress for the student’s major preference.

c. Identify the probable semester of relocation for a student based on major preference.

d. Assure that relocation does occur consistent with the current course requirements of a student’s major preference, the student’s actual course experience, and the planned course offerings of the campus over the next several semesters.

5. Students may enroll at any campus during the summer session. However, this will not change their regularly assigned campus for the fall semester.

Early Change of Campus Request Procedure

1. A student is expected to remain at his/her campus of admission until he/she achieves fifth semester standing. A student may request an early change of campus in order to maintain normal academic progress when he/she is unable to obtain a full schedule of relevant (i.e., to his/her major) courses at his/her current campus. Students requesting an early change of campus because of academic reasons are expected to remain in their current major and schedule courses consistent with that major at the new campus.

2. Student requests for an early change of campus because of personal reasons may be considered. However, the student must document that there are clear and compelling reasons why an early campus change should be considered.

3. Both the sending campus and the receiving campus have the authority to deny the student request.

4. A currently enrolled student initiates an early change of campus request through the change of campus contact at the student’s current campus.

5. The student’s current campus will:

a. Determine if the student can obtain a course schedule that will permit the student to maintain normal academic progress at the present campus. This will be determined by the Associate Dean/DAA or designate at the campus.

b. If normal academic progress toward the student’s major preference can be maintained at the present campus, the Associate Dean/DAA or designate notifies the student that the request is denied.

c. If normal academic progress cannot be maintained at the student’s current campus, the change of campus contact forwards the request to the receiving campus for consideration (see 5.e below).

d. If the student’s request is based on non-academic reasons, the Associate Dean/DAA at the campus will make an informed decision based on available facts. If the request is not supported, the Associate Dean/DAA notifies the student that the request is denied. If the request is supported, the change of campus contact forwards the request to the receiving campus for consideration (see 5.e below).

e. To initiate an early change of campus request (for either academic or non-academic reasons), the sending change of campus contact enters the appropriate student information and reason for the request on ISIS screen ARUSBC. This action provides email notification to the receiving change of campus contact.

6. If the receiving campus is a non-UP location, the receiving campus will:

a. Review the request to determine if the student can obtain a course schedule that will permit the student to maintain normal academic progress at the receiving campus and determine if space is available. This review should be accomplished by the Associate Dean/DAA or designate.

b. The change of campus contact at the receiving campus will enter an approval/denial decision on screen ARUSBC. This action provides an email message to the sending change of campus contact and to the student.

c. If approved, the campus Registrar at the receiving campus is responsible for providing the student with appropriate registration instructions.

7. If the receiving campus is University Park:

a. The college change of campus contact will review the request.

b. The college will enter an approval/denial decision on screen ARUSBC. This action provides an email message to the sending change of campus contact and to the student.

Cancellation of an Approved Campus Change

The student may elect to cancel an approved change of campus. Upon notification by the student, the receiving change of campus contact cancels the approved change using screen ARUSBC. The Registrar’s office confirms this cancellation by notifying the student.

If a student's schedule of courses is not consistent with the reason that an early change of campus was approved, the change of campus approval may be rescinded and the student may be required to return to his/her original campus for the semester immediately following.

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)
Approved: ACUE (10-6-05)
Approved: ACUE (6-7-07)
Revised: ACUE (1-7-10)

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study


N-5: ENROLLMENT STATUS

The following statements define the Penn State enrollment reporting status for students. These statements are in accordance with other Penn State policies and with applicable federal requirements.

A. Definitions – these data fields are automatically calculated during the registration processes as students register, drop, add, late drop, or withdraw.

a. Enrolled credits - The total of the number of course credits on the student’s semester enrollment. It includes all courses offered by resident instruction and continuing education. Courses taken as “audit” are excluded. Credits earned through credit-by-exam or credit-by-portfolio are excluded. World Campus on-line courses are included.
b. World Campus on-line courses – These are credit, cohort-based courses offered through the World Campus using distance learning technologies.
c. Independent learning courses – These are credit courses offered through the World Campus using paper-based exchange of lessons and student assignments/examinations. These courses may have some impact on the determination of enrollment status. See the calculations that follow in a later section for the detail.

B. Undergraduate Students

a. All calculations apply to fall, spring, and summer.
b. Full-time – 12 or more credits
c. Half-time – 6 to 11.5 credits
d. Less-than-half-time – less than 6 credits
e. These calculations are based on enrolled credits.
f. If the student is enrolled for independent learning courses, these credits are used to increase the enrollment status by a maximum of one level. For example, if enrolled credits are less than 6, add independent learning credits. If the new total is greater than 6 report as half time. Selected undergraduate courses are defined as full-time enrollment due to co-operative education or internship experiences. Students enrolled in one of these courses are reported as full-time enrollment.
g. Students approved for concurrent enrollment in the undergraduate/graduate integrated program are reported as undergraduate students.

C. Graduate Students

a. All calculations apply to fall, spring, and summer.
b. Full-time – 9 or more credits
c. Half-time – 5 to 8.5 credits
d. Less-than-half time – less than 5 credits
e. These calculations are based on enrolled credits.
f. If the student is enrolled for independent learning courses, these credits are used to increase the enrollment status by a maximum of one level. For example, if enrolled credits are less than 5, add independent learning credits. If the new total is greater than 5 report as half time.
g. Students enrolled as both a graduate student and a law student are verified according to their primary student status (either graduate or law).
h. For graduate students on an assistantship:

• Add 3 credits to enrolled credits if a 3/4 time assistantship.

D. Law Students

a. All calculations apply to fall, spring, and summer
b. Full-time – 12 or more credits
c. Half-time – 6 to 11.5 credits
d. Less-than-half-time – less than 6 credits
e. These calculations are based on enrolled credits.
f. Students enrolled as both a law student and graduate student are verified according to their primary student status (either law or graduate).

E. Medical Students

a. Always reported as full-time.

F. Undergraduate Internship and Co-operative Enrollments

a. Federal regulations permit the reporting of full-time status for undergraduate students providing that the work portion of a co-operative education program in which the amount of work performed is equivalent to the academic workload of a full-time student.
b. The Office of the University Registrar maintains a record of approved courses that are to be reported as full-time, even though the number of credits is less than the 12-credit minimum.
c. Academic units must complete the Full-time Equivalent Form for those internship and co-operative courses that will result in reporting students as enrolled full-time.

Approved: ACUE (9-4-03)
Revised: Editorial (5-8-07)


P-1: NEW UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES/MAJORS, OPTIONS AND MINORS, AND CHANGES IN UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS/MAJORS, OPTIONS AND MINORS

P-1 proposals are the basis of Administrative and University Faculty Senate curricular approval and are used to add or amend undergraduate academic programs, including majors, options within majors, and minors.

Academic approval by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs is required when colleges wish to add new majors, options, or minors, amend program requirements, drop programs, or change the name of a major, option, or minor. See Guidelines to Curricular Procedures, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs (http://www.senate.psu.edu/curriculum_resources/guide/contents.html).

Administrative approval is required when colleges propose new majors, options, and minors or propose to change the name of existing programs.

Administrative approval is not required to implement the amendment of majors, options, or minors approved by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs. Implementation of P-1 proposals may occur the first semester following approval. Students must receive timely notification and will be subject to the requirements in effect at the time of most recent entrance into the program. Students may consult with the head of a program or program committee or their representative to resolve difficulties caused by the curricular change.

P-1 Timeline

• Preliminary college and disciplinary consultation and consultation between appropriate campus chancellor(s) and the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses

• Submission of Prospectus to ACUE by College Associate Dean

• ACUE Prospectus deliberation and written response to submitting college

• College/Campus (or colleges and campuses) development of formal proposal, including appropriate consultation, data collection, and research

• Submission of P-1 proposal by College Dean to University Faculty Senate

• Senate Curricular Affairs Committee review

• Senate 30 day Blue Sheets hold for university-wide comment

• Senate P-1 transmittal to Office of Undergraduate Education for review and approval

• Provost review of Office of Undergraduate Education action

• Office of Undergraduate Education memo to implement distributed to appropriate offices

• Office of Undergraduate Education memo to Board of Trustees informing of program implementation

• Implementation the following semester or later

Approved: Provost Brighton (6-23-98)
Revised: ACUE (5-3-01)
Revised Editorial: (4-18-06)
Approved: ACUE (2-7-08)


P-3: MOVING/DISCONTINUING DEGREE PROGRAMS AMONG COLLEGES AND CAMPUSES

P-3 proposals are the basis of the administrative review and approval process that enable a second college or multiple colleges to deliver programs already authorized in another college; that enable a college to deliver an existing program at an additional campus within its purview or through the World Campus; that authorize the closure of a program in a college or campus so long as that program will continue to be offered elsewhere at the University; and that, under extraordinary circumstances, may authorize the delivery of extended degrees. Note that a P-6 proposal is required to terminate a program when doing so will completely remove it from the University's offerings. As with P-1 and P-6 proposals, P-3 proposals must be preceded by submission of an ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus. Following the completion of the prospectus process, a P-3 proposal may be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Education. It must address all relevant strategic and academic issues, including those outlined in Academic Administrative Policy P, Section V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

P-3 Proposals

One or more colleges may be authorized to offer degree programs. This authorization has sometimes been referred to as academic program sponsorship or program sponsorship transfer. The Provost is responsible for administratively authorizing the moving, sharing, and discontinuance of academic sponsorship of existing degree programs for all colleges and campuses. The University Faculty Senate does not take part in this authorization.

Three types of sharing and transferring of sponsorship may occur:

(1) Joint sponsorship in which, in addition to the original sponsoring college, one or more additional colleges also are awarded authority to offer the existing program. Graduates in these programs belong to and are certified for graduation by the college in which they are enrolled.

(2) Handoff sponsorship in which the authority to offer an academic program is transferred from one college to another. Here, an original sponsoring college withdraws its academic authority for a program and another college or group of colleges is awarded authority in its place.

(3) Extended programs are discussed below.

In every case in which a program is transferred or shared, every effort must be made to insure curricular integrity by minimizing the number of core course substitutions at the newly offering campus or college. Disciplinary communities are nonetheless encouraged to consider the development of program options beyond the core that reflect local expertise, student demand, and market need.

Deans retain the authority to move a degree program within a college without initiating the P-3 process. When such actions are taken, the college must notify the Office of Undergraduate Education, which will then inform other offices as appropriate.

Extended Programs

There is a third type of shared program referred to as an "extended degree." Based upon extraordinary circumstances, such as specialized licensing and/or accreditation requirements, a single college may offer its programs by extending their availability to additional campuses. In this arrangement, only the "extending" college has the authority to award the program degree, although the degree may be delivered at multiple campuses. A college must submit a P-3 proposal to the Office of Undergraduate Education that includes endorsement from both the extending college and the unit(s) at which the extended degree will be offered.

P-3 Probationary Period

Four years after a program has been authorized for delivery by an additional campus/college or through World Campus through a P-3 process, a program review will be conducted. The additional location offering the program will provide evidence to the Office of Undergraduate Education that the following criteria are being achieved:

1. Adequate faculty and staff resources exist

2. The program aligns with university and unit missions

3. Market need and demand exists to maintain sufficient student enrollments

4. Students are able to maintain timely academic progress

5. Adequate equipment, library and information technology resources, clinical and cooperative arrangements, or other special facilities exist

6. Adequate financial resources have been established to assure program continuation

7. Assessment data indicate that students are achieving the program's learning objectives

The provost may, through the Office of Undergraduate Education, end the P-3 probationary period by granting joint or handoff program sponsorship status to the unit(s); or the provost may, based upon an unsatisfactory evaluation of the reviewed criteria, require the P-3 offering to be phased out; or conditions may be established, including a limited time period to complete them, that must be met to avoid P-3 program phase out.

The four year review of extended programs will trigger an additional set of questions and possible administrative responses. Assuming a positive evaluation of criteria 1-7 above, a determination will be made as to whether extended status should be continued or replaced by joint or handoff program sponsorship status. The decision will be made based upon whether externalities such as licensing, accreditation rules, or other unique circumstances reasonably justify a continuation of the extended degree status. The review will be conducted by the Office of Undergraduate Education in consultation with the affected units. If the extended status is maintained, the next consideration of extended status will take place five years hence.

P-3 Timeline

•  Preliminary college and disciplinary consultation and consultation between appropriate campus chancellor(s) and Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses

•  Submission of prospectus to ACUE by College Associate Dean

•  ACUE Prospectus deliberation and written response to submitting college

•  College development of formal proposal, including appropriate consultation, data collection, and research

•  Submission of P-3 proposal by College Dean to Office of Undergraduate Education

•  Office of Undergraduate Education review

•  Provost review of Office of Undergraduate Education action

•  Office of Undergraduate Education memo to implement distributed to appropriate offices

•  Implementation the following semester or later

•  Year Four P-3 probationary review

Approved: ACUI (10-25-79)
Approved: Provost Eddy (12-5-79)
Approved: Provost Brighton (8-25-97)
Approved: Provost Erickson (9-20-00)
Revised: Editorial (4-18-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)
Revised: ACUE (4-2-09)


P-2: FIVE YEAR AUTOMATIC DROPS

Policy:

Any course which has not been given for a period of five years is automatically dropped from the University's approved course offerings. (Ref: Senate Record, 5-1-58)

 

Approved: Senate (5-1-58)

Procedure:

Annually the Director of Registration and Scheduling submits a list of courses, which have not been given for a period of five years, to the appropriate academic department heads and college deans for review. Following their review five year automatic drop actions are reported tot he Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs for publication in the BLUE SHEETS.

A list is also compiled of those courses which have not been given for a period of four years, and which, if not given within the following academic year, will be subject to automatic drop action as of June 30 of the following year.

 

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)


L-2: DEGREE CHECKING

Senate Policy:  32-50, Audit of Unfulfilled Requirements

Degree Audits for Degree Checking

Each semester a degree audit for each student indicating an intent to graduate (i.e., those who have informed the Registrar of an intent to graduate through the eLion Graduating this Semester application), is produced by the Registrar's office and available to college deans through eDDS (eDocument Distribution System).

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (12-6-07)

Grade Point Average Requirements

The Registrar's office will certify that the candidate has met the 2.0 cumulative grade point average requirements prior to graduation. The Registrar's office will also certify the grade point average requirements for graduation with distinction. (Ref: Senate Policies 82-40 and 88-30) 

Approved: ACUI (5-22-80)

Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (12-6-07)

Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Graduation Requirement Review

1. Students who expect to graduate at the end of the semester inform the Registrar of their intent to graduate through the eLion Graduating this Semester application for that semester.

2. Tentative graduation approval indicators are automatically entered on the student's record by the eLion Graduating this Semester application and displayed on ISIS screens ARUGU and ARUGA.

3. Beginning with the fourth week of the semester, the Registrar's office provides each college ACUE dean with a bi-weekly report of students who have potential problems in meeting the University graduation requirements for that semester. Beginning with the twelfth week, the report is forwarded to the ACUE dean on a weekly basis.

4. When a student is attending a campus other than the campus of their major, the college representative for the degree program is responsible for working with the campus representative where the student is enrolled to certify that all graduation requirements have been met.

5. If it is determined that a student is to be removed from the graduation list after review of the problems list, the removal will be made on screen ARUGU by the ACUE dean. The ACUE dean also notifies the student. The Registrar's office, in conjunction with the college Dean's offices, is responsible for insuring that specific degree requirements are met.

6. Colleges must remove ineligible students from the graduation list by 4 p.m. five days prior to commencement if one or more of the following requirements are not met. In addition to recording the removal on ARUGU, the ACUE dean must electronically mail the removal information to the Registrar, and notify the student.

a. Limitations on Time for Credit Acquisition, Senate Policies 83-80.2 and 83-80.3.

b. Short total credits completed, including credits scheduled and review of courses with 'R' grades for applicability to the degree.

c. Removal of a grade (NG) or a deferred grade (DF) for previous semester.

7. Colleges must remove ineligible students from the graduation list by 4 p.m., two days prior to commencement if one or more of the following requirements are not met. In addition to recording the removal on ARUGU, the ACUE dean must electronically mail the removal information to the Registrar, and notify the student.

a. Requirements satisfied by current semester grades. Assume "C" if grade is not available by the deadline.

b. Revised current semester course grades, removal of deferred grades (DF) not received.

c. Advanced standing from another school not received.

d. Credit by examination not received.

NOTE: Proportionate times are used for summer session degree checking procedures.

Approved: ACUI (1-20-83)

Revised: ACAS (6-12-87)

Revised: ACAS (10-14-88)

Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (12-6-07)


N-2: HOLDS ON STUDENT REGISTRATION AND RECORDS

Procedure:

For procedures to process financial, health and conduct holds on student registration and records refer to the Procedure for Processing Holds on Student Records and Other Record Actions prepared by Systems and Procedures.

 

Approved: Systems and Procedures (11-20-73)

Guidelines:

In addition to the financial, health and conduct holds on student registration and records, a student may be prevented from completing registration by an administrative officer or a college dean in accordance with the following guidelines:

1. A hold may be used to ensure compliance with Senate Policies such as 39-50 (Enrollment Time Limit), 39-80 (Completion of Enrollment), 58-50 (Readmission as a Degree Candidate) and 83-60 (Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Time Limit).

2. A hold may be used as a means to ensure direct communication with a student regarding the need to fulfill certain administrative or college requirements.

NOTE: In those cases where academic performance does not meet Senate approved college or program standards, a drop action should be taken rather than a hold action in accordance with Senate Policy 54-56. An approved college drop action under Senate Policy 54-46 will automatically prevent a student from registration as a degree candidate until such time as that student is reinstated to degree candidacy.

Procedure:

1. Alternative methods to communicate the problem to the student should be used prior to initiating a hold.

2. If a hold is to be issued, the Student Records Action Form (FORM N-1) will be completed in accordance with approved procedures.

3. A hold should be considered as temporary and removed as soon as the conditions for placing the hold are met.

Approved: ACUI (10-20-77)

 


P-2: FIVE YEAR AUTOMATIC DROPS

University Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs policy maintains a policy in which any undergraduate course that has not been offered for five years will be automatically dropped unless an academic unit requests an exemption and the exemption is granted by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs.

Procedure:

1.   The Faculty Senate Office will provide an annual fall report to ACUE deans with a list of courses that have not been delivered during the preceding five years and that have been placed in automatic-drop status.

2.   ACUE deans will consult with appropriate members of their academic units to determine whether an exception to the five year drop policy should be requested. Such requests must be submitted by the associate dean [form under construction] to the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs within 45 days.

3.   The Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs will review exception requests and make a determination within 60 days.

4.   The Faculty Senate Office will publish a list of all dropped courses at the end of each academic year in the Senate Curriculum Report.

*Note: There is, as of September 2010, a backlog of 683 undergraduate courses that have not been delivered for five years or more. There is an expectation that the Faculty Senate Office and the Office of Undergraduate Education will work together during the 2010-2011 academic year to facilitate entry of these courses into the CSCS system once college requests for automatic drop exceptions have been lodged and acted on.

 

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (9-2-10)


L-2: DEGREE CHECKING

Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Graduation Requirement Review

1. Students who expect to graduate at the end of the semester should inform the Registrar of their intent to graduate through the eLion 'Graduating this Semester' application for that semester.

2. Tentative graduation approval indicators will automatically be entered on the student's record by the eLion 'Graduating this Semester' application and be displayed on ISIS screens ARUGU and ARUGA.

3. Each semester, a degree audit for each student who indicated the intent to graduate (i.e., those who have informed the Registrar of an intent to graduate through the eLion 'Graduating this Semester' application) is produced by the Registrar's office and will be available to college deans through eDDS (eDocument Distribution System).

4. Beginning with the fourth week* of the semester, the Registrar's office provides each college with a bi-weekly report of students who appear unable to meet the University graduation requirements for that semester. Beginning with the twelfth week*, reports that identify the students with potential graduation problems will be forwarded to colleges on a weekly basis. Additional reports, listing students with failing and incomplete grades for the graduation semester, will also be provided to the colleges.

5. It is the college's responsibility to address all the problems identified by the reports, either by resolving them, or by removing the student from the graduation list. To do so, the college must work in collaboration with the student's major department, regardless of the student's location or registration status. If, after review of the problems reports, it is determined that a student is to be removed from the graduation list, the removal will be made by the college using ISIS screen ARUGU, and the student's major department or college will notify the student.

6. The Registrar's Office is responsible for verifying the following graduation requirements:

Students with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average or with ongoing DF or NG grades are ineligible to graduate and must be removed from the graduation list. Petitions for exceptions must be submitted by the student, through the college dean, to the University Faculty Senate. Support from the college dean is necessary for the consideration of the petition. Exceptions approved by the Senate must be forwarded, in writing, to the college and to the Registrar's office no later than 3:00 PM on the final grade date shown on ISIS screen AMMU. Students with unresolved graduation problems by the deadline will be removed from the graduation list by the Registrar's office using ISIS screen ARUGI, and the student's college(s) will be notified. The college will then notify the student of the removal.

7. The college, in collaboration with the student's major department, is responsible for verifying the following graduation requirements:

Students who have not met the above requirements are ineligible to graduate and must be removed from the graduation list by the college, unless the college has approved and recorded exceptions. Beginning five days prior to the final grade date shown on ISIS screen AMMU, colleges must remove ineligible students from the graduation list using ISIS screen ARUGU, electronically notify the Registrar's Office of the removal, and notify the student of the removal. All students who are ineligible for graduation must be removed from the list using ARUGU and the Registrar's office must be notified of the removal by 3:00 PM on the final grade date shown on screen AMMU.

* Proportionate times are used for summer session degree checking procedures. 

Approved: ACUI (1-20-83)

Revised: ACAS (6-12-87)

Revised: ACAS (10-14-88)

Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)

Revised: ACUE (12-6-07)

Revised: ACUE (9-2-10)

Revised: Editorial (9-30-10)


C-3: UNDER-ENROLLED SECTIONS

1.   Under-enrolled sections are defined as:

--001 through 399-level course with an enrollment of fewer than fifteen students;
--400-level course with an enrollment of fewer than eight students;
--500-level or 800-level course with an enrollment of fewer than five students.

Under-enrolled criteria do not apply to the following courses:

--600-level courses (graduate thesis, supervised teaching, foreign experience);
--700-level courses (medical);
--900-level courses (law);
-- honors courses (i.e. courses numbered 001-499 with an "H", "M", "T", or "U" suffix);
--individualized instruction courses (i.e. courses numbered 001-499 with a "J" suffix);
--courses numbered X94 (research topic), X95 (internship), X96 (independent study), X99 (foreign studies);
--Continuing Education courses (courses with a delivery code of C);
--World Campus courses (courses with location code of WD);
--courses offered through the eLearning Cooperative;

2.   Under-enrolled sections should not be offered except under exceptional circumstances. Exceptional circumstances that permit the offering of an under-enrolled section include:

--the section is essential for normal degree progress for specifically identified students.
--learning space in essential classrooms or laboratories for a section is limited.

3.   To assist academic units in identifying under-enrolled sections, the campus Registrar will provide appropriate informational reports.

4.   Sections that are to be dropped because of under-enrollment should be dropped in a timely manner such that registered students have sufficient time to register for other appropriate courses. Academic units should carefully analyze the section offerings each semester and annually review the causes for under-enrolled section offerings. Patterns should be monitored and appropriate steps taken to minimize the number of under-enrolled sections.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-09)


PROPOSED B-1: STRUCTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY'S ADVISING PROGRAM

Senate Policy:  32-10, The University's Advising Program

Policy:

Senate Policy 32-10 establishes the University Advising Council and outlines its duties.

Procedure:

Procedures are under construction by the University Advising Council.


B-2: THE NATURE OF THE UNIVERSITY ADVISING PROGRAM

Senate Policy:  32-20, The Nature of the University Advising Program

Senate Policy 32-20 prescribes the nature of the University's advising program, with each academic unit to establish an academic advising system designed to meet the goals (Senate Policy 32-00) of: helping advisees identify and achieve their academic goals; promoting intellectual discovery; and encouraging students to take advantage of both in- and out-of-class educational opportunities and to become self-directed learners and decision-makers.

The unit's academic advising system is to address nine elements: policy, structure, support, training, delivery, first-year students, frequency of consultations, recognition and reward, and assessment.

Procedure:

1.   Each academic unit is to develop its own advising program, consistent with the University Faculty Senate's policy.

2.   Descriptions of the academic unit's advising program and instructions on how students and advisers are to use it are to be part of the unit's orientation for new faculty and students and should be readily available in Web- and paper-based publications.

Approved: ACUE (4-2-98)

Revised: Editorial (5-25-10)

 


B-3: RESPONSIBILITIES OF ADVISERS AND ADVISEES

Senate Policy:  32-30, Responsibilities of Advisers and Advisees

Policy:

Senate Policy 32-30 specifies Responsibilities of Advisers and Advisees.  The advisee's unit of enrollment is to provide each advisee with a primary academic adviser as well as with information needed to plan the chosen program of study and referrals to other specialized resources.  The college or department also will monitor the progress of its advisees towards satisfactory completion of all graduation requirements and inform students of their status each semester.

 Both advisers and advisees share responsibilities for the advising relationship to succeed.  Advisers are to encourage advisees to become engaged in their education, to meet their educational goals, and to develop the habit of learning.  Advisees will routinely contact their advisers each semester and will assume final responsibility for course scheduling, program planning, and the successful completion of graduation requirements.

Procedure:

1.   Providing all enrolled students with a primary academic adviser (see Senate Policy 32-40 and B-4) is to be accomplished in a systematic way that includes informing both the advisee and adviser of their assignments.  Information and referrals needed to plan the advisee's chosen program of study are to be made easily accessible by the academic unit, including both Web- and print-based publications.

2.    Monitoring of advisees' progress and informing them of their status are to be accomplished by procedures established by the enrollment college and department.  eLion and the Degree Audit system provide direct access for students and advisers to this information and should be incorporated into the college and department procedures.

3.    Advisers are to develop their own individual procedures to fulfill their responsibilities in implementing the academic unit's advising program.  The eLion "Advisers" section, Advising@psu, University Undergraduate Advising Handbook, and the Center for Excellence in Academic Advising are available to support the adviser.

4.    Advisees are to consult with their adviser at least once a semester.  They are to develop their own individual procedures to fulfill their responsibilities within the academic unit's advising system.  eLion includes several applications to support the student in her or his relationship with the adviser as well as in the student's own academic planning and assessment activities.

Senate Policy:  32-30, Responsibilities of Advisers and Advisees

Approved: ACUE (4-2-98)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)
Revised: Editorial (5-25-10)


B-4: ASSIGNMENT OF ADVISERS

Senate Policy:  32-40, Assignment of Adviser

Policy:

Senate Policy 32-40 specifies responsibilities for the Assignment of Advisers for various categories of students, including degree candidates, provisional students, and nondegree regular and conditional students. 

Procedure:

1.   Assignment of primary academic advisers for degree candidates and nondegree conditional students by the college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) is to occur at the time of enrollment of the advisee.  Both advisers and advisees are to be informed of the assignment and guided in their shared process of establishing an effective advising relationship.

2.    Assignment of academic advisers for provisional students by DUS is to occur at the time of initial registration as a provisional student.  Both advisers and advisees are to be informed of the assignment and guided in their shared process of establishing an effective advising relationship.

3.    After nondegree regular and nondegree conditional students who have never enrolled in degree status at Penn State have been approved for enrollment, they will be provided by the Office of the University Registrar with a list of locations on their respective campuses where academic advising can be sought.
Assignment of primary academic advisers to these students is to occur after the students have made contact with the college to which they seek admission. If the students are undecided or exploring curricular options they will be referred to the Division of Undergraduate Studies for advising.
Both advisers and advisees are to be informed of the assignment and guided in their shared process of establishing an effective advising relationship.

Senate Policy:  32-40, Assignment of Adviser

Approved: ACUE (4-2-98)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)


L-3: BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS (BDR)

Senate Policy:  82-00 and 83-00, Degree Requirements

Procedure:

It is the responsibility of each college dean to ensure that students being awarded baccalaureate degrees have fulfilled the approved University requirements. On rare occasions, special circumstances may warrant the granting of exceptions or waivers from the approved program requirements for individual students. The following procedures have been established to govern waiving, substitutions and auditing of BDR requirements.

1. The responsibility for granting waivers to BDR requirements, the substitutions thereto, shall rest with the student's college dean.

2. The responsibility for auditing the student's progress in fulfilling the requirements of BDR shall reside with the student's college dean.

3. Appeals arising from decisions made by the college dean and any requests for extraordinary exceptions to graduation requirements must be submitted to the Subcommittee on Academic Standards of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education as a final review board.

4. The Administrative Council on Undergraduate Education shall annually review the actions taken by the several colleges in granting waivers and substitutions to insure against the erosion of standards established by BDR. (Ref: Senate Policy 82-60)

Senate Policy:  82-00 and 83-00, Degree Requirements

 

Approved: ACUI (1-23-75)

Revised ACUE (9-26-96)


P-2: FIVE YEAR AUTOMATIC DROPS

University Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs policy maintains a policy in which any undergraduate course that has not been offered for five years will be automatically dropped unless an academic unit requests an exemption and the exemption is granted by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs.

Procedure:

1.   The Faculty Senate Office will provide an annual fall report to ACUE deans with a list of courses that have not been delivered during the preceding five years and that have been placed in automatic-drop status.

2.   ACUE deans will consult with appropriate members of their academic units to determine whether an exception to the five year drop policy should be requested. Such requests must be submitted by the associate dean to the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs within 45 days.

3.   The Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs will review exception requests and make a determination within 60 days.

4.   The Faculty Senate Office will publish a list of all dropped courses at the end of each academic year in the Senate Curriculum Report.

*Note: There is, as of September 2010, a backlog of 683 undergraduate courses that have not been delivered for five years or more. There is an expectation that the Faculty Senate Office and the Office of Undergraduate Education will work together during the 2010-2011 academic year to facilitate entry of these courses into the CSCS system once college requests for automatic drop exceptions have been lodged and acted on.

 

Approved: ACUI (9-15-77)

Revised: ACUI (9-2-10)

Revised: Editorial (10-21-10)


B-6: COLLEGE, CAMPUS, AND ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS

Senate Policy:  32-10, The University's Advising Program

Policy:

The patterns of academic advising information and administrative support programs provided to students are to be consistent across locations and among colleges and be clearly visible to and easily accessible for both students and advisers (see Academic Administrative Policies and Procedures under D which contains rules on Entrance to College and Lower Division Location, Entrance to Major and Upper Division, and Change of Major).  Regardless of location, colleges are responsible for providing advising information and assessing the effectiveness of advising programs provided to students enrolled in both the college common year and specific majors.  Similarly, regardless of college or major, locations are responsible for providing advising information and assessing effectiveness of advising services provided to students enrolled at their location.  All student actions regarding college of admission, college common year designation, location of enrollment, preferred major designation, course registrations, and actual major are recorded in the Integrated Student Information System (ISIS).

Access to advising information may be provided to students and advisers by campuses and colleges via advising centers and advising Web pages.  College, campus, and university-wide administrative offices are responsible for identifying the persons whom students and advisers should contact if they wish to ask specific questions or if they want to implement academic actions regarding choice of major, course registrations, or change of location assignments.

Procedures:

The following procedures will guide the assignment of responsibilities among colleges, campuses, and administrative units for advising information and communications regarding admission to college and lower division location, entrance to major and upper division, and change of major.

1.   All colleges are to appoint a College Contact Person (CCP) and to develop and disseminate advising information related to its majors and any requirements related to entering or changing majors or changing location assignment.  This information must be made available via the Web; the Web site must identify an office in the college that individual students or advisers at other locations may contact directly for clarifying information.  The CCP is to maintain a working relationship with the network of persons designated at campuses as the College Contact and Referral Representatives (CCRR) (see #2 below).  The University Park colleges should conduct at least one meeting per year for their CCRRs, with expenses shared by the college and locations.  The other colleges should collaborate in arranging at least one annual meeting.

2.   Each campus is to identify a CCRR for each University Park-based college and one CCRR to represent all other colleges.  Among other responsibilities, the CCRR at the campus is to:  a) maintain contact with the CCP; b) keep abreast of college advising information; c) monitor the campus advising Web site to assure the college’s advising information is available to local students; and d) be responsive to queries from local students about requirements for college majors and change of location assignments.

3.   Advising Web sites should be developed in accordance with guidelines established by the University Advising Council.

4.   Annually, each college and each campus is to assess the effectiveness of its advising information network across and among locations of the University and incorporate improvement steps in its advising plans.

5.   All CCRRs and CCPs must have ready access to the Internet.

6.   Academic administrative support offices, including Undergraduate Admissions and the University Registrar, are to maintain Web-based systems to inform and guide students as they take academic actions relating to admission to their college and location, registration for courses, monitoring academic progress, and petitioning for entrance to a major or a change in location assignment.  All academic administrative support offices and colleges maintaining Web-based information systems should provide a link to eLion to take advantage of centrally supported advising information resources and procedures.

Senate Policy:  32-10, The University's Advising Program

Approved: Vice President/Dean, CES (12-7-89)
Approved: Vice Provost/Dean, Undergrad Ed (12-7-89)
Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)
Revised: Editorial (5-25-10)


D-1: ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE AND LOWER DIVISION CAMPUS

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study

College Common Year Designation and Initial Campus Assignment

1. First-semester baccalaureate and associate degree candidates admitted to the University will be assigned to a campus only if that campus can provide at least two semesters of normal academic progress toward the baccalaureate or associate degree program selected by the student.

2. Regardless of campus, first-semester baccalaureate degree candidates are normally admitted into a college or the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS), assigned a college common year designation code, and enroll in course work consistent with normal academic progress for the academic majors in that college.

3. A student is expected to remain at his/her campus of admission until he/she achieves fifth semester standing. At this point, a baccalaureate degree candidate may have to change to a University campus that is authorized to deliver his/her major.

4. The dean for each college is responsible for establishing advising procedures to accomplish each of the following objectives:

a. Inform each baccalaureate degree candidate in the college of the policies and procedures governing relocation to another campus.

b. Identify the course requirements to maintain normal academic progress for the student’s major preference.

c. Identify the probable semester of relocation for a student based on major preference.

d. Assure that relocation does occur consistent with the current course requirements of a student’s major preference, the student’s actual course experience, and the planned course offerings of the campus over the next several semesters.

5. Students may enroll at any campus during the summer session. However, this will not change their regularly assigned campus for the fall semester.

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)
Approved: ACUE (10-6-05)
Approved: ACUE (6-7-07)
Revised: ACUE (1-7-10)
Revised: ACUE (5-6-10)

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study


D-2: ENTRANCE TO MAJOR AND UPPER DIVISION CAMPUS

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study

Recording and Use of Major Preference Data

1. Each student may identify up to three major preferences. Student major preferences are initially collected from the admissions application and recorded in the admissions file in ISIS. At the time the student accepts the University’s admission offer, the student’s recorded major preferences are moved to the Freshman Academic Information file in ISIS. These major preferences can be subsequently modified by the student through the Educational Planning Survey distributed by the Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS).

2. Students have the opportunity to further modify their major preferences at any time before entering a major. Major preferences can be changed by informing the student’s academic adviser at advising sessions. Students may also access the eLion Entrance to Major application to modify their major preferences.

3. Each college must provide information to all University students and advisers relevant to gaining entrance to the college’s majors.

4. Colleges authorized to implement administrative controls on the number of students who may be granted entrance to a major each year must inform students about these controls, the procedures for gaining entrance to a controlled major, and alternative majors as appropriate.

5. The major preference data are used to review entrance to all majors, regardless of whether the major is controlled or not. Students generally enter a major after their first year, but before their third year. The specific timing depends on the requirements of the college and major.

Designation of Entrance to Major Pools

1. All baccalaureate degree candidates are assigned to a specific entrance to major pool. The pool assignment assumes that, following the time of entrance to major, the student would be ready to enroll in major required courses. The pool designation is normally the spring of the student’s sophomore year.

2. Entering freshmen are assigned a pool through automated ISIS procedures at the time of admission or first recorded adviser contact. The college dean assigns the pool designation for advanced standing students entering a common year major at the time of admission to the college.

3. The colleges and DUS are responsible for notifying their students of the pool designation.

4. Under exceptional circumstances, the college dean may designate an alternative pool for a student.

5. All pool designations are entered or updated on ISIS screen ARUES.

Student Entrance to Majors and Upper Division Campus

The Registrar’s office, on behalf of the college, will notify each student in the designated pool. This notification will:

a. Instruct students to confirm their three major preferences.
b. Instruct students that changes to their major preferences can be made using eLion, by contacting their adviser, or by contacting their college dean’s office. A deadline for such changes will be specified.
c. Inform the student of the upper division campus(es) at which the student’s three preferred majors are offered.

Selection of Students from the Pool

1. The Registrar’s office will provide all colleges with Major Decision Reports. The report identifies students requesting the identified major preference. In addition to the report, the Registrar’s office will identify whether or not the students have satisfied the academic requirements for entrance to the major.

2. Students shall be reviewed for selection eligibility by the college. Eligibility will be determined on the basis of approved and published criteria.

3. The college will assign eligible students requesting non-controlled majors to those majors within the college.

4. Entrance to controlled majors is determined according to policy P-4. In accordance with the policy, eligible students with the approved grade-point average are guaranteed entrance to controlled majors. The college will assign remaining students in order of descending cumulative grade-point average until all controlled spaces are assigned.

Notification to Students

1. All students in a specific pool are to be notified of their status by the college performing the selection. Notification is to occur prior to the beginning of the registration period for the next fall semester.

2. Students selected are to be informed that they have been granted entrance to a specific major and upper-division campus effective the next semester of enrollment. Entrance to major is conditional pending appropriate current semester performance. The status of all students selected into the major is reflected in the ISIS system.

3. Notification to ineligible students will include referral to the appropriate advising center.

4. The Registrar’s office will provide appropriate support services to all of the colleges.

Calendar

The Office of the University Registrar will publish an annual Entrance to Major calendar with specific dates and events.

Entrance to Major Outside of This Process

The college dean has the authority to allow a student to enter a major outside of the regular entrance to major process. Such approvals are entered using ISIS screen ARUSAD.

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)
Revised: Editorial (9-6-01)
Revised: ACUE (10-6-05)
 

Policy: click to access Senate Policy 37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study


D-3: CHANGE OF MAJOR

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study

1. Each college dean shall establish procedures for assisting students in the change of major process. Information regarding this process can be obtained from the appropriate college advising contact.

2. Change of major requests and decisions are recorded on ISIS (screen ARUSBB or ARUSAD). Email notifications of approvals entered on ARUSAD or ARUSBB are sent to the student and the former dean’s office. Email notifications of denials entered on ARUSBB are sent to the current dean’s office. The current dean’s office will notify the student of the decision.

3. If a student’s request for change of major is approved into a common-year major or DUS, the new college dean’s office will review the student’s entrance to major pool and make any necessary adjustments.

Note: Students who have completed a baccalaureate or associate degree program and enter into another undergraduate degree program must use the re-enrollment process in accordance with policy K-1.

Approved: ACUE (1-8-98)

Revised: ACUE (10-6-05)

Senate Policy:  37-30, Entrance to and Changes in Major Programs of Study


R-7: INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL POLICY FOR PENN STATE STUDENTS, STAFF AND FACULTY

Preamble:

Penn State is committed to providing credible international experiences that will enhance our students' journey toward global citizenship. Helping our students to acquire critical global competencies through immersion experiences requires us to manage the risks that exist and validate that they are commensurate with the potential benefits to the participants and their academic experience.

The University discourages faculty members, students, and staff from traveling to countries on the U.S. State Department Travel Warnings list. However, exceptions can be made using the process outlined below. Exceptions and waivers would be based upon proposals by each person or group proposing the travel and would be reviewed by a Standing Advisory Committee appointed by the Vice Provost for Global Programs. The findings by this Committee as well as other inputs from other expert sources on the country being visited will inform the Vice Provost’s recommendation to the Executive Vice President and Provost who has the final authority to approve or reject such proposals.

Guidelines:

The University will continue its current practice of suspending Education Abroad-affiliated programs in countries under active U.S. State Department Travel Warnings. However, exemptions can be granted as follows:

1. Faculty members may petition for a waiver to lead a short-term program involving students to travel to safer areas of countries under active State Department Travel Warnings. The Standing Advisory Committee will evaluate petitions on a case-by-case basis with a written proposal outlining the detailed travel plan brought forward by the lead faculty member. The proposer should clearly give the compelling reasons for the travel in the proposal, the awareness of the inherent risks associated with the trip and efforts to minimize these risks (Petition Form for Study in Countries with a Travel Warning).

2. Students can also petition for a waiver to study for semester or academic year Education Abroad-affiliated programs, which have been suspended because they are in countries under active Department of State travel warnings. A list of Education Abroad-affiliated programs can be found at http://www.international.psu.edu. A student’s petition must show evidence of an excellent academic record, a solid rationale for studying in the suspended program, and due diligence in understanding the risks involved with studying in a nation under travel warning status and efforts to minimize the risks (Petition Form for Study in Countries with a Travel Warning). If the student’s petition for a waiver is approved by the Standing Advisory Committee, the student would be eligible to apply for financial aid through Penn State’s Office of Student Aid.

3. Travel by faculty members with legitimate and compelling need to travel to countries on the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) list can be permitted only through a similar petition process as outlined below, where the University has secured a license from the U.S. Department of Treasury. If the petition is approved by the Executive Vice President and Provost, university or grant-based support will be permitted for the travel.

Procedure:

1. A Standing Advisory Committee formed by the Vice Provost for Global Programs will review proposals from faculty members and students proposing educational programs including research study that involve travel in countries under active State Department Travel Warnings. The Committee is chaired by the University Office of Global Program's (UOGP) Executive Director of Education Abroad.

2. The Committee includes two faculty members with active engagement in international educational activities, along with representatives from the Graduate School, the Office of Undergraduate Education, the Office of Risk Management, the Office of Public Affairs, as well as the Director of the Center for Studies of International Terrorism.

3. The Committee will meet periodically to review faculty and student requests for international travel to sensitive areas. The Committee will make its recommendation to the Vice Provost for Global Programs, who will use it as the basis for making final recommendations to the Executive Vice President and Provost. If approved, the program may then proceed.

4. Finally, students and faculty approved for travel to countries under a U.S. State Department Travel Warning must sign a waiver with the UOGP that Penn State will not be held liable for anything that may happen to them in connection with their travels to such countries.

Approved: Executive Vice President and Provost Rodney Erickson (11-21-07)

Revised: Executive Vice President and Provost Rodney Erickson (7-03-08)

Please refer questions concerning the above policy to:

Executive Director of Education Abroad, 410 Boucke Building, University Park, PA 16802

Telephone: (814) 863-3667; Email: bjr22@psu.edu


Q-1: ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS UNDER UNIVERSITY CONTROL

Policy: Preamble

University scholarships should operate with unanimity of purpose in support of excellence, and with close cooperation among functional program components from fund acquisition through student recruitment and recipient selection to award processing. It is the purpose of this document to provide a frame of reference for academic scholarships while addressing in greater detail some policy and procedural matters of academic concern.

Students are the raison d'etre of any university. Ultimately, they establish the norms of quality. At a great university, they must be good when they come in and noticeably better when they leave. As a major facet of Penn State's commitment to the basic principle of the Morrill Land-Grant Act of 1862 that education should be available to all who could qualify for it regardless of class or financial position. University scholarships shall operate to attract and retain the "best and brightest" in support of a university education suited to superior motivation, curiosity, and intellect.

The legitimate preferences of our scholarship fund donors shall be observed. The Pennsylvania State University does not discriminate in academic scholarship selection on the basis of age, health, sex, marital status, number of children, etc. Such information is useful in the selection of recipients of awards from endowed funds bearing restrictions based on handicaps, health problems, and sex restrictions, or to assist in assessment of appropriate living costs. Awards may be made from funds bearing such restrictions only if necessary compensatory funds are available from other sources as required under Title IX Regulations, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and other authorities.

Current Policy

Basic policy for establishing or accepting funds for scholarships, graduate fellowships, grants-in-aid, and awards is set by the Board of Trustees. The current policy, approved May 16, 1986, is reprinted here:

Definition of Terms

Scholarship is an award of money to a student, granted in recognition of academic distinction, often, but not necessarily requiring that the recipient be in need of financial assistance.

Graduate Fellowship is an award of money to a graduate student, granted in recognition of academic distinction, often but not necessarily requiring that the recipient be in need of financial assistance.

Grant-in-Aid is an award of money made to a student in good academic standing and making normal progress. It usually, but not always, implies financial need. It may be an award of money to a student without regard to academic excellence who possesses certain talents sought or valued by the University, such as an athletic grant-in-aid or a music grant-in-aid.

Award is recognition for achievement of a single specific nature. It may be for grades, for activities, or a combination of both grades and activities.

Procedure for Establishing

Persons or organizations contemplating the establishment of scholarships, graduate fellowships, grants-in-aid, or awards should discuss the procedures and requirements with the proper officers of the University. A written proposal addressed to the President with the proper University official for the specific proposal.

Scholarship, graduate fellowship, grant-in-aid, or award funds should have few or no limitations placed on them by the donors. If possible, the funds should be flexible enough to provide aid where most required and to be available in order that all students have an opportunity to be potential recipients. The University will not administer a student aid program that is contrary to the law, or restricted on an unreasonable geographic basis.

Minimum Requirements for Funds

In order to establish a separate endowment fund scholarship or grant-in-aid in memory of a person, or to honor a person, organization, or program, the capital sum for investment, in the absence of unusual circumstances, shall not be less than $15,000. The funding level for a named Academic Excellence Scholarship in support of the University Scholars Program shall require a minimum endowment of $25,000. A capital sum of $10,000 or more will be accepted for inclusion in one of several University-endowed scholarship programs to establish a scholarship in the name of a person, organization or program. Sums less than $10,000 are accepted for placing without specific designation in existing University scholarship programs.

To establish an endowed graduate fellowship, the capital sum for investment, in the absence of unusual circumstances, shall not be less than $50,000.

A separate endowed award in memory of a person or to honor a person may be established with a capital sum of $5,000.

Any sum of $1,000 of more is accepted to provide a scholarship or grant-in-aid in the names of an individual, organization or program on an annual basis and may be continued for as long as the sponsor provides the funds.

Guidance

1. Scholarship guidelines should be University-centered rather than donor-centered; and though they may bear restrictions to specific colleges, campuses, and majors, to the maximum extend practicable such guidelines shall be in consonance with standard University practice and procedure and shall be developed in coordination with the Office of University Development and the Office of Student Aid. Approval and acceptance for the University is a responsibility of the Treasurer, with final approval by the Board of Trustees.

2. Recipient selection and recognition authority resides with the scholarship fund-controlling college, campus, or special committee. Committees may make awards, within the limitations of the guidelines approved by the donors and Board of Trustees, as they see fit. It is incumbent upon such committees that the consequences of their awards on student's aid packages be understood.

3. Scholarship awards may required the Office of Student Aid to reduce or recoup other aid already utilized by the student. Scholarship awards made early in the awarding year enable the aid package in the most appropriate manner. If other aid is already in place, the scholarship committee should confer with Student Aid to determine the most suitable action. Scholarship awards are subject to continued review by the office of Student Aid throughout the year as other aid information becomes available. Application of the following limitations is dependent upon the aid sources held by the student.

a. Allowable Gift Aid Limitation. This applies to all Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) grants. A student should not receive University scholarship funds which in addition to other gift aid (grants/scholarships) would exceed; the sum of tuition, room and board, and books; or the PHEAA maximum allowable gift aid limit if higher. Scholarship awards should be reduced as necessary to remain within these limits. Loans and wages are not included in gift aid calculations. PHEAA grants will be reduced if scholarship awards place the grant recipients above the gift aid limit.

b. Cost of Attendance Limitation. This applies to all Guaranteed Student Loans. The total aid (including loans and wages) any student may receive should not exceed the total allowable costs of attendance; tuition, room and board, books, transportation, clothing, laundry, medical, dental, personal, recreation, and miscellaneous expenses as established by the Office of Student Aid. Scholarship awards should be reduced as necessary to remain within such limit ; however, students should be permitted the option of early repayment of current year loans in order to reduce their aid total sufficiently to permit processing of scholarship awards. Scholarship awards should not be reduced because of wages earned subsequent to receipt of the scholarship. Early repayment of Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL) will be required if a scholarship award places the GSL recipient above the cost of attendance limit.

c. Financial Need Limitation. A student should not receive and may not retain need-based aid; National Direct Student Loan (NDSL), Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and/or College Work Study Program (CWSP); in excess of documented financial need. If other aid cannot be revised to remain within documented need, need-based scholarships should be adjusted. Immediate repayment of NDSL and/or SEOG will be required if a scholarship award places the NDSL/SEOG recipient above the documented need limit.

d. The Office of Student Aid shall not adjust scholarship awards made by college, campus, or other committees but shall limit any adjustment action to the specific aid source to which the limitation applies.

e. Nothing contained herein should operate to prevent additional recognition of deserving students by awards without monetary remuneration.

4. Unless otherwise specified in the specific scholarship fund guidelines, all recipients shall be:

a. U.S. citizens or eligible noncitizens (foreign nationals are not eligible).

b. Full-time degree-seeking Penn State undergraduate students.

(1) If students are not registered, current and future semester awards should be cancelled.

(2) If students are registered part-time, current semester awards should be cancelled but future semester awards should remain available.

(3) Special exceptions may be authorized on a case-by-case basis for students in their last semester.

c. Exceptions to a. and b. above may be authorized by the Coordinator of University Scholarships on a case-by-case basis.

5. Proper accounting procedures should be observed with all awards.

a. Accounts may not be overdrawn; awards may be made only for the academic year for which funds have been reported available by the Office of Student Loans and Scholarships.

b. Awards should be credited to students' accounts and refunds obtained following normal procedures. Special certificates/citations should be used for presentation ceremonies wherever possible. Special request for checks should be kept to a minimum.

c. Retroactive awards (for past semesters) may not be authorized.

6. Scholarships should be awarded to entering freshmen as early as practicable. Other scholarship awards may be made after that time, up to the last day of finals for a particular semester/session. No awards may be made to a previous semester/session.

7. All reasonable efforts should be made to find eligible recipients. Utilized funds should be kept to a minimum.

8. At the end of the fiscal year, unutilized earnings should be added to the principal of endowed funds unless specific arrangements to the contrary are made in advance. The principal shall not be invaded.

9. Scholarship awards should be processed before the offer is transmitted to the student. Direct entry on the Administrative Information System (AIS) is sufficient. Procedures for direct entry are covered in the General Forms Usage Guide, page 9.19.

Responsibilities

Cohesive and effective scholarship administration is enhanced through the very close cooperation of the offices and committees with different scholarships responsibilities.

1. Bursar. The Officer of the Bursar maintains cognizance of students accounts, and refunds upon student request any scholarship monies to recipients after University charges have been satisfied.

2. Faculty Senate. The University Faculty Senate Constitution provides that scholarships are within the legislative jurisdiction of the Senate. The Standing Rules provide that the Committee on Student Life shall also recommend policies and procedures relating to student awards and scholarships.

3. Scholarship Committees. Scholarship committees and their coordinating college or campus office, if any, are responsible for:

a. Selection of recipients in accordance with the specific fund guidelines as approved by the donors and the Board of Trustees.

b. Verification of recipient eligibility with the latest AIS information.

c. Entry onto AIS of scholarship awards prior to notifying recipients.

d. Notifying recipients in writing after AIS data entry.

The Senate Scholarship Committee has cognizance of all undergraduate scholarship awards and administrative responsibility for awards and their renewals from funds not assigned to other committees and unrestricted as to college, major, and campus.

The Freshman Scholarship Committee has cognizance of awards and their renewals to entering freshman and advanced standing undergraduates and administrative responsibility for such scholarship funds not assigned elsewhere. The chairperson of the Senate Scholarship Committee shall be member of the Freshman Scholarship Committee.

Faculty should be represented on all scholarship committees.

4. Student Aid. The Office of Student Aid, for the Vice President for Academic Services, is responsible for:

a. University-wide coordination of undergraduate scholarships to include the provision and maintenance of up-to-date financial aid information, the collection and distribution of applications as required, and the production of consideration listings as appropriate.

b. The security of the AIS student aid summary screen, and permitting access to it.

c. The correction of financial aid overawards.

d. The administration and support of assigned scholarship programs such as the Penn State Academic Grant, the Black Incentive Grant and Black Achievement Award programs, the Penn State Commonwealth Campus Scholarship and Commonwealth Campus Kunkle Scholarships, and the Kodak Scholars program.

e. Administrative support to the Freshman Scholarship Committee, the Renaissance Scholarship Committee, and the University Scholars program.

f. Providing scholarship information, and financial aid information as appropriate, to the Faculty Senate Committee on Student Life.

5. Student Loans and Scholarships. The Office of Student Loans and Scholarships, for the Senior Vice President for Finance and Operations and Treasurer, and the Controller, is responsible for:

a. Recording scholarship guidelines and assigning AIS source codes following Board of Trustees approval and receipt of the funds.

b. The security of the AIS scholarship awarding screen and permitting access to it.

c. Disbursing awards to the individual student account in the Bursar's Office. Disbursements are defined as the movement of monies from the scholarship budgets into the student's account by the Office of Student Loans and Scholarships. In exceptional situations, an "award document" (FORM Q-1) must be forwarded to the Office of the Assistant Treasurer or the Office of Student Loans and Scholarships for the preparation of a special check on behalf of the student. In such cases, the check must be picked up in the Office of the Bursar by the student or an authorized individual.

d. Reporting recipients and fund balances to the Treasurer's Office for reports to the donors and Board of Trustees, and to the Vice President for Academic Services for scholarship program review.

e. Reporting estimated funds available for award, including unutilized fund balances, to the appropriate offices and committees.

6. Treasurer. The Office of the Treasurer acts for the University in the acceptance of funds. Funds for University scholarships are received, deposited, and processed according to University policy. (Ref: Policy Manual, CS-3) This does not pertain to scholarships awarded directly to students from outside organizations and which are not covered by guidelines from the University Board of Trustees.

7. University Development. The Office of University Development is responsible for the coordination of scholarship fund raising efforts and donor contacts. The appropriate development officer should be contacted in the earliest stages of scholarship development. The Development Office is responsible for the preparation of scholarship guidelines, in consultation with the Office of Student Aid, in the proper format for submission to the Board of Trustees.

Any conflicts with the policy contained herein should be brought to the attention of the Coordinator of University Scholarships in the Office of Student Aid.

Approved: ACAS (1-17-86)

Approved: Provost Richardson (4-86)


Q-2: FEDERAL STUDENT ASSISTANCE SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS STANDARD

Policy:

The policy concerning Federal Student Assistance Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard may be found in the University Faculty Senate Policies for Students.

Procedure:

1. Students who encounter extenuating circumstances interfering with the sucessful completion of attempted credits and/or are required to attend beyond the allowable maximum length of study for completion of a degree program may appeal for an exception to the Office of Student Aid.

2. Students should submit a written appeal to the Office of Student Aid using the Academic Progress Appeal form (FORM Q-2) or other appropriate written method.

3. Notification in writing of an appeal decision will be sent to a student approximately two to four weeks after the appeal is received by the Office of Student Aid. After the appeal review has been completed, a student will be automatically be reconsidered for the aid sources for which he/she has applied.

4. Copies of the Academic Progress Appeal form may be obtained from the Office of Student Aid.

Reviewed: ACAS (4-6-90)

Revised: Editorial (5-29-01)

Maximum Semesters Provided to Complete the Degree Program


J-1: WITHDRAWAL

Senate Policy:  56-30, Withdrawal

Procedure

Withdrawal from the University is a serious action. The University has the responsibility to advise the student of the implications of the withdrawal action. However, it is the responsibility of the student who withdraws from enrollment in courses at the University to make the final decision and to understand the implication of their withdrawal action. To insure that the student has had full advising opportunity, two methods of initiating the withdrawal are provided:

(1) Sign an Official Withdrawal form and submit this signed form to the campus Registrar's office. The Official Withdrawal form can be obtained from the student's college dean, college advising center, campus Division of Undergraduate Studies Office, or campus Registrar's Office.

(2) Complete the withdrawal action using eLion.

Before the withdrawal is processed the student will be informed of issues that pertain to their specific situation and be provided with appropriate advising contacts. The Integrated Student Information System withdrawal process will examine the student's record for the following conditions:

After the withdrawal is processed, appropriate offices will be notified of the student's withdrawal action by electronic mail.

The effective date of the withdrawal action will be the date received by the Registrar's office or the date processed on eLion. The Fee Assessor will determine the amount of refund due the student. If the student provides documentation from each course instructor of the last date of classes attended, the Fee Assessor will use the latest of these dates for tuition refund calculation. The Bursar's office home page gives details on refunds of tuition and charges.

Students who live in a residence hall must check out of the hall within 24 hours after processing the withdrawal action.

This withdrawal action drops all courses (current semester and future semesters) offered through resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus.

The deadline for withdrawing is 5:00 p.m. on the last day of classes.

A "W" symbol will appear in the grade column on a student's transcript for all courses still in session on the effective date of withdrawal. Courses that ended before the effective date of the withdrawal will be grade reported following normal conventions. All courses that have not yet started as of the effective date of the withdrawal will be deleted and no entry will appear on the student's transcript.

The student transcript will also contain a message in the special notes and action section. This notation will be of the following format:

WITHDRAWAL FALL 1997

Degree students who withdraw from the University must apply for re-enrollment if they wish to return to degree status (see Senate Policy 58-00).

Medical Withdrawal:

In the event that a student may be unable to complete a schedule of classes due to illness, a withdrawal for medical reasons should be accomplished. Student medical withdrawals are authorized under one of two actions.

1. University physicians can initiate withdrawal actions by recommending to the college dean/campus executive officer that the student be withdrawn. The University physician sends a memo to the student college dean/campus executive officer authorizing medical withdrawal.

2. Students who require a medical withdrawal and are unable to consult with a University physician may contact their college dean/campus executive officer and request a medical withdrawal. The college dean/campus executive officer may initiate the request for a medical withdrawal on behalf of a student. Consultation and authorization from a University physician may be solicited.

Students capable of signing the Official Withdrawal form are expected to do so. If the student is not capable of signing the Official Withdrawal form, the college dean/campus executive officer may sign on behalf of the student.

University physicians have the option of placing registration holds on students withdrawing for medical reasons. This hold will require that the student consult with University physicians before a re-enrollment request will be approved.

Summer Only Withdrawal:

There are two special conditions associated with a "summer only withdrawal" These conditions are:

1. Because summer is not a required period of enrollment, students withdrawing during the summer continue to be eligible for enrollment during the following fall semester. (Re-enrollment is not required).

2. First time freshmen who were first enrolled during the summer of withdrawal invalidate their admission offer if they withdraw. If the student withdraws and desires to enroll later, the student must contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office for a re-evaluation of the offer of admission.

Military Duty Withdrawal:

Students should contact the campus Registrar and present a copy of the military orders. An Official Withdrawal form will be signed by the student and the campus Registrar. The reason cited on the form will be "Military."

If timing does not permit an initial presentation of the military orders, the student may initiate the withdrawal by providing a formal request in writing, personally signed, and sent to the University Registrar, 114 Shields Building, University Park, PA 16802; or by FAX to 814-863-1929. A copy of the military orders must also be provided.

The University Registrar will initiate the withdrawal action on behalf of the student. In addition to the various offices normally notified by the withdrawal action, the Fee Assessor will be specifically notified.

The Office of Student Aid will review eligibility for aid funds already received by the student. Students will be evaluated and advised on the status of their financial aid based on the date of their withdrawal. Students will also be advised of actions required to defer loan(s) repayments based on active military duty.

Students with a "military withdrawal" will not be charged tuition for the semester of withdrawal. They will be charged a housing assessment to cover expenses already incurred. Unused meal plan points will be refunded. No refunds can be made until the University has received a copy of the military orders calling the student to active duty.

At the time the student is discharged from military service or is placed on inactive duty, the student is eligible for "military re-enrollment " to the University, assuring the student direct access to the same major and location as was assigned at the time of withdrawal. Students are eligible to advance register for courses at the time of re-enrollment to the University. The re-enrollment fee is waived for "military re-enrollment."

Questions by students during military absence regarding their status or procedures for re-entry into the University can be directed to the Veterans Program Office.

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (4-13-78)

Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)

Revised ACUI (1-17-85

Revised: ACUI (3-25-85)

Revised: ACAS (5-8-87)

Revised: ACUE (4-3-97)

Revised: Editorial (9-29-00)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)

Senate Policy:  56-30, Withdrawal


J-2: LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Senate Policy:  56-70, Leave of Absence

Procedure:

1. Only students who are baccalaureate, associate, or medical doctorate degree candidates may file for a leave of absence. A student desiring to take a leave of absence must obtain on a Leave of Absence form the approval of the student's college dean, campus chief academic officer, the Director of the Division of Undergraduate Studies, or designee, whichever is appropriate.

2. If the leave is approved by the dean/academic officer/director/designee, the leave is entered, and the form retained in that office. The deadline for filing is the last working day prior to the first day of classes for the semester/session that the leave will begin. Leaves are not required for summer session only.

3. Normally, leaves for undergraduate students are not approved for a period longer than one year. Under special circumstances (e.g. military deployment), a leave of absence may be approved to a maximum of five years. Leaves for medical students may be approved for a maximum of two years.

4. A student who has withdrawn as a degree candidate is not eligible for a leave of absence. A student who has been dropped or dismissed from the University is not eligible for leave of absence.

5. A student who fulfills the conditions of an approved leave of absence may register upon return without applying for re-enrollment. The student registers for the returning semester according to the schedule established for that semester.

6. Except in the case of military deployment, if a student desires to return earlier or later than the semester agreed upon on the leave of absence form as the "returning semester," the student must make application for re-enrollment as a degree candidate. Students on military leave of absence should contact the Registrar's Office when they are ready to return.

7. A student who plans to enroll for course work at another accredited institution during a leave of absence should review program plans with the student's academic adviser and the Undergraduate Admissions Office to verify the eligibility for receiving credit.

8. Before commencing a leave of absence, a student is responsible for notifying other appropriate offices, such as the Office of Student Aid.

 

Senate Policy:  56-70, Leave of Absence

 

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)

Revised: ACAS (4-8-88)

Revised: ACUE (6-6-96)

Revised: Editorial (9-5-08)

Revised: ACUE (5-7-09)

Revised: Editorial (1-20-10)


C-2: REGISTRATION

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

Principles Related to the Registration Process

1. Registration System

One registration system registers all students at all locations for credit courses offered through the resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus delivery systems. Non-credit courses follow different registration procedures.

The campus Registrar is responsible for providing semester-by-semester registration instructions to students, advisers, faculty, and staff. Registration instructions are published no later than the publication of the initial Schedule of Courses.

The registration process is continuous in nature. Each student is assigned a "first date to register. " Starting with this first date, the student may initially register and subsequently adjust the registration as appropriate and necessary. The fundamental goal of this process is to finalize course registrations before the first day of the semester.

Students may register for courses using the following options:

·       Using the eLion system  

·       In-person registration at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising center, or continuing education office.


2. Incomplete and Complete Registrations

Students begin the registration process by meeting with their academic adviser and scheduling courses. Registration is completed when the student has paid the appropriate tuition and fees.

Students who have registered for courses receive a statement of tuition and fees from the Bursar's office. This statement includes the amount due as well as possible credits resulting from applicable scholarships, loans, grants, and other forms of financial assistance. In some cases, because of possible financial credits, a student may not be required to make payment to the University. In other cases, a student may be due a refund from the University. In all cases, regardless of amount due, student action is required to complete the registration process.

Failure to complete the registration process by payment of tuition and fees may result in any or all of the following actions:

·       The University will not provide grades for courses attended.

·       Once classes begin, students cannot add, late add, or late drop courses for the current semester if their tuition and fees have not been paid.

·       Students are ineligible to register for future semesters.

·       Students receiving student loans may enter repayment status with their lenders.

·       Students receiving student aid may have some of their aid sources cancelled.

·       Students receiving Federal Work-Study awards cannot be hired.

·       International students may be out of compliance with SEVIS.

Campus Registrars are responsible for contacting students who have failed to complete the registration process. If a student is earnestly seeking to finalize payment, campus Registrars may allow the student to remain in an incomplete registration status. The campus Registrar has the authority to cancel the incomplete registration of any student.

3. Registration Holds

Authorized University offices may place a hold on a student's record that will prevent registration. Because of the seriousness of this action, the office placing the hold is required to notify the student. Holds are placed because of:

·       Academic issues--placed and removed by college deans' offices;

·       Financial issues--placed and removed by offices such as Parking, Library, Bursar;

·       Disciplinary issues--placed and removed by Student Affairs;

·       Health issues--placed and removed by the Health Center;

·       Administrative issues--placed and removed by the University Registrar.

4. Credit Limitations

Students are not permitted to register for more than 19 credits prior to the first day of the semester. After consultation with their academic adviser, students may register for more than 19 credits during the first ten calendar days of the semester.

5. Registration Calendar

The campus Registrar is responsible for developing a registration calendar for each semester. Consultation should occur among those campus Registrars at campuses where students typically enroll at multiple locations.

The registration calendar is prioritized according to the following scheme:

a.   Students with priority needs (authorized categories include honor students, students with disabilities, and student athletes);

b.   Graduate degree students;

c.    Undergraduate degree students (descending order of total credits completed plus currently enrolled credits);

d.   Provisional and nondegree students (register on a space-available basis).

The process for determining priority needs categories of students is as follows:

1) Requests for priority registration shall be endorsed by a university dean or delegate.
2) Requests for priority registration shall be in writing and submitted to the University Registrar.
3) The request shall specify:

a. the group of students for whom priority registration is requested,
b. the rationale for priority registration status and how the request meets the criteria guidelines (see below),
c. the number of students in the group,
d. the requested time frame for implementation.

4) The University Registrar will bring new requests to the Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid (ARSSA) Committee of the Faculty Senate for review.
5) The requestor, or designee, will come to present their request to ARSSA at a regularly scheduled committee meeting.
6) ARSSA will deliberate in closed session, make a determination, and notify the requestor of the decision.
7) Guiding principles used in considering requests:

a. Compelling Scheduling Need - some factor of the group restricts the times that the group may take classes.
b. Overall benefits outweigh detriment to the university community at large.

8) The ARSSA Committee shall report annually to the Faculty Senate on the status of Priority Registration.

6. Late Registration

The registration process is to be completed before the first day of the semester. Late registration is defined as a first-time course registration on or after the first day of the semester. The student pays a fee for the privilege of registering late. Students registering late receive a bill from the Bursar's office which displays the date when payment is expected to avoid late payment fees. A student's registration is considered incomplete until the tuition and fees are paid.   Students in an incomplete registration status may not add courses, but are permitted to drop courses.

7. Registration Adjustments--Before the First Day of the Semester

After the initial registration, students may adjust their course registration as appropriate and necessary using any of the methods available for registration.

8. Registration Adjustments--First Ten Days of the Semester

Once the semester begins, students must have completed the registration process in order to add courses. Students with an incomplete registration are not permitted to add courses. Regardless of registration status, students are permitted to drop courses. The student may make these changes using any of the methods available for registration.

A proportionate length of time is provided for summer session courses.


9. Registration Adjustments--After the Tenth Day of the Semester

Adding a course after the tenth day of the semester is a Late Add and requires approval of the course instructor. Students requesting a Late Add should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding missed work. Late Adds must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Add.

Dropping a course after the tenth day of the semester and through the end of the twelfth week of the semester is a Late Drop. For courses offered for less than a full semester, the late drop period ends after 80% of the course has been completed. Students requesting a Late Drop should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding the potential impact of delaying normal progress towards graduation, possible loss of some forms of student aid, and likely ineligibility of coverage on parental insurance policies. Late Drops must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office, or using the eLion system. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Drop.

Students who have not completed the registration process by payment of tuition and fees are not permitted to Late Add nor Late Drop courses.

The time periods for Late Add and Late Drop are pro rated for courses offered for other than a fifteen-week semester calendar.

All Late Drops are subject to the credit limitations established by University Faculty Senate policy. If a provisional or nondegree student becomes a degree candidate, the Late Drop credits used while in provisional or nondegree status are carried forward to the degree program status. If a baccalaureate or associate degree candidate becomes a nondegree student, the Late Drop credits used while in degree candidacy count in the total Late Drop credits available to the nondegree student.

10. Limitation of Retroactive Registration

After the last class day of the semester, registration for that semester is closed. After this date, requests to complete a previously initiated registration are subject to administrative review and may be denied. Retroactive registration is only available for courses for which the student was scheduled during the semester. In other words, this process cannot be used to add courses to the student's schedule after the semester ends.

Requests for retroactive registration must be initiated by the end of the 9th month following the end of the semester for which retroactive registration is being requested.

If the retroactive registration request is approved:

•  Semester tuition and fees will be charged at the current rates effective with the date on which the retroactive registration request was initiated.

•  Full payment of tuition and fees is required before the retroactive registration is recorded. Full payment must be made within one month of approval.

•  All previously scheduled courses will be recorded. Courses may not be added or dropped from the student's schedule.

•  The Registrar's office will contact the course instructor(s) to seek final grades. In the event that a grade for a course cannot be obtained from the instructor, the instructor's department head will provide the grade.

11. Administrative Course Cancellation

The Administrative Course Cancellation procedure is available to correct errors. It is not to be used as an alternative to normal registration procedures.

If a student identifies a course for which registration was not intended, the student must contact the department offering the course. The department staff will initiate an Administrative Course Cancellation form and ask the student to sign the request. The department staff forward the form to the course instructor. If the instructor has no evidence that the student participated in the course and makes this declaration of non-participation by signing the form, the form is returned to the department office, for forwarding to the campus Registrar's office. The campus Registrar will remove the course from the student's academic record. This procedure is available one semester beyond the semester in which the error occurred. After this time, the Faculty Senate must act on the course cancellation request.

12. Multiple Campus Registration

Each student is assigned a home campus at which the student must be registered.

Students who are part of a multi-campus college are expected to first register at their home campus; they may then register at any campus within the college without special permission or restriction.

Students who are not part of a multi-campus college first register for courses offered by their home campus. Permission is required for registration at any other campus. Permission is granted by the college dean or academic department offering the course and processed by the campus Registrar. At least one half of the student's total semester credits must be from courses offered by the home campus.

13. Section Changes

A section change is an administrative change to a student's registration that results in moving a student from one section of a course to another. Section changes may not be initiated directly by the student using eLion. All section changes must be processed by a Penn State staff member using ISIS screens ARURD or ARURG.

Section changes may be processed through the last day of classes. When processing a section change, there is no impact on late drop credits nor are late drop/add fees applicable.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)

Revised: Editorial (9-29-00)

Revised: ACUE (4-7-05)

Revised: ACUE (6-7-07)

Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)

Revised: ACUE (6-5-08)

Revised: Editorial (1-28-09)

Revised: Editorial (3-25-09)

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop


P-9: ARTICULATION AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE SCHREYER HONORS COLLEGE AND THE DICKINSON SCHOOL OF LAW

The articulation agreement, dated October 20, 1998, is intended to provide benefits to both the Honors College and the Law School by (a) enabling each to attract talented and accomplished students and, (b) facilitating collaborative faculty work.

This Agreement provides a process through which students in the Honors College who have completed three-fourths or more of the course work toward their undergraduate degrees and three years of resident study can seek early matriculation in the Law School in the following academic year. Such students would be eligible to receive their undergraduate degrees after successful completion of the first year of work in the Law School.

This Agreement also provides a process for students in the Honors College to obtain an early commitment of admission to the Law School for matriculation in the academic year immediately following the year in which the students receive their undergraduate degrees.

Finally, this Agreement expresses an understanding that Law School faculty and faculty associated with the Honors College will collaborate in pre-law counseling of students in the Honors College, thesis or independent study advising for Law School and Honors College students, and will be encouraged to undertake other joint teaching, research, or service activities.

1. Eligibility to apply for early matriculation in the Law School.

Students in the Honors College who:

(i) are in their third year in residence in the Honors College; and,

(ii) anticipate completing three-fourths of the requirements toward the undergraduate degree and the requirements for their major by the end of their third year; and,

(iii) anticipate graduating with Honors by completing all Honors College requirements, including an Honors Thesis; and,

(iv) have taken the LSAT test in October or February of their third year; and,

(v) are recommended by the dean of the Honors College, are eligible to apply for admission to the Law School for the following academic year under the standards and procedures set forth in paragraph 2 below.

 

A student who meets the foregoing requirements but does not anticipate completion of the major requirements by the end of the third year in residence also is eligible to apply for early matriculation in the Law School but must provide certification from the student's undergraduate advisor and the dean of the Honors College that successful completion of one or more courses in the required first-year curriculum of the Law School will complete and satisfy the student's undergraduate major requirements.

A student who meets the foregoing requirements but does not anticipate completion of an Honors Thesis by the end of the third academic year in residence is eligible to apply for early matriculation in the Law School on condition that the Honors Thesis be satisfactorily completed by August 15 next following completion of the student's third academic year in residence in the Honors College.

 

2. Eligibility to apply for early commitment of admission to the Law School.

Students in the Honors College who satisfy the requirements stated in paragraph 1 above but who (a) will not complete their major requirements in three years of residence in the Honors College and (b) will not receive credit toward their major requirements by completing courses in the required first-year Law School curriculum will not be eligible for early matriculation in the Law School. Such students are, however, eligible to apply for an early commitment of admission to the Law School for matriculation in the Law School in the academic year following completion of their undergraduate work in the Honors College. In such cases, the Honors College thesis must be completed by August 15 following completion of the fourth academic year in residence in the Honors College.

 

3. Law School early matriculation application procedures and standards.

Application: Honors College students who are eligible to apply for early matriculation in the Law School under the terms of paragraph 1 above must complete an Application for Admission prepared by the Law School. The Application will include a statement by the applicant that the applicant intends to complete the program of study for the Juris Doctor at the Law School.

Admissions standards: Applicants for early matriculation should have:

(i) a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or better at the end of five semesters of undergraduate work;

(ii) a superior score on the LSAT test taken in the third year of undergraduate study;

(iii) letters of recommendation for early matriculation from (1) the dean of the Honors College, (2) the undergraduate faculty advisor, and (3) two other members of the Penn State faculty who are familiar with the applicant's academic work, describing the applicant's intellectual strengths and weaknesses, writing and communications skills and social and academic maturity. The letter from the dean of the Honors College must attest that the applicant has not been found to be in violation of any academic or other rules of Penn State applicable to Penn State undergraduate students generally or to Honors College students particularly.

Honors College interviews: The Honors College may, in its discretion, require that such applicants be interviewed and evaluated for early matriculation to the Law School by an Honors College committee of faculty and administrators which might include a member of the Law School faculty who is not a member of the Law School Admissions Committee.

Application deadline: Completed applications must be presented to the Law School Admissions Committee no later than March 15 of the applicant's third year in the Honors College; this requirement, however, may, in special circumstances, be waived by the dean of the Law School.

Law School interviews: Honors College students who have completed applications for early matriculation to the Law School will be interviewed by the dean of the Law School and by members of the Law School Admissions Committee.

Admissions decisions: Decisions to admit applicants for early matriculation to the Law School will be made by the Law School Admissions Committee on the basis of an assessment of the applicant's intellectual capacity, undergraduate record, maturity, and capacity for success in the Law School. The Law School Admissions Committee may, in its discretion, give preference to applicants who have completed, during their undergraduate work (or through advanced placement credit) courses in American history, American government, macroeconomics, accounting, and/or a foreign language.

 

4. Law School early admissions commitment procedures and standards. The procedures and standards for early commitment of admission to the Law School are as described in paragraph 3 above.

 

5. No prejudice. A decision not to admit an Honors College student to early matriculation to the Law School or to make an early commitment of admission to a student will not prejudice that student's ability to gain admission to the Law School during the student's fourth year of residence in the Honors College or after completion of the student's undergraduate program.

 

6. Pre-Law advising. Students in the Honors College will be eligible for pre-law advising as provided by Penn State through the College of the Liberal Arts or otherwise and, in addition, the dean of the Honors College and the dean of the Law School shall develop a special program of pre-law advising for Honors College students in their freshman, sophomore and junior years that will include (i) access to and presentations by members of the faculties; (ii) presentations by alumni of the Law School and of Penn State who are knowledgeable about the legal profession; and, (iii) visits by interested students to the Law School to meet with faculty and students and to attend classes.

 

7. Joint mentoring/preceptorship. Students in the Honors College who declare, by the end of their third semester in the Honors College, that they are seriously interested in possible early matriculation to the Law School will, upon their request, be assigned two mentors or advisors, one of whom will be a member of the faculty of the student's undergraduate major department and the other of whom will be a member of the Law Faculty. These mentors will be responsible for advising about course and program selection, Honors Thesis topics, and will make every effort to advise the students so as to maximize the students' chances for both admission to and success in the Law School. Such students also will be eligible to be paired with a graduate of Penn State or of the Law School who has practiced law and who will agree to serve as an informal mentor to the student. Finally, such students will be eligible to use the services of the Law School, including its Career Services Office, for the purpose of finding summer employment related to the students' possible legal career goals.

 

8. Overseas programs of law study. The Law School operates a summer program of upperclass law study in Florence, Italy and another similar program conducted in Strasbourg, France, Brussels, Belgium, and Vienna, Austria. Students in the early matriculation program will be eligible for participation in these summer programs following completion of one year at the Law School. The Law School will provide such students with a complete scholarship (grant-in-aid) plus reasonable travel costs to one of these programs during that summer.

 

9. Tuition and financial aid. Students matriculating in the Law School will pay the then applicable tuition of the Law School for their work in the Law School. Such students will be eligible to apply for all Law School need-based and merit scholarships and for all loan programs otherwise available to students at the Law School. Students who are early matriculants to the Law School will also be eligible for AES scholarships (funded by the Honors College) for one year in addition to Law School funded financial aid. The Law School will provide early matriculation students with a single room in the Law School dormitories at normal rental rates. The Law School will give preference to early matriculants for positions as paid research assistants to members of the law faculty during their second and third years of enrollment in the Law School.

 

10. Effectiveness of Agreement; Periodic review. This Agreement and any amendment thereto will become effective upon (i) the approval of the Law Faculty; (ii) the approval of the deans of the Honors College and the Law School; (iii) the approval of Penn State's Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education; and, (iv) such other approvals as may be deemed necessary by Penn State's Provost's Office. Operation of the Agreement shall be formally reviewed by the deans of the Law School and the Honors College every three years and such modifications as may be deemed necessary shall be made from time to time in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement.

 

11. Exclusivity. Neither the Honors College nor the Law School shall enter into any similar (law school) articulation or early matriculation agreement, except the Law School's current articulation agreement with Dickinson College, and except further that with the written consent of the Provost of Penn State, the Law School may enter into similar agreements with other colleges of Penn State and with the honors program of the University of Delaware.

 

12. Promotional brochure. The Law School and the Honors College will jointly develop and share in the cost of a promotional brochure designed to attract potential freshman students to enroll in the Honors College. Costs shall be shared as follows: 75% to be borne by the Honors College and 25% to be borne by the Law School.

 

Executed this 20th day of October, 1998

By: Cheryl Achterberg, Dean

By: Peter G. Glenn, Dean

Approved by: John A. Brighton, Executive Vice President and Provost

Interactions between Schreyer Honors College and other Penn State Colleges

There are to be discussions between Schreyer Honors College and the degree-granting colleges concerning: a) whether any majors of the degree awarding college are to be withheld from participation in this articulation agreement; b) whether recruitment materials identifying early matriculation opportunities are to reference majors for which the option is available; and c) agreements on how program planning and advising for students on three-year, fast-tracks in the major are to be conducted.


L-6: MINORS - ENTRANCE AND CERTIFICATION

(Implementation – Fall 2011)

AAPP L-6 was revised February 3, 2011, and applies only to students graduating in December 2011 or thereafter. Students who graduate prior to this date are bound to the earlier L-6 Minor procedures.

Senate Policy:  59-00, Requirements for the Minor

Introduction


The University Faculty Senate amended Policy 59-00 on October 19, 2010, to read: “Requirements for a minor may be completed at any campus location offering the specified courses for the minor.” In effect, this makes it possible for Penn State students to meet the requirements of many of the University’s minors regardless of their campus of residence. The Senate vote recognizes several important Penn State curricular principles:

 

The amended 59-00 also states that, “Students may not change from a campus that offers their major to a campus that does not offer their major for the purpose of completing a minor.” The intent is not to prevent a student from enrolling for a course necessary for a minor at a campus other than their campus-of-residence. Such enrollments have always been possible. Rather, the stipulation recognizes the major as the University’s fundamental educational commitment and the minor as a secondary complement.

Procedure:

1.   Students wishing to declare a minor must use eLion unless the minor has a Faculty Senate-approved entrance requirement, such as an audition or portfolio review, or carries restrictions necessitated by explicit articulation or licensing requirements. Under these circumstances, eLion will generate an automatic message referring the student to the unit with administrative oversight. Upon approval, the unit will enter the student into the minor on ISIS screen ARUSAN.

If the student has declared a minor, but then terminates degree enrollment, the minor declaration becomes void. The student must submit a new eLion minor declaration after receiving degree status through the reenrollment process.

 

2.   Intent to pursue a minor may be declared after the student has achieved at least fifth semester classification, but prior to the end of the late drop period of the student’s final semester. In those instances where a minor requires an entry fee or entrance requirement, the student must declare before the end of the regular add/drop period of their final semester. The fee will be applied to the student’s semester bill at the time the intent is submitted.

 

3.   Responsibility for degree audit substitutions, certification of minor completion, and other administrative actions for students enrolled at:

 

o      campus colleges rests with the associate dean or designee at the student’s campus of residence;

 

o      campuses of the University College rests with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee, in the Office of the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses;

 

o      University Park and World Campus rests with the associate dean or designee in the college in which the student is enrolled.

 

4.   During the seventh week of the student's final semester, the University Registrar will distribute the list of minor candidates and their degree audits to the office of the appropriate associate dean or designee.

 

5.   The associate dean or designee will certify completion of minor requirements on each student record by adding an approval indicator on ISIS screen path ARUGB.

 

6.   The Office of the University Registrar will prepare a minor certificate for each approved student. The certificate will include the signatures of the President of the Board of Trustees, the President of the University, and the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University. The minor certificate will be presented to the graduate along with the diploma as long as the minor is approved on ISIS screen path ARUGB by the end of the 13th week of classes. Certificates produced for minors approved after this deadline may need to be mailed to the student.

 

7.   The Registrar is responsible for recording on the student's academic record the successful completion of the minor program at the time the baccalaureate degree is conferred.

NOTE: A minor may be awarded retroactively through the following process: The associate dean or designee certifies that a student has met the requirements for the minor at the time of graduation and forwards this information to the University Registrar in writing. The Registrar adds the appropriate notation to the student's transcript. The certificate for the minor is produced and mailed to the student.

The following conditions apply to the retroactive awarding of minors:

 

 

 

Senate Policy:  59-00, Requirements for the Minor


Approved: ACUI (4-7-83)
Revised: ACAS (6-10-88)
Revised: ACAS (9-8-89)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-95)
Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (1-21-99)
Revised: ACUE (3-2-00)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (1-8-04)
Revised: Editorial (4-9-07)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (6-4-09)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (2-3-11)


P-1: NEW UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES/MAJORS, OPTIONS, IUGs, AND MINORS; AND CHANGES IN UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS/MAJORS, OPTIONS, IUGs, AND MINORS

P-1 proposals are the basis of Administrative and University Faculty Senate curricular approval and are used to add or amend undergraduate academic programs, including majors, options within majors, IUGs, and minors; and to phase out minors.

Academic approval by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs is required when colleges wish to add new majors, options, IUGs, or minors, amend program requirements, drop programs, or change the name of a major, option, IUG, or minor. See Guidelines to Curricular Procedures, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs (http://www.senate.psu.edu/curriculum_resources/guide/contents.html). (P-3, rather than P-1 approval, is required to drop an option while otherwise retaining the program.)

Administrative approval is required when colleges propose new majors, options, IUGs, and minors or propose to change the name of existing programs.

Administrative approval is not required to implement the curricular amendment of majors, options, IUGs, or minors approved by the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs. Implementation of P-1 proposals may occur the first semester following approval. Students must receive timely notification and will be subject to the requirements in effect at the time of most recent entrance into the program. Students may consult with the head of a program or program committee or their representative to resolve difficulties caused by the curricular change.

P-1 Timeline

• Preliminary college and disciplinary consultation and consultation between appropriate campus chancellor(s) and the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses

• Submission of Prospectus to ACUE by College Associate Dean

• ACUE Prospectus deliberation and written response to submitting college

• College/Campus (or colleges and campuses) development of formal proposal, including appropriate consultation, data collection, and research

• Submission of P-1 proposal by College Dean to University Faculty Senate

• Senate Curricular Affairs Committee review

• Senate 30 day Blue Sheets hold for university-wide comment

• Senate P-1 transmittal to Office of Undergraduate Education for review and approval

• Provost review of Office of Undergraduate Education action

• Office of Undergraduate Education memo to implement distributed to appropriate offices

• Office of Undergraduate Education memo to Board of Trustees informing of program implementation

• Implementation the following semester or later

Approved: Provost Brighton (6-23-98)

Revised: ACUE (5-3-01)

Revised Editorial: (4-18-06)

Approved: ACUE (2-7-08)

Revised: ACUE (9-2-10)


P-3: MOVING/DISCONTINUING DEGREE PROGRAMS AMONG COLLEGES AND CAMPUSES

P-3 proposals are the basis of the administrative review and approval process that enable a second college or multiple colleges to deliver programs already authorized in another college; that enable a college to deliver an existing program at an additional campus within its purview or through the World Campus; that authorize the closure of a major or minor program in a college or campus so long as that program will continue to be offered elsewhere at the University; that authorize dropping an option within a program so long as the program in which the option was located will continue to be offered; and that, under extraordinary circumstances, may authorize the delivery of extended degrees. Note that a P-6 proposal is required to terminate a program when doing so will completely remove it from the University's offerings. As with P-1 and P-6 proposals, P-3 proposals must be preceded by submission of an ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus. Following the completion of the prospectus process, a P-3 proposal may be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Education. It must address all relevant strategic and academic issues, including those outlined in Academic Administrative Policy P, Section V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

P-3 Proposals

One or more colleges may be authorized to offer degree programs. This authorization has sometimes been referred to as academic program sponsorship or program sponsorship transfer. The Provost is responsible for administratively authorizing the moving, sharing, and discontinuance of academic sponsorship of existing degree programs for all colleges and campuses. The University Faculty Senate does not take part in this authorization.

Three types of sharing and transferring of sponsorship may occur:

(1) Joint sponsorship in which, in addition to the original sponsoring college, one or more additional colleges also are awarded authority to offer the existing program. Graduates in these programs belong to and are certified for graduation by the college in which they are enrolled.

(2) Handoff sponsorship in which the authority to offer an academic program is transferred from one college to another. Here, an original sponsoring college withdraws its academic authority for a program and another college or group of colleges is awarded authority in its place.

(3) Extended programs are discussed below.

In every case in which a program is transferred or shared, every effort must be made to insure curricular integrity by minimizing the number of core course substitutions at the newly offering campus or college. Disciplinary communities are nonetheless encouraged to consider the development of program options beyond the core that reflect local expertise, student demand, and market need.

Deans retain the authority to move a degree program within a college without initiating the P-3 process. When such actions are taken, the college must notify the Office of Undergraduate Education, which will then inform other offices as appropriate.

Extended Programs

There is a third type of shared program referred to as an "extended degree." Based upon extraordinary circumstances, such as specialized licensing and/or accreditation requirements, a single college may offer its programs by extending their availability to additional campuses. In this arrangement, only the "extending" college has the authority to award the program degree, although the degree may be delivered at multiple campuses. A college must submit a P-3 proposal to the Office of Undergraduate Education that includes endorsement from both the extending college and the unit(s) at which the extended degree will be offered.

P-3 Probationary Period

Four years after a program has been authorized for delivery by an additional campus/college or through World Campus through a P-3 process, a program review will be conducted. The additional location offering the program will provide evidence to the Office of Undergraduate Education that the following criteria are being achieved:

1. Adequate faculty and staff resources exist

2. The program aligns with university and unit missions

3. Market need and demand exists to maintain sufficient student enrollments

4. Students are able to maintain timely academic progress

5. Adequate equipment, library and information technology resources, clinical and cooperative arrangements, or other special facilities exist

6. Adequate financial resources have been established to assure program continuation

7. Assessment data indicate that students are achieving the program's learning objectives

The provost may, through the Office of Undergraduate Education, end the P-3 probationary period by granting joint or handoff program sponsorship status to the unit(s); or the provost may, based upon an unsatisfactory evaluation of the reviewed criteria, require the P-3 offering to be phased out; or conditions may be established, including a limited time period to complete them, that must be met to avoid P-3 program phase out.

The four year review of extended programs will trigger an additional set of questions and possible administrative responses. Assuming a positive evaluation of criteria 1-7 above, a determination will be made as to whether extended status should be continued or replaced by joint or handoff program sponsorship status. The decision will be made based upon whether externalities such as licensing, accreditation rules, or other unique circumstances reasonably justify a continuation of the extended degree status. The review will be conducted by the Office of Undergraduate Education in consultation with the affected units. If the extended status is maintained, the next consideration of extended status will take place five years hence.

P-3 Timeline

•  Preliminary college and disciplinary consultation and consultation between appropriate campus chancellor(s) and Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses

•  Submission of prospectus to ACUE by College Associate Dean

•  ACUE Prospectus deliberation and written response to submitting college

•  College development of formal proposal, including appropriate consultation, data collection, and research

•  Submission of P-3 proposal by College Dean to Office of Undergraduate Education

•  Office of Undergraduate Education review

•  Provost review of Office of Undergraduate Education action

•  Office of Undergraduate Education memo to implement distributed to appropriate offices

•  Implementation the following semester or later

•  Year Four P-3 probationary review

Approved: ACUI (10-25-79)
Approved: Provost Eddy (12-5-79)
Approved: Provost Brighton (8-25-97)
Approved: Provost Erickson (9-20-00)
Revised: Editorial (4-18-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)
Revised: ACUE (4-2-09)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-10)

G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Senate Policy:  49-20, Academic Integrity

Introduction:

Recognizing the importance of academic integrity to the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction, represented in the procedures that follow, is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Each campus or academic college at University Park, shall interpret and apply Academic Integrity Procedures consistent with University policy.

Campus or college Academic Integrity Committees shall maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.
 
Procedures:

A. When Academic Misconduct is Suspected:

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegation while taking into account the confidential nature of the information and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning.

2. When evidence suggests that academic misconduct has occurred, the faculty member will enter the charge and the academic sanction on the campus or college’s Academic Integrity Form, will sign the form, and then convey the charge and sanction to the student for his or her signature (in person or through other methods if necessary). [Note: If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, please refer to Section E for additional clarification.]

3. After reviewing the allegation of academic misconduct with the student, the faculty member may provide the student with an additional period of time (determined by the campus or college procedures) before the student has to make a decision and sign the Academic Integrity Form as to whether or not to accept the academic sanction. A student’s failure to sign and return the Academic Integrity Form, by the specified deadline, consistent with campus or college procedures, will be construed as not contesting the charge or sanction and the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.

4. Normally, it is preferable to pursue academic sanctions with the campus or college, relying on the assignment of grades and course or program-related sanctions to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional University-level disciplinary sanctions. However, where integrity violations are considered to be extreme, the faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with both the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Judicial Affairs. A more detailed and comprehensive listing of the types of academic sanctions faculty may assign to students on the Academic Integrity Form can be found in the document Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, the authority to administer academic sanctions remains the responsibility of the instructor and the campus or college AI Committee, as appropriate. In situations where a disciplinary sanction is requested and referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs, the application of academic sanctions will be carried out by the campus or college, while the application of any disciplinary sanctions will be carried out by the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee, in consultation with the Academic Integrity Committee of the campus or college.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic misconduct is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process. The Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for notifying the Office of the University Registrar when academic misconduct is suspected in a course. Any drop or withdrawal from the course during this time will be reversed. A student who has received an academic sanction as a result of a violation of academic integrity may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time. These drop actions include regular drop, late drop, withdrawal, retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. This drop policy may be superseded in exceptional circumstances (i.e. trauma drop). In these cases, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will confer with the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative to determine if the drop is warranted.

NOTE: The following statement shall appear on all campus and college Academic Integrity Forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course to avoid a sanction for a violation of academic integrity. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures."

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the Academic Integrity Form by the specified deadline, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.

8. The Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for ensuring that the process outlined in this document and the specific campus or college procedures are followed. If either the student or the faculty member involved in the instance of alleged academic misconduct thinks that there has been a procedural problem, then he/she should bring that concern to the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative for resolution.

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form, then forwards the form to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Judicial Affairs for recording, it is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. If a prior recorded violation is discovered after the student has admitted responsibility and accepted the academic sanction(s), this additional information should be reviewed and a new academic sanction may be considered by the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges in consultation with the faculty member. Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing additional academic sanctions. If the sanction is to be changed, a new form should be provided to the student and he/she should have the opportunity to accept or contest the charge given the increase in sanction. If the student accepts, the academic sanction will be assigned and the case will be closed and sent to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the outcome of the case by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.] If the student chooses to contest, refer to section C. If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to maintain the original sanction, the case will be closed and sent on to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee for record keeping. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the outcome of the case by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.]

If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to maintain the originally assigned academic sanction but now add disciplinary sanction(s) the College will assign the academic sanction and send a recommended disciplinary sanction to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee along with the Academic Integrity Form and other relevant documentation. The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will meet with the student and review the recommendation, as well as precedent guidelines in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign.  If the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, he/she must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to modify the originally assigned academic sanction to a more serious academic sanction, as well as add a disciplinary sanction, a new form should be provided to the student and he/she should have the opportunity to accept or contest the charge given the increase in sanction.  If the student accepts, the academic sanction will be assigned and a recommended disciplinary sanction will be sent to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee along with the Academic Integrity Form and other relevant documentation.   The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will review the recommendation, as well as precedent guidelines in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign.  If the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, they must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

4. Upon final disposition of the case, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will communicate the outcome to the campus or college Academic Integrity Chair and/or appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the final disposition by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.]

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form indicating that the charge or sanction(s) is being contested and then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. The campus or college Academic Integrity Committee will conduct a review in accordance with their respective procedures.

3. If the student is found responsible for the alleged misconduct by the Academic Integrity committee, the committee will then be informed if the student has prior Academic Integrity violations. This information will be obtained from Judicial Affairs by the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative but not made available to the Academic Integrity Committee until the determination of responsibility occurs. With this information, the AI Committee will determine the sanction to be assigned. If the sanction is only an academic sanction, the Academic Integrity Committee will assign the final charge and sanction and close the case. The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will be notified of the outcome for record-keeping. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the final disposition by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.] If the Academic Integrity committee determines that disciplinary sanctions should be considered, the student is notified by the College that he/she has been found responsible for the charge, and that the academic sanction will be put into place. In addition, the student's case will be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee for consideration of a disciplinary sanction. The Academic Integrity committee will also send their recommendation for a disciplinary sanction.

4. When communicating with a student who has been found responsible by an Academic Integrity Committee and has been recommended for disciplinary sanctions, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will review precedent guidelines, as well as the Academic Integrity Committee's recommendation, in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign. If the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, they must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

5. If the student is found not responsible for the alleged misconduct by the Academic Integrity committee, the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for notifying the Office of the University Registrar that academic misconduct has not occurred in the course. The student may drop or withdraw from the course at any time.

D. Sanctions:

1. Faculty may assign a wide range of sanctions to a student found responsible for violating academic integrity. Most faculty may choose to utilize academic sanctions (the modification of grades due to misconduct), but when referring cases to Judicial Affairs, faculty have the option to also recommend a full range of disciplinary sanctions available to Judicial Affairs such as: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Suspension, Indefinite Expulsion or Expulsion; or the "XF" transcript notation (see: Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations and Explanations for Disciplinary Sanctions).


2. "XF" sanctions are assigned only after consultation with the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Assigning an "XF" notation to a student’s transcript should be a rare occurrence and is reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity, which may include repeat misconduct.

3. With any recommendation to Judicial Affairs for an XF grade, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee must include those conditions (if any) under which it would approve the removal of the "XF" sanction from the transcript. Judicial Affairs will consider this recommendation when deciding upon the length of time that the "XF" notation will remain on the student's transcript. When the conditions (if any) are met for removal of the "XF", an academic "F" will remain on the transcript. Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.

4. Through the Judicial Affairs process the student will be able to request a sanction review for the disciplinary sanction assigned, but not for the academic sanction assigned. Once the student is found responsible in the process, the academic sanction recommended by the faculty and/or the Academic Integrity Committee will be put into place. The only exception occurs when the academic sanction assigned by the faculty member or the Academic Integrity Committee is a dismissal from the academic program. On those occasions, students may request a sanction review from the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative.  A student assigned any level of disciplinary sanction will have the right to request a sanction review from the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee.
 
E. Schreyer Honors College Students:

1. For honors courses, as with all other courses, the campus or academic college delivering the course maintains responsibility for reviewing and issuing academic sanctions and/or referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a campus or college finds a Schreyer Scholar has committed, or has not contested, academic misconduct, the Schreyer Honors College is notified and will respond through on internal process that may lead to dismissal from the Schreyer Honors College.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.
 
F. Students Enrolled in Intercollege Majors or Minors:

For intercollege programs, the Dean of the College (UP), the Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee responsible for approving the course instructor for the course in which the alleged violation occurred will determine and manage the appropriate Academic Integrity procedures. These responsibilities will include communicating with the Office of Judicial Affairs or Judicial Affairs designee and the sanction review process, when applicable.

G. Students Enrolled in Other Credit-bearing Activities or Programs:

Students enrolled in other Penn State credit-bearing academic activities or programs (e.g. World Campus, Continuing Education, Cooperative Education, internships, study abroad programs, etc.) are subject to the University Academic Integrity Policy as implemented by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP), Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee who has academic responsibility for the program, course or activity.

H. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate Dean of the College (UP), Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee is responsible for forming Academic Integrity Committees and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They are also responsible for seeing that all cases are reported to Judicial Affairs. The specific information reported to Judicial Affairs should include: a) a copy of the signed Academic Integrity Form, and b) other supporting documents that were established or reviewed while managing the case.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for the central record keeping and disclosing of student disciplinary records at the University, including academic dishonesty cases. Judicial Affairs will disclose student disciplinary records of academic dishonesty to third parties when those records include University-level disciplinary sanctions assigned by the Office of Judicial Affairs or Judicial Affairs designee. The Office of Judicial Affairs will disclose student discipline record information to third parties in accordance with federal law (FERPA) and the University policy on managing Student Discipline Records (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/studentdisciplinaryrecords.shtml).

Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)
Revised: ACUE (9-1-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)
Revised: ACUE (5-1-08)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-09)
Revised: Editorial (4-29-10)

Senate Policy:  49-20, Academic Integrity


G-9: ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Senate Policy:  49-20, Academic Integrity

Introduction:

Recognizing the importance of academic integrity to the Penn State community, the University Faculty Senate adopted a new Academic Integrity policy, Spring 2000. The shared conviction, represented in the procedures that follow, is that academic integrity is best taught and reinforced by faculty as an element of the teaching and learning process. Only in the limited instances in which faculty believe that disciplinary, as well as academic, sanctions are called for should the process move to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Each campus or academic college at University Park, shall interpret and apply Academic Integrity Procedures consistent with University policy.

Campus or college Academic Integrity Committees shall maintain guidelines on ranges of appropriate sanctions for given types of infractions. Academic sanctions range from a warning to removal from the academic program.
 
Procedures:

A. When Academic Misconduct is Suspected:

1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegation while taking into account the confidential nature of the information and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning.

2. When evidence suggests that academic misconduct has occurred, the faculty member will enter the charge and the academic sanction on the campus or college’s Academic Integrity Form, will sign the form, and then convey the charge and sanction to the student for his or her signature (in person or through other methods if necessary). [Note: If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, please refer to Section E for additional clarification.]

3. After reviewing the allegation of academic misconduct with the student, the faculty member may provide the student with an additional period of time (determined by the campus or college procedures) before the student has to make a decision and sign the Academic Integrity Form as to whether or not to accept the academic sanction. A student’s failure to sign and return the Academic Integrity Form, by the specified deadline, consistent with campus or college procedures, will be construed as not contesting the charge or sanction and the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.

4. Normally, it is preferable to pursue academic sanctions with the campus or college, relying on the assignment of grades and course or program-related sanctions to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional University-level disciplinary sanctions. However, where integrity violations are considered to be extreme, the faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action in conjunction with both the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee and the Office of Judicial Affairs. A more detailed and comprehensive listing of the types of academic sanctions faculty may assign to students on the Academic Integrity Form can be found in the document Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations.

5. Throughout the academic integrity process, the authority to administer academic sanctions remains the responsibility of the instructor and the campus or college AI Committee, as appropriate. In situations where a disciplinary sanction is requested and referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs, the application of academic sanctions will be carried out by the campus or college, while the application of any disciplinary sanctions will be carried out by the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee, in consultation with the Academic Integrity Committee of the campus or college.

6. Once a student has been informed that academic misconduct is suspected, the student may not drop the course during the adjudication process. The Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for notifying the Office of the University Registrar when academic misconduct is suspected in a course. Any drop or withdrawal from the course during this time will be reversed. A student who has received an academic sanction as a result of a violation of academic integrity may not drop or withdraw from the course at any time. These drop actions include regular drop, late drop, withdrawal, retroactive late drop and retroactive withdrawal. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. This drop policy may be superseded in exceptional circumstances (i.e. trauma drop). In these cases, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will confer with the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative to determine if the drop is warranted.

In the case of a student who has dropped or withdrawn from a course before notification of an alleged academic integrity violation, the adjudication process can still go forward and a record of violation created, if appropriate.  In such a case, the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, in consultation with the instructor of the course, will confirm that the student is notified of the alleged violation and proceed in accordance with the campus or college procedure.

NOTE: The following statement shall appear on all campus and college Academic Integrity Forms:

"You may not drop or withdraw from this course until this academic integrity case is resolved and you are not found responsible. Any such drop action of the course will be reversed. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, you fail to sign this form, the academic integrity adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures."

7. If, after notification of a violation of academic integrity, a student fails to sign the Academic Integrity Form by the specified deadline, the adjudication process will go forward as defined by campus or college procedures.

8. Depending on the campus or college procedures, the final decision on a sanction may differ from the sanction recommended by the faculty member regardless of whether or not the student accepts responsibility for the violation.  For this reason, a student who has been notified of an alleged academic integrity violation should continue to attend classes and meet course requirements during the adjudication process.  If the student chooses not to attend class or fulfill course expectations while the College completes its review of the academic integrity case, he or she agrees implicitly with the sanctions recommended by the faculty member and will receive their grade as appropriate.  The imposed sanction will be communicated in writing to the student by the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative upon conclusion of the review.

9. The Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for ensuring that the process outlined in this document and the specific campus or college procedures are followed. If either the student or the faculty member involved in the instance of alleged academic misconduct thinks that there has been a procedural problem, then he/she should bring that concern to the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative for resolution.

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form, then forwards the form to the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. In all cases, before submitting the Academic Integrity Form to the Office of Judicial Affairs for recording, it is the responsibility of the campus or college to determine through consultation with Judicial Affairs if the student has prior academic integrity violation(s).

3. If a prior recorded violation is discovered after the student has admitted responsibility and accepted the academic sanction(s), this additional information should be reviewed and a new academic sanction may be considered by the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges in consultation with the faculty member. Information concerning prior academic misconduct may not be used as a basis for judging a student's guilt, but it may be used as a basis for imposing additional academic sanctions. If the sanction is to be changed, a new form should be provided to the student and he/she should have the opportunity to accept or contest the charge given the increase in sanction. If the student accepts, the academic sanction will be assigned and the case will be closed and sent to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the outcome of the case by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.] If the student chooses to contest, refer to section C. If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to maintain the original sanction, the case will be closed and sent on to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee for record keeping. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the outcome of the case by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.]

If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to maintain the originally assigned academic sanction but now add disciplinary sanction(s) the College will assign the academic sanction and send a recommended disciplinary sanction to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee along with the Academic Integrity Form and other relevant documentation. The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will meet with the student and review the recommendation, as well as precedent guidelines in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign.  If the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, he/she must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

If the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges, in consultation with the faculty member, wishes to modify the originally assigned academic sanction to a more serious academic sanction, as well as add a disciplinary sanction, a new form should be provided to the student and he/she should have the opportunity to accept or contest the charge given the increase in sanction.  If the student accepts, the academic sanction will be assigned and a recommended disciplinary sanction will be sent to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee along with the Academic Integrity Form and other relevant documentation.   The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will review the recommendation, as well as precedent guidelines in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign.  If the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, they must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

4. Upon final disposition of the case, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will communicate the outcome to the campus or college Academic Integrity Chair and/or appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the final disposition by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.]

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

1. The faculty member asks the student to sign the campus or college's Academic Integrity Form indicating that the charge or sanction(s) is being contested and then forwards the form to the Academic Integrity Committee Chair or Coordinator (at University Park) or to the appropriate designee at other campuses or colleges.

2. The campus or college Academic Integrity Committee will conduct a review in accordance with their respective procedures.

3. If the student is found responsible for the alleged misconduct by the Academic Integrity committee, the committee will then be informed if the student has prior Academic Integrity violations. This information will be obtained from Judicial Affairs by the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative but not made available to the Academic Integrity Committee until the determination of responsibility occurs. With this information, the AI Committee will determine the sanction to be assigned. If the sanction is only an academic sanction, the Academic Integrity Committee will assign the final charge and sanction and close the case. The Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will be notified of the outcome for record-keeping. If the student is a member of the Schreyer Honors College, the Schreyer Honors College will be notified of the final disposition by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative. [Note: Please refer to Section E for additional clarification.] If the Academic Integrity committee determines that disciplinary sanctions should be considered, the student is notified by the College that he/she has been found responsible for the charge, and that the academic sanction will be put into place. In addition, the student's case will be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee for consideration of a disciplinary sanction. The Academic Integrity committee will also send their recommendation for a disciplinary sanction.

4. When communicating with a student who has been found responsible by an Academic Integrity Committee and has been recommended for disciplinary sanctions, the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee will review precedent guidelines, as well as the Academic Integrity Committee's recommendation, in determining the appropriate disciplinary sanction to assign. If the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee desires to reject the disciplinary recommendation, they must consult with the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative, which may include the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.

5. If the student is found not responsible for the alleged misconduct by the Academic Integrity committee, the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative is responsible for notifying the Office of the University Registrar that academic misconduct has not occurred in the course. The student may drop or withdraw from the course at any time.

D. Sanctions:

1. Faculty may assign a wide range of sanctions to a student found responsible for violating academic integrity. Most faculty may choose to utilize academic sanctions (the modification of grades due to misconduct), but when referring cases to Judicial Affairs, faculty have the option to also recommend a full range of disciplinary sanctions available to Judicial Affairs such as: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Suspension, Indefinite Expulsion or Expulsion; or the "XF" transcript notation (see: Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Integrity Violations and Explanations for Disciplinary Sanctions).


2. "XF" sanctions are assigned only after consultation with the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and Judicial Affairs. Assigning an "XF" notation to a student’s transcript should be a rare occurrence and is reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity, which may include repeat misconduct.

3. With any recommendation to Judicial Affairs for an XF grade, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee must include those conditions (if any) under which it would approve the removal of the "XF" sanction from the transcript. Judicial Affairs will consider this recommendation when deciding upon the length of time that the "XF" notation will remain on the student's transcript. When the conditions (if any) are met for removal of the "XF", an academic "F" will remain on the transcript. Such conditions must reflect both the circumstances of the individual case and consultation among the instructor, the campus or college Academic Integrity Committee, and the Office of Judicial Affairs.

4. Through the Judicial Affairs process the student will be able to request a sanction review for the disciplinary sanction assigned, but not for the academic sanction assigned. Once the student is found responsible in the process, the academic sanction recommended by the faculty and/or the Academic Integrity Committee will be put into place. The only exception occurs when the academic sanction assigned by the faculty member or the Academic Integrity Committee is a dismissal from the academic program. On those occasions, students may request a sanction review from the Dean of the College (UP) and/or the Chancellor (campuses) or his or her representative.  A student assigned any level of disciplinary sanction will have the right to request a sanction review from the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Judicial Affairs designee.
 
E. Schreyer Honors College Students:

1. For honors courses, as with all other courses, the campus or academic college delivering the course maintains responsibility for reviewing and issuing academic sanctions and/or referring cases to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

2. When a campus or college finds a Schreyer Scholar has committed, or has not contested, academic misconduct, the Schreyer Honors College is notified and will respond through on internal process that may lead to dismissal from the Schreyer Honors College.

3. The Schreyer Honors College maintains authority over alleged breaches of academic integrity for its students in all cases in which the violation concerns Schreyer Honors College work, such as thesis research, but in which the student is not enrolled in a course.
 
F. Students Enrolled in Intercollege Majors or Minors:

For intercollege programs, the Dean of the College (UP), the Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee responsible for approving the course instructor for the course in which the alleged violation occurred will determine and manage the appropriate Academic Integrity procedures. These responsibilities will include communicating with the Office of Judicial Affairs or Judicial Affairs designee and the sanction review process, when applicable.

G. Students Enrolled in Other Credit-bearing Activities or Programs:

Students enrolled in other Penn State credit-bearing academic activities or programs (e.g. World Campus, Continuing Education, Cooperative Education, internships, study abroad programs, etc.) are subject to the University Academic Integrity Policy as implemented by the appropriate Dean of the College (UP), Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee who has academic responsibility for the program, course or activity.

H. Record Keeping:

1. The appropriate Dean of the College (UP), Chancellor (campuses), or the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses or his or her designee is responsible for forming Academic Integrity Committees and seeing that students and faculty have ready access to such bodies. They are also responsible for seeing that all cases are reported to Judicial Affairs. The specific information reported to Judicial Affairs should include: a) a copy of the signed Academic Integrity Form, and b) other supporting documents that were established or reviewed while managing the case.

2. Judicial Affairs alone is responsible for the central record keeping and disclosing of student disciplinary records at the University, including academic dishonesty cases. Judicial Affairs will disclose student disciplinary records of academic dishonesty to third parties when those records include University-level disciplinary sanctions assigned by the Office of Judicial Affairs or Judicial Affairs designee. The Office of Judicial Affairs will disclose student discipline record information to third parties in accordance with federal law (FERPA) and the University policy on managing Student Discipline Records (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/studentdisciplinaryrecords.shtml).

 

Approved: ACUI (1-5-78)
Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)
Revised: ACUI (3-29-84)
Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-00)
Revised: ACUE (7-5-01)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-04)
Revised: ACUE (9-1-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)
Revised: ACUE (5-1-08)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-09)
Revised: Editorial (4-29-10)
Revised: ACUE (1-6-11)
Revised: ACUE (3-3-11)


C-2: REGISTRATION

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

 

Principles Related to the Registration Process

·       Registration is a two-step process. Students first register for specific courses and then complete registration by paying tuition and fees.
·       Prior to any registration activity, students meet with their designated academic adviser or appropriate advising center personnel, to plan a course of study. Both the adviser and advisee share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed.
·       Students should complete the registration process and finalize course schedules prior to the first day of the semester.
·       The registration system enables students to register for courses at more than one campus in the same semester.   Some restrictions apply.   

1. Registration System

One registration system registers all students at all locations for credit courses offered through the resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus delivery systems. Non-credit courses follow different registration procedures.

The campus Registrar is responsible for providing semester-by-semester registration instructions to students, advisers, faculty, and staff. Registration instructions are published no later than the publication of the initial Schedule of Courses.

The registration process is continuous in nature. Each student is assigned a "first date to register. " Starting with this first date, the student may initially register and subsequently adjust the registration as appropriate and necessary. The fundamental goal of this process is to finalize course registrations before the first day of the semester.

Students may register for courses using the following options:

·       Using the eLion system  
·       In-person registration at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising center, or continuing education office.
2. Incomplete and Complete Registrations

Students begin the registration process by meeting with their academic adviser and scheduling courses. Registration is completed when the student has paid the appropriate tuition and fees.

Students who have registered for courses receive a statement of tuition and fees from the Bursar's office. This statement includes the amount due as well as possible credits resulting from applicable scholarships, loans, grants, and other forms of financial assistance. In some cases, because of possible financial credits, a student may not be required to make payment to the University. In other cases, a student may be due a refund from the University. In all cases, regardless of amount due, student action is required to complete the registration process.

Failure to complete the registration process by payment of tuition and fees may result in any or all of the following actions:

·       The University will not provide grades for courses attended.
·       Once classes begin, students cannot add, late add, or late drop courses for the current semester if their tuition and fees have not been paid.
·       Students are ineligible to register for future semesters.
·       Students receiving student loans may enter repayment status with their lenders.
·       Students receiving student aid may have some of their aid sources cancelled.
·       Students receiving Federal Work-Study awards cannot be hired.
·       International students may be out of compliance with SEVIS.

Campus Registrars are responsible for contacting students who have failed to complete the registration process. If a student is earnestly seeking to finalize payment, campus Registrars may allow the student to remain in an incomplete registration status. The campus Registrar has the authority to cancel the incomplete registration of any student.

3. Registration Holds

Authorized University offices may place a hold on a student's record that will prevent registration. Because of the seriousness of this action, the office placing the hold is required to notify the student. Holds are placed because of:

·       Academic issues--placed and removed by college deans' offices;
·       Financial issues--placed and removed by offices such as Parking, Library, Bursar;
·       Disciplinary issues--placed and removed by Student Affairs;
·       Health issues--placed and removed by the Health Center;
·       Administrative issues--placed and removed by the University Registrar.

4. Credit Limitations

Students are not permitted to register for more than 19 credits prior to the first day of the semester. After consultation with their academic adviser, students may register for more than 19 credits during the first ten calendar days of the semester.

5. Registration Calendar

The campus Registrar is responsible for developing a registration calendar for each semester. Consultation should occur among those campus Registrars at campuses where students typically enroll at multiple locations.

The registration calendar is prioritized according to the following scheme:

a.   Students with priority needs (authorized categories include honor students, students with disabilities, and student athletes);
b.   Graduate degree students;
c.    Undergraduate degree students (descending order of total credits completed plus currently enrolled credits);
d.   Provisional and nondegree students (register on a space-available basis).

The process for determining priority needs categories of students is as follows:

1) Requests for priority registration shall be endorsed by a university dean or delegate.
2) Requests for priority registration shall be in writing and submitted to the University Registrar.
3) The request shall specify:
a. the group of students for whom priority registration is requested,
b. the rationale for priority registration status and how the request meets the criteria guidelines (see below),
c. the number of students in the group,
d. the requested time frame for implementation.
4) The University Registrar will bring new requests to the Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid (ARSSA) Committee of the Faculty Senate for review.
5) The requestor, or designee, will come to present their request to ARSSA at a regularly scheduled committee meeting.
6) ARSSA will deliberate in closed session, make a determination, and notify the requestor of the decision.
7) Guiding principles used in considering requests:
a. Compelling Scheduling Need - some factor of the group restricts the times that the group may take classes.
b. Overall benefits outweigh detriment to the university community at large.
8) The ARSSA Committee shall report annually to the Faculty Senate on the status of Priority Registration.

6. Late Registration

Late registration is defined as registering for the first time on or after the first day of the semester. A late registration fee, however, is only assessed when late registration occurs after the end of the regular drop/add period.

7. Registration Adjustments--Before the First Day of the Semester

After the initial registration, students may adjust their course registration as appropriate and necessary using any of the methods available for registration.

8. Registration Adjustments--First Ten Days of the Semester

Once the semester begins, students must have completed the registration process in order to add courses. Students with an incomplete registration are not permitted to add courses. Regardless of registration status, students are permitted to drop courses. The student may make these changes using any of the methods available for registration.

A proportionate length of time is provided for summer session courses.


9. Registration Adjustments--After the Tenth Day of the Semester

Adding a course after the tenth day of the semester is a Late Add and requires approval of the course instructor. Students requesting a Late Add should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding missed work. Late Adds must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Add.

Dropping a course after the tenth day of the semester and through the end of the twelfth week of the semester is a Late Drop. For courses offered for less than a full semester, the late drop period ends after 80% of the course has been completed. Students requesting a Late Drop should be carefully advised and cautioned regarding the potential impact of delaying normal progress towards graduation, possible loss of some forms of student aid, and likely ineligibility of coverage on parental insurance policies. Late Drops must be processed in person at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advising centers, or continuing education office, or using the eLion system. A $6.00 processing fee is charged for a Late Drop.

Students who have not completed the registration process by payment of tuition and fees are not permitted to Late Add nor Late Drop courses.

The time periods for Late Add and Late Drop are pro rated for courses offered for other than a fifteen-week semester calendar.

All Late Drops are subject to the credit limitations established by University Faculty Senate policy. If a provisional or nondegree student becomes a degree candidate, the Late Drop credits used while in provisional or nondegree status are carried forward to the degree program status. If a baccalaureate or associate degree candidate becomes a nondegree student, the Late Drop credits used while in degree candidacy count in the total Late Drop credits available to the nondegree student.

10. Limitation of Retroactive Registration

After the last class day of the semester, registration for that semester is closed. After this date, requests to complete a previously initiated registration are subject to administrative review and may be denied. Retroactive registration is only available for courses for which the student was scheduled during the semester. In other words, this process cannot be used to add courses to the student's schedule after the semester ends.

Requests for retroactive registration must be initiated by the end of the 9th month following the end of the semester for which retroactive registration is being requested.

If the retroactive registration request is approved:

•  Semester tuition and fees will be charged at the current rates effective with the date on which the retroactive registration request was initiated.

•  Full payment of tuition and fees is required before the retroactive registration is recorded. Full payment must be made within one month of approval.

•  All previously scheduled courses will be recorded. Courses may not be added or dropped from the student's schedule.

•  The Registrar's office will contact the course instructor(s) to seek final grades. In the event that a grade for a course cannot be obtained from the instructor, the instructor's department head will provide the grade.

11. Administrative Course Cancellation

The Administrative Course Cancellation procedure is available to correct errors. It is not to be used as an alternative to normal registration procedures.

If a student identifies a course for which registration was not intended, the student must contact the department offering the course. The department staff will initiate an Administrative Course Cancellation form and ask the student to sign the request. The department staff forward the form to the course instructor. If the instructor has no evidence that the student participated in the course and makes this declaration of non-participation by signing the form, the form is returned to the department office, for forwarding to the campus Registrar's office. The campus Registrar will remove the course from the student's academic record. This procedure is available one semester beyond the semester in which the error occurred. After this time, the Faculty Senate must act on the course cancellation request.

12. Multiple Campus Registration

Each student is assigned a home campus at which the student must be registered.

Students who are part of a multi-campus college are expected to first register at their home campus; they may then register at any campus within the college without special permission or restriction.

Students who are not part of a multi-campus college first register for courses offered by their home campus. Permission is required for registration at any other campus. Permission is granted by the college dean or academic department offering the course and processed by the campus Registrar. At least one half of the student's total semester credits must be from courses offered by the home campus.

13. Section Changes

A section change is an administrative change to a student's registration that results in moving a student from one section of a course to another. Section changes may not be initiated directly by the student using eLion. All section changes must be processed by a Penn State staff member using ISIS screens ARURD or ARURG.

Section changes may be processed through the last day of classes. When processing a section change, there is no impact on late drop credits nor are late drop/add fees applicable.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)
Revised: Editorial (9-29-00)
Revised: ACUE (4-7-05)
Revised: ACUE (6-7-07)
Revised: Editorial (11-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (6-5-08)
Revised: Editorial (1-28-09)
Revised: Editorial (3-25-09)
Revised: Editorial (6-2-11)

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

 


L-6: MINORS - ENTRANCE AND CERTIFICATION

(Implementation – Fall 2011)

AAPP L-6 was revised February 3, 2011, and applies only to students graduating in December 2011 or thereafter. Students who graduate prior to this date are bound to the earlier L-6 Minor procedures.

Senate Policy:  59-00, Requirements for the Minor

Introduction


The University Faculty Senate amended Policy 59-00 on October 19, 2010, to read: “Requirements for a minor may be completed at any campus location offering the specified courses for the minor.” In effect, this makes it possible for Penn State students to meet the requirements of many of the University’s minors regardless of their campus of residence. The Senate vote recognizes several important Penn State curricular principles:

·       University courses may be offered at any Penn State location at which the dean or chancellor certifies the availability of qualified faculty and necessary facilities. This “a-course-is-a course” policy contributes to the development of professional faculty disciplinary communities and curricular integrity, as well as to Penn State’s commitment to its organizational and academic structure as a single university dispersed across the Commonwealth.
 
·       The University distinguishes between majors and minors. Senate Policy 83-80 was amended August 31, 2010 to make explicit each college’s authority to require that up to 24 credits of coursework in a major “be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned.” The amendment recognizes the significant depth and disciplinary mastery associated with majors, the obligation of deans and chancellors to certify the quality of faculty and of majors at their campuses, and the role of regular faculty and student learning community interaction in a student’s chosen area of specialization.

Minors do not certify comparable levels of domain mastery. Senate Policy 59-00 defines a minor as “an academic program of at least 18 credits that supplements a major.” The breadth of minors at Penn State, some located in a single domain and others interdisciplinary and/or intercollege, speaks to the University’s understanding of these programs as curricular complements. Although some minors can and do exceed complementary status, minors are designed to provide familiarity with domains and practices that can enhance a student’s major programmatic studies rather than produce the level of domain mastery certified by the completion of a major.

The amended 59-00 also states that, “Students may not change from a campus that offers their major to a campus that does not offer their major for the purpose of completing a minor.” The intent is not to prevent a student from enrolling for a course necessary for a minor at a campus other than their campus-of-residence. Such enrollments have always been possible. Rather, the stipulation recognizes the major as the University’s fundamental educational commitment and the minor as a secondary complement.

Procedure:

1.   Students wishing to declare a minor must use eLion unless the minor has a Faculty Senate-approved entrance requirement, such as an audition or portfolio review, or carries restrictions necessitated by explicit articulation or licensing requirements. Under these circumstances, eLion will generate an automatic message referring the student to the unit with administrative oversight. Upon approval, the unit will enter the student into the minor on ISIS screen ARUSAN.

If the student has declared a minor, but then terminates degree enrollment, the minor declaration becomes void. The student must submit a new eLion minor declaration after receiving degree status through the reenrollment process.
 
2.   Intent to pursue a minor may be declared after the student has achieved at least fifth semester classification, but prior to the end of the late drop period of the student’s final semester. In those instances where a minor requires an entry fee or entrance requirement, the student must declare before the end of the regular add/drop period of their final semester. The fee will be applied to the student’s semester bill at the time the intent is submitted.
 
3.   The academic authority for undergraduate minors is established in a college or colleges through the AAPP P-1 and P-3 processes. A student's ability to complete a University minor independent of the campus at which he or she is registered, however, requires a means by which local academic decision-making and record-keeping are optimized.

Therefore, some administrative actions for undergraduate minors are dispersed such that colleges granted authority for a minor retain academic authority and oversight, while delegating responsibility for degree audit substitutions, certification of minor completion, and similar actions to the associate dean of a student's college of enrollment. Such delegation must occur through consultation with the associate dean of the college granted authority for the minor through the AAPP P-1 or P-3 process.
 
4.   During the seventh week of the student's final semester, the University Registrar will distribute the list of minor candidates and their degree audits to the office of the appropriate associate dean or designee.
 
5.   The associate dean or designee will certify completion of minor requirements on each student record by adding an approval indicator on ISIS screen path ARUGB.
 
6.   The Office of the University Registrar will prepare a minor certificate for each approved student. The certificate will include the signatures of the President of the Board of Trustees, the President of the University, and the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University. The minor certificate will be presented to the graduate along with the diploma as long as the minor is approved on ISIS screen path ARUGB by the end of the 13th week of classes. Certificates produced for minors approved after this deadline may need to be mailed to the student.
 
7.   The Registrar is responsible for recording on the student's academic record the successful completion of the minor program at the time the baccalaureate degree is conferred.

NOTE: A minor may be awarded retroactively through the following process: The associate dean or designee certifies that a student has met the requirements for the minor at the time of graduation and forwards this information to the University Registrar in writing. The Registrar adds the appropriate notation to the student's transcript. The certificate for the minor is produced and mailed to the student.

The following conditions apply to the retroactive awarding of minors:

·       The minor must have been in existence at the time the student graduated.
 
·       Awarding of a retroactive minor is limited to five years after the student's graduation.
 
·       If a fee is assessed for the minor, it must be paid to the Bursar before the minor is approved by the associate dean or designee. Fees are assessed at the rate in effect at the time the minor is retroactively awarded.
 
·       Any minor that has an entrance requirement (e.g., portfolio, audition, or plan of study) may not be awarded retroactively.

Senate Policy:  59-00, Requirements for the Minor


Approved: ACUI (4-7-83)
Revised: ACAS (6-10-88)
Revised: ACAS (9-8-89)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-95)
Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (1-21-99)
Revised: ACUE (3-2-00)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (1-8-04)
Revised: Editorial (4-9-07)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (6-4-09)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (2-3-11)
Revised: ACUE (5-5-11)


L-2: DEGREE CHECKING

Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Graduation Requirement Review

1. Students who expect to graduate at the end of the semester should inform the Registrar of their intent to graduate through the eLion 'Graduating this Semester' application for that semester.

2. Tentative graduation approval indicators will automatically be entered on the student's record by the eLion 'Graduating this Semester' application and be displayed on ISIS screens ARUGU and ARUGA.

3. Each semester, a degree audit for each student who indicated the intent to graduate (i.e., those who have informed the Registrar of an intent to graduate through the eLion 'Graduating this Semester' application) is produced by the Registrar's office and will be available to college deans through eDDS (eDocument Distribution System).

4. Beginning with the fourth week* of the semester, the Registrar's office provides each college with a bi-weekly report of students who appear unable to meet the University graduation requirements for that semester. Beginning with the twelfth week*, reports that identify the students with potential graduation problems will be forwarded to colleges on a weekly basis. Additional reports, listing students with failing and incomplete grades for the graduation semester, will also be provided to the colleges.

5. It is the college's responsibility to address all the problems identified by the reports, either by resolving them, or by removing the student from the graduation list. To do so, the college must work in collaboration with the student's major department, regardless of the student's location or registration status. If, after review of the problems reports, it is determined that a student is to be removed from the graduation list, the removal will be made by the college using ISIS screen ARUGU, and the student's major department or college will notify the student.

6. The Registrar's Office is responsible for verifying the following graduation requirements:

·       grade point average requirements for graduation with distinction (Senate Policy 88-30)
·       a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average (Senate Policy 82-40)
·       no DF or NG grades on transcript (Senate Policies 48-40 and 48-50.3)
·       the minimum total number of credits required for the degree

Students with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average, with ongoing DF or NG grades, or with fewer than the minimum total number of credits required for the degree are ineligible to graduate and must be removed from the graduation list. The University Faculty Senate may approve exceptions, but any approved exceptions must be forwarded, in writing, to the college and to the Registrar's office no later than 3:00 PM on the final grade date shown on ISIS screen AMMU. Students with unresolved graduation problems by the deadline will be removed from the graduation list by the Registrar's office using ISIS screen ARUGI, and the student's college(s) will be notified. The college will then notify the student of the removal.

7. The college, in collaboration with the student's major department, is responsible for verifying the following graduation requirements:

·       completion of all course requirements for the degree (Senate Policies 82-20 and 82-60) and appropriate grades (i.e. C or better, Senate Policy 82-44)
·       resolution of "R" (research) grades for courses applicable to the degree program (Senate Policy 49-40)
·       residency requirements (Senate Policies 83-80)

Students who have not met the above requirements are ineligible to graduate and must be removed from the graduation list by the college, unless the college has approved and recorded exceptions. Beginning five days prior to the final grade date shown on ISIS screen AMMU, colleges must remove ineligible students from the graduation list using ISIS screen ARUGU, electronically notify the Registrar's Office of the removal, and notify the student of the removal. All students who are ineligible for graduation must be removed from the list using ARUGU and the Registrar's office must be notified of the removal by 3:00 PM on the final grade date shown on screen AMMU.

* Proportionate times are used for summer session degree checking procedures.

 
Approved: ACUI (1-20-83)
Revised: ACAS (6-12-87)
Revised: ACAS (10-14-88)
Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (12-6-07)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-10)
Revised: Editorial (9-30-10)
Revised: Editorial (12-2-10)

P: CURRICULAR PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES

Preface

Penn State University's baccalaureate and associate degree programs are offered by its colleges. Academic program authority may be lodged in a single college or shared among several. A single program may be offered jointly by several colleges. Program delivery may be accomplished through traditional single-college residence-based instruction, joint college and campus instruction, and World Campus. New technologies, learning assessment, the full involvement of university-wide disciplinary communities, and increasingly sophisticated approaches to learning itself encourage an openness to experiment with delivery protocols and recognition that program outcomes are the primary basis of formative and summative academic assessment. In all cases, the University's academic degree programs must receive administrative authorization granted by the Provost through the Office of Undergraduate Education and by the University Faculty Senate. The principles, guidelines and procedures that follow provide the authorization protocols to offer, deliver, and terminate academic programs.

I. Curricular Principles and Guidelines

Curricular programs should reflect disciplinary integrity across all campuses of the University.

Curricular integrity requires planning and implementation that reflects quality among units with common curricular interests, regardless of location or delivery mode.

Decisions regarding undergraduate programs, majors, options, and minors require both academic and administrative review and approval.

The Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education serves as the Provost's designee and may review curricular proposals on the Provost's behalf.   In this capacity, the Office of Undergraduate Education is available for curricular consultation involving programs and may facilitate arbitration among colleges and other units.

Academic review and approval is conducted by the faculty through the University Faculty Senate. Academic review ensures adherence to the University's standards of academic quality and curricular integrity.

Administrative review and approval is conducted by the Office of the Provost. Administrative review ensures consideration and fulfillment of the broader University mission, enrollment management, local needs, and resource availability and use, as well as overall academic quality and curricular integrity.

New programs must be justified by considerations of quality, cost, enrollment, impact upon availability of senior faculty to engage in lower division instruction, implications for other programs and courses; program duplication: university, college, and campus mission; market need and demand; and resource feasibility.

Unique new majors, minors, and options should be proposed only when the variation from existing curricula is substantial, and when the program fulfills a demonstrable demand by students that is likely to continue.

Proposals for academic programs, program amendments, and program terminations are developed in consultation with disciplinary communities and administrative units and reflect strategic as well as academic deliberation.

The initial intention to develop a program proposal must be shared across the University utilizing an ACUE Prospectus, a process which must be completed prior to submission of a P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal.

All proposals to add or drop programs must reference common criteria (see below, V: Common Program Justification Criteria).

The Provost informs the Board of Trustees when proposals to add or drop programs are authorized. Administratively authorized new programs, program drops, and changes in the names of programs are implemented only after the Board of Trustees has been informed of the curricular action.

The authorization to implement new and amended programs is issued by the Office of Undergraduate Education to the dean of the proposing college and disseminated to the university community, including Undergraduate Admissions, University Registrar, the Provost, University Faculty Senate, and others.

II. ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus for New Academic Programs, Delivery of Academic Programs at Additional Campuses, and Phase-Out of Academic Programs

The Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education facilitates ACUE's consideration of new academic majors, options, minors, substantial program amendment likely to carry implications for other colleges or delivery units, program name changes, and the delivery of existing academic programs at additional campuses during the pre-proposal germination period.  Accordingly, a curricular program prospectus must precede development and submission of formal P-1 (New Undergraduate Major, Option or Minor), P-3 (Moving/Discontinuing Degree Programs), and P-6 (Academic Program Phase-Out) proposals.  The curricular program prospectus process is based upon the 2005 recommendations from the Joint Committee on Curricular Integrity appointed by the Provost and University Faculty Senate. The prospectus must identify strategic considerations and issues of academic quality associated with new program offerings. Prospectuses initiate effective preliminary consultation within disciplines and across the breadth of the University utilizing the ACUE membership.

World Campus must be considered as an additional campus for purposes of P-1, P-3 and P-6 program proposals and the prospectuses that precede them. Accordingly, a college offering an existing program that wishes to move the program to World Campus, or to deliver the program through World Campus as well as through residence instruction, must treat World Campus as an additional location. As World Campus is a delivery unit, rather than an independent academic unit, all programs delivered through the World Campus must be authorized for delivery through an academic college. P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals and prospectuses for World Campus program delivery must be submitted jointly by the authorized college and World Campus.

The curricular program prospectus requires three steps:

Step One: The college associate dean in which the proposed academic program will be housed must submit a brief curricular program prospectus utilizing the on-line submission form. The information collected should enable ACUE membership to engage in a collegial conversation centered on the need for the program, resource availability, and impact on other academic units across the University. Unlike a fully developed P-1, P-3, or P-6, the prospectus is intended to generate early consultation at ACUE and to identify or flesh out issues that must be addressed in the full P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal.

Prospectuses submitted by a college's associate dean a minimum of one week before the next ACUE meeting will be vetted at that meeting. Arrangements may be made under extraordinary circumstances for proposals submitted during the summer.

Step Two:  Curricular program prospectuses will be distributed electronically by the Office of Undergraduate Education to ACUE membership, including the Office of the University Faculty Senate, prior to each ACUE meeting.  ACUE members should use this opportunity for formative consultation with appropriate colleagues in their college, across the University, and with the originating college.

Step Three:  Following discussion of the curricular program prospectus at ACUE, an ACUE committee consisting of the ACUE chair, the University College associate dean who serves on ACUE, the chair of the Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs and an Office of Undergraduate Education associate dean will review the prospectus. The ACUE committee may also invite others as appropriate to add expertise. The ACUE committee will provide a brief recommendation to the submitting college, taking into consideration the ACUE discussion, curricular integrity, and strategic university considerations such as physical, fiscal, and faculty resources.

Upon receipt of the ACUE recommendations, a full P-1, P-3, or P-6 proposal, including evidence of consultation and attention to ACUE recommendations, may be submitted to the University Faculty Senate (P-1, P-6) or to the Office of Undergraduate Education (P-3) as appropriate. P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals must include a copy of the ACUE recommendations.

III. P-1, P-3, P-6 Authority and Expectations

The Provost, as chief academic officer, maintains authority for the Academic Administrative Policies and Procedures that govern the undergraduate curriculum and may, in consultation with faculty, deans, and other appropriate offices, make exceptions to them.

Colleges and departments are required to engage in formal consultation when proposing new (P-1) undergraduate majors, options, and minors; or when moving or discontinuing degree programs among colleges or college locations, including World Campus (P-3); and academic program phase-out (P-6).

P-1, P-3, and P-6 proposals from the non-University Park campuses must be submitted by the appropriate Chancellor to the Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses (VPCC) for consultation and endorsement prior to their entry into the University Faculty Senate and Office of the Provost approval paths described elsewhere in P: Curricular Principles and Procedures.  In each case, the VPCC and the Office of Undergraduate Education will consider relevant academic and strategic factors, including those listed below in V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

It is important to distinguish between program phase-out (P-6), which refers to procedures by which degree programs are dropped, and department phase-out, the procedures by which academic departments are discontinued. When proposing the phase-out of a department, reference should be made to the "Faculty Senate Guidelines for Review of the Establishment, Reorganization, or Discontinuation of Academic Organizational Units" (http://www.psu.edu/ufs/guide/reviewacadunits.html).

It is necessary to complete separate proposals, and to receive separate approvals, to phase out a program and a department in which it resides. A department may be phased out without discontinuing programs, which may be moved to alternative departments or colleges. The P procedures do not pertain to departmental phase-out.

IV. Consultation

Consultation provides the foundation of disciplinary continuity and scholarship and a basis for principled collegial faculty governance. Evaluative analyses and assessments are accepted as contributions toward a common goal of academic coherence and achievement and do not in and of themselves restrict the development, alteration, or phasing out of programs.

Consultation should be conducted via electronic media such as those employing summary e-mail statements with detailed attachments or web links. It must be possible to forward attachments and/or links to appropriate colleagues without passwords or similar limitations.

ACUE deans are the primary academic conduit among Penn State schools and colleges for purposes of consultation. A current ACUE roster is maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Education and is available for purposes of consultation as a LISTSERVE.

Consultation must include those likely to have a common interest in a proposed curricular action and include any faculty group or program that would reasonably and predictably offer courses or programs that seek academic outcomes similar to the proposed program. This includes all ACUE deans, academic units within the college in which the proposal is made, other colleges in which the proposed program/major, minor, or option is offered or will be offered or will in any way be directly affected.

Consultative comments, and responses to them, must be included in proposals sent to the University Faculty Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs, which will forward the correspondence with the proposal when it is delivered to the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education for further review.

Consultation is conducted with an expectation of timeliness that includes a minimum of ten business days in which consultative responses may be returned electronically. Reasonable extensions should be provided at the request of an ACUE dean.

The proposing unit should respond electronically and in a timely manner to those who have submitted concerns, objections, or exceptions to proposals.

V.   Common Program Justification Criteria

P-1 and P-3 proposals must include current, localized data and information relevant to several academic and strategic elements. These include, but may not be limited to:

1. Relationship of proposal to university and college mission.

2. Learning quality indicators such as:

         A. On-going availability of a minimum of three or more standing faculty;

         B. Program leadership by senior-level faculty;

         C. Availability of a standing faculty cohort academically and disciplinarily aligned with the proposed program;

         D. Ability to move student program cohorts through in a timely manner;

         E. Impact on the University's preference to utilize, whenever possible, standing or tenure track senior level faculty in lower division undergraduate courses;

         F. Availability of faculty to deliver currently authorized, as well as new programs;

         G. Availability of a sufficient number of program electives within the discipline and in supporting area of study;

         H. University-wide curricular integrity that includes disciplinary community engagement and the avoidance of curricular drift;  

          I. Ability to minimize the need for core course substitutions and explicit rationale for, and justification of, necessary core substitutions.

4. Impact on Penn State college and campus enrollments and flow of students among campuses;

5. Market need and demand documented by current, valid, and reliable evidence;

6. Physical and fiscal resource availability (please include the official Faculty Senate costing analysis form as well as other relevant information);  

7. Strategic and academic approval and support demonstrated by the sign-off of the appropriate chancellor and/or dean;

8. Disciplinary community and administrative consultation.

VI. Consortium Program Authorization and Delivery

Programs may arise on occasion that support hybrid administrative and delivery structures. P-1 and P-3 processes allow colleges to share authorization to deliver programs and to award degrees. Under special circumstances involving accreditation, licensing, or other extraordinary elements, a college that does not have authorization to award a particular degree may nonetheless deliver the degree curriculum as an "extended degree program" through the auspices of an authorized Penn State college.

The organizational structure of the Commonwealth Campuses and the University College, University Park, new technology developments in course delivery, and the University's commitment to viewing Penn State as one university also enable a consortium of Penn State colleges and/or campuses to integrate faculty, administrative, fiscal, and physical resources to deliver a single academic program. This differs from the above examples in that consortium degree authorization and delivery is based upon the sum of consortium resources across members, rather than the presence of all necessary elements within a single campus or academic unit.

Consortium Programs must meet all the Common Program Justification Criteria detailed in Section V above. Consortium Programs also generate the need for additional elements of strategic and academic planning because of the special responsibilities carried by each unit to contribute to the success of the students and faculty from beyond any single campus. Toward this end Consortium P-1, P-3 and P-6 proposals should, in addition to the Common Program Justification Criteria, include (but may not be limited to):

1.   A single Consortium proposal with a sign-off from each Program Consortium member Chancellor and/or Dean and the Vice President of Commonwealth Campuses;
 
2.   The (a) strategic and (b) academic rationales for developing a consortium for purposes of the specific program under consideration;
 
3.   A clear description of cost and revenue sharing among consortium participants;
 
4.   A clear description of advising arrangements to meet the needs of students within a consortium program regardless of their primary campus affiliation;
 
5.   Anticipated faculty, physical, fiscal, and other resources from each of the participating campuses;
 
6.   Identification of (a) campus program leadership and of (b) consortium program leadership who will hold authority for the program at the campus and at the consortium level.
 
7.   A plan for clear communication to future students indicating the proposed program's special characteristics, including, but not limited to, curricular delivery that may include a combination of on-line, video, and classroom-based instruction, and courses that may be distributed across multiple campuses and available only at a campus other than the student's home campus.
 
8.   An enforceable "Exit Plan" strategy should one or more campuses become unable to meet its faculty or other resource responsibilities, or fail to generate appropriate enrollment, or for any reason wish to discontinue its role within the consortium;
 
9.   Approvals are granted to consortiums, rather than to campuses. All members must be signatories on the request to restructure the consortium. The revised consortium must seek approval through the P-3 process. That process includes submission of a new prospectus.

Additionally, the Vice President of Commonwealth Campuses, the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education, and the Provost may, at their individual discretion, require a memo of understanding with participant sign-off, or a meeting of principle administrators during the formative and/or review process, to assure common understandings and expectations.

Approved: ACUE (9-5-02)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-04, 10-7-04)
Revised: Editorial (10-26-05)
Revised: ACUE (11-3-05)
Revised: ACUE (3-2-06)
Revised: ACUE (7-6-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)
Revised: Editorial (2-4-09)
Revised: ACUE (1-7-10)


P-3: MOVING/DISCONTINUING DEGREE PROGRAMS AMONG COLLEGES AND CAMPUSES

P-3 proposals are the basis of the administrative review and approval process that enable a second college or multiple colleges to deliver programs already authorized in another college; that enable a college to deliver an existing program at an additional campus within its purview or through the World Campus; that authorize the closure of a major or minor program in a college or campus so long as that program will continue to be offered elsewhere at the University; that authorize dropping an option within a program so long as the program in which the option was located will continue to be offered; and that, under extraordinary circumstances, may authorize the delivery of extended degrees. Note that a P-6 proposal is required to terminate a program when doing so will completely remove it from the University's offerings. As with P-1 and P-6 proposals, P-3 proposals must be preceded by submission of an ACUE Curricular Program Prospectus. Following the completion of the prospectus process, a P-3 proposal may be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Education. It must address all relevant strategic and academic issues, including those outlined in Academic Administrative Policy P, Section V: Common Program Justification Criteria.

P-3 Proposals

One or more colleges may be authorized to offer degree programs. This authorization has sometimes been referred to as academic program sponsorship or program sponsorship transfer. The Provost is responsible for administratively authorizing the moving, sharing, and discontinuance of academic sponsorship of existing degree programs for all colleges and campuses. The University Faculty Senate does not take part in this authorization.

Three types of sharing and transferring of sponsorship may occur:

(1) Joint sponsorship in which, in addition to the original sponsoring college, one or more additional colleges also are awarded authority to offer the existing program. Graduates in these programs belong to and are certified for graduation by the college in which they are enrolled.

(2) Handoff sponsorship in which the authority to offer an academic program is transferred from one college to another. Here, an original sponsoring college withdraws its academic authority for a program and another college or group of colleges is awarded authority in its place.

(3) Extended programs are discussed below.

In every case in which a program is transferred or shared, every effort must be made to insure curricular integrity by minimizing the number of core course substitutions at the newly offering campus or college. Disciplinary communities are nonetheless encouraged to consider the development of program options beyond the core that reflect local expertise, student demand, and market need.

Deans retain the authority to move a degree program within a college without initiating the P-3 process. When such actions are taken, the college must notify the Office of Undergraduate Education, which will then inform other offices as appropriate.

Extended Programs

There is a third type of shared program referred to as an "extended degree." Based upon extraordinary circumstances, such as specialized licensing and/or accreditation requirements, a single college may offer its programs by extending their availability to additional campuses. In this arrangement, only the "extending" college has the authority to award the program degree, although the degree may be delivered at multiple campuses. A college must submit a P-3 proposal to the Office of Undergraduate Education that includes endorsement from both the extending college and the unit(s) at which the extended degree will be offered.

P-3 Extended Program Probationary Period

Four years after a program has been authorized for delivery by an additional campus/college or through World Campus through a P-3 process, a program review will be conducted. The review will be conducted by the authorizing college in consultation with the Office of Undergraduate Education. The review may consist of requests for evidence, including items 1-7 below, and additional evaluations or data as necessary. The review may be conducted through site visits, outside evaluations, or other appropriate means as determined by the authorizing college in consultation with the Office of Undergraduate Education and the delivering unit.

The additional location offering the program will provide evidence to the authorizing college and to the Office of Undergraduate Education that the following criteria are being achieved:

1. Adequate faculty and staff resources exist

2. The program aligns with university and unit missions

3. Market need and demand exists to maintain sufficient student enrollments

4. Students are able to maintain timely academic progress

5. Adequate equipment, library and information technology resources, clinical and cooperative arrangements, or other special facilities exist

6. Adequate financial resources have been established to assure program continuation

7. Assessment data indicate that students are achieving the program's learning objectives

The provost may, through the Office of Undergraduate Education, end the P-3 probationary period by granting joint or handoff program sponsorship status to the unit(s); or the provost may, based upon an unsatisfactory evaluation of the reviewed criteria, require the P-3 offering to be phased out; or conditions may be established, including a limited time period to complete them, that must be met to avoid P-3 program phase out.

The four year review of extended programs triggers an additional set of questions and possible administrative responses. Assuming a positive evaluation of criteria 1-7 above (and/or other review criteria as appropriate), a determination will be made by the Office of Undergraduate Education in consultation with the authorizing college and the delivering unit as to whether (a) extended status should be continued or (b) extended status will be replaced by joint or handoff program sponsorship status. The decision will include elements such as licensing, accreditation rules, and other unique circumstances.

If the extended status is maintained, the next consideration of extended status will take place five years hence.

If the authorizing college determines that an extended status should not be continued and that the program should not be continued by the delivering unit, then the college will work in consultation with the Office of Undergraduate Education and the delivering unit to phase out the program at that location through the P-3 process.

P-3 Timeline

•  Preliminary college and disciplinary consultation and consultation between appropriate campus chancellor(s) and Vice President for Commonwealth Campuses

•  Submission of prospectus to ACUE by College Associate Dean

•  ACUE Prospectus deliberation and written response to submitting college

•  College development of formal proposal, including appropriate consultation, data collection, and research

•  Submission of P-3 proposal by College Dean to Office of Undergraduate Education

•  Office of Undergraduate Education review

•  Provost review of Office of Undergraduate Education action

•  Office of Undergraduate Education memo to implement distributed to appropriate offices

•  Implementation the following semester or later

•  Year Four P-3 probationary review

Approved: ACUI (10-25-79)
Approved: Provost Eddy (12-5-79)
Approved: Provost Brighton (8-25-97)
Approved: Provost Erickson (9-20-00)
Revised: Editorial (4-18-06)
Revised: ACUE (3-1-07)
Revised: ACUE (2-7-08)
Revised: ACUE (4-2-09)
Revised: ACUE (9-2-10)
Revised: ACUE (4-7-11)

A-11: ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS

Introduction:

University Faculty Senate legislation (3-31-98) identifies policies to guide the development, implementation, and maintenance of articulation agreements with other institutions. Articulation agreements bypass normal admission procedures and are generally understood to involve agreements between Penn State and another institution to admit students to Penn State, to agree to transfer courses in a block, or otherwise to encourage movement from the other institution to Penn State.

Articulation agreements between Penn State and other colleges and universities are to be consistent throughout the University and equitable to all constituents, both within and outside the University. An articulation agreement should not have a negative impact on any Penn State program or campus in terms of enrollment or academic quality but should be made from the perspective that it will enhance the University. Students admitted to one of the University's academic programs through an articulation agreement must be held to equivalent entrance and admission requirements as are in effect for Penn State matriculated students.

Articulation agreements should be viewed as a component of Penn State's academic advising system. The agreement is to provide a procedure for students who begin their college studies at some non-Penn State location and then complete them by earning a Penn State degree. The procedure is to include an outline of the most appropriate courses to schedule in pursuing a plan to matriculate at Penn State and complete a Penn State degree program.

Senate Policy on Articulation Agreements (see Senate Agenda, 3-31-98):

1.   The executive vice president and provost is the University officer responsible for administratively authorizing, extending, or terminating articulation agreements with other academic institutions relating to the admission, curricular offerings, enrollments, or awarding of degrees for academic programs and students at all college and campus locations.
2.   Academic deans may propose to enter into, extend, or terminate articulation agreements with external institutions and agencies or with graduate and professional units within the University.
3.   Proposals are to be developed after consultations with appropriate academic and administrative officers within the University, including other deans.
4.   When an agreement is proposed with an institution that is located within the geographic service area of a Penn State campus, the dean/chancellor of that campus must be consulted before an agreement is finalized. An articulation agreement should not have a negative impact on any Penn State program or campus in terms of enrollment.
5.   Whenever appropriate, articulation agreements shall include the provision for multiple campuses and colleges of the University to participate in the agreement.
6.   All academic and administrative policies of the University will be honored in the proposed articulation agreement. This includes, but is not limited to, Policy 42-82, Credit by Transfer from Other Institutions:  Accredited U.S. Institutions, which stipulates that course work completed at an accredited college or university may be evaluated for transfer credit if passed with a grade equivalent to A, B, or C at Penn State and useful to the candidate's program of study at Penn State. As such, if an articulation agreement is using a block grant approach, only courses with a C or better will become a part of the student's Penn State academic record. An articulation agreement should not have a negative impact on any Penn State program or campus in terms of academic quality.
7.   When a student is admitted to the University through an articulation agreement, the entrance and admission requirements for enrollment in a college and entrance to a major will be no less than those in effect at the time for Penn State matriculated students.
8.   The Undergraduate Admissions Office will evaluate the application and scholastic credentials for students seeking entry to the University through an articulation agreement.
9.   Articulation agreements involving undergraduate students shall be subject to a review by the Senate Committee on Admissions, Records, Scheduling, and Student Aid (ARSSA) before being authorized by the provost. Articulation agreements involving graduate students shall be subject to a review by the Graduate Council before being authorized by the provost.
10.                 Once established, articulation agreements should be reviewed periodically for viability by the sponsoring unit, approximately every five years.
11.                 A register of authorized articulation agreements will be maintained by the vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education.
12.                 Articulation agreements authorized prior to the approval and implementation of these recommendations shall be reviewed and, if necessary, modified to ensure that they are in accord with this policy.

Administrative Procedures for Articulation Agreements:

1.   All requests to establish, renew, or terminate an articulation agreement must be initiated with the submission of an Administrative Council on Undergraduate Education (ACUE) Articulation Agreement Prospectus.

The college in which the requested academic program will be housed must submit a brief Articulation Agreement Prospectus utilizing the on-line submission form. The information collected should enable ACUE membership to engage in a collegial conversation centered on the need for the articulation and the expected impact on academic units across the University. The prospectus is intended to generate early consultation at ACUE and to identify or flesh out issues that must be addressed in the full articulation proposal.

Prospectuses submitted by a college's associate dean a minimum of one week before the next ACUE meeting will be vetted at that meeting. Arrangements may be made under extraordinary circumstances for proposals submitted during the summer.

Articulation agreement prospectuses will be distributed electronically by the Office of Undergraduate Education to ACUE membership, including the Office of the University Faculty Senate, prior to each ACUE meeting. ACUE members should use this opportunity for formative consultation with appropriate colleagues in their college, across the University, and with the originating college.

Following discussion of the articulation agreement prospectus at ACUE, the ACUE prospectus committee will review the prospectus. The ACUE committee may also invite others as appropriate to add expertise. The ACUE committee will provide a brief recommendation to the submitting college, taking into consideration the ACUE discussion and strategic university considerations.

2.   Upon receipt of the ACUE recommendations, the dean(s) of the college(s) seeking to enter the articulation agreement must submit a written request, including supporting documentation, as well as recommendations resulting from consultations with other units of Penn State, to the vice president and dean for undergraduate education.

Criteria by which articulation agreement requests are evaluated include, but might not be limited to:

a. The rationale for the proposed articulation agreement;
b. A description of how the agreement may be renewed or terminated;
c. An estimate of the number of students transferring to Penn State annually;
d. Admission requirements and transfer of academic credits;
e. Advising and special services at the non-Penn State location and at Penn State, if appropriate;
f. Impact of the agreement, if any, on other programs, colleges, and campuses of the University, including evidence of consultation within Penn State;
g. A plan for future program review and renewal;
h. An exit strategy and accommodation of enrolled students, if the parties to the agreement decide to terminate.

3.   The vice president and dean for undergraduate education will forward the proposal to ARSSA or the Graduate Council for a review and recommendation.

4.   After receiving recommendations from ARSSA or the Graduate Council, the vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education, acting as the provost's agent, will approve or reject the articulation request and inform relevant parties of the action.

5.   All approved articulation agreements may be viewed on an appropriate Web site, as determined by the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Approved: ACUE (3-4-99)
Approved: ACUE (2-4-10)


C-3: UNDER-ENROLLED SECTIONS

1.   Under-enrolled sections are defined as:
--001 through 399-level course with an enrollment of fewer than fifteen students;
--400-level course with an enrollment of fewer than eight students;
--500-level or 800-level course with an enrollment of fewer than five students.

Under-enrolled criteria do not apply to the following courses:

--600-level courses (graduate thesis, supervised teaching, foreign experience);
--700-level courses (medical);
--900-level courses (law);
-- honors courses (i.e. courses with an "H", "M", "T", or "U" suffix);
--individualized instruction courses (i.e. courses numbered 001-499 with a "J" suffix);
--courses numbered X94 (research topic), X95 (internship), X96 (independent study), X99 (foreign studies);
--Continuing Education courses (courses with a delivery code of C);
--World Campus courses (courses with location code of WD);
--courses offered through the eLearning Cooperative;
--ROTC courses coded as "MS"

2.   Under-enrolled sections should not be offered except under exceptional circumstances. Exceptional circumstances that permit the offering of an under-enrolled section include:
--the section is essential for normal degree progress for specifically identified students.
--learning space in essential classrooms or laboratories for a section is limited.
3.   To assist academic units in identifying under-enrolled sections, the campus Registrar will provide appropriate informational reports.
4.   Sections that are to be dropped because of under-enrollment should be dropped in a timely manner such that registered students have sufficient time to register for other appropriate courses. Academic units should carefully analyze the section offerings each semester and annually review the causes for under-enrolled section offerings. Patterns should be monitored and appropriate steps taken to minimize the number of under-enrolled sections.

Revised: ACUE (3-4-99)
Revised: ACUE (1-8-09)
Revised: Editorial (12-20-10)


L-9: First-Year Seminars

In December 1997, the University Faculty Senate passed legislation mandating a first-year seminar requirement for all incoming first-year baccalaureate students who were admitted to the University after spring semester 1999.

Procedure

1.   First-year seminars (FYS) are either identified by the course abbreviation "PSU" or by the suffix "S," indicating that the course is a first-year seminar; "T," indicating that the course is an honors course and a first-year seminar; or "X," indicating that the course is both writing intensive and a first-year seminar.

2.   FYS are normally taught by regular faculty—tenured, tenure-track, or full-time fixed term faculty with at least three years experience.

3.   The FYS section size is normally limited to 20 students.  Minor exceptions to this limit may occur from time to time but should not be standard practice.

4.   Content and number of credits (between 1 and 4) are at the discretion of colleges, but seminars are designed to engage students in the scholarly community and to introduce them to the faculty.  Activities to achieve these goals include:

·       Introducing students to university study and to Penn State as an academic community.
·       Acquainting students with learning tools and resources.
·       Providing opportunities to develop academic relationships with faculty and peers.
·       Introducing responsibilities as members of the community.

5.   It is expected that all baccalaureate degree candidates will include a first-year seminar as part of their first 27 credits scheduled in residence at Penn State.  Students are encouraged to complete this requirement in their first two periods of enrollment.

6.   The following students are exempt from the FYS requirement:  provisional and nondegree (regular and conditional) students who have completed 18 or more credits in that status, advanced standing admits (18 or more transfer credits), admits with 18 or more credits in another status at Penn State (e.g., associate degree), and associate degree candidates.

7.   Students who do not successfully complete an FYS must fulfill the requirement in an alternative activity as directed by the associate dean of their college.

8.   If a student is changing colleges or equivalent units, his/her FYS course or approved alternative activity is wholly portable and must be counted as meeting the FYS requirement in the new college/unit.  However, if a student's college/unit waived the FYS requirement, his/her new college/unit may require an alternative activity.

9.   Each college at University Park will provide as many FYS seats as are required to meet the needs of all first-year students enrolled in that college, plus a proportion of Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) students.  Annually, the executive director of DUS will identify and assign, in consultation with the colleges, the number of FYS seats that may be needed in each college.  Colleges at other locations will provide as many FYS seats as are required to meet the needs of all first-year baccalaureate students enrolled at that location.

10.                 Annually, ACUE will review each college's participation rate using data provided by the University Registrar and Undergraduate Education. 

 

Approved: ACUE (9-06-01) 
Revised:  ACUE (3-14-02)  

Senate General Education Legislation


A-5: PROVISIONAL STUDENT (DEGREE SEEKING)/NONDEGREE TO DEGREE

Senate Policy:  12-30, Baccalaureate Degree Candidate

Senate Policy:  12-70, Associate Degree Candidate

Procedure:

1.   Students seeking a change from provisional/nondegree status to degree status need to complete the web application for undergraduate admission found at http://www.psu.edu/admissions/apply. It is recommended that the completed application, with complete credentials, be submitted at least one semester in advance of the semester for which the student desires to make the change in status.
2.   A nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application.
3.   Complete credentials are (a) a secondary school record including grades and evidence of graduation [a Secondary School Equivalency Diploma (GED) is accepted as equivalent]; (b) the required combination of Carnegie units for entrance into the desired programs; and (c) an official transcript from each college or university previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the registrar of each college or university attended to the admissions office. Credit courses taken at other accredited colleges or universities are evaluated and credited towards a degree program as specified in Senate Policies 42-80 and 42-90.
4.   An applicant is usually admitted as a degree candidate at the location where credit courses were taken as a provisional or nondegree student.
5.   A semester classification is assigned when a student is admitted as a degree candidate in accordance with the policies and procedures of Senate Policy 37-70. (Ref: Senate Policies 12-00 and 18-00)

Approved: ACUI (4-29-76)

Revised: ACUI (4-8-82)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Revised: Editorial (3-13-03)


A-6: PROVISIONAL STUDENT (DEGREE SEEKING)/NONDEGREE TO DEGREE-CAMPUS/COLLEGES

Senate Policy:  12-30, Baccalaureate Degree Candidate

Senate Policy:  12-70, Associate Degree Candidate

Procedure:

1.   The vice provost and dean for enrollment management and administration has delegated the authority to review requests for change from provisional/nondegree status to the degree candidate status at the campuses/colleges to the appropriate executive officer at the campus/college.
2.   The admissions officer at the campus/college may evaluate an application for change of status from provisional/nondegree student to degree candidate for that location.  This evaluation may be performed at the end of the semester in which the applicant has completed at this University the minimum number of credits (18 credits for a baccalaureate degree program and 9 credits for an associate degree program) required for such an evaluation.
3.   Students seeking a change from provisional/nondegree status to degree status need to complete the web application for undergraduate admission found at http://www.psu.edu/admissions/apply.  After verifying that the applicant is qualified for admission to degree candidacy, the admission officer may authorize the student to register as a degree candidate at that location for the next semester.
4.   Evaluations should be completed and assurance of admission given within the course add period of registration of the semester for which admission is sought; otherwise the admission to degree candidacy should be assured for the next semester.
5.   If the admissions officer cannot complete the evaluation by verifying all of the required information, the admission of the student to degree candidacy should be processed by the admissions office at University Park.

Senate Policy:  12-30, Baccalaureate Degree Candidate

Senate Policy:  12-70, Associate Degree Candidate

Approved: DARS (2-14-75)

Announced at ACUI: (2-20-75)

Revised: ACUI (5-19-83)

Revised: ACUE (7-26-96)

Revised: Editorial (7-10-98)

Revised: Editorial (3-13-03)


O-4: GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION

Senate Policy:  88-30, Graduation with Distinction

Procedure:

1. Revised Senate Policy 88-30 will be implemented effective Fall Semester 1983 for baccalaureate and associate degree candidates who will have degrees conferred Fall Semester 1983 and thereafter.

2. The cut-off grade point averages for the "With Distinction," "With High Distinction," and "With Highest Distinction" categories will be determined annually by the University Registrar for each college based on the previous year's graduates in a college.

3. When the intent to Graduate indicator is set for a student, distinction will be determined using the cumulative grade point average at the end of the preceding semester.

4. Colleges having a small number of graduates will be handled on an individual basis through consultation between the University Registrar and the college.

Senate Policy:  88-30, Graduation with Distinction

Approved: ACUI (1-6-83)

L-6: MINORS - ENTRANCE AND CERTIFICATION

Senate Policy:  59-00, Requirements for the Minor

Introduction


The University Faculty Senate amended Policy 59-00 on October 19, 2010, to read: “Requirements for a minor may be completed at any campus location offering the specified courses for the minor.” In effect, this makes it possible for Penn State students to meet the requirements of many of the University’s minors regardless of their campus of residence. The Senate vote recognizes several important Penn State curricular principles:

·       University courses may be offered at any Penn State location at which the dean or chancellor certifies the availability of qualified faculty and necessary facilities. This “a-course-is-a course” policy contributes to the development of professional faculty disciplinary communities and curricular integrity, as well as to Penn State’s commitment to its organizational and academic structure as a single university dispersed across the Commonwealth.
 
·       The University distinguishes between majors and minors. Senate Policy 83-80 was amended August 31, 2010 to make explicit each college’s authority to require that up to 24 credits of coursework in a major “be taken at the location or in the college or program where the degree is earned.” The amendment recognizes the significant depth and disciplinary mastery associated with majors, the obligation of deans and chancellors to certify the quality of faculty and of majors at their campuses, and the role of regular faculty and student learning community interaction in a student’s chosen area of specialization.

Minors do not certify comparable levels of domain mastery. Senate Policy 59-00 defines a minor as “an academic program of at least 18 credits that supplements a major.” The breadth of minors at Penn State, some located in a single domain and others interdisciplinary and/or intercollege, speaks to the University’s understanding of these programs as curricular complements. Although some minors can and do exceed complementary status, minors are designed to provide familiarity with domains and practices that can enhance a student’s major programmatic studies rather than produce the level of domain mastery certified by the completion of a major.

Declaring a minor does not guarantee enrollment in those courses, the future availability of those courses, or completion of the minor.

The amended 59-00 also states that, “Students may not change from a campus that offers their major to a campus that does not offer their major for the purpose of completing a minor.” The intent is not to prevent a student from enrolling for a course necessary for a minor at a campus other than their campus-of-residence. Such enrollments have always been possible. Rather, the stipulation recognizes the major as the University’s fundamental educational commitment and the minor as a secondary complement.

Procedure:

1.   Students wishing to declare a minor must use eLion unless the minor has a Faculty Senate-approved entrance requirement, such as an audition or portfolio review, or carries restrictions necessitated by explicit articulation or licensing requirements. Under these circumstances, eLion will generate an automatic message referring the student to the unit with administrative oversight. Upon approval, the unit will enter the student into the minor on ISIS screen ARUSAN.

If the student has declared a minor, but then terminates degree enrollment, the minor declaration becomes void. The student must submit a new eLion minor declaration after receiving degree status through the reenrollment process.
 
2.   Intent to pursue a minor may be declared after the student has achieved at least fifth semester classification and has been accepted into his/her major, but prior to the end of the late drop period of the student's final semester. A student may not declare a minor that is the same as his/her major (e.g., a student majoring in History may not also declare a History minor). In those instances where a minor requires an entry fee or entrance requirement, the student must declare before the end of the regular add/drop period of their final semester. The fee will be applied to the student's semester bill at the time the intent is submitted.
 
3.   The academic authority for undergraduate minors is established in a college or colleges through the AAPP P-1 and P-3 processes. A student's ability to complete a University minor independent of the campus at which he or she is registered, however, requires a means by which local academic decision-making and record-keeping are optimized.

Therefore, some administrative actions for undergraduate minors are dispersed such that colleges granted authority for a minor retain academic authority and oversight, while delegating responsibility for degree audit substitutions, certification of minor completion, and similar actions to the associate dean of a student's college of enrollment. Such delegation must occur through consultation with the associate dean of the college granted authority for the minor through the AAPP P-1 or P-3 process.
 
4.   During the seventh week of the student's final semester, the University Registrar will distribute the list of minor candidates and their degree audits to the office of the appropriate associate dean or designee.
 
5.   The associate dean or designee will certify completion of minor requirements on each student record by adding an approval indicator on ISIS screen path ARUGB.
 
6.   The Office of the University Registrar will prepare a minor certificate for each approved student. The certificate will include the signatures of the President of the Board of Trustees, the President of the University, and the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University. The minor certificate will be presented to the graduate along with the diploma as long as the minor is approved on ISIS screen path ARUGB by the end of the 13th week of classes. Certificates produced for minors approved after this deadline may need to be mailed to the student.
 
7.   The Registrar is responsible for recording on the student's academic record the successful completion of the minor program at the time the baccalaureate degree is conferred.

NOTE: A minor may be awarded retroactively through the following process: The associate dean or designee certifies that a student has met the requirements for the minor at the time of graduation and forwards this information to the University Registrar in writing. The Registrar adds the appropriate notation to the student's transcript. The certificate for the minor is produced and mailed to the student.

The following conditions apply to the retroactive awarding of minors:

·       The minor must have been in existence at the time the student graduated.
 
·       Awarding of a retroactive minor is limited to five years after the student's graduation.
 
·       If a fee is assessed for the minor, it must be paid to the Bursar before the minor is approved by the associate dean or designee. Fees are assessed at the rate in effect at the time the minor is retroactively awarded.
 
·       Any minor that has an entrance requirement (e.g., portfolio, audition, or plan of study) may not be awarded retroactively.

Senate Policy:  59-00, Requirements for the Minor

Approved: ACUI (4-7-83)
Revised: ACAS (6-10-88)
Revised: ACAS (9-8-89)
Revised: ACUE (11-2-95)
Revised: ACUE (9-26-96)
Revised: ACUE (1-21-99)
Revised: ACUE (3-2-00)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (1-8-04)
Revised: Editorial (4-9-07)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (6-4-09)
Revised: ACUE and editorial (2-3-11)
Revised: ACUE (5-5-11)
Revised: ACUE (7-7-11)
Revised: Editorial (8-17-11)


C-2: REGISTRATION

Senate Policy:  34-23, Registration

Senate Policy:  34-27, Advance Registration

Senate Policy:  34-87, Course Add

Senate Policy:  34-89, Course Drop

Principles Related to the Registration Process

·       Registration is a two-step process. Students first register for specific courses and then complete registration by paying tuition and fees.
·       Prior to any registration activity, students meet with their designated academic adviser or appropriate advising center personnel, to plan a course of study. Both the adviser and advisee share responsibility for making the advising relationship succeed.
·       Students should complete the registration process and finalize course schedules prior to the first day of the semester.
·       The registration system enables students to register for courses at more than one campus in the same semester.   Some restrictions apply.

1. Registration System

One registration system registers all students at all locations for credit courses offered through the resident instruction, continuing education, and World Campus delivery systems. Non-credit courses follow different registration procedures.

The campus Registrar is responsible for providing semester-by-semester registration instructions to students, advisers, faculty, and staff. Registration instructions are published on the web.

The registration process is continuous in nature. Each student is assigned a "first date to register. " Starting with this first date, the student may initially register and subsequently adjust the registration as appropriate and necessary. The fundamental goal of this process is to finalize course registrations before the first day of the semester.

Students may register for courses using the following options:

·       Using the eLion system  
·       In-person registration at the campus Registrar's office, academic department offices, advisin