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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

 

The University Faculty Senate

 

AGENDA

 

Tuesday, December 5, 2000, at 1:30 PM in

112 Kern Graduate Building

 

[In the case of severe weather conditions or other emergencies, you may call the Senate Office at (814) 863-0221 to inquire if a Senate meeting has been postponed or canceled.  This may be done after normal office hours by calling the same number and a voice mail announcement can be heard concerning the status of any meeting.  You may also leave a message at that time.]

 

A.  MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING -

      Minutes of the October 24, 2000, Meeting in The Senate Record 34:2

 

B.     COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE - Senate Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets) of November 21, 2000                                  

 

C.  REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL - Meeting of November 14, 2000

 

D.  ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR -

 

E.  COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY -

 

 

F.      FORENSIC BUSINESS -

 

G.  UNFINISHED BUSINESS -

 

H.     LEGISLATIVE REPORTS –

 

        Committees and Rules

 

            Revision of Constitution, Article II, Section 1 (Membership)  

 

            Revision of Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(e) 

 

        Undergraduate Education

 

            Revision of Senate Policy 42-27: Class Attendance      

 

I.        ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS –

 

  University Planning

 

    Recommendation for Developing an Ecologically Sustainable University  

 

J.      INFORMATIONAL REPORTS -

     

      Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid

 

            Reserved Spaces Program          

 

      Faculty Affairs

 

            UniSCOPE 2000 Presentation     

 

      Undergraduate Education

 

            Summary of Student Petitions by College, Unit or Location          

 

      University Planning

 

            Long-term Debt and Debt Service of the University  

 

            A Grand Destiny, The Penn State Campaign, Rodney Kirsch, Vice President for

            Development and Alumni Relations         

 

K.  NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

 

L.  COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY -

 

 

-----------------

Note:  The next regular meeting of the University Faculty Senate will be held on Tuesday,

           January 30, 2001, at 1:30 PM in Room 112 Kern Building.

 

            The Informational Report entitled “A Grand Destiny, The Penn State Campaign” will

            be presented as the first informational report (under J.) on the floor of the Senate.

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Graduate Building

University Park, PA  16802

(814) 863-1202 – phone   (814) 865-5789 – fax

 

Date:            November 17, 2000

 

To:      Cara-Lynne Schengrund, Chair, University Faculty Senate

 

From:  Louis F. Geschwindner, Chair, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

 

            The Senate Curriculum Report, dated November 21, 2000, has been circulated throughout the University.  Objections to any of the items in the report must be submitted to the University Curriculum Coordinator at the Senate Office, 101 Kern Graduate Building, e-mail ID sfw2@psu.edu, on or before December 21, 2000.

 

            The first list of editorial prerequisite changes was published in the October 10, 2000, Senate Curriculum Report.  The second and final list has been published in the November 21, 2000, Report.  Each publication has listed over 400 editorial course prerequisite changes.  We encourage you to review the listings.

 

            The Senate Curriculum Report is available on the web.  It can be accessed via the Faculty Senate home page (URL http://www.psu.edu/ufs).  Since the Report is available on the web, printed copies are not distributed to the University community.  An electronic mailing list is used to notify individuals of its publication.  Please contact the Curriculum Coordinator at the e-mail ID indicated above if you would like to be added to the notification list.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

 

Revision of Constitution, Article II, Section 1 (Membership)

 

(Legislative)

 

(Implementation Date: Upon approval by the President)

 

 

Recommendation

The Senate Committee on Committees and Rules proposes the following change to the Constitution, Article II, Section 1:

 

Article II

Section 1

Membership

For the purpose of defining the electorate of the Senate, the term University Faculty shall mean all persons who are not candidates for degrees at Penn State, who hold full time academic appointments, and who fall into one of the following categories: those holding professorial, research (excluding noncontinuing research appointees), or librarian titles and those who are full-time instructors, senior lecturers and lecturers, or assistant librarians.

 

Rationale

This rule has often been violated in the past, most often when people have sought graduate degrees in Higher Education. That, however, should not be a rationale, but support for the rationale, namely that the requirement is not necessary. The fear is that Senators will be guilty of a conflict of interest, but that is often the nature of whole committees such as Faculty Affairs and Faculty Benefits. The addition of Dickinson College of Law to Penn State has allowed professors in a number of fields to desire and pursue law degrees. They should not be penalized for this. Since Senators are asked by the Senate to disclose such degree pursuit, it would be simple for the voting units to request such information and for the electorate to make their own decisions bearing this information in mind if they wish.

 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Mark A. Casteel, Vice-Chair

Joseph J. Cecere

Dwight Davis

Terry Engelder

Sabih I. Hayek

Deidre E. Jago, Chair

John R. Lippert

Arthur C. Miller

John W. Moore

Murry R. Nelson

John S. Nichols

Jean Landa Pytel

Dennis C. Scanlon

Cara-Lynne Schengrund

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

 

Revision of Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(e)

 

(Legislative)

 

(Implementation: Upon Passage by the Senate)

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The Faculty Senate of Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies has petitioned to have a representative on the Faculty Affairs Committee.  The Committee on Committees and Rules has unanimously voted to support this petition.

 

RATIONALE

 

Penn State Great Valley currently has two (2) Senators.  To maintain consistency with other academic units, Penn State Great Valley should have representation on the Faculty Affairs Committee.

 

PRESENT

 

(e)   Committee on Faculty Affairs

1.       Membership:

(i)            At least nineteen (19) elected faculty Senators including at least one (1) faculty Senator from each college at University Park and one (1) faculty Senator from each of Abington College, Altoona College, Penn State Erie-The Behrend Col­lege, Berks-Lehigh Valley College, Capital College, Com­monwealth College, Dickinson School of Law, The College of Medicine, and University Libraries.

PROPOSED

 

(e)   Committee on Faculty Affairs

1.       Membership:

(i)            At least TWENTY (20) elected faculty Senators including at least one (1) faculty Senator from each college at University Park and one (1) faculty Senator from each of THE FOLLOWING: Abington College, Altoona College, Penn State Erie-The Behrend Col­lege, Berks-Lehigh Valley College, Capital College, Com­monwealth College, Dickinson School of Law, The College of Medicine, GREAT VALLEY SCHOOL OF GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL STUDIES, and University Libraries.

 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Mark A. Casteel, Vice-Chair

Joseph J. Cecere

Dwight Davis

Terry Engelder

Sabih I. Hayek

Deidre E. Jago, Chair

John R. Lippert

Arthur C. Miller

John W. Moore

Murry R. Nelson

John S. Nichols

Jean Landa Pytel

Dennis C. Scanlon

Cara-Lynne Schengrund

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

 

Revision of Senate Policy 42-27: Class Attendance

 

(Legislative)

 

[Implementation Date: Fall 2000]

 

Background

 

Senate Policy 42-27 describes the importance of class attendance and exemptions to the class attendance policy.  Official University excuses for attendance are only provided for University-approved curricular and extracurricular activities (such as field trips, debate trips, choir trips, and athletic contests).  We believe that the University-approved Martin Luther King (MLK) Day of Service provides enriching learning experiences and should receive equal consideration under Senate Policy 42-27.  By procedure, students will be expected to sign-up for The MLK Day of Service activities by the end of the prior fall semester and present the official University excuse form with an attached description of the activities at the beginning of the spring semester.  The Martin Luther King Day of Service will be available across all Penn State locations through the Office of Student Affairs.

 

Rationale

 

The proposed amendment is intended to increase opportunity for community involvement by both students and faculty.  The amendment is also intended to further three major goals of the MLK Day of Service initiative: increasing an appreciation for diversity and cultural awareness, increasing a sense of civic and social responsibility among all Penn Staters, and increasing an appreciation for civility and community.  Last year was the first MLK Day of Service.  Over 600 students participated in community service projects ranging from volunteering in K-12 schools in districts across the state to non-profit human service agencies.  The number of students expected to participate in the coming year is expected to exceed the previous year’s involvement.  The MLK Day of Service has been recognized as a University Sponsored event.  It is therefore recommended that the term, The MLK Day of Service, be inserted into Senate Policy 42-27 to give both students and faculty the opportunity to become more involved in the community and further the goals of the initiative.

 

Recommendation

 

The Faculty Senate recommends the insertion of “The MLK Day of Service” within Senate Policy 42-27.

 

42-27 Class Attendance As Written

 

The faculty, staff, and other resources of the University are furnished for the education of students who attend the University.  A class schedule is provided for students and faculty so that a reasonably orderly arrangement for instruction is facilitated.  The fact that classes are scheduled is evidence that the faculty believes class instruction is important. Therefore, class attendance is important for the benefit of students.

 

Accordingly, it is the policy of the University that class attendance by students be encouraged and that all instructors organize and conduct their courses with this policy in mind.  A student should attend every class for which the student is scheduled and should be held responsible for all work covered in the courses taken.  In each case, the instructor should decide when the class absence constitutes a danger to the student's scholastic attainment and should make this fact known to the student at once.  A student whose irregular attendance causes him or her, in the judgment of the instructor, to become deficient scholastically, may run the risk of receiving a failing grade or receiving a lower grade than the student might have secured had the student been in regular attendance.

 

Instructors should provide, within reason, opportunity to make up work for students who miss class for regularly scheduled, University-approved curricular and extracurricular activities (such as field trips, debate trips, choir trips, and athletic contests).  However, if such scheduled trips are considered by the instructor to be hurting the student's scholastic performance, the instructor should present such evidence for necessary action to the head of the department in which the course is offered and to the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled or to the Division of Undergraduate Studies if the student is enrolled in that division.

 

Instructors also should provide, within reason, opportunity to make up work for student's who are obliged to miss classes for other legitimate reasons.

 

42-27 Class Attendance As Proposed

 

The faculty, staff, and other resources of the University are furnished for the education of students who attend the University.  A class schedule is provided for students and faculty so that a reasonably orderly arrangement for instruction is facilitated.  The fact that classes are scheduled is evidence that the faculty believes class instruction is important. Therefore, class attendance is important for the benefit of students.

 

Accordingly, it is the policy of the University that class attendance by students be encouraged and that all instructors organize and conduct their courses with this policy in mind.  A student should attend every class for which the student is scheduled and should be held responsible for all work covered in the courses taken.  In each case, the instructor should decide when the class absence constitutes a danger to the student's scholastic attainment and should make this fact known to the student at once.  A student whose irregular attendance causes him or her, in the judgment of the instructor, to become deficient scholastically, may run the risk of receiving a failing grade or receiving a lower grade than the student might have secured had the student been in regular attendance.

 

Instructors should provide, within reason, opportunity to make up work for students who miss class for regularly scheduled, University-approved curricular and extracurricular activities (such as THE MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY OF SERVICE, field trips, debate trips, choir trips, and athletic contests).  However, if such scheduled trips are considered by the instructor to be hurting the student's scholastic performance, the instructor should present such evidence for necessary action to the head of the department in which the course is offered and to the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled or to the Division of Undergraduate Studies if the student is enrolled in that division.

 

Instructors also should provide, within reason, opportunity to make up work for student's who are obliged to miss classes for other legitimate reasons.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

                       


Cheryl Achterberg                  

Richard L. Ammon                       

Theresa A. Balog              

Dawn G. Blasko             

Richard J. Bord                       

Ali Borhan                               

John J. Cahir                           

William J. Campbell                     

Paul F. Clark                           

Rebecca K. Corwin            

Cheng Don                  

M. Margaret Galligan           

David J. Green

Lynn Hendrickson

Gary L. Hile

Larry J. Kuhns

Jamie M. Myers, Chair

Laura L. Pauley

Robert D. Ricketts, V-Chair

Thomas A. Seybert

Carol A. Smith

Jane S. Sutton

Eric R. White

Jenny Zhang    

 

PENN STATE___________________________________________________________

(Shield Logo Here)                             ALLOWED ABSENCE CARDS

 

 

 

ALLOWED ABSENCE BECAUSE OF ___THE MLK DAY OF SERVICE_______

 

TO ALL INSTRUCTORS:

 

M__________________________________________________________________

Was granted permission to be absent from college classes, practicums, and military drill between

 

_____________19_________M, and _____________19_________M

 

This student should not be penalized for the absence, but should be responsible for any work missed.

 

                                                                        _______________________________________

                                                                            Sponsoring Unit Chairman

 

A description of the events the student will be attending on the MLK Day of Service is provided in the attached sheet. The student must present this excuse to each of his instructors within one college week of the last date named above.

 

     SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

 

Recommendation for Developing an Ecologically Sustainable University

 

(Advisory and Consultative)

 

BACKGROUND

 

            In September 1998, a group of Penn State faculty, staff and students released The Penn State Indicators Report.   This report did something that had never before been done--it examined Penn State through the lens of sustainability to evaluate whether the University was moving toward or away from sustainable practices.    This analysis relied on thirty-four sustainability indicators in areas such as energy, food, water, waste, transportation, buildings, and decision-making. 

 

            The 1998 Indicators Report attracted both local and national attention and in late 1999 the "Indicators" group created Penn State's Green Destiny Council, a faculty-staff-student association committed to promoting ecological responsibility at Penn State.  The Green Destiny Council believes that institutions of higher education can be leverage points in the transition to a sustainable society in so far as they model sustainable practices and foster ecological literacy. 

 

            In April 2000, the Green Destiny Council released Indicators 2000, an update of the original 1998 Indicators Report (http://www.bio.psu.edu/Greendestiny/indicators.shtml).   The new report cites some improvements at Penn State but makes it clear that there is still a considerable sustainability deficit at our university.    The Report suggests that the time has come to join Penn State's individual environmental initiatives into a comprehensive Ecological Mission.   

 

            What would an Ecological Mission look like for Penn State?  Simply stated, it would define the pre-conditions for genuine sustainability at Penn State.  For example, in the area of energy use, an essential precondition for long-term sustainability is the significant reduction in university's reliance on fossil fuels.  The unrestrained use of fossil fuels throughout the world causes air pollution, acid precipitation, chronic health problems, and, very likely, climate change.  American universities, like Penn State, are in a position to set an example to students, business and society in general of ecological responsibility by articulating an ecological mission which includes a commitment to reduce fossil fuel dependence.  Indeed, leading the way on this important effort is intimately related to the mission of a great university.  In fact it is paramount that we, the University, set an example for our students on being ecologically sustainable. 

 

            Another precondition for genuine sustainability is the adoption of practices that dramatically reduce waste.  At present, Penn State continually receives products from distant sources, consumes these products, and then funnels enormous quantities of waste to distant landfills.  Instead Penn State needs, as a component of its long-term ecological mission, the clear intent to minimize solid, liquid and hazardous wastes.             

            A comprehensive ecological mission for Penn State would also include long-term targets in the realms of water conservation, land stewardship, low-impact transportation, sustainable food production, and "green" building construction.

 

            Of course, all of us in the Penn State community recognize that there will be up-front costs involved in doing such things as reducing dependence on fossil fuels, promoting zero-waste technologies, and constructing "green" buildings, but we also know that waste is expensive and that up-front investments in sustainable practices might pay off over the long-term, especially if environmental and social costs were calculated and educational benefits were tallied.  

 

            Another major result of the University adopting a policy and actions in regards to sustainability is the impact on students.  Indeed, some would say that this is the most important outcome.  If the University sets an example of sustainability it would be a powerful role model for our students and greatly multiply the effects of the undertaking.  Graduates having experienced living in such an environment while attending Penn State will carry this orientation with them throughout their lives and influence other individuals and organizations.

 

RATIONALE

 

            There is a need for Penn State to develop long term goals in regards to ecological sustainability and to incorporate them into the University’s Strategic Plan.  These goals would encourage all sectors of the University to explore resource-use options that are more conserving, healthful, and efficient.  It is our sincere hope that the Faculty Senate will endorse the recommendation listed below which supports the Green Destiny Council's general ecological mission policy statement.  By doing so, we will set an example for our students and society on how to meet the many environmental challenges of today and in the future.  Supporting ecological sustainability will not only promote environmental improvements within the University and Pennsylvania, but also economic health.  As Senator Gaylord Nelson put it, “the environment is the economy.”  By adopting a strong position on these issues, our University will stand out as a leader on this front.  This leadership role will attract students, faculty and funding for the University in addition to enhancing Pennsylvania’s reputation with regard to environmental stewardship.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

The Faculty Senate hereby recommends that Penn State incorporate, to the fullest extent possible, the following LONG-TERM GOALS into all future University Strategic Plans.

           

 

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

P. Richard Althouse

William J. Anderson, Jr.

Anthony J. Baratta, V-Chair

Michael J. Cardamone

David Chao

Peter Deines, Chair

Peter B. Everett

William M. Frank

Daniel R. Hagen

Ali R. Hurson

Ernest W. Johnson

Daniel G. Kiefer

Rodney Kirsch

Robert N. Pangborn

Louise E. Sandmeyer

Michael C. Saunders

Gary C. Schultz

Marley W. Watkins

Beno Weiss

Daniel E. Willis

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS, RECORDS,

SCHEDULING AND STUDENT AID

 

Reserved Spaces Program

 

(Informational Report)

 

            "Reserved Spaces" represent spaces at the University Park Campus reserved for eligible freshmen with special needs that cannot be met at non-University Park locations.  These spaces are generally for students whose predicted GPA's are below the cutoffs for regular fall admissions for University Park.

 

            In nearly all cases, students admitted at the University Park Campus through the Reserved Spaces Program meet the basic admission standards of the University.  In some instances, it is not possible to calculate a predicted GPA (there were 4 such cases in 2000).  This is sometimes the issue for an international student.  There are, on occasion, special circumstances that warrant dropping below the 2.00 minimum predicted GPA, although there were no cases of this in 2000 admissions.

 

            A large number of the reserved spaces (50% in 2000) are for specially talented students in such areas as athletics, the arts and the Blue Band.  Most of these students contribute uniquely both to the educational and cultural life of the entire University Park community.  Spaces are also reserved for veterans, those entering under the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) and those entering the recently instituted College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP).  These three groups, along with Arts and Architecture talent admits, are Senate approved.  Two other general classifications account for the remaining students admitted through the Reserved Spaces Program.  "Other Academic" admissions involve students granted entrance by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions' Admissions Review Committee, and students on ROTC scholarships.  Administrative admissions include athletes, members of the Blue Band, and a few additional administrative spaces.

 

            The first table contains data giving a profile of admissions through the Reserved Spaces Program for six of the years since the program began in 1984.  During this time, the approved maximum for the program has been reduced and the number actually admitted each year through the program has been below the approved limit.  In 2000, 5.81% of the entering fall semester freshman class at University Park was admitted through the Reserved Spaces Program.  This is a substantial reduction from 1984, both in absolute number and percentage of new freshmen.  The second table provides a distribution by category over the same six years.

 

            The third table indicates the distribution of admissions through the Reserved Spaces by admission category (predicted GPA) for each general classification.

 

            The last table displays the approved limits for Fall 2001 by specific category.  These limits are the same as those for 2000.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS, RECORDS SCHEDULING AND STUDENT AID

           

Deborah F. Atwater

Kevin R. Cheesbrough

JoAnn Chirico, Chair

Lynn E. Drafall

Peter Georgopulos, Vice Chair

Anna Griswold

Geoffrey J. Harford

Terry P. Harrison

Amanda Hudnall

Victor Nistor

P. Peter Rebane

John J. Romano

J. James Wager

Roger P. Ware

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AFFAIRS

 

UniSCOPE 2000 Presentation

 

(Informational)

 

 

            As distributed at the September 12 Senate meeting, the UniSCOPE Learning Community has developed a “multidimensional model of scholarship for the 21st century.”  This report recognizes the three missions of the University – teaching, research, and service – as a continuum of scholarship.  The UniSCOPE model serves as a basis for identifying, assessing, and rewarding the types of scholarship in the University.

 

After the December Senate meeting, the Faculty Affairs Committee will review the UniSCOPE report, examine its implications in the promotion and tenure process, and report to the Faculty Senate.  For your information and access, the URL of the UniSCOPE report is:  http://www.cas.psu.edu/docs/CASPROF/keystone21/uniscope/default.htm

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AFFAIRS

Shelton S. Alexander

Syed S. Andaleeb

Kultegin Aydin

Ingrid M. Blood

Melvin Blumberg

Clay Calvert

Lynn A. Carpenter

Renee D. Diehl

James M. Donovan

Jacqueline P. Esposito

Dorothy H. Evensen

Veronique M. Foti

Margaret B. Goldman

Elizabeth A. Hanley

Ravinder Koul

Robert LaPorte

Sallie M. McCorkle

Louis Milakofsky, Chair

Victor Romero

William A. Rowe

Robert Secor

Jeffery M. Sharp

Stephen W. Stace

Kim C. Steiner

Valerie N. Stratton, V-Chair

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

 

Summary of Student Petitions by College, Unit or Location

 

(Informational)

 

        The Senate through its committees has permitted students to petition for exceptions to the Senate academic rules found in the Academic Policies, Rules and Procedures for Students.  Implementation and exceptions to these policies are the responsibility of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education unless otherwise assigned to another standing committee.

 

        The committee regularly reports to the Senate on the type and number of student petition actions.  This report provides a summary of petitions over the last two years and their sources by colleges and campuses.

 

        The petition provides an opportunity for the student to receive consideration on extenuating circumstances affecting his/her progress.  It is composed of a petition letter and transcript from the student, supporting documents from advisors, instructors, physicians or other appropriate personnel and a review statement by the student’s dean or campus executive officer.  The final decision by the committee represents an effort to weigh the personal circumstances of the individual while maintaining the academic standards of the University.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

                       


Cheryl Achterberg                  

Richard L. Ammon                       

Theresa A. Balog              

Dawn G. Blasko             

Richard J. Bord                       

Ali Borhan                               

John J. Cahir                           

William J. Campbell                     

Paul F. Clark                           

Rebecca K. Corwin            

Cheng Don                  

M. Margaret Galligan                       

David J. Green

Lynn Hendrickson

Gary L. Hile

Larry J. Kuhns

Jamie M. Myers, Chair

Laura L. Pauley

Robert D. Ricketts, V-Chair

Thomas A. Seybert

Carol A. Smith

Jane S. Sutton

Eric R. White

Jenny Zhang        

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

Summary of Student Petitions by Types

 

For The Period 08/01/98 – 07/31/99

 

 

                                                Submitted                        Granted                        Denied

 

                        Drop/Add                        754                        608                        146

 

                        Withdraw                        572                        508                    64

 

               Miscellaneous:

               Corrected Grades       31             31       0

               Other                 20     18               2

 

                                                Totals     1,377              1,165                         212

 

 

For The Period 08/01/99 – 07/31/00

                                                Submitted                        Granted                        Denied

 

                        Drop/Add                        840                        613                        227

 

                        Withdraw                        561                        424                  137

 

               Late Registration               286               284                  2

 

               Miscellaneous:

               Corrected Grades       46             45       1

               Other                 24     24               0

 

                                                Totals     1,757              1,390                        367

 

                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted

 

Submitted

 

% Increase

 

Granted

Denied

 

 

 

1998-99

 

1999-00

 

in Petitions

 

 

 

Abington College

 

72

 

88

 

22%

 

48

40

Agricultural Sciences

 

43

 

61

 

42%

 

46

15

Altoona College

 

79

 

81

 

3%

 

60

21

Arts & Architecture

 

46

 

53

 

15%

 

44

9

Beaver Campus

 

7

 

7

 

0%

 

5

2

Behrend College

 

49

 

54

 

10%

 

41

13

Berks Campus

 

38

 

35

 

-8%

 

29

6

Business Administration

120

 

191

 

59%

 

158

33

Capital College

 

31

 

39

 

26%

 

31

8

Commonwealth College

0

 

2

 

--'

 

2

0

Communications

 

73

 

90

 

23%

 

80

10

Delaware County

 

13

 

23

 

77%

 

21

2

Div. Of Undergraduate Studies

103

 

113

 

10%

 

86

27

DuBois Campus

 

10

 

15

 

50%

 

13

2

Earth & Mineral Sciences

43

 

46

 

7%

 

41

5

Education

 

 

48

 

42

 

-13%

 

37

5

Engineering

 

95

 

152

 

60%

 

121

31

Fayette Campus

 

19

 

15

 

-21%

 

14

1

Hazleton Campus

 

8

 

15

 

88%

 

11

4

Health & Human Development

111

 

154

 

39%

 

138

16

Information Sci. & Tech.

0

 

1

 

--'

 

1

0

Lehigh Valley

 

4

 

6

 

50%

 

4

2

Liberal Arts

 

113

 

212

 

88%

 

168

44

McKeesport Campus

 

22

 

25

 

14%

 

15

10

Mont Alto Campus

 

12

 

16

 

33%

 

12

4

New Kensington Campus

17

 

15

 

-12%

 

9

6

Registrar's

Representative

28

 

34

 

21%

 

23

11

Schuylkill

 

 

20

 

36

 

80%

 

31

5

Science

 

 

91

 

59

 

-35%

 

41

18

Shenango Campus

 

8

 

10

 

25%

 

7

3

Wilkes-Barre Campus

 

11

 

17

 

55%

 

13

4

Worthington Scranton Campus

18

 

20

 

11%

 

18

2

York Campus

 

25

 

30

 

20%

 

22

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Totals

 

 

1377

 

1757

 

28%

 

1390

367

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

 

Long-term Debt and Debt Service of the University

 

                                                                        (Informational)

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The Committee on University Planning reviews at intervals the status of Penn State’s indebtedness.  The Committee examines in particular (i) the size of the debt, (ii) the purpose of the debt, and (iii) the expense of the debt service.  The last report was completed in January 1997 (Senate Agenda 1-18-97 Appendix “G”).

 

New classroom buildings, laboratories, residence halls, library buildings, and similar improvements require financing.  The necessary funds are obtained from various sources including the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, private donations and through the issuing of bonds by Penn State.  Long-term debt is not incurred by the University to cover operating expenses but is used for the construction of new facilities.  The Board of Trustees has the sole responsibility and privilege of issuing debt for the University and has established the following standards for issuance of long-term debt:

 

1. Debt financing will only be used for projects that clearly and significantly advance the University's missions;

2. There are measurable and predictable streams of income to pay back long-term debt over a period of 25 to 30 years;

3. The University is reluctant to create any new debt that would cause debt service to burden the University in any way that might jeopardize its prime credit standing among lenders, or that might jeopardize its above-average status among peer group research universities.

 

In general, PSU takes on debt for projects that will generate revenue that can amortize this debt. i.e., revenue sources associated with many projects are evident, such as room charges that will be collected after construction of a new dormitory or the research grants attracted by a new laboratory .  Other revenue sources are less direct, e.g., new classroom buildings might contribute to increasing tuition revenues if they lead to higher enrollments.

 


Bonds are "IOUs" obligating the University to make semi-annual payments to lenders.  These payments cover both interest and a portion of the amount owed (called the principal).  Bonds are issued by Penn State for maturities up to 30 years.  They are sold primarily to institutions such as insurance companies, banks, and trust funds, although they may also be purchased by individual investors.  PSU, as a state-supported institution, enjoys the privilege of issuing tax-exempt bonds.  That means that the semi-annual interest payments made by the University to bond owners are not subject to federal income tax.  Interest payments may also be exempt from Pennsylvania state income tax if they are purchased by Pennsylvania residents.  This tax-exempt status enhances the demand for these bonds.  The University takes advantage of this by borrowing funds at lower interest rates than would otherwise be necessary.

 

All long-term debt is amortized.  Amortization is the process of paying off a debt gradually during its lifetime.  Every six months PSU makes a payment on its bonds; a portion of this payment goes to lenders to cover interest.  The rest is used to pay down the debt. Amortization schedules are set so as to continually reduce the debt until the bond matures, when the debt becomes $0.

 

DATA

         

Table 1. below summarizes the University’s long term debt and debt service for the period 1993 to 2000.  The amount of debt, Row A, the amount paid to bond holders (principal plus interest) Row B are shown and Row C expresses the debt service as a percentage of the total University budget.  In Row D the amount of the debt service paid from general funds is given while in Row E this amount has been expressed as % of the debt service that has been contributed from general funds.  General funds consist of unrestricted current revenues and expenditures.  Nearly all general funds income is derived from tuition and state support while a small fraction comes from other sources, such as investment income and cost recovery.

 

Table 1. University Long-Term Debt and Debt Service

End of Fiscal Year

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

A Total Long Term Debt

($ millions)

439

423

410

395

380

478

459

441

B Annual Debt Service

($ millions)

38

38

38

38

37

40

44

42

C Total Debt Service as %

of Total University Budget

2.9

2.5

2.4

2.4

2.3

2.9

3.0

2.8

D Part of Total Debt Service

Paid from General Funds

($ millions)

2.1

2.1

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

5.3

E Percent of Total Debt Service paid from General Funds

5.5

5.5

10.5

10.5

10.8

10.0

9.1

12.6

F Bond Rating Moody’s

A1

A1

A1

A1

A1

Aa3

Aa3

Aa3

Standard & Poor’s

AA-

AA-

AA-

AA-

AA-

AA-

AA-

AA-

                     

 

In the U.S. an issuer of-any substantial amount of bonded debt must request expert evaluation of its bonds from one or two independent rating agencies. Most borrowers call on Standard and Poor's Corporation and Moody's Investors' Service.  They assign a rating  "grade" to a borrower's bonds. These ratings are summarized in Table 2.  The Table shows the broad quality judgement that is inferred by each grade, however each agency stratifies these classifications by adding further qualifiers.  In Standard & Poor’s case, they add a + or – to an individual rating if they believe the institution is slightly better or worse than the average institution in that category while Moody’s appends a 1, 2 or 3 to an individual rating with a 1 being the highest within a particular grade and a 3 being the lowest.  Ratings are important to participants in financial markets because they represent riskiness.  Investors wish to be rewarded for risk-taking: the higher the risk the higher is the interest rate they demand.

 

 

Table 2. Selected Credit Ratings of Bonded Debt

Classification

Standard & Poor’s

Moody’s

Investment Grade Bonds

Best quality; least degree of investment risk

AAA

Aaa

High quality; slightly less secure

AA

Aa

High grade, some weaknesses

A

A

Adequate security , some fundamental weakness

BBB

Baa

Below Investment Grade ("Junk Bonds")

Some speculative elements , more uncertainty

BB

Ba

Lacks characteristics of a good investment

B

B

Poor condition, may be in default

CCC

Caa

Speculative, major shortcomings

CC

Ca

Poor quality , poor prospects

C

C

 

 

Penn State has a sufficiently high rating, (see Table 1) such that the University can command relatively low interest rates.  The high ratings are consistent for the two independent rating agencies, indicating their confidence in the Universities fiscal management.  The most recent rating assessment was completed this past summer and both agencies affirmed their current ratings after considering all effects of the Hershey de-merger.

 

While the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania does not guarantee PSU’s bonds, Penn State’s bond rating is related to that of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as long as the University receives a significant fraction of its budget from the state.  The bond ratings of the State of Pennsylvania at this time are AA (S&P) and Aa2 (Moody’s) which sets a benchmark for the University’s rating and in some ways limits the rating which evaluating agencies are willing to assign to the University.

           

CONCLUSIONS

 

It is normal practice of Penn State’s financial management to borrow funds for long-term projects.  In 1997 it was anticipated that the University might have to incur $50 to 100 million of new debt and that as much as $150 million of additional could be incurred without jeopardizing Penn State’s debt rating.  Since the last report the University’s indebtedness has been increased by $61 million, only a portion of the increase that appeared prudent in 1997. Moody’s Investors Service upgraded PSU’s rating from A1 to Aa3, effective 6/17/97, and as previously noted, the recent review affirmed the University’s upgraded Aa3 rating.

 

The annual debt service has remained a relatively constant (between 2.4 and 3%) fraction of the total University budget.  The recent change to 12.6 % of the fraction of debt service paid from general funds is related to the termination of 1st mortgage bonds (auxiliary funds) and partially to the higher proportion of general funds projects in the 1997 bond issue.

 

As the institution looks to the future, the overall debt will increase modestly and the portion of debt paid by general funds will increase more significantly.  This is due to insufficient Commonwealth support to meet our most pressing Education and General capital needs across all of Penn State’s campuses.  Because the University’s academic leadership has identified lack of adequate facilities as one of the most serious impediments to improving academic quality, the administration has developed a plan to supplement the Commonwealth’s $200 million capital commitment with an additional $180 million of borrowing for Educational and General facilities.  The debt service and operating cost will be provided for by committing 1.0% of the annual tuition increase over 5 years for this purpose.  The University continues to have the flexibility to issue future bonds and is anticipating that approximately $250 million of bonds will be issued over the next two to three years.

 

The University Planning Committee has reaffirmed the conclusion that it reached in its 1997 review.  It is confident that Penn State's debt is well managed and that its debt burden is relatively moderate.  The University retains flexibility in its options for raising additional capital funds for investment in its plant and equipment.

 

 If future indebtedness is acquired only for projects consistent with the University's academic mission, and the central administration continues its practice of sound debt management, the committee anticipates that the long-term debt will not be burdensome and that the University will have the ability to borrow funds to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities to serve its various constituencies.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

P. Richard Althouse

William J. Anderson, Jr.

Anthony J. Baratta, V-Chair

Michael J. Cardamone

David Chao

Peter Deines, Chair

Peter B. Everett

William M. Frank

Daniel R. Hagen

Ali R. Hurson

Ernest W. Johnson

Daniel G. Kiefer

Rodney Kirsch

Robert N. Pangborn

Louise E. Sandmeyer

Michael C. Saunders

Gary C. Schultz

Marley W. Watkins

Beno Weiss

Daniel E. Willis

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

 

A Grand Destiny, The Penn State Campaign

 

(Informational)

 

 

Rodney Kirsch, Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations, will present an update concerning "A Grand Destiny, The Penn State Campaign."  This will involve a summary of the capital campaign that's underway, including campaign progress, endowment information, featured objectives and our goal reassessment process. 

 

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

 

P. Richard Althouse

William J. Anderson, Jr.

Anthony J. Baratta, V-Chair

Michael J. Cardamone

David Chao

Peter Deines, Chair

Peter B. Everett

William M. Frank

Daniel R. Hagen

Ali R. Hurson

Ernest W. Johnson

Daniel G. Kiefer

Rodney Kirsch

Robert N. Pangborn

Louise E. Sandmeyer

Michael C. Saunders

Gary C. Schultz

Marley W. Watkins

Beno Weiss

Daniel E. Willis

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

MINUTES OF SENATE COUNCIL

Tuesday, November 14, 2000     1:30 PM   102 Kern Graduate Building

 


MEMBERS PRESENT

A. Chellman

W. R. Curtis

W. T. DeCastro

P. Deines

G. F. De Jong

D. S. Gouran

E. A. Hanley

P. C. Jurs

W. L. Kenney

R. L. McCarty

J. W. Moore

M. R. Nelson

J. S. Nichols

I. Richman

A. B. Romberger

A. W. Scaroni

C. L. Schengrund

S. R. Smith

L. L. Snavely

T. T. Turner

 

G. J. Bugyi

B. S. Hockenberry

V. R. Price

 

ACCOUNTED FOR

C. D. Baggett

R. P. Crum

C. D. Eckhardt

R. A. Erickson

A. E. Leure-duPree

G. B. Spanier

B. B. Tormey

 

GUESTS

K. Cheesebrough

M. Goldman

L. Milakofsky

R. Ricketts

J. Romano

R. Secor


 

Chair Schengrund called the meeting to order at 1:30 PM on Tuesday, November 14, 2000, in Room 102 Kern Graduate Building.  The minutes of the meeting of October 24, 2000 were approved as distributed on a Jurs/Richman motion.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND REMARKS

 

The Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC) met Thursday, November 9 and discussed the following topics: campus climate; hate mail; labor relations board decision regarding unionization of graduate students – effect on Penn State?; status of the implementation of general education; intellectual property update; rules for faculty emeritus status; legal representation; definition of residency for faculty; dean search updates for Berks-Lehigh Valley College and the Commonwealth college; and Napster news. 

 

The next meeting of FAC is scheduled for Tuesday, January 16.  If anyone has any items for FAC to address, please contact one of the Senate Officers or one of the three elected FAC members; Peter Deines, Peter Rebane (Betz Hanley will be on sabbatical spring semester) or Gordon De Jong.

 

The Senate Officers concluded the fall trips with a visit to the Dickinson School of Law on October 31, 2000.  The debriefing meeting with Provost Erickson has been scheduled for November 27.

 

Dr. Schengrund, George Bugyi and John Nichols attended a CIC Leadership Conference on November 3 & 4 at Purdue University.  Other attendees included faculty governance leaders from the University of Illinois-UC, Indiana University, University of Iowa, University of Michigan, Michigan State University, University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, and Purdue University.

 

Some of the issues addressed at that conference were the involvement of non-tenure track faculty in faculty governance. A question raised during the discussion was what does tenure actually guarantee.  Several of the universities limit the number of full-time, non-tenure track faculty that can participate faculty governance. Diversity issues were also discussed. One question asked was; do faculty disengage themselves from the issues not directly related to courses they teach?  A third issue discussed was the university viewed as an enterprise and the fact that while we need to keep civic engagement and not go bankrupt, our mission is to teach, not necessarily turn a profit for the institution. 

 

The following items were also discussed: termination for cause or neglect of duties and post-tenure review, the cost of publications to libraries and whether faculty could help by publishing in journals not published by Elsevier, athletic governance, health care costs, intellectual property, recruitment of new faculty into governance, and electronic privacy.

 

Dr. Schengrund noted that Sandy Smith, who has served as Co-chair of the Commonwealth Caucus, is resigning from the Senate (and, therefore, Senate Council).  She will be the Interim Director of Academic Affairs at Penn State Fayette.  Professor Smith was thanked for her service.  Salvatore Marsico has been elected to Co-chair the Commonwealth Caucus and will be joining Council for next semester.  

 

Immediate-Past Chair Murry Nelson commented that at the last Senate meeting one of the speakers went over the time allotted and that it is important that speakers stay within the set time limits. 

 

REPORT OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL

 

Dr. Schengrund announced that Caroline Eckhardt, the Liaison to the Graduate Council, was not able to make this meeting but that the minutes of the Graduate Council meeting of October 18, 2000 were included in today’s Agenda.  A summary of this meeting is attached to these minutes.

 

There was a discussion on the topic of the status of the Intellectual Property report that was considered by the Senate in the spring.  Professor Schengrund indicated that the committee appointed by Vice President Pell to deal with the issue of course ware had sent a copy of their proposal to the appropriate Senate Committees.  Drs. Schengrund and Nelson have been in contact with Dr. Pell on this topic. 


AGENDA ITEMS FOR DECEMBER 5, 2000

 

Legislative Reports

 

Committee on Committees and Rules – “Revision of Constitution, Article II, Section l.”

This report was presented by Professor Nelson and he stated that the words “…who are not candidates for degrees at Penn State…” should be struck in this section.  This prohibition has not been adhered to in practice for some time and should be removed.  A Richman/Gouran motion to place this report on the Senate Agenda was passed.

 

Committee on Committees and Rules – “Revision of Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(e).”  Chair Schengrund offered this report and indicated that the thrust of this report was that a representative from the Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies be appointed to the Senate Committee on Faculty Affairs.  Without discussion, a Richman/Hanley motion was passed. 

 

Undergraduate Education – “Revision of Senate Policy 42-27: Class Attendance.”  Robert Ricketts presented this report and stated that the committee is proposing that the Martin Luther King Day of Service have the same status as field trips and athletic contests so that the students involved could be excused from classes.  Dr. Ricketts indicated that the oversight for the “Allowed Absence Cards” would lie with the Office of Student Affairs at each location.  After some discussion on the responsibility of the individual faculty member involved, a Jurs/Hanley motion was accepted by Council. 

 

Advisory and Consultative Reports

 

Faculty Affairs – “Report on the Impact on Faculty Development of Hiring Faculty Off the Tenure Track.”  Louis Milakofsky and Margaret Goldman presented this report.  Council expressed concern for the manner in which the report was formatted and suggested that it be taken back to committee.  The need to integrate the recommendations and rationale was suggested and also the striking of the accompanying data.  Drs. Milakofsky and Goldman withdrew the report so that the committee could have time to reformat it.

 

University Planning – “Recommendation for Developing an Ecologically Sustainable University.”  Peter Deines informed Council that this report was made to his committee and that they agreed with the adoption of these long-term goals as a part of the strategic plans of the University.  Council asked about the cost of implementation and Dr. Deines indicated that there is no way to cost this out at this time.  Rather, there must be a balancing out of costs within the strategic plans.  This report was passed for the Senate Agenda on a Kenney/Hanley motion. 

 

Informational Reports

 

Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid – “Reserved Spaces Program.” Kevin Cheesbrough offered this report and stated that since 1996 the number of reserved spaces has stayed very constant at about 263 students. Captain Cheesbrough indicated that the committee was comfortable with these figures.  Without discussion, a Jurs/Hanley motion was accepted. 

 

Faculty Affairs – “UniSCOPE 2000 Presentation.”  Dr. Milakofsky addressed this report and noted that it was distributed to all Senators at the September 12 Senate meeting so there should have been time for everyone to read it.  Drew Hyman will deliver the report on the Senate floor.  After this presentation, his committee will examine its implications on the promotion and tenure process and report back to the Senate.   Council asked that Dr. Hyman’s presentation be held to about 10 minutes.  A Richman/Hanley motion put this report on the Agenda

 

Undergraduate Education – “Summary of Student Petitions by College, Unit and Location.”  Professor Ricketts presented the report and informed Council that it was an annual report and also very straightforward.  Council suggested some editorial changes and asked if a follow up report could be done to analyze any trends in petitions and why the numbers are steadily going up.  Council passed the report on a Jurs/Richman motion.   

 

University Planning – “Long-term Debt and Debt Service of the University.”  Professor Deines indicated his committee reviewed the intervals of the status of the institution’s indebtedness.  The last report was in 1997 so it was the thought of the committee to present an updated report.  After a short discussion, the report was accepted on a Curtis/Snavely motion. 

 

University Planning – “Grand Destiny, The Penn State Campaign.”  Dr. Deines indicated that Vice President Kirsch would be holding his remarks to 10 to 15 minutes.  The objective of the report is to update the Senate on the status of the campaign.  A Carr-Chellman/Kenney motion was passed to include this report on the Senate Agenda.  

 

A second Scaroni/Romberger motion was also passed to present this report as the first Informational report.  This motion passed with the friendly amendment that it remains in the same place on the published Agenda but that a notation on the Agenda be made that it will be heard as the first Informational report.  

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

There were no action items for the Council to address. 

 

NEW BUSINESS

 

There was no new business for the Council to address, but there was a discussion on the report entitled “Fan Behavior” from the last Senate meeting.  It was the consensus of the Council that nothing more should be done with this report. 

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

Senate Chair Schengrund thanked the members of Council for their attention to their duties and adjourned the meeting at 3:20 PM.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

George J. Bugyi

Executive Secretary

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Graduate Building

University Park, PA  16802

(814) 863-0221 – phone   (814) 863-6012 – fax

 

 

 

Date:            October 27, 2000

 

To:      Cara-Lynne Schengrund, Chair, University Faculty Senate

 

From:            Caroline D. Eckhardt, Senate Council/Graduate Council Liaison

 

Re:            Minutes of Graduate Council Meeting of October 18, 2000

 

 

 

COMMUNICATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

Dean Eva Pell reported that the Faculty Workshop "Re-Envisioning the Ph.D. at Penn State" held on October 3 was well attended.  She also reported that she and other colleagues made a presentation on the activities of the Graduate School at the Academic Leadership Forum held on October 11.  Academic colleges will be asked to prepare a poster on innovative graduate program activities, to be displayed at the Graduate Exhibition in March 2001.  Dr. Pell also announced that the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board has decided in favor of the request from Temple University students to be recognized as employees.  She also announced that the Office of Educational Equity has been awarded a $20,000 grant from the Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education.

 

Dr. Richard Yahner announced that guidelines on the handling of sensitive materials submitted with graduate applications are available.  He also announced that the next Conversations at Kern will be held on Wednesday, November 1, in 112 Kern Building, with the speaker being Dr. Nina Fedoroff.  Dr. Orlando Taylor, of Howard University, will visit Penn State on January 31, 2001 to make a presentation on "strategies for obtaining inclusiveness in graduate education."

 

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES 

 

A proposal to change the name of the Committee on Graduate Student and Faculty Affairs was discussed.  Concern was raised that adding "educational equity" to the committee's title may be seen as giving this committee responsibility for dealing with teaching assistant duties, TA stipends, etc.  The change was returned to the Committee on Committees and Procedures.  The stated duties of the Committee on Academic Standards were adjusted to include "including but not limited to issues of academic integrity and grade adjudication" following the policy change on academic integrity approved by the University Faculty Senate.  The Committee on Graduate Research indicated that the poster sessions for next Spring's Graduate Exhibition will be held on Sunday, March 25, with the Performance Option Saturday evening, March 24.  He suggested that colleges might want to consider hosting their graduate recruitment weekend in conjunction with the exhibition. The Graduate School Alumni Society will be involved in judging the posters this year.  As recommended by the Committee on Programs and Courses, the Council approved changes to the graduate program in Quality and Manufacturing Management and a proposal to change the name of the Linguistics program to Linguistics and Applied Language Studies.

 

SPECIAL REPORTS 

 

Council heard a report on a sample World Campus graduate program, the Adult Education Master's Program, as presented by Dr. Eunice Askov and Dr. Gary Kuhne. Students are admitted to the program under the same criteria as those used for students admitted in residence.  There is no residency requirement for the master's program; however, students will likely be continuously enrolled. There are a number of advantages or benefits to offering such a program, i.e., reaching more students, achieving efficiency in delivering the courses once developed (though the development process is expensive), fostering problem-based learning and critical thinking, and enabling nonresident students to earn Penn State credits.  Currently there are 43 students enrolled and there is growing interest internationally. A new course is being added each semester; all courses should be on-line by Fall 2001.  The program continues to evaluate course design, and time requirements for faculty and students taking the courses.

 

In discussion, it was clarified that the World Campus owns the material, as they put the course curriculum into a format compatible to the web.  Concern was raised about the intellectual property rights of the faculty developing the curriculum.  Dr. Pell has appointed a group to review the policy on intellectual property.  Dr. Pell indicated that the Council will be seeing a proposal later this year for a second World Campus program.  For additional WC information, see http://www.worldcampus.psu.edu. The University is also working with the CIC to offer course exchanges so students will be able to take courses not offered at their home institution.

 

The Graduate Council adjourned at 5:02 PM.

 

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

 INTER-OFFICE CORRESPONDENCE

Date:       November 17, 2000

From:      George J. Bugyi, Executive Secretary

To:          All Senators and Committee Personnel

            Please note the scheduled time and location of your committee.  If you are unable to attend, notify the Senate Office prior to Senate Day -- if possible.

    MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2000                  7:00 PM

     Officers' and Chairs' Meeting                                Faculty/Staff Club, NLI

                                                                        8:00 PM

     Commonwealth Caucus                            CANCELLED

     TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2000                 7:30 AM

     Intercollegiate Athletics                                         205 Shields Building

                                                                                  8:00 AM

     Faculty Affairs                                                       106 HUB

     Outreach Activities                                                 502 Keller Building

     Student Life                                                           301 HUB

                                                                                 8:30 AM

     Admissions, Records,
Scheduling and Student Aid203 Shields Building

     Committees and Rules                                          16 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center

     Curricular Affairs                                                   102 Kern Building

     Intra-University Relations                                      233 HUB

     Research                                                               114 Kern Building 

Undergraduate Education                                      221 Chambers Building

     University Planning                                                322 HUB

                                                                                 9:00 AM

     Faculty Benefits                                                     101-A Kern Building

     Libraries                                                               E510 Paterno Library

                                                                                 9:30 AM                     

     Computing and Information Systems                      327 HUB

                                                                                 1:30 PM

     University Faculty Senate                      112 Kern Building

There will be a Commonwealth Caucus meeting at 11:00 AM on TUESDAY,  DECEMBER 5, 2000, in the ASSEMBLY ROOM OF THE  NLI.  At approximately 12:00 Noon, a buffet luncheon will be served.

The Pennsylvania State University

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Building (814) 863-0221

Fax:  (814) 863-6012

 

 

Date:     November 17, 2000

 

To:     Commonwealth Caucus Senators (This includes all elected Senators from

     Campuses, Colleges, and Locations Other Than University Park)

 

From:     Irwin Richman and Sandy Smith

 

 

  MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2000 

 

THERE WILL BE NO COMMONWEALTH CAUCUS MEETING ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2000. 

 

 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2000 -- 11:00 AM --

ASSEMBLY ROOM, NITTANY LION INN

 

     The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, December 5, 2000, in the Assembly Room of the NLI.  A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

 

     The tentative Agenda includes:

 

I.        Call to Order

 

II.           Announcements and Reports from co-chairs of the caucus

         (Richman & Smith)

 

III.           Reports from Committee Chairs

 

IV.  Report from Cara-Lynne Schengrund, Chair, University Faculty Senate

 

V.           Other Business

 

                      VI.           Adjournment and Lunch