Penn State University Home  

 

 

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

AGENDA

Tuesday, December 8, 1998, at 1:30 PM in

112 Kern Graduate Building

[In the case of severe weather conditions or other emergencies, you may call the Senate Office
at (814) 863-0221 to inquire if a Senate meeting has been postponed or canceled. This may be
done after normal office hours by calling the same number and a voice mail announcement can
be heard concerning the status of any meeting. You may also leave a message at that time.]

A. MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING -
Minutes of the October 27, 1998, Meeting in The Senate Record 32:2

B. COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE - Senate Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets)
of November 24, 1998

C. REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL - Meeting of November 17, 1998

D. ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR -

E. COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY -

F. FORENSIC BUSINESS -

G. UNFINISHED BUSINESS -

MOTION BY LOUIS F. GESCHWINDNER, SENATOR, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

General Education Report on Second Language Report (Recommendation #8)

"SINCE THE GENERAL EDUCATION IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE DID NOT AGREE TO WITHDRAW THEIR REPORT FOR RECONSIDERATION BUT LEFT IT ON THE FLOOR, WE HAVE NO ASSURANCES THAT, IN FACT, THEY WILL ADDRESS THE CONCERNS THAT WERE RAISED. THEREFORE, I MOVE THAT THE INFORMATIONAL REPORT, APPENDIX "D" FOR THE OCTOBER 27, 1998, UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE MEETING, BE WITHDRAWN. THE GENERAL EDUCATION IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE HAS GONE BEYOND THEIR AUTHORITY IN ALTERING POLICY AT THE UNIVERSITY ON THE ACCEPTANCE AND USE OF TRANSFER CREDITS."

MOTION BY GREGORY FARBER, SENATOR, EBERLY COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

Domestic Partner Health Care Benefits

"IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS, A NUMBER OF ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS HAVE OFFERED DOMESTIC PARTNER BENEFITS TO THEIR EMPLOYEES. OVER THAT SAME PERIOD OF TIME, PENN STATE HAS ADJUSTED, AS ALLOWED BY LAW, ALL OF ITS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR AN INCLUSIVE BENEFITS PROGRAM - WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE EXTENSION OF MEDICAL BENEFITS TO SAME SEX DOMESTIC PARTNERS.

A REVIEW OF TRENDS IN THE BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT, AND HIGHER EDUCATION COMMUNITIES INDICATES THAT THE EXTENSION OF MEDICAL BENEFITS TO SAME SEX DOMESTIC PARTNERS IS MORE TYPICAL NOW (SEE THE JULY, 1998 REPORT OF THE TASK FORCE ON THE FUTURE OF BENEFITS). THE COSTS INVOLVED IN EXTENDING THESE BENEFITS ARE MINIMAL WHEN VIEWED WITHIN THE TOTAL COST OF THE BENEFITS PROGRAM. IN ADDITION, THERE IS SOME EVIDENCE THAT PENN STATE IS NOW PLACED AT A COMPETITIVE DISADVANTAGE IN ITS EFFORTS TO ATTRACT AND RETAIN HIGH-QUALITY FACULTY, STAFF, AND STUDENTS WITHOUT HEALTH BENEFITS FOR SAME SEX DOMESTIC PARTNERS.

THEREFORE, THE SENATE RECOMMENDS THAT THE UNIVERSITY MODIFIES ITS CURRENT POLICIES AND EXTEND MEDICAL, DENTAL, AND VISION BENEFITS TO SAME SEX DOMESTIC PARTNERS."

H. LEGISLATIVE REPORTS –

I. ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS -

J. INFORMATIONAL REPORTS -

Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid

Reserved Spaces Program

Faculty Benefits

Voluntary Phased Retirement Program -- First Year Report

General Education Implementation Committee

Foreign/Second Language Report (Recommendation #8)

Research

Report on Graduate Education, Rodney A. Erickson, Vice President for Research/ Dean of the Graduate School

Undergraduate Education

Grade Distribution Report

Mid-Semester Evaluation Report

K. NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

L. COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY

-----------------

Note: The next regular meeting of the University Faculty Senate will be held on Tuesday, February 2, 1999, at 1:30 PM in Room 112 Kern Building.

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

Birch Cottage

University Park, PA 16802

(814) 863-0221 – phone (814) 863-6012 – fax

E-mail address: http://www.psu.edu/ufs/

Date: November 20, 1998

From: Peter Deines, Chair, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

To: Leonard J. Berkowitz, Chair, University Faculty Senate

The Senate Curriculum Report, dated November 24, 1998, has been circulated throughout the University, via the web. Objections to any of the items in the report must be submitted to the University Curriculum Coordinator at the Senate Office, Birch Cottage, e-mail ID sfw2@psu.edu, on or before December 23, 1998.

The Senate Curriculum Report is available on the web. It can be accessed through the Faculty Senate home page (URL http://www.psu.edu/ufs). Since the Report is available on the web, printed copies were not distributed to the University community. An electronic mailing list was used to notify all individuals currently receiving the Report of its publication.

Please contact the Curriculum Coordinator at the e-mail ID indicated above if you would like to be added to the notification list.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS, RECORDS,

SCHEDULING AND STUDENT AID

Reserved Spaces Program

(Informational Report)

"Reserved Spaces" represent spaces at the University Park Campus reserved for eligible freshmen with special needs that cannot be met at non-University Park locations. These spaces are generally for students whose predicted GPA's are below the cutoffs for regular fall admissions for University Park.

In nearly all cases, students admitted at the University Park Campus through the Reserved Spaces Program meet the basic admission standards of the University (categories 1 through 6 on the first of the attached tables/charts). In some instances, it is not possible to calculate a predicted GPA (there were 7 such cases in 1998). This is sometimes the issue for an international student. Also, there are special circumstances that warrant dropping below the 2.00 minimum predicted GPA (there were 4 such cases in 1998).

Over half of the reserved spaces (53 percent in 1998) are for specially talented students in such areas as athletics, the arts and the Blue Band. Most of these students contribute uniquely both to the educational and cultural life of the entire University Park community. Spaces are also reserved for veterans, those entering under the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) and those entering the recently instituted College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). These three groups, along with Arts and Architecture talent admits, are Senate approved. Two other general classifications account for the remaining students admitted through the Reserved Spaces Program. "Other Academic" admissions involve students granted entrance by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions' Admissions Review Committee, and students on ROTC scholarships. Administrative admissions include athletes, members of the Blue Band, and a few additional administrative spaces.

The first table indicates the distribution of admissions through the Reserved Spaces Program by predicted GPA for each general classification. About 31 percent of the 298 students admitted through the Reserved Spaces Program for the current academic year were at or near the University Park cutoffs.

The second table contains data giving a profile of admissions through the Reserved Spaces Program for six of the years since the program began in 1984. During this time, the approved maximum for the program has been reduced and the number actually admitted each year through the program has been below the approved limit. It stood at 365 for 1995, and 335 for the last three admissions years. The difference is due to the fact that the category "international students" was removed from the Reserved Spaces Program for the 1996 admissions cycle. Thus, the limits were actually the same over the last four years and will be slightly lower, as mentioned below, for 1999. Currently, about seven percent of the entering fall semester freshman class at University Park is admitted through the Reserved Spaces Program, which is a substantial reduction from 1984, both in absolute number and percentage of new freshmen. These same data are displayed as histograms in the third attachment.

The last table displays the approved limits for Fall 1999 by specific category. Note that: the category "Communications Disorders" has been eliminated; the limit for "Veterans" has been decreased to 10 spaces; and, the limit for EOP/CAMP has been increased to 85 spaces. Students previously admitted under "Communications Disorders" and most of those previously admitted under "Veterans" can now be admitted through other special admissions programs or policies that have been instituted in the University since the Reserved Spaces Program began in 1984. For example, many veterans are now admitted under policies developed for adult learners. The increase in EOP/CAMP category is due to the recent addition of the CAMP program. Based on the number of reserved spaces utilized over the last few years, the approved total number of reserved spaces for Fall 1999 has been reduced by five.

Senate Committee on Admissions, Records Scheduling and Student Aid
JoAnne Chirico
Stephen E. Cyran
Lynn E. Drafall
Renata S. Engel, Vice Chair
Anna Griswold
Geoffrey J. Harford
Peter D. Georgopulos
David J. Green
William E. Haner
Frank J. Kristine, Chair
Robert B. Mitchell
Helena Poch
Barbara L. Power
John J. Romano
J. James Wager
Adrian J. Wanner
Ted Ziegunfus

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY BENEFITS

Voluntary Phased Retirement Program -- First Year Report

(Informational)

Background

In early 1997 the Senate Committee on Faculty Benefits prepared an informational report for the Senate explaining the Voluntary Phased Retirement Program that was to be implemented prior to July 1, 1997. As explained in that report, the program allows a reduction of the work commitment and compensation as faculty or staff approach a designated retirement date. Although it does reduce compensation, for those faculty whose financial planning permits salary reduction, the program provides a mechanism for allowing a reduced teaching load, advising activities, a transitioning of a research lab to another faculty member, or other work-related activities. The current report is an analysis of the program after one year of operation. A formal review and assessment is planned every three years by the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Personnel and the Assistant Vice President for Human Resources with input from the Deans.

Findings

Information on participants in the Voluntary Phased Retirement Program was provided by the Assistant Vice President for Human Resources, and includes the following:

a. During the July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 period, eight (8) persons requested and were approved for participation in the program. This number included persons classified as administrators (1), faculty (4), and staff (3). Of this total, two (2) are members of the State Employees Retirement System (SERS) and six (6) are members of the TIAA plan.

b. The program initially envisioned reduction in initial increments of 15 to 25% over a period of 2 to 3 years, to a minimum of a 25% appointment in the terminal year, but because flexibility was desired, other possibilities were negotiable. Current participants are planning for a 2 to 3 year phase-out, but the extent of reduction agreed to varies widely, from a first-year change to a 90% appointment, down to a first-year change to a 25% appointment; reductions to 50 or 60% appointments for the first year were the most common, however.

Conclusion

The Senate Committee on Faculty Benefits concluded that the Voluntary Phased Retirement Program appears to be serving the needs of the faculty and staff essentially as planned, with the only concern being that information on the program may not have been as widely circulated as needed. However, the Office of Human Resources provides a copy of the policy at its Web site address: http://www.ohr.psu.edu/policy/hr29.cfm. Furthermore, steps are being taken to inform faculty and staff about the program through an INTERCOM article in the near future.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY BENEFITS
Keith Burkhart
Thomas Daubert
Gregory Farber
Charles Gunderman
Jamie Myers
Mary Nicholson
Timothy Ovaert
Allen Phillips (Chair)
Gerhard Strasser
Donna Testa
Anita Vickers


General Education Implementation Committee

Foreign/Second Language Report (Recommendation #8)

(Informational)

Introduction

In December 1997 the University Faculty Senate adopted Recommendation #8 of the Report of' the Special Committee on General Education:

"An option to substitute study in a second language at the third semester or higher levels for any three credits in the general education curriculum" (p. iv).

The purpose of this recommendation is to provide within General Education a way of encouraging students to further their knowledge of a foreign/second language without establishing a specific university-wide foreign/second language requirement. Such encouragement supports the international dimension within General Education and fosters a greater awareness of globalization. The legislation allows students who have reached the 12th credit level of proficiency or higher to substitute three such course credits for any other three credits of General Education requirements. Substitution of another sort is already permitted elsewhere within General Education: students who wish to take an additional course in Arts, Humanities, and Social and Behavioral Sciences may substitute that third course for a course in one of the other two areas. The General Education Implementation Committee approves of such substitutions, but it wants to make sure that students take at least one course in each General Education area. For that reason, it stipulates that substitutions may not eliminate an entire area of General Education.

The committee is also sensitive to the fact that some degree, college, or major programs have specific course requirements within General Education which this substitution policy may not eliminate.

Considerations of the General Education Implementation Committee

The General Education Implementation Committee has carefully considered Recommendation #8. For purposes of implementing that recommendation, the committee understands the recommendation to have the following meanings:

  1. This substitution option exists to encourage all students to study a foreign/second
  2. language beyond the elementary level and to do so as part of General Education.

  3. At Penn State, while various curricular patterns exist, the most common introductory language sequence consists of three four-credit courses. A student who completes that introductory sequence is said to have reached the 12th credit level of proficiency.
  4. Baccalaureate degree candidates who successfully reach that 12th credit level of
  5. proficiency or higher (or its equivalent) may substitute three credits of foreign/second language study for three credits in any of the categories of General Education.

  6. Although the third course in the typical 12 credit sequence earns four credits, the student may substitute only three of those credits within any category of General Education.
  7. For example, students who have successfully completed the third course in a
  8. sequence, e.g., French 003, Japanese 003, or Swahili 003, or who have completed a higher level course, e.g., German 201, may substitute three of those credits for some other General Education requirement.

  9. This substitution may not lead to the complete elimination of any area within the
  10. Skills or Knowledge Domains categories of the General Education Program.

  11. If the student’s degree program requires foreign/second language study, then those
  12. language courses required as part of the degree program may not also be used as part of General Education. However, students who achieve language proficiency beyond what is required by their degree program may substitute three of those additional credits of foreign/second language study for any General Education requirement.

  13. Transfer credits will be accepted according to normal University policies subject to
  14. the restrictions discussed above.

  15. Since certain General Education courses apply toward accreditation criteria in some
  16. programs or serve as pre- or co-requisites for other courses in a specific major, students will need to consult with an adviser about where they intend to make such a substitution.

    Suggestions

    1. Taking these understandings into account, the General Education Implementation
    2. Committee proposes that the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs amend page 24 of the Guide to Curricular Procedures to read as follows:

      A student may, in consultation with the adviser and the approval of the student’s college dean, develop a sequence of 9 credits in either the Arts, Humanities, or Social and Behavioral Sciences by substituting 3 credits from one of the other two areas not in the student’s major field of study. BACCALAUREATE DEGREE CANDIDATES MAY SUBSTITUTE STUDY IN FOREIGN/SECOND LANGUAGE AT THE 12TH CREDIT LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY OR HIGHER FOR ANY THREE CREDITS IN ANY OF THE CATEGORIES OF GENERAL EDUCATION IF THOSE THREE CREDITS ARE IN LANGUAGE STUDY BEYOND THEIR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS. THE USE OF THESE TWO SUBSTITUTIONS, EITHER ALONE OR IN COMBINATION, MAY NOT LEAD TO THE COMPLETE ELIMINATION OF ANY AREA IN THE SKILLS OR KNOWLEDGE DOMAINS CATEGORIES IN THE STUDENT’S GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM.

    3. The committee advises the Chair of the Faculty Senate to charge the appropriate Senate committee to: 1) examine the matter of non-resident instruction credit substitution for this foreign/second language substitution option, and 2) if appropriate, to provide a legislative report which will establish the rules and appropriate forms (see attached sample forms currently in use) under which language credits might be substituted.

    4. General Education Implementation Committee
      Frank Ahern
      John Bagby, Chair
      Ingrid Blood
      George Bugyi
      Peter Deines
      Donald Fahnline
      Gary Fosmire
      John Moore, Vice Chair
      Dennis Scanlon
      James Smith
      Kenneth Thigpen

      SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

      Mid-Semester Evaluation Process 1992-97

      (Informational)

      The University-wide Mid-semester Evaluation process became operational fall semester 1992. Mid-semester evaluations are assigned to freshmen and provisional students enrolled in resident instruction courses, in compliance with Faculty Senate Policy 46-00. This process is based upon the rationale that "a formal mid-semester notification of unsatisfactory performances by freshmen will help to improve student academic performance, lead to more effective student advising, and enhance the retention of undergraduate students." (April 1989 Senate Legislation)

      At its March 14, 1995 meeting, the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education voted to make the following editorial insertion to the Policies and Rules handbook in order to inform students of the process:

      47-70 Mid-semester Evaluation

      At the end of the sixth week of classes during both fall and spring semesters, each instructor shall evaluate the performance of each first- and second-semester degree candidate or provisional student. If any such student has a grade of less than "C," the instructor will notify the registrar who will then notify the student and his or her advisor that the performance is unsatisfactory.

      In practice, the Registrar sends instructors the evaluation forms prior to the sixth week of classes, with instructions to return them by the end of the eighth week. The following campuses independently process approved mid-semester evaluation systems and are not included in this report: Beaver, Delaware, DuBois, Hazleton and Schuylkill.

      Tables 1-4 show the results of these evaluations (data provided by the Registrar) for fall semesters 1992-97, the spring semester data does not differ noticeably. It has been noted that instructors do not enter evaluations for about 22% of the student enrollments, however, non-responses are now indicated as "satisfactory" evaluations in the data. This is a reflection of the way that many faculty complete the forms, which ask for the instructor to mark either "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory" for each student; many instructors mark only the unsatisfactory cases. Given this practice, it is not possible to determine the significance of an instructor failing to return the form. The Committee is aware that in some courses, no formal evaluation of students’ progress is made until after the eighth week of the semester. In other cases, instructors elect not to participate for various reasons. Consequently, the Committee has chosen not to attempt any analysis of the data.

      The Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education thanks Gary Hile, Associate Registrar, Academic Records, for supervising this process and preparing the tables for this report.

      SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION
      Steven F. Arnold, Vice Chair
      Rebecca Beatty
      James G. Brasseur
      John J. Cahir
      Dennis Calvin
      Santa Casciani
      Joseph Cecere
      James P. Crawford
      Terry Engelder
      Thomas A. Frank
      M. Margaret Galligan
      Gary L. Hile
      David Kayal
      William C. Lasher
      Janet A. May
      Kenneth P. McGraw
      Arthur C. Miller, Chair
      David J. Myers
      Deanna Puryear
      Eric R. White
      Robert Zelis

      THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

      The University Faculty Senate

      MINUTES OF SENATE COUNCIL

      Tuesday, November 17, 1998 1:30 PM 101 Kern Graduate Building

      MEMBERS PRESENT
      J. W. Bagby
      L. J. Berkowitz
      M. E. Broyles
      L. A. Carpenter
      S. de Hart
      P. Deines
      D. E. Fahnline
      G. W. Franz
      L. C. Friend
      L. F. Geschwindner
      D. S. Gouran
      D. E. Jago
      P. C. Jurs
      D. L. Kerstetter
      P. A. Klein
      V. Lunetta
      L. P. Miller
      M. R. Nelson
      S. Richman (for I. Richman)
      P. P. Rebane
      A. B. Romberger
      A. W. Scaroni
      C. H. Strauss
      B. B. Tormey
      G. Bugyi
      B. Hockenberry
      V. Price
      ACCOUNTED FOR
      J. A. Brighton
      E. Leure-duPree
      G. B. Spanier
      GUESTS
      J. Cahir
      T. Cunning
      R. Erickson
      R. Filippelli
      E. Hawthorne
      T. Jackson
      T. Jones
      J. Moore
      A. Phillips
      R. Secor
      J. Strasser

      Chair Berkowitz called the meeting to order at 1:34 PM on Tuesday, November 17, 1998, in Room 101 Kern Graduate Building. The minutes of the October 6, 1998 meeting were approved as distributed on a Jurs/Tormey motion.

      ANNOUNCEMENTS AND REMARKS

      Chair Berkowitz reported that the Faculty Advisory Committee met on October 6 and that he had announced those agenda items at the October 27 Senate meeting. The next meeting of the FAC is scheduled for Wednesday, November 18. He will share those agenda items as a part of the December 8 Senate meeting. He also announced at the October Senate Meeting that the Senate Officers visited Penn State Erie, Beaver and Shenango Campuses on October 13 and 14. They visited Altoona College on November 5 and the last visit for the fall will be to Dickinson School of Law on December 10.

      Professor Berkowitz indicated that he had received two memos from President Spanier regarding implementation of reports passed by the Senate. These include, from the April 28, 1998, Senate meeting, "College of Medicine Addendum: 1997 Report on Faculty Salary Equity By Gender." Dr. Spanier is requesting that the Assistant Vice President for Human Resources and Director of the Affirmative Action Office "to begin a case-by-case review of individual faculty salaries for the purpose of evaluating and, where necessary, to correct any gender equity situations within departments in the College of Medicine. In addition, the Joint University Planning, Faculty Benefits Committee on Faculty Compensation Data Reporting Issues should continue its deliberations regarding improved methods of examining faculty salary issues."

      From the September 15, 1998, Senate meeting, "Proposed Change to HR-36 -Educational Privileges for Regular Employees and Other Members of the University Staff." The President is asking the Assistant Vice President for Human Resources to implement the revisions in Human Resources Policy HR-36.

      Dr. Berkowitz also received a memo from the President finalizing the appointment of the Joint Committee on Insurance and Benefits for 1998-99. George Franz will chair the committee again this year. Other members of the committee are -- Ken Babe, Nancy Hensal, Michael Klein, Debra Putt, and Billie Willits from the administration. Senate appointees include John Nichols, Kathryn Dansky, Stephen Foreman, Charles Gunderman and George Franz.

      Senate Chair-Elect Nelson informed the Council that he and Executive Secretary Bugyi attended the CIC Faculty Senate Leadership Conference at the University of Minnesota on November 6 and 7. He indicated that 10 of the 11 CIC institutions were represented and that the exchange was very useful for all conferees. He would be happy to share the agenda and the issues discussed if anyone wishes to contact him. The next meeting will be at the University of Wisconsin-Madison next November.

      REPORT OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL

      Philip Klein reported to Council that he is happy with the excellent rapport he has as the Senate Council Representative to the Graduate Council. A copy of Professor Klein's report of the October 21, 1998, Graduate Council meeting is attached to these minutes.

      AGENDA ITEMS FOR THE DECEMBER 8 SENATE MEETING

      Dr. Berkowitz called the Council's attention to the two motions under Unfinished Business on the proposed December 8, 1998 Senate Agenda. The first of these two motions was made by Louis Geschwindner regarding the Informational Report from the General Education Implementation Committee entitled "Second Language Report (Recommendation #8)." The second motion was made by Gregory Farber regarding domestic partner benefits. Chair Berkowitz related to Council the likely disposition of those motions. It is his understanding that, given the changes in the foreign language report, Dr. Geschwindner is planning to ask permission to withdraw his motion at the next Senate meeting. If there are no objections, the motion will be withdrawn.

      Regarding Professor Farber's motion, he is presently working with the Faculty Benefits Committee to move a version of that motion through committee. If that works out in Faculty Benefits, he'll move to postpone his motion. Thus, if the committee motion/report comes to the Senate, Dr. Farber's motion will be withdrawn. It is expected that the Faculty Benefits motion/report will be presented to Council in January to go to the Senate floor for the February meeting. Dr. Berkowitz announced that he attended a meeting with the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Commission on Equity and they decided that they agreed with the concept that a motion/report coming through the Faculty Benefits Committee would be best. If a motion/report doesn't come out of the Faculty Benefits Committee, then Professor Farber will move forward with his motion.

      Legislative Reports

      There were no Legislative reports for the Council to consider.

      Advisory and Consultative Reports

      There were no Advisory and Consultative reports for the Council to address.

      Informational Reports

      Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid - "Reserved Spaces Program." Chair Berkowitz asked for and received a Gouran/Romberger motion to put this report on the Senate Agenda. Dr. Berkowitz next announced that Vice Provost Cahir would address any questions regarding this report. Council expressed its concern about the fact the between 1997 and 1998 there appears to be about a 30% increase in the reserved spaces after many years of decline. There was no further discussion, and Chair Berkowitz asked for a vote on the Gouran/Romberger motion. The motion passed.

      Faculty Benefits - "Voluntary Phased Retirement Program -- First Year Report." A Jurs/Tormey motion was made to accept this report. Allen Phillips addressed this report and asked if there were any questions. Council asked if the individuals who have taken advantage of the program had any problems with the process in participating in the program. Dr. Phillips indicated that Billie Willits had indicated that there had been no problems associated with the program thus far. The Jurs/Tormey motion was passed at this point.

      General Education Implementation Committee - "Foreign/Second Language Report (Recommendation #8)." Chair Berkowitz reminded Council that this was an updated version of the report that Council passed at its last meeting. A Gouran/Rebane motion was made to include this report on the Senate Agenda. John Moore addressed Council by stating that changes were made in the report by first reformatting the report. A substantive change was made by including point #8 which deals with the fact that transfer credits will be accepted according to normal University policies. He also stated that a new section was added to advise the Chair of the Senate to charge the appropriate Senate committees to examine the matter of non-resident instruction credit substitution. Council passed the Gouran/Rebane motion with little discussion.

      Research - "Report on Graduate Education." Dr. Berkowitz announced that this was to be an oral informational report about graduate education and Graduate Council. He then reminded Council that one of our objectives over the last couple of years was to bring graduate education and Graduate Council within the purview of the University Faculty Senate. Thus, there have been a number of issues that came from Graduate Council to the Senate. As a part of that effort, we are asking the Dean of the Graduate School to make reports like this one to the full Senate. He asked for a motion to include this report on the Agenda, and there was a Jurs/Gouran motion made. Rodney Erickson addressed Council and indicated that he would provide information of major trends in graduate education. This would include what is happening to enrollments, issues that Graduate Council has been considering, and major issues in graduate education. Several questions were asked about the status of graduate students and their relationship to the institutions they are associated with as employees. Professor Berkowitz asked Thomas Jackson, Chair of Research, that if the committee would wish to sponsor a second report by Dean Erickson concerning these broader national issues, they should consider it. Council passed the Jurs/Gouran motion.

      Undergraduate Education - "Grade Distribution Report." Chair Berkowitz asked for a motion to put this report on the Senate Agenda. There was a Gouran/Jago motion made to that affect. Council pointed out several problems with the Figures in the report. They needed to be labeled, to re-scale the axis, and to explain and interpret the curves in the Figures. There were several other suggested revisions and corrections made by Council in the text and the Tables. Chair Berkowitz called for a vote on the Gouran/Jago motion and it was defeated, thus sending the report back to committee.

      Undergraduate Education - "Mid-Semester Evaluation Report." A Jurs/Gouran motion was made to place this report on the Senate Agenda. Council expressed concern about the number of mid-semester forms that were not returned by the faculty and suggested that this number, or a percentage, be included in the report. Chair Berkowitz next called for a vote to place this report on the Agenda. The vote was positive.

      APPROVAL OF THE SENATE AGENDA

      At this point, Dr. Berkowitz declared the above, passed reports the Senate Agenda for the December 8, 1998.

      ACTION ITEMS

      The first action item was a proposal from the College of the Liberal Arts to Drop the Major in Prelaw. Ronald Filippelli asked if there were any questions of him regarding this proposal. Without discusion, there was a Richman/Tormey motion made, and passed, as follows:

      In accordance with our duties as prescribed in Bylaws,
      Article II, Section 1(d), it is the advice of Senate Council that the proposal to Drop the Major in Prelaw be implemented as described in the documents we have received.

      The second action item was from the Commonwealth College and entitled "Revision of the Commonwealth College Division Head Structure." Joseph Strasser and Elizabeth Hawthorne addressed the proposal and offered to clarify any questions in the proposal. Dean Strasser explained the difference between the present division structure and the proposed structure. He indicated that this new structure would allow more time and support for the division heads to travel to the campuses to provide the mentoring of new faculty and advise the faculty that are presently in place.

      Council was concerned that the particular combination of disciplines within the divisions may be a problem. Council was also concerned about the extensive travel that must be done by these division heads. The workload of the division heads was also a point of concern for Council. Dean Strasser indicated that it is his plan that division heads be relieved of teaching responsibilities in the fall semester so that the division heads can travel to campuses and mentor faculty. There will also be senior faculty assigned to help out with the duties of the division heads. After further discussion, the following Romberger/Tormey motion was passed by Council:

      In accordance with our duties as prescribed in Bylaws,
      Article II, Section 1(d), it is the advice of Senate Council that the proposal for revision of the Commonwealth College Division Head structure be implemented with the following condition -- That the new structure be revisited (reevaluated) in three years.

      ADJOURNMENT

      Senate Chair Berkowitz thanked Council for their efforts in establishing the Senate Agenda and the thoughtful handling of the Action Items. He adjourned the meeting at 2:53 PM.

      Respectfully submitted,
      George J. Bugyi Executive Secretary

      THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

      The University Faculty Senate

      Birch Cottage

      University Park, PA 16802

      (814) 863-0221 – phone (814) 863-6012 – fax

      E-mail address: http://www.psu.edu/ufs/

      Date: November 10, 1998

      To: Senate Council

      From: Philip A. Klein, Representative to Graduate Council

      Re: Report on Meeting of October 21, 1998

      The Graduate Council met on October 21, 1998.

      Dean Erickson reported on several items of general interest:

      1. He reported on his attendance at the CIC Graduate Deans meeting. Intellectual property and copyright issues are still being discussed, and it appears they will be with us for some time to come. Penn State is one of very few universities that require graduate students to sign an intellectual property agreement.

      2. He reported that not only is enrollment down in a number of graduate schools around the country but minority enrollments are down nationally and significantly so. Big Ten Universities are turning major attention to minority graduate recruitment and retention.

      3. The Dean reported that the budget agreement recently enacted in Washington includes a FICA tax exemption for certain students in public institutions. This will apply to undergraduate students as well as to certain graduate assistants.

      4. The Dean announced that a search is underway to fill the position of Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the Graduate School.

      5. In his capacity as Vice President for Research, Dean Erickson reported that a search is underway for a new Associate Vice-President and Director of Strategic and Interdisciplinary Initiatives.

      6. He also reported that research expenditures at Penn State will be over $370 million in fiscal year 1998 enabling Penn State to retain its national ranking in this area.

      Among committee reports we may mention:

      1. The Committee on Academic Standards is discussing the transfer of non-degree graduate credit to Penn State graduate degree programs. Requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      2. The Committee on Graduate Research is planning the Graduate Research Exhibition to be held March 26-27, 1999.

      3. The Committee on Graduate Student and Faculty Affairs is exploring issues in graduate student health insurance and an effort will be made to benchmark other CIC institutions with locations similar to Penn State's.

      THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

      INTER-OFFICE CORRESPONDENCE

      Date: November 20, 1998

      From: George J. Bugyi, Executive Secretary

      To: All Senators and Committee Personnel

      Please note the scheduled time and location of your committee. If you are unable to attend, notify the Senate Office prior to Senate Day -- if possible.

      MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1998 7:00 PM

      Officers' and Chairs' Meeting Ballroom DE, Nittany Lion Inn

      8:00 PM

      Commonwealth Caucus No meeting this month

      TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1998 7:30 AM

      Intercollegiate Athletics HUB Gallery Lounge

      8:00 AM

      Curricular Affairs 101 Kern Building

      Outreach Activities 502 Keller Building

      Student Life Paul Robeson Cultural Center

      8:30 AM

      Admissions, Records, Scheduling and

      Student Aid 203 Shields

      Committees and Rules 227 HUB

      8:30 AM (continued)

      Intra-University Relations 305 HUB

      Research 114 Kern Building

      Undergraduate Education 307 HUB

      University Planning Donovan Room, 204 HUB

      9:00 AM

      Faculty Affairs 404 Old Main

      Libraries 323 HUB

      9:30 AM

      Computing and Information Systems 101-A Kern Building

      Faculty Benefits Birch Cottage

      1:30 PM

      University Faculty Senate 112 Kern Building

      There will be a Commonwealth Caucus meeting at 11:00 AM on TUESDAY,

      DECEMBER 8, 1998, in BALLROOM DE OF THE NITTANY LION INN.

      At approximately 12:00 Noon, a buffet luncheon will be served.

      The Pennsylvania State University

      The University Faculty Senate

      Birch Cottage (814) 863-0221

      Fax: (814) 863-6012

      Date: November 20, 1998

      To: Commonwealth Caucus Senators (This includes all elected Senators from
      Campuses, Colleges, and Locations Other Than University Park)

      From: Deidre Jago and Andrew Romberger

      NO MONDAY NIGHT MEETING THIS MONTH

      Officers' and Chairs' Meeting Board Room I, NLI

      Commonwealth Caucus No meeting this month

      TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 19987:30 AM

      Intercollegiate Athletics HUB Gallery Lounge

      8:00 AM

      Curricular Affairs101 Kern Building

      Outreach Activities502 Keller Building

      Student LifePaul Robeson Cultural
      Center

      8:30 AM

      Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid 203 Shields

      Committees and Rules 227 HUB

      Intra-University Relations 305 HUB

      Research 114 Kern Building

      Undergraduate Education 307 HUB

      University PlanningDonovan Rm., 204 HUB

      9:00 AM

      Faculty Affairs 404 Old Main

      Libraries 323 HUB

      9:30 AM

      Computing and Information Systems 101-A Kern Building

      Faculty BenefitsBirch Cottage

      1:30 PM

      The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, December 8, 1998, in the Ballroom DE of the Nittany Lion Inn. A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

      The tentative Agenda includes:

      1. Call to Order
      2. Announcements and reports from co-chairs
      3. Dean Strasser -- First-Year Seminar and other issues
      4. Discussion of Agenda Items
      5. Reports from Senate Committees
      6. Adjournment and Lunch