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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

AGENDA

Tuesday, February 2, 1999, at 1:30 PM in

112 Kern Graduate Building

[In the case of severe weather conditions or other emergencies, you may call the Senate Office at (814) 863-0221 to inquire if a Senate meeting has been postponed or canceled. This may be done after normal office hours by calling the same number and a voice mail announcement can be heard concerning the status of any meeting. You may also leave a message at that time.]

A. MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING -

Minutes of the December 8, 1998, Meeting in The Senate Record 32:3

B. COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE - Senate Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets)
of January 12, 1999

C. REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL - Meeting of January 19, 1999

D. ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR -

E. COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY -

F. FORENSIC BUSINESS -

G. UNFINISHED BUSINESS -

H. LEGISLATIVE REPORTS –

Committees and Rules

Revision of Standing Rules, Article II: Senate Committee Structure

Student Life

Resolution

Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon

WHEREAS the Penn State Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic DanceMar athon, during the past 27 years, has raised over 10.5 million dollars to support the Four Diamonds Fund benefiting the families of children with cancer at the Hershey Medical Center, andWHEREAS THONTM is recognized as the nation’s largest student-run philanthropy, recently committing over five million dollars over the next five years to create a cancer research facility dedicated to finding a cure for pediatric cancer, and WHEREAS THONTM demonstrates Penn State’s fraternities' and Sororities' commitment to the betterment of humanity and contributes to the educational mission of the University by providing opportunities for students and faculty to give back to society, BE IT RESOLVED that The Pennsylvania State University Faculty Senate commends the achievements of the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon and encourages faculty at all locations to support its activities.

I. ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS -

J. INFORMATIONAL REPORTS -

Curricular Affairs

The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Descriptions

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities

Annual Report for 1997-98

General Education Implementation Committee

Intercultural and International Competence Requirement
(Recommendation #7)

Senate Council

Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

K. NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

L. COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY -

-----------------

Note: The next regular meeting of the University Faculty Senate will be held on Tuesday, March 2, 1999, at 1:30 PM in Room 112 Kern Building.

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

Birch Cottage

University Park, PA 16802

(814) 863-0221 – phone (814) 863-6012 – fax

E-mail address: http://www.psu.edu/ufs/

Date: January 22, 1999

From: Peter Deines, Chair, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

To: Leonard J. Berkowitz, Chair, University Faculty Senate

The Senate Curriculum Report, dated January 12, 1999, has been circulated throughout the University, via the web. Objections to any of the items in the report must be submitted to the University Curriculum Coordinator at the Senate Office, Birch Cottage, e-mail ID sfw2@psu.edu, on or before February 12, 1999.

The Senate Curriculum Report is available on the web. It can be accessed through the Faculty Senate home page (URL http://www.psu.edu/ufs). Since the Report is available on the web, printed copies were not distributed to the University community. An electronic mailing list was used to notify all individuals currently receiving the Report of its publication.

Please contact the Curriculum Coordinator at the e-mail ID indicated above if you would like to be added to the notification list.

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Revision of Standing Rules, Article II Senate Committee Structure

(Legislative)

(Implementation upon passage by the Senate)

INTRODUCTION

In light of the increased level of interest expressed by the student government in undergraduate education issues, and an interest on the part of the committee to be inclusive of student issues related to undergraduate education, including the Schreyer Honors College, the Committee on Committees and Rules proposes the following legislation regarding the membership of the Committee on Undergraduate Education.

RECOMMENDATION

The legislative action is to amend Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6, (m) Committee on Undergraduate Education:

Standing Rules

ARTICLE II: SENATE COMMITTEE STRUCTURE

SECTION 6: Senate Committees:

(m) Committee on Undergraduate Education

    1. Membership:
    1. At least twelve (12) elected faculty Senators
    2. Two (2) undergraduate student Senators
    3. THE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC ASSEMBLY
    4. (iii) The Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education*
    5. (iv) The Director of the Division of Undergraduate Studies*
    6. THE DEAN OF THE SCHREYER HONORS COLLEGE*

*nonvoting unless Article IV, Section 2 of the Bylaws applies

RATIONALE

The Committee on Undergraduate Education has recommended the above changes in order to be able to include the student perspective more directly into their deliberations and the Dean of the Schreyer Honors College as an appropriate representative. The Academic Assembly is actively involved in addressing issues common to those addressed by the committee. It will be beneficial to the Senate to have these interests more fully represented on the committee.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Leonard J. Berkowitz
Edward W. Bittner
S. Diane Brannon
Barton W. Browning
Mark A. Casteel
Caroline D. Eckhardt, V-Chair
Donald E. Fahnline
Louis F. Geschwindner
John H. Harwood
Murry R. Nelson
Laura L. Pauley
Jean Landa Pytel
Nancy J. Wyatt, Chair

SENATE COMMITTEE ON CURRICULAR AFFAIRS

The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Description

(Informational)

Introduction

On December 2, 1997, the Senate adopted the requirement that all Baccalaureate students entering the University complete a First-Year Seminar (FYS). The figure on page 29 of the legislative report, which also was adopted by the Senate (the figure is reproduced as Attachment 1 to the present report), shows the First-Year Seminar within "The Framework for General Education at Penn State," and indicates a minimum of 1 credit worth of instruction for the seminar. The total number of credits included in "The Framework for General Education" sum to 45 credits. Additional requirements of the report were that the FYS be portable; i.e., that a student could complete the seminar requirement in any college, and that each college develop First-Year Seminars.

The Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs (SCCA) and the General Education Implementation Committee (GEIC) have now received and reviewed the plans outlining how the colleges plan to offer the FYS. While some details about FYS offerings remain to be clarified, it has become clear that several of the colleges' plans cannot be implemented within the strictures of the Senate legislation and that for some colleges it would be impossible to devise a plan that would meet all of the requirements set forth in "The Framework for General Education." The matter is further complicated by the need to state the FYS requirement clearly in all Baccalaureate Program descriptions with due respect to the transportability requirement for the FYS.

Proposed Addition to the Guide of Curricular Procedures

After consultation with GEIC, the Vice-Provost for Undergraduate Education, and the Senate Leadership, a consensus has been reached that some flexibility is needed in order to be able to provide a clear description of the nature of the FYS requirement in the academic program descriptions. The SCCA has been charged by the Senate, as a whole, to review, evaluate, and approve or reject all course and curriculum proposals. Under this authority the SCCA proposes to include the following statement, concerning the description of the FYS requirement in the academic program descriptions, in the Guide to Curricular Procedures:

"The General Education Component of the Baccalaureate degree consists of 45 to 46 credits, including one credit of a First-Year Seminar. Colleges or departments which require First-Year Seminars for more than one credit and which propose a course that cannot be completed within the 46 credits of General Education need to account clearly for the additional credits in their academic programs under the Categories of College or Major Requirements."

SENATE COMMITTEE ON CURRICULAR AFFAIRS:

Ronald Bettig
Garry L. Burkle
Louis J. Campbell III
Peter Deines, Chair
Richard B. Englund
Gary J. Fosmire
George W. Franz
Gretchen Kline-deHart
Darla Lindberg
Herberta M. Lundegren
J. Daniel Marshall
Robert A. Novack
Henry O. Patterson
Judith Ozment Payne
M. Susan Richman
Shelley M. Stoffels
Jessica L. Stuart
Roger P. Ware
Diane Zabel
Gregory R. Ziegler
Sally Heffentreyer

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Annual Report for 1997-98

(Informational)

I am pleased to present the report of the Senate Committee on Faculty Rights and Responsibilities to you today.

As you will see from this report, the Committee dealt with ten cases this past year. This is one fewer than last year and continues the case levels the Committee experienced during the early 1990s.

Eight of the ten cases dealt with either tenure and/or promotion denial, while the other cases dealt with issues of professional ethics and administrative prerogative. Nine of the ten cases were brought by faculty members and, for the first time in recent memory, a complaint against a faculty member was brought to the Committee by an administrator. I point this out to remind senators that the petition and review process of the Committee is open to administrators who "seek a Committee judgment as to appropriate action toward a faculty member who, in his or her judgment, may be failing to meet his or her responsibilities."

All eight of the tenure and/or promotion denials alleged procedural irregularities, while three also complained of violations of academic freedom and/or professional ethics. One of the cases was brought by a faculty member who had left the employ of the University and thus, the Committee concluded, was not eligible to petition for redress. In none of the cases did the Committee find the claims of procedural irregularity to be either correct or of sufficient gravity to have made a difference in a case. In most of the cases, the evidence made clear that these decisions were made on the basis of academic judgment by peers, and that such judgments were not violations of either procedural fairness, academic freedom, or professional ethics. Thus the Committee did not recommend further action by the Provost in any of these eight cases.

As we have said in the past, the lessons we draw from these cases hold no surprises. Explicit communication between candidates and administrators concerning the outcomes of reviews remains essential to a fair and useful process. Mentoring by department heads likewise remains a key to success. We saw a number of cases this past year where committee and administrator review letters containing clear statements of concern and warnings were ignored or not responded to, resulting in negative outcomes. Again, we cannot urge too strongly that candidates take every opportunity to learn about the process and discuss expectations and their progress with senior colleagues and administrators.

This past year’s cases did not bring up issues of gender or forms of discrimination, nor were there cases that could be traced to structural changes in the University. At least two of the cases concerned either procedures of the University Promotion and Tenure Review Committee or conditions under which cases receiving a negative vote by the college dean would come to that committee. This may speak to a need for faculty to better understand the procedures for cases going to the University level.

This is the first full year the Committee has operated under the mandated time period of sixty days to complete a case review. As I said last year, I believe that we are in almost all cases meeting that mandate, and where we do not, we resolve those cases as quickly as we possibly can.

In closing, I regret to tell you that I have stepped aside as Chair of the Committee after two years in that position and this, my sixth year on the Committee, will be my last as I move on to other challenges and service. I have been honored to serve the Senate and the faculty in this capacity. I continue to be impressed with the open-mindedness, seriousness, and sincerity with which my fellow Committee members carry out this vital responsibility. Thank you.

TABLE 1

FACULTY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES COMMITTEE

CASE LOAD IN RECENT YEARS

Years Number of Cases

1989-90 -- 9

1990-91 --12

1991-92 -- 8

1992-93 -- 24

1993-94 -- 23

1994-95 -- 21

1995-96 -- 18

1996-97 -- 11

1997-98 -- 10

1997-98 SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Annette L. Caruso
Jacob De Rooy
Rodney A. Erickson
Gary J. Fosmire, Vice-Chair
Margaret M. Lyday
James M. Rambeau
Barbara M. Shannon
Leon J. Stout, Chair
David N. Wormley

GENERAL EDUCATION IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE

Intercultural and International Competence Requirement (Recommendation #7)

(Informational)

The Senate Legislation of December 2, 1997 replaced the "Diversity Requirement" with an "Intercultural and International Competence Requirement," and asked that the guidelines used in approving courses intended to develop intercultural and international competence be refined and that they emphasize student engagement and active learning. In response to this charge, and based upon the implementation guidelines presented in the General Education Report (December 2, 1997), the General Education Implementation Committee has developed a draft for the Guide to Curricular Procedures, which should replace the current section on Diversity. In developing this draft care was taken not to alter the intent of the original Senate Legislation on Diversity (March 29, 1990), while including the ideas expressed in the legislation of December 2, 1997.

The General Education Implementation Committee interprets the Senate Legislation of December 2, 1997 to mean that the University’s commitment to teach students about diversity issues continues, but that the scope of this part of the student’s education was widened when it was named "Intercultural and International Competence Requirement".

Thus, the General Education Implementation Committee interprets the term "Intercultural", used in the Report of December 2, 1997, to pertain to interactions taking place between two or more cultures. It understands culture in this context as:

  1. a particular form or stage of civilization, as that of a certain nation or period;
  2. the sum total of ways of living built up by a group of human beings and
    transmitted from one generation to another; and/or
  3. the behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular group (ethnic,
    religious etc.) within a society.

    The General Education Implementation Committee suggests that the section on Diversity in the Guide to Curricular Procedures be replaced by the attached statement.

    General Education Implementation Committee

    Frank Ahern
    John Bagby, Chair
    Ingrid Blood
    George Bugyi
    Peter Deines
    Donald Fahnline
    Gary Fosmire
    John Moore, Vice-Chair
    Dennis Scanlon
    James Smith
    Kenneth Thigpen

    Intercultural and International Competence Requirement

    On March 20, 1990, the University Faculty Senate established a Cultural Diversity graduation requirement effective Summer Session 1991 for all students entering the University as baccalaureate degree candidates. Students had to take either 3 credits of Diversity Focused (DF) courses or 12 credits of Diversity Enhanced (DE) courses. The legislation was modified on April 26, 1994, eliminating the Diversity Enhanced option to fulfill this requirement. This action became effective Summer Session 1994. On December 2, 1997, the University Faculty Senate recommended an enlargement in the scope of this part of the student’s education and named it the "Intercultural and International Competence Requirement". The guidelines for the implementation accompanying this legislation asked that courses fulfilling this requirement require students to make comparisons, particularly with their own realm of experience, and to emphasize student engagement and active learning. Courses fulfilling this requirement have a GI suffix. Students may satisfy the Intercultural and International Competence requirement with experiential learning, including University-approved study abroad, specific and structured internships, Peace Corps experiences, and their equivalents. Petitions for all experiential learning intended to satisfy the Intercultural and International Competence Requirement must be submitted to SCCA for review.

    The goal of Cultural Diversity courses was to encourage students through their studies in many disciplines to (a) consider the various historical backgrounds, cultural and scientific contributions, economic, psychological, and political situations of a wide range of diverse peoples; and (b) appreciate the impact of the developing global community on American society (SR:3/20/90). The report of December 1997 accepted this view but asked to sharpen the focus of the requirement and to include courses or experiences (study abroad, in-service work, etc.) that pertain to what students come to know and learn to do.

    Gaining "Intercultural Competence" in this context means to develop an understanding of the relationships between and among cultures through focused studies of particular forms or stages of civilization, such as that of certain nations or periods. It also means to increase the comprehension of the behaviors and beliefs characteristic of particular social groups within a pluralistic society distinguished by characteristics related to their culture, ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, and/or sexual orientation. Gaining competence refers to the acquisition of skills needed to deal constructively with questions which arise between cultures and within a society consisting of diverse cultural groups.

    Gaining "International Competence" in this context means to acquire a global perspective through study of the impact of other countries and their peoples on society and to develop skills which enable a student to function effectively in a complex and increasingly interdependent global community.

    An Intercultural and International Competence Course (GI) concentrates on one or both of the objectives above.

    I. Criteria for Intercultural and International Competence Courses

    The criteria for the approval of Intercultural and International Competence courses below have been derived from the previously stated goals of the Cultural Diversity requirement and expanded by the goals of the December 2, 1997 report. While no one course or section is expected to achieve every criterion, each course proposal must clearly specify which criteria it proposes to meet.

    A. Courses emphasizing development of intercultural competence of students should provide a study of one or more of the following elements:

    1. The nature of relationships among cultures, their change over time, and impact on the global society;

    2. The interrelations between dominant and non-dominant cultures, either in the United States or elsewhere.

    3. Significant cultural experiences and/or achievements of individuals (identified by ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, or sexual orientation) and the relationship between the individual experiences, the group’s culture, and other cultures.

    B. Courses emphasizing development of the student’s international competence should provide a study of the philosophy, history, culture, work, organization, economy, science, and/or technology of societies as they impact on the developing global community.

    C. All Intercultural and International Competence (GI) course proposals need to:

    1. Explain which of the elements of active learning (Recommendation #7, Senate Report, December 2, 1997) will be integrated into the course and how the students will be engaged, through active learning, to develop their Intercultural and International Competence.

    2. Identify the main cultural or societal concern(s) (ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, sexual orientation) or the main global/international concern(s) on which the course will focus.

    3. Describe, if appropriate, how the course encourages students to develop understanding of the historical backgrounds, cultural and scientific contributions, economic, social, psychological, and/or political circumstances of the group being studied.

    D. No one course can be expected to address all of the educational objectives stated in the implementation guidelines to the legislation of March 20, 1990 and December 2, 1997, which are summarized below. The course proposals must clearly demonstrate, however, how students, within the context of the course, will be encouraged to do or achieve more than one of the following:

    1. see nations and cultures not in isolation, but in relation to each other;

    2. cultivate their awareness of the pluralism and diversity within international cultures;

    3. convey consideration for different cultural values, traditions, beliefs and customs;

    4. appreciate the diversity that exists among persons who share a particular social identity;

    5. increase their knowledge about the range of cultural achievements and

    human conditions through time;

    6. recognize and be sensitive to the different ways social identities have been valued;

    7. reexamine their beliefs and behaviors about social identities (ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, or sexual orientation);

    8. be more sophisticated in their understanding of the nature of stereotypes and biases;

    9. be able to interact successfully with representatives of other nations;

    10. be able to interact effectively with persons of different social groups;

    11. increase their ability to locate and evaluate information, and to gain knowledge about other peoples of the world.

    II. Procedures for Submitting Intercultural and International

    Competence (GI) Course Proposals

    A. Proposed courses must:

    1. be consistent with the objectives of the Intercultural and International Competence requirement;

    2. include a complete course outline together with a statement of course objectives; (see Section "C" of the Guide to Curricular Procedures) {www.psu.edu/ufs – click on Publications then click on Guide to Curricular Procedures};

    3. explain how the course meets the appropriate criteria;

    4. identify and explain any intended linkages, thematic or sequential, between the proposed course and other courses;

    5. indicate what size student audience will be addressed and whether there will be specific limits set for enrollment in the course; if the course includes discussion or lab sections their enrollment limits should be given;

    6. include a publishable one-page description of the course;

    7. include the name(s) of the faculty member(s) who has major responsibility for the development of the course;

    8. address all additional applicable course criteria, if the course is intended to fulfill other General Education requirements (Knowledge Domains or Skills Area) in addition to the Intercultural and International Competence requirement.

  4. B. Mechanism for action on proposal:

    1. The proposal is submitted to the Curriculum Coordinator at the Senate Office using the Course Proposal Form and following the standard procedures.

    2. The Intercultural/International Subcommittee (and if appropriate the General Education Subcommittee) reviews the proposal and makes recommendations to the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs.

    3. The Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs acts on the proposal and publishes the results in a subsequent issue of the Curriculum Report.

    The Pennsylvania State University

    The University Faculty Senate

    Birch Cottage (814) 863-0221

    Fax: (814) 863-6012

    Date: January 19, 1999

    To: The University Faculty Senate - For Your Information

    From: Donald E. Fahnline, Chair, Elections Commission

    The 1999-2000 Census of the faculty for the University Faculty Senate was conducted in the following manner.

    Using an information base provided by the Office of Administrative Systems, a Senate census data base was created which included all personnel falling within the definition of the electorate of the University Faculty Senate as defined in Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution of the University Faculty Senate. This electorate includes all persons who are not candidates for degrees at Penn State, who hold full-time appointments as of 10/30/98, and who fall into one of the following categories: those holding professorial or librarian titles; those who are full-time instructors, senior lecturers and lecturers or assistant librarians; and those holding research rank (excluding non-continuing). These lists were sent to Deans and Directors of Academic Affairs of the various voting units for verification. For the Military Sciences, the list was compiled by the Coordinator of the Combined Departments of the Military Sciences at University Park. Military Sciences faculty at other locations were counted with that voting unit. For Librarians, the list was compiled by the Dean of the University Libraries. The Commonwealth College Librarians were counted with their voting unit.

    Both a copy of the verified list together with a letter informing the academic voting unit of the number of its electorate and the number of Senate seats to be filled were sent to each Dean and Director of Academic Affairs as well as to the Coordinator of the Military Sciences and the Dean of University Libraries. A copy of the memo was sent to each Senate Council representative.

    The total membership of the 1999-2000 University Faculty Senate will be 252. This total will include 210 elected faculty Senators, 21 appointed and ex officio Senators, and 21 student Senators. The student Senators will include: one (1) undergraduate from each of the ten (10) colleges at University Park; one (1) from each of the following locations--Abington, Altoona, Berks-Lehigh Valley, Penn State Erie-The Behrend College, Capital College, College of Medicine, Commonwealth College, The Dickinson School of Law, Division of Undergraduate Studies, the Graduate School, and Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies.

    ELECTIONS COMMISSION

    Donald E. Fahnline, Chair
    Thomas Daubert
    Peter Deines
    Jacob De Rooy
    Louis Geschwindner
    Philip Klein
    Margaret Lyday
    Kenneth Thigpen

    Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

    For the Purpose of Election of Senators (As of November 1, 1998)

    1998-991 9 9 9 - 2 0 0 01999-2000

     

     

     

     

     

    ACADEMIC VOTING UNITS

                 

    Abington

    91 5

    58

    35

    3

    96 5

    -

    Agricultural Sciences

    279 14

    269

    D>

    12

     

    289 14

    -

    Altoona

    102 5

    86

    25

     

    4

    115 6

    +1

    Arts & Architecture

    153 8

    143

    12

       

    155 8

    -

    Behrend College

    155 8

    98

    53

    4

    3

    158 8

    -

    Berks-Lehigh Valley

    85 4

    58

    23

     

    4

    85 4

    -

    Business Administration

    134 7

    115

    23

    3

     

    141 7

    -

    Capital College

    178 9

    155

    31

     

    4

    190 9

    -

    Commonwealth College

    548 27

    342

    206

     

    13

    561 28

    +1

    Communications

    51 3

    44

    10

       

    54 3

    -

    Dickinson School of Law

    34 2

    24

    6

    5

     

    35 2

    -

    Earth & Mineral Sciences

    154 8

    132

    14

    6

     

    152 8

    -

    Education

    123 6

    114

    11

     

    125 6

    -

    Engineering

    483 24

    273

    9

    216

     

    498 25

    +1

    Great Valley

    32 2

    32

    2

     

    1

    35 2

    -

    Health & Human Development

    268 13

    167

    90

    10

     

    267 13

    -

    Liberal Arts

    412 21

    362

    62

    4

     

    428 21

    -

    Libraries

    55 3

         

    47

    47 2

    -1

    Medicine

    403 20

    457

    17

    3

    3

    480 24

    +4

    Military Sciences

    24 1

    19

    7

       

    26 1

    -

    Science

    300 15

    238

    41

    9

     

    288 14

    -1

    TOTAL

    4064 205

    3186

    685

    272

    82

    4225 210

    +5

    UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE OFFICE

    Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

    For the Purpose of Election of Senators (As of November 1, 1999)

    1998-99 1 9 9 9 - 2 0 0 0 1999-2000

     

     

     

     

    LOCATIONS OF THE

    COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE

             

    Beaver

    37

    23

    13

    1

    37

    Delaware

    54

    45

    11

    2

    58

    DuBois

    44

    29

    18

    1

    48

    Fayette

    48

    28

    18

    -

    46

    Hazleton

    54

    30

    23

    1

    54

    McKeesport

    36

    23

    11

    2

    36

    Mont Alto

    55

    22

    37

    1

    60

    New Kensington

    41

    27

    8

    1

    36

    Shenango Valley

    32

    19

    12

    1

    32

    Wilkes-Barre

    38

    25

    13

    1

    39

    Worthington Scranton

    54

    36

    18

    1

    55

    York

    55

    35

    24

    1

    60

    Subtotal

    548

    342

    206

    13

    561

    .

    THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

    The University Faculty Senate

    MINUTES OF SENATE COUNCIL

    Tuesday, January 19, 1999 1:30 PM 101 Kern Graduate Building

    MEMBERS PRESENT

    J. W. Bagby
    L. J. Berkowitz
    M. E. Broyles
    L. A. Carpenter
    S. de Hart
    P. Deines
    D. E. Fahnline
    L. C. Friend
    L. F. Geschwindner
    D. S. Gouran
    D. E. Jago
    P. C. Jurs
    D. L. Kerstetter
    P. A. Klein
    A. E. Leure-duPree
    V. Lunetta
    M. R. Nelson
    I. Richman
    P. P. Rebane
    A. B. Romberger
    A. W. Scaroni
    C. H. Strauss
    B. B. Tormey
    G. Bugyi
    B. Hockenberry
    V. Price
    ACCOUNTED FOR
    J. A. Brighton
    G. W. Franz
    L. P. Miller
    G. B. Spanier

    GUESTS
    J. Cahir
    C. Eckhardt
    B. Ellis
    J. Moore
    J. Romano
    L. Stout

    Chair Berkowitz called the meeting to order at 1:36 PM on Tuesday, January 19, 1999, in Room 101 Kern Graduate Building. The minutes of the November 17, 1998 meeting were approved as distributed on a Jurs/Leure-duPree motion.

    ANNOUNCEMENTS AND REMARKS

    Chair Berkowitz announced that the Faculty Advisory Committee met on November 18 and he anounced the agenda items at the December 8 Senate meeting. They were: Senior Administrative Searches; Domestic Partners Update; Lines of Reporting; Campus Colleges; Course Prerequisites; Automation of Student Services; and Big Ten/CIC Membership. The next meeting of FAC is scheduled for tomorrow, Wednesday, January 20. This agenda will be reported at the February 2 Senate meeting.

    Next Professor Berkowitz reported to Council on the status of the Domestic Partners Advisory and Consultative report of December 8. He remarked that the President has communicated with every Senator by letter. Before that letter went out,

    Dr. Spanier called a special FAC meeting so the members of that committee were aware of the situation before the letter was posted. Thus, everyone should be well informed.

    The spring visits of the Senate Officers at University Park are now set. These include: January 26, College of Engineering; January 27, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences; February 9, College of Agricultural Sciences; February 10, College of Education; February 18, Division of Undergraduate Studies; and April 6, College of Arts and Architecture. These dates/locations are posted on the Senate's web page.

    The Chair received a memo from President Spanier regarding implementation of legislation passed by the Senate. The President is approving for implementation the report from Undergraduate Education/University Planning titled "Fall Semester Academic Calendar Changes." He is referring this report to the Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Administration for implementation.

    Senate Secretary Fahnline announced that the Nominating Committee of Senate Council met today. He informed Council that Dennis Gouran was elected Chair of that committee. Dr. Gouran noted that the committee is off to a very good start with a number of names generated already. It was agreed that they would receive no further nominations after February 8 and would make their decisions on the slates of nominees at their meeting of February 18 for presentation to Council on that date.

    REPORT OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL

    Philip Klein reported on the Graduate Council meeting of November 19, 1998. A copy of Professor Klein's report is attached to these minutes.

    AGENDA ITEMS FOR FEBRUARY 2, 1999

    Legislative Reports

    Committee on Committees and Rules -- "Revision of Standing Rules, Article II, Senate Committee Structure." A Bagby/Jurs motion was made to place this report on the Senate Agenda. Caroline Eckhardt represented CC&R and made some editorial changes. Substantively, this report adds the Dean of the Schreyer Honors College and the President of Academic Assembly to the list of named members of the Undergraduate Education Committee. There were no questions or comments from Council and the Bagby/Jurs motion was passed.

    Student Life -- "Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon." A Leure-duPree/Tormey motion to accept this report was made. Bill Ellis spoke to the report and indicated that the Student Life Committee would like to enthusiastically forward this resolution to commend the efforts of the Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic. He stated that this is a timely resolution since it will be presented at Senate two days before the Dance Marathon Kick-Off Dinner on February 4. There were no comments by Council, and the Leure-duPree/Tormey motion was passed placing this report on the Agenda.

    Advisory and Consultative Reports

    There were no Advisory and Consultative reports for Senate Council to consider.

    Informational Reports

    Faculty Rights and Responsibilities -- "Annual Report of 1997-98." There was a Tormey/Romberger motion to place this report on the Agenda. Leon Stout presented the report and indicated that this is a mandated annual report. He stated that there were no real trends in this report except that the figures seem to be moving back to those of the early 1990s. He shared that this reversal might be due to faculty mentoring and better preparation of both the faculty and the administration from the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Personnel. Council had several questions but suggested no changes. The Tormey/Romberger motion was accepted.

    General Education Implementation Committee -- "Intercultural and International Competence Requirement (Recommendation #7)." A Jurs/Lunetta motion was made to place this report on the Agenda. John Bagby and John Moore presented this report. Dr. Bagby made several editorial corrections and the Council also asked that some other changes be included. This report will set the standards for the new Intercultural and International Competence requirement. The Jurs/Lunetta motion was passed. Professor Bagby noted that GEIC will have upcoming Informational Reports for Council consideration on Skills, Flexibility, and Assessment.

    Curricular Affairs Committee -- "The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Descriptions." This report was distributed by campus-mail in a second mailing after the distribution of the Council Agenda and, because of the severe weather, many of the Councilors from locations other than University Park did not receive that mailing before leaving to come to this meeting. On that basis, a Rebane/Leure-duPree motion to postpone consideration of this report until the next Council meeting was made.

    At this point, Peter Deines addressed the report and the impact of postponing it. He indicated that the departments are ready to revise their curricula and must have the information in this report to do so. At the last meeting of the Curricular Affairs Committee, they examined what would be necessary for the faculty to reformulate their courses in meeting the criteria in the Senate legislation on General Education. This report was discussed with the General Education Implementation Committee and the Provost and it was decided that the information in this report needed wide distribution so that departmental level planning could continue. He also indicated that SCCA could implement this report without bringing it to the Senate floor, but decided that a formal report would be a better vehicle for distribution of the information. The Rebane/Leure-duPree motion was withdrawn.

    Next, a Richman/Broyles motion was made and passed and the report was placed on the Senate Agenda.

    Intercollegiate Athletics Committee-- "Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 1997-98." Chair Berkowitz announced that even though this report was submitted for consideration for the February 2 Senate meeting, it will be impossible to have it presented then since the NCAA Certification Site Visit is on that same day. Therefore, Faculty Athletic Representative John Coyle will not be available to present the report. Dr. Berkowitz suggested that the report be considered today, and, if it is acceptable, then pass it to be presented at the March 2 Senate meeting. If it is more appropriate to put this report off for consideration until the next Council meeting, that would also acceptable. A Jurs/Leure-duPree motion was made to consider this report for the March 2 Senate meeting. Council did have several questions and editorial changes, therefore, the Jurs/Leure-duPree motion was not passed. Thus, the report will be resubmitted for the February 16 Council meeting.

    Election Commission -- "Faculty Census Report - 1999/200." A Lunetta/Broyles motion was proposed to place this report on the Senate Agenda. Senate Secretary Fahnline thanked Vickie Price for preparing this report and asked if there were any questions. Without any questions, Council passed this report.

    APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA FOR FEBRUARY 2, 1999

    Chair Berkowitz declared the above, passed reports as part of the Senate Agenda for February 2, 1999.

    ACTION ITEMS

    There were no Action Items for the Council to consider.

    NEW BUSINESS

    There was no New Business for Council to be addressed.

    ADJOURNMENT

    Senate Chair Berkowitz thanked Council for their attention to the Council Agenda and adjourned the meeting at 2:55 PM

    Respectfully submitted
    George J. Bugyi
    Executive Secretary

    THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

    The University Faculty Senate

    Birch Cottage

    University Park, PA 16802

    (814) 863-0221 – phone (814) 863-6012 – fax

    E-mail address: http://www.psu.edu/ufs/

    Date: January 6, 1999

    To: Senate Council

    From: Philip A. Klein

    Report of Graduate Council Meeting

    The Graduate Council met on Wednesday, November 19, 1998. There was no meeting in December (the December 9th meeting was cancelled), and so these minutes will be circulated in January.

    Dean Erickson announced that a search was in progress for a new Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the Graduate School.

    He also reported on the recent meeting of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. Once more, attention seems to be being directed at intellectual property rights and distance education.

    In his capacity as Vice President for Research, Dr Erickson reported that a task force is at work considering space allocation for graduate research at University Park.

    Among committees reporting, the Committee on Graduate Research reported that it is hard at work planning for the Graduate Research Exhibition to be held March 26-27, 1999.

    The Committee on Graduate Student and Faculty Affairs is examining the question of health insurance for graduate students.

    The Committee on Programs and Courses offered approval of a new Option in Neuroscience in the Graduate Program in Biobehavioral Health. The proposal was approved unanimously.

    Submitted by Philip A. Klein, Senate Council Representative to the Graduate Council

     

    Pennsylvania State University

    The University Faculty Senate

    Birch Cottage (814) 863-0221

     

    Date: January 22, 1999

    To: Commonwealth Caucus Senators (This includes all elected Senators from Campuses, Colleges, and Locations Other Than University Park)

    From: Deidre Jago and Andrew Romberger

     

    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 19997:00 PM

    Officers' and Chairs' Meeting Alumni Lounge, NLI

    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 19998:00 PM

    Commonwealth Caucus Assembly Room, NLI

    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 19997:30 AM

    Intercollegiate AthleticsNO MEETING THIS MONTH

    8:00 AM

    Curricular Affairs101 Kern Building

    Outreach Activities502 Keller Building

    Student LifePaul Robeson Cultural
    Center

    8:30 AM

    Admissions, Records, Scheduling and
    Student Aid207 Shields (with UE)

    Committees and Rules227 HUB

    Intra-University Relations305 HUB

    Research 114 Kern Building

    Undergraduate Education207 Shields (with ARSSA)

    University PlanningDonovan Rm., 204 HUB

    9:00 AM

    Faculty Affairs404 Old Main

    Libraries E510 Paterno Library

    9:30 AM

    Computing and Information Systems

    Faculty Benefits

  5. The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, February 2, 1999, in the Alumni Lounge of the Nittany Lion Inn. A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

     

    The Pennsylvania State University

    The University Faculty Senate

    Birch Cottage (814) 863-0221

    Fax: (814) 863-6012

    Date: January 22, 1999

    To: Commonwealth Caucus Senators (This includes all elected Senators from
    Campuses, Colleges, and Locations Other Than University Park)

    From: Deidre Jago and Andrew Romberger

     

    MONDAY NIGHT -- FEBRUARY 1, 1999 -- 8:00 PM -- ASSEMBLY ROOM, NLI

    Special Caucus to discuss nominations for Senate Officers, Faculty Advisory Committee to the President, Committee on Committees and Rules, and Caucus Co-chairs.

    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1999 -- 11:00 AM -- ALUMNI LOUNGE, NLI

    The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, February 2, 1999, in the Alunni Lounge of the Nittany Lion Inn. A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

    The tentative Agenda includes:

      I. Call to Order

      II. Announcements and reports from co-chairs

      A. Nominations for Senate Officers

      III. Discussion of Agenda Items

      IV. Committee Activities

      V. Other Items of Concern

      VI. Adjournment and Lunch