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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

 

The University Faculty Senate

 

AGENDA

 

Tuesday, January 29, 2002, at 1:30 PM in

112 Kern Graduate Building

 

 

 

          [In the case of severe weather conditions or other emergencies, you may call the Senate Office

          at (814) 863-0221 to inquire if a Senate meeting has been postponed or canceled.  This may be

          done after normal office hours by calling the same number and a voice mail announcement can

          be heard concerning the status of any meeting.  You may also leave a message at that time.]

 

 

A.  MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING -

      Minutes of the December 4, 2001, Meeting in The Senate Record 35:3

 

B.     COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE - Senate Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets)

                              of January 15, 2002        

C.  REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL - Meeting of January 15, 2002

D.  ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR -

 

E.  COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY -

 

F.      FORENSIC BUSINESS –

 

G.  UNFINISHED BUSINESS -

 

H.     LEGISLATIVE REPORTS –

 

      Committees and Rules

 

            Changes in Constitution, Article II, Section 5; Standing Rules, Article II,

            Section 6(e)1; and Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(f)1     

 

I.        ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS -

 

J.       INFORMATIONAL REPORTS –

 

Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid

 

      Change of Campus Location to University Park     

 

 

Faculty Affairs

 

      Best Practices for Recruitment and Retention of Women and Minority Faculty     

 

Libraries

 

Trends in the University Libraries’ Budget Allocation            

 

      Outreach Activities

 

            Update on the Status of Penn State’s World Campus      

 

      Senate Council

 

            University Faculty Census Report – 2002-03 

 

            Report on Fall 2001 Campus Visits, Secretary Jago     

 

      University Planning

 

            Update on Classroom Conditions      

     

K.  NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

 

L.  COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY -

 

 

-----------------

Note:  The next regular meeting of the University Faculty Senate will be held on Tuesday,

           February 26, 2002, at 1:30 PM in Room 112 Kern Building.

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Graduate Building

University Park, PA  16802

(814) 863-1202 – phone   (814) 865-5789 – fax

 

 

Date:   January 18, 2002

 

To:      John S. Nichols, Chair, University Faculty Senate

 

From:  Louis F. Geschwindner, Chair, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

 

 

The Senate Curriculum Report, dated January 15, 2002, has been circulated throughout the University.  Objections to any of the items in the report must be submitted to the University Curriculum Coordinator at the Senate Office, 101 Kern Graduate Building, e-mail ID sfw2@psu.edu, on or before February 14, 2002.

 

The Senate Curriculum Report is available on the web.  It can be accessed via the Faculty Senate home page (URL http://www.psu.edu/ufs).  Since the Report is available on the web, printed copies are not distributed to the University community.  An electronic mailing list is used to notify individuals of its publication.  Please contact the Curriculum Coordinator at the e-mail ID indicated above if you would like to be added to the notification list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Changes in Constitution, Article II, Section 5;
Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6 (e)1; and

Standing Rules, Article II, Section  6(f)1

(Legislative)

(Implementation Date:  Upon approval by the President)

 

Introduction

The Committee on Faculty Affairs report entitled “Recommendations for Emeritus/Retired Faculty” was passed on January 30, 2001 (Appendix “E”) and approved by the President. Recommendation #7 of the report reads as follows:
 

“The Senate Committee on Committees and Rules should propose the establishment of representation of emeritus faculty in the University Faculty Senate by having a voting member elected from and by emeritus faculty.”

 

Rationale and Recommendations

The recommendation from the Committee on Faculty Affairs suggested that one (1) emeritus Senator be given membership on the University Faculty Senate.  After extensive discussion in the Committees on Committees and Rules, it was decided that not one but rather two new members be included.  It became clear that both the Senate and the retired population would be better served if there were a retired faculty Senator on the Committee on Faculty Affairs and the Committee on Faculty Benefits.  In both cases, there are agenda issues addressed in these committees that have implications for retired faculty. 

The decision to become more inclusive and have these new faculty Senators not only from the emeritus faculty ranks but rather from all of the retired population was based on the fact that there are many retired faculty who would be very effective Senators but were never in a position to be granted emeritus status. 

Recommendation #1

Change Constitution, Article II, Section 5 as follows:

Section 5

(a) The following persons shall be ex officio members of the Senate: the President of the University; the Executive Vice President and Provost of the University; the Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School; the Chair of the Academic Leadership Council; the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education; the University Registrar; the Director of the Division of Undergraduate Studies; and any elected member of the Faculty Advisory Committee who is not an elected faculty Senator.

(b) The President may appoint other University personnel to membership in the Senate on an annual basis. The total number of appointed and ex officio members (not including any member of the Faculty Advisory Committee) shall not exceed a number equal to ten (10) percent of the elected faculty Senators.

(c) The full-time, degree-seeking students at the University shall be represented by elected student Senators as follows:

 

1.        One undergraduate student from each of the ten (10) colleges at University Park.

 

2.  One student from each of the following locations or units:

Penn State Abington

Penn State Altoona

Penn State Berks-Lehigh Valley

Penn State Erie-The Behrend College

Penn State Capital College

Penn State College of Medicine

Penn State Commonwealth College

The Dickinson School of Law of The Pennsylvania State University

The Division of Undergraduate Studies

The Graduate School

Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies

Whenever comparable units are added to the University or created through reorganization, each new unit shall elect one student Senator. The term of a student Senator shall be one (1) year.

(D) THE RETIRED FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY SHALL BE REPRESENTED BY TWO (2) ELECTED RETIRED FACULTY SENATORS.

Recommendation #2

Change Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(e)1 as follows:
(e) Committee on Faculty Affairs        
1. Membership

(i)     At least twenty (20) elected faculty Senators including at least one (1) faculty Senator from each college at University Park and one (1) faculty Senator from each of the following: Abington College, Altoona College, Penn State Erie-The Behrend College, Berks-Lehigh Valley College, Capital College, Commonwealth College, Dickinson School of Law, The College of Medicine, Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies, and University Libraries.

                (ii)    ONE RETIRED FACULTY SENATOR

Recommendation #3

Change in Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(f)1 as follows:
(f) Committee on Faculty Benefits

1.  Membership

(i)     At least seven (7) elected faculty Senators

              (ii)          The Assistant Vice President for Human Resources
          (iii)           ONE RETIRED FACULTY SENATOR

 Procedures

It is proposed that the following method for fulfilling these recommendations be used:

1) The Senate Office will obtain, from the Office of Human Resources, a list of retired faculty members from the last ten (10) years who are living in Pennsylvania and the contiguous states,

 

2) This list will be cross-checked with the names of those who served on the Senate prior to retirement,


3) From this list of former Senators, the Committee on Committees and Rules will establish a list of candidates and the Executive Secretary will then contact the individuals and ask if they would stand for election to the Senate,


4) A ballot will be established with the individual former Senators (the order of names on the ballot will be determined by lot) who have consented to serve,


5) This ballot will also have a line marked “Other” for write-in votes so that other members of the retired population can be included in the voting,


6) The ballot will be made available to all retired faculty,


7) A simple plurality vote will determine the winners (the first year of the election two retired faculty Senators will be elected).  In the case of a tie the Committee on Committees and Rules will determine a winner,


8) Two retired faculty members will be elected.   The Senate Committee on Committees and Rules will appoint one to serve on the Committee on Faculty Affairs and one to serve on the Committee on Faculty Benefits,


9) The term of office will be four (4) years.  In the first year of the election, one Senator will be elected to a four (4) year term and one to a two (2) year term,

 

10) If a retired Senator cannot fulfill his/her term, the alternate from the last election will be appointed to do so,


11) The elected retired faculty will be full voting members of the Senate.


SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES
Joseph J. Cecere
Dwight Davis
Terry Engelder
Joanna Floros
Sabih I. Hayek
Deidre E. Jago
Arthur C. Miller
John W. Moore
John S. Nichols
Jean Landa Pytel, Chair
Cara-Lynne Schengrund
Stephen M. Smith
Valerie N. Stratton, Vice-Chair

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS, RECORDS,

SCHEDULING AND STUDENT AID

Change of Campus Location to University Park

(Informational)

Background

When the campus college structure was established in 1997, it was expected that Penn State’s new academic colleges would offer baccalaureate degrees with the result that campus college enrollments, especially at the junior and senior levels, would increase.  The anticipated growth in campus enrollments was directly related to the campuses’ ability to offer four-year degree programs, enabling students to remain on campus for the upper division years.  This has occurred and this informational report outlines this progress.

 

In developing the campus college plan, it was recognized that Penn State’s array of degree programs would increase thereby giving students more options to complete their chosen degree programs at campuses all across the Commonwealth.  As part of this plan, students would continue to be free to pursue the academic programs of their choice and to move among the campuses of the University in accord with their chosen majors.

 

Yet another matter to be considered with the new campus college plan was if an increase in campus enrollments resulted in an increase in the number of students moving from the campus colleges to University Park, this might increase enrollments at University Park beyond the established enrollment target (40,000 to 42,000).  Thus, concomitant with the establishment of the campus college structure, campus colleges and the office of Enrollment Management and Administration were expected to monitor the number of students changing campus locations to University Park.  Finally, change of location targets were also established for each of the campuses.

Results

As campuses developed new baccalaureate degree offerings, campus college faculty and staff, along with activities in the Undergraduate Admissions Office and the Office of the University Registrar, worked to help students understand the new baccalaureate degree opportunities available to them.  Almost immediately enrollments of upper division students at the campus colleges began to increase.  Tables 1 and 2 show recent trends in upper division campus enrollments at each of the new campus colleges and Table 3 shows upper division enrollments for the specific campuses of the Commonwealth College.  As junior and senior enrollments at the campus colleges increased, the number of students changing from a campus college to University Park began to decline sharply.  Table 4 shows numbers of students changing campuses to University Park from 1997-98 to 2001-02 along with the change of location targets that were previously established.

 

 

TABLE 1.  Upper Division Enrollment Campus Colleges

                                    (excluding UP, Hershey, Dickinson, and Penn College)

 

TABLE 2.  Upper Division Enrollment Changes at Campus Colleges

 

TABLE 3.  Upper Division Enrollment Changes Commonwealth College

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 4.  Summary of Change of Location to University Park

1997-2001

 

 

Location

 

Target

 

1997

 

1998

 

1999

 

2000

 

2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abington

422

471

419

397

309

355

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Altoona

860

1001

1082

1041

1004

872

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Berks/Lehigh Valley

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Berks

356

397

373

375

365

395

   Lehigh Valley

182

138

167

125

99

105

   Total

538

535

540

500

464

500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth College

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Beaver

195

200

207

192

139

125

   Delaware

245

268

241

224

193

164

   DuBois

119

122

113

114

85

81

   Fayette

65

85

50

37

69

63

   Hazleton

380

428

367

350

346

323

   McKeesport

167

197

180

147

124

156

   Mont Alto

181

186

195

164

169

138

   New Kensington

110

128

88

115

57

94

   Shenango

55

43

41

45

38

33

   Wilkes-Barre

131

146

119

132

123

121

   Worthington Scranton

189

169

153

156

126

150

   York

159

147

134

122

123

110

   Total

1996

2119

1888

1798

1592

1558

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erie

268

284

267

234

201

194

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schuylkill

109

106

112

137

100

105

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

4193

4516

4308

4107

3670

3584

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When the change of location targets were established for the campuses, questions were raised about what would happen if a campus exceeded its target.  A financial assessment was considered if a campus exceeded its target (50 percent of in-state tuition when the target was exceeded by from 1-49 students and 100 percent of in-state tuition if the target was exceeded by more than 50 students).

 

One campus, Altoona, did exceed its target, but no financial assessments have been levied.  Instead, campus leaders have been working closely with the staff in the Undergraduate Admissions Office and with the Vice Provost and Dean for Enrollment Management and Administration to implement admissions and enrollment strategies that will result in this campus meeting its target.  No other campuses are expected to exceed the target given current enrollment patterns and actions.  All of these matters are under review by the Central Enrollment Management Group.

Looking to the Future

Speculating about future enrollments is always a bit risky.  However, given current enrollment protocols, it seems reasonable to forecast that change of location numbers are likely to stabilize at current levels, e.g., 2000-01 and 2001-02.  There does not seem to be any indication that any of the campuses will exceed the change of location targets that have been established.  Indeed, as more campuses develop additional baccalaureate degree options, it is possible that the number of students moving from the campuses to University Park may modestly decline.

 

 

Senate Committee on Admissions, Records,
Scheduling and Student Aid Committee

Deborah F. Atwater
Edward W. Bittner
Ingrid M. Blood
JoAnn Chirico, Chair
Peter Deines
Anna M. Griswold
Geoffrey J. Harford
Luen-Chau Li
Victor Nistor
Molly A. Powell
Ronald W. Propst
P. Peter Rebane
John J. Romano
Carol A. Smith, Vice-Chair
J. James Wager

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AFFAIRS

Best Practices for Recruitment and Retention of Women and Minority Faculty

(Informational)

Abstract

 

This report is submitted as an informational report for wide dissemination to all Penn State faculty, faculty search committees, department heads, deans and central administration. The presentation has evolved from the work done by the three commissions that are sponsoring this report. The Provost and the President invited the Commission for Women leadership to present this idea to the Council of Academic Deans in 1999 and 2000 and it was focused primarily on women faculty. In 2001, CORED submitted a comprehensive report to the President with specific recommendations for diversifying the PSU faculty. The present version that combines the work of CFW, CORED and input from CLGBTE was adopted by the Senate Committee on Faculty Affairs.

 

Penn State adopted an affirmative action policy in 1974. After 27 years, there is a substantial phase lag between Ph.D. production in the various disciplines and the representation of women and minorities on the PSU faculty. There is a further, more serious problem with retention, especially of minority faculty. In the last 20 years, there has been no great increase in the number of minority faculty, since the attrition rate is comparable to the rate of recruitment. The low overall percentage of tenured women and minority faculty is also of great concern. There is a further problem with the low numbers of senior faculty  - male or female at non-University Park locations. A study of all these issues was a major part of the charge given to the Senate Committee of Faculty Affairs for the 2001-2002 Senate year. This presentation is the first of a series of reports that are forthcoming from the Senate Committee on Faculty Affairs.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AFFAIRS
Susan M. Abmayr
Syed S.Andaleeb
Kultegin Aydin
Melvin Blumberg
Clay Calvert
Lynn A. Carpenter
Roy B. Clariana
James M. Donavon
Cheng Dong
Charles R. Enis
Jacqueline Esposito
Dorothy Evensen
Mary I. Frecker
Margaret B. Goldman (Vice Chair)
David J. Green
Janis E. Jacobs
W. Larry Kenney
Sallie M. McCorkle
Howard P. Medoff
Katherine C. Pearson
Andrew B. Romberger
Robert Secor
Kim C. Steiner
Mila C. Su
Joan S. Thomson
Vasundara V. Varadan  (Chair)

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES

Trends in the University Libraries’ Budget Allocations

(Informational)

 

At the request of the Faculty Senate Committee on Libraries, the following financial picture has been prepared to update university faculty on how the University Libraries (UL) compares to other national research libraries and to summarize trends in the allocation of funds over the last twenty-three years. 

 

The University Libraries includes the libraries at all 24 campuses. The summary data includes all but Penn College, regardless of reporting relationships.  Charts 1 and 2 summarize the current organizational and reporting relationships.

 

The 1999/2000 budget, for which we have the last full year of data, is summarized in Chart 3.  Total budget for the University Libraries, including all sources of funds (state, income-generating, private, fees, grants and contracts), totals $35,368,278.  Charts 4, 5, and 6 summarize allocation of expenditures for the UL from 1978 through 1999 and compare those trends to those for all members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Those comparisons indicate the following budget trends:

 

Salaries:

 

Collections (serials, monographs, other materials):

·         ARL collections budgets were 38% of budget in 1978, 40% in 1989, and 38% in 1999.

·         PSU collections budgets were 32% of budget in 1978, 33% in 1989, and 37% in 1999.

·         Thus, PSUL now mirrors the percent of budget spent on collections nationally.

 

Chart 7 indicates that during this same period, the number of students increased at Penn State, and service demands, illustrated by interlibrary loan increases, continued to go up.

 

Charts 8, 9, and 10 provide data on number of titles (monographs, serials, electronic resources) purchased by Penn State, as compared to ARL libraries.  The data indicates that Penn State has done much better than the ARL libraries generally, increasing the number of titles purchased annually while other research libraries were decreasing the numbers purchased. This reinforces the outcome of the budget shifts illustrated in Charts 4-6.

 

Charts 11 and 12 provide information on collection endowments, up from 11 in 1979 to 76 in 2001. Annual income from the collection endowments has increased from $20,997 to $713,136.  Collection endowments are a major emphasis in the capital campaign.

 

Charts 13 and 14 provide data on our staffing patterns and reinforce the data from Charts 4-6.  Because we have emphasized collections over staff during this period, we are third from the bottom in the CIC with regard to the ratio of professional staff to students. Chart 14 indicates that technical staff support has not kept pace with the construction of electronic classrooms. Adequate staffing to meet growing service demands is a concern of the Libraries’ administration.

 

Even though the overall PSUL budget has increased from $7,077,403 in 1978 to $35,368,278 in 2000 (a 400% increase), high inflation has continued to reduce purchasing power, thus forcing PSUL and all research libraries to seek more cost effective methods of providing information.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES
Richard N. Barshinger
Aida M. Beaupied
Charles L. Burchard
Mark A. Casteel, Chair
Brian A. Curran
Nancy Eaton
Paul J. Eslinger
Dale A. Holen
Wayne K. Marshall
Gwenn McCollum
Laura K. Probst
Dagmar Sternad, V-Chair
Adrian J. Wanner

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON OUTREACH ACTIVITIES

Update on the Status of Penn State’s World Campus

(Informational)

 

The World Campus was launched in January 1998 as a unit of the Department of Distance Education in Outreach and Cooperative Extension, upon the recommendations of a University-wide Study Team.  The Faculty Senate Committee on Outreach and the Faculty Senate Committee on University Planning subsequently issued an Advisory and Consultative Report on Faculty Involvement in the World Campus.  The report included seven recommendations.   The purpose of this informational report is to update the Faculty Senate on World Campus activities related to each of the seven recommendations.

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation 1:  The Faculty Senate endorses the concept of the World Campus as an important initiative to extend the reach of higher education in a changing educational environment and, further, recognizing a “window of opportunity for this initiative, concurs with the need for timely implementation tempered by the principle that implementation can be accomplished within the pedagogical ideals that serve as the foundation for a Penn State education.

 

Update:  The World Campus is a delivery unit of the University. Its programs are the programs of the sponsoring academic unit, which has full academic authority over content and faculty assignment.

 

In academic year 2000-01,the World Campus completed its third full year of operations.  The year saw a significant increase in programs and enrollments, as well as important enhancements to administrative procedures and policies that guide the World Campus’ relationship with academic units.  

 

The growth of the World Campus is summarized below:

 

 

FY98-99

FY99-00

FY00-01

Course enrollments

(credit and noncredit)

 

846

 

2,964

 

5,119

 

Student headcount

(credit and noncredit)

 

   641

 

1,777

 

2,714

 

Certificate and

degree programs

 

 

 11

    

 

    18

 

 

    22

 

Courses offered

 

  33

 

 

  155

 

 

        188

 

Faculty

       

         23

      

        120            

    

        160

The World Campus allows faculty to use a variety of distance education media and methods to extend key Penn State programs to students who otherwise might not have access to Penn State.  The following chart illustrates that the World Campus is reaching new students from well beyond the traditional campus environment:

 

 

2000-01 Student Profile

Percent

 

AGE

   Under 24

   24 and over

 

 

18%

82%

 

GENDER

   Male

   Female

 

 

                  51%

                  49%

 

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION

     Pennsylvania

     Other U.S. Locations*

     International*

 

 

 

37%

60%

  3%

 

                *Students come from all 50 states and 49 countries around the globe.

 

During 2000-01, approximately 3% of World Campus enrollments were from students matriculated at a traditional Penn State campus.  These were either resident students in the academic unit that offered the course or students from non-UP campuses who were enrolled in a World Campus course through their local campus’s participation in the University-wide Campus Course Exchange process.   Through the Campus Course Exchange, campuses may list a World Campus course as a local course; the World Campus then provides the instruction and charges the campus a fee for service.  Students enroll through the campus and are mingled with World Campus students.

 

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation 2:  The Faculty Senate endorses the principle of development and implementation of World Campus programs as part of the regular teaching load (i.e., “on-load”) for University faculty.  Given the complexity of World Campus programs it is important that both the development and implementation not be add-ons to a faculty member’s workload, but is done so with appropriate release time and supplemental appointment.  The Senate believes an important component to practical implementation of this principle is the concept of revenue sharing with academic units, and strongly encourages adherence to this model.

 

Update:  The World Campus responds to policy issues in close collaboration with the World Campus Steering Committee.  This Committee is appointed by the Provost and includes representatives of the Graduate School, Undergraduate Programs, the Faculty Senate, the Graduate Council, the University Libraries, International Programs, the University Budget Office, Computer and Information Systems, and deans of five Colleges.   During 2000-01, the World Campus worked closely with the Academic Leadership Council and the World Campus Steering Committee to establish University-wide policies and processes to guide its work with academic units.  Among the accomplishments related to this Faculty Senate recommendation:

 

 

The World Campus recognizes that, in this new environment, faculty members require professional support in order to get involved in online distance education.  The World Campus provides support through its Instructional Design and Development unit and in partnership with the Center for Educational Technology Services.  In addition, the World Campus sponsored 25 faculty development programs during the past year.  A survey of 100 faculty members is now underway through the Center for the Study of Higher Education.  The World Campus has received funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to work with faculty across several institutions to establish instructional workload guidelines for online learning.

 

A major initiative in 2000-01 was the creation of a new World Campus Faculty Resources Website, with links to a wide variety of online resources. 

 

The World Campus has proposed funding to the Sloan Foundation to support individual faculty research initiatives and multi-institution workshops aimed at developing experience-based standards for faculty involvement in online teaching.

 

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation 3:  The Faculty Senate endorses the principle that responsibility for courses and programs of the World Campus lie within the University’s academic units and that existing mechanisms for review of credit courses and programs be used for World Campus credit courses and programs.  It further endorses the principle that existing admissions requirements for undergraduate and graduate programs be followed for World Campus programs.  In general, it encourages the use of existing resident instruction protocol for World Campus programs rather than the creation of parallel, and potentially redundant, processes.

 

Update:  The World Campus adheres to the principle that it is a central administrative unit that offers degree and certificate programs of the University’s academic units.  During the past year, several steps were taken to reinforce the implementation of that principle:

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation 4:  The Faculty Senate encourages the review of procedures currently in place for non-credit courses and progress to ensure these procedures are adequate to ensure the quality of World Campus programs.  It further encourages these procedures to be widely disseminated to increase awareness and understanding across the University community.

 

Update:  This issue extends well beyond the World Campus.  It also affects the delivery of noncredit programs through Continuing Education at all University locations.  The issue is being addressed through the Coordinating Council for Outreach and Cooperative Extension (CCOCE), which includes associate deans for Outreach and Cooperative Extension from all colleges, including campus colleges.   CCOCE has adopted the recommendations of a subcommittee that defined guiding principles and procedures for the approval of noncredit programs.  Academic units wishing to offer noncredit programs through the World Campus will adhere to these principles and procedures.  Among the principles:

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation 5:  The Faculty Senate encourages the development of formal definitions of degree programs, various types of certificate programs, and credit and noncredit courses, and the universal adoption of these definitions across the University community.

 

Eight colleges offered 22 degree and certificate programs through the World Campus during the 2000-01 academic year.  This is an increase of 22 percent over the previous year.  New programs included a postbaccalaureate certificate in Community and Economic Development, an undergraduate certificate in Communications, a noncredit professional development program in landscape architecture, and the first core undergraduate course from the new School of Information Sciences and Technology.  The number of individual courses offered grew substantially, as more than 40% of courses in the Independent Learning portfolio were transformed to an on-line format and as new courses were developed with central support the President’s Fund.

 

All programs and courses offered by the World Campus are the programs and courses of the academic units.   They are approved through the same academic approval processes that apply to any academic program.   Degree programs are the same programs that are offered on campus.  Students in these programs must meet the normal requirements for admissions, prerequisites, etc. 

 

The postbaccalaureate certificate is a relatively new credential for the University.  Postbaccalaureate certificates are approved within the sponsoring college.  The World Campus works within a set of guidelines developed by the Graduate School and the Coordinating Council for Outreach and Cooperative Extension.  The guidelines define a postbaccalaureate certificate as follows:

 

A post-baccalaureate credit certificate program is a sequence, pattern or group of courses or contact hours that focuses upon an area of specialized knowledge or information and which is developed, supervised, and evaluated by the faculty members of the academic unit offering the program.


The guidelines place responsibility for approval of postbaccalaureate certificate programs with the sponsoring academic unit and establish a number of guiding principles.   


Faculty Senate Recommendation 6:  The Faculty Senate recommends a review of existing procedures for classification of students, both degree and non-degree, and their standing as they would apply to both World Campus and existing programs.  This review should include identifying credit load limits, procedures for handling course prerequisites, and other issues.  As much as possible such definitions, classifications, limits and procedures should be consistent regardless of educational venue, and ideal for all students.

 

Update:  The World Campus is classified as a location of the University.  World Campus students are assigned a location code—WD—when they enroll in a course.  However, the World Campus registration and records system is not yet fully integrated into the University’s student database system.  This has caused problems for some students who are studying at multiple locations and who seek financial aid.   This issue has been recognized and is being solved at two levels:

 

 

 

Faculty Senate Recommendation 7:  The Faculty Senate concurs with the ideal that students participating in the World Campus be provided with an educational environment that fosters a collegial experience and identity with Penn State and encourages the pursuit of means to achieve this as much as practical.  Special attention should be given to means that achieve the goals idealized for residency, such as intellectual exchange and academic enrichment.  The Faculty Senate also encourages that colleges offering programs through the World Campus avoid unnecessary duplication and competition with programs offered at other colleges or campuses of the University.



Update:   As the World Campus developed, it became essential that the World Campus Student Services unit develop ways to meet the needs of a growing number of students.  Several initiatives were undertaken:

 

 

The World Campus is also developing an online student portal that will ensure that all World Campus students have access to the same resources that are provided to campus-based students.

 

Student satisfaction with their World Campus experience is very high.  During the year, the Center for the Study of Higher Education conducted a variety of surveys of current students.  Among the findings:

 

 

Students also responded favorably to the online learning environment in which the World Campus operates:

 

 

 

In 2000, the World Campus gathered data for the first time on course completion, working with a model that was reviewed by the Office of Undergraduate Programs to ensure consistency with how completion is measured on traditional campuses.  The data revealed the following completion rates in the three semesters of 2000:

 

                Spring 2000                        86%

                Summer 2000                        85%

                Fall 2000                 95%

 

The World Campus has worked with the Commonwealth College to respond to the concern about unnecessary competition with other locations.   Elements of this agreement include:

 

·         Use of the Campus Course Exchange to permit campus college students to participate in World Campus courses through their home campus.

·         A mechanism by which a campus college receives a percentage of income when it generates enrollments for World Campus programs from area employers.

·         A means to compensate a campus college when World Campus students choose to use the local campus for student services.

·         Confirmation that a campus college may extend its own programs through the World Campus.

 

The agreement was reviewed with the Deans of other campus colleges through the Council of Campus Administrators.  Use of World Campus courses through the Campus Course Exchange is open to all University locations.  Other elements of the agreement are being piloted this year, with the goal of generally extending them to all campus colleges in 2002-03.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON OUTREACH ACTIVITIES
Theodore R. Alter
G. Jogesh Babu
Christopher J. Bise, Chair
Patricia A. Book
Thomas E. Glumac
Irene E. Harvey
Julia C. Hewitt, V-Chair
Timothy Hurtz
Kenneth B. Kephart
Kevin R. Maxwell
James H. Ryan
Karen Wiley Sandler
Adam A. Schott

 

The Pennsylvania State University

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Building (814) 863-0221

Fax:  (814) 863-6012

 

 

Date:       January 15, 2001

 

To:      The University Faculty Senate - For Your Information

 

From:      Deidre E. Jago, Chair, Election Commission

 

 

The 2002-2003 Census of the faculty for the University Faculty Senate was conducted in the following manner.

 

Using an information base provided by the Office of Administrative Systems, a Senate census data base was created which included all personnel within the definition of the electorate of the University Faculty Senate as defined in Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution of the University Faculty Senate.  This electorate includes all persons who hold full-time appointments as of 10/31/01, and who fall into one of the following categories:  those holding professorial or librarian titles; those who are full-time instructors, senior lecturers and lecturers or assistant librarians; and those holding research rank (excluding non-continuing).  These lists were sent to Deans and Campus Executive Officers of the various voting units for verification.  For the Military Sciences, the list was compiled by the Coordinator of the Combined Departments of the Military Sciences at University Park.  Military Sciences faculty at other locations was counted with that voting unit.  For Librarians, the list was compiled by the Dean of the University Libraries.  The Commonwealth College Librarians were counted with their voting unit.

 

Both a copy of the verified list together with a letter informing the academic voting unit of the number of its electorate and the number of Senate seats to be filled were sent to each Dean and Campus Executive Officers as well as to the Coordinator of the Military Sciences and the Dean of University Libraries.  A copy of the memo was sent to each Senate Council representative.

 

The total membership of the 2002-2003 University Faculty Senate will be 278.  This total will include 233 elected faculty Senators, 23 appointed and ex officio Senators, and 22 student Senators.  The student Senators will include: one (1) undergraduate from each of the eleven (11) colleges at University Park; one (1) from each of the following locations--Abington, Altoona, Berks-Lehigh Valley, The Behrend College, Capital College, College of Medicine, Commonwealth College, The Dickinson School of Law, Division of Undergraduate Studies, the Graduate School, and Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies.

 

ELECTION COMMISSION
Christopher Bise
Edward Bittner
Barton Browning
Robert Burgess
Peter Deines
Jacob DeRooy
Louis Geschwindner
Pamela P. Hufnagel
Deidre Jago, Chair
Peter Jurs
Jean Landa Pytel
Mila C. Su
Vasundara V. Varadan


 

UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE OFFICE

Faculty Census Report - 2002/2003

For the Purpose of Election of Senators (As of November 1, 2001)

 

                                                                         2001-02           2 0 0 2  -  2 0 0 3         2002-03

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC VOTING UNITS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abington

    97        5

     57

    37

 

     4

    98        5

   -

Agricultural Sciences

  296      15

   279

    16

    13

 

  308      15

   -

Altoona

  126        6

     95

    29

 

     4

  128        6

   -

Arts & Architecture

  164        8

   155

    17

      

 

  172        9

   +1

Behrend College

  181        9      

   104    

    88

      2

     4

  198      10    

   +1

Berks-Lehigh Valley

  107        5

     79

    31

 

     6

  116        6

   +1

Business Administration

  150        7

   109

    27

      3

 

  139        7

   -

Capital College

  210      10

   165

    38

 

     7

  210      10

   -

Commonwealth College

  604      30

   349

  254

 

   22

  625      31     

   +1

Communications

    55        3

     37

    16

 

 

    53        3

   -

Dickinson School of Law

    41        2 

     32

      5

      

     6

    43        2    

   -

Earth & Mineral Sciences

  161        8

   138

    14

      8

 

  160        8

   -

Education

  132        7

   121

    25

      1

 

  147        7

   -

Engineering

  480      24

   277

      7    

  215

 

  499      25

   +1

Great Valley

    40        2

     31     

      8 

 

     1

    40        2 

   -

Health & Human Development

  274      14

   173

    94

      5

 

  272      14

   -

Institute of Sciences & Technology

    10        1

     17

      4

      

      

    21        1

   -

Liberal Arts

  443      22

   360

    93

    12

 

  465      23

   +1

Libraries

    52        3

 

 

 

   58

    58        3

   -

Medicine

  503      25

   581

    24

      1

     4

  610      30

   +5

Military Sciences

    21       1

     14

      9

 

 

    23        1

   -

Science

  298      15

   229

    63

      7

 

  299      15

   -

TOTAL

4445    222

 3402

  899

  267

 116

4684    233

  +11


2

 

Faculty Census Report - 2002/2003

 

For the Purpose of Election of Senators (As of November 1, 2001)

 

 

                                                                         2001-02           2 0 0 2  -  2 0 0 3   2002-2003

 

 

 

 

 

LOCATIONS OF THE

COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE

 

 

 

 

 

Beaver

    38       

     25

    13

     1

    39       

Delaware

    70       

     49

    20

     2

    71       

DuBois

    49       

     31

    20

     3

    54       

Fayette

    52       

     25

    24

     2

    51       

Hazleton

    58      

     30

    27

     2

    59       

McKeesport

    36      

     21

    15

     2

    38       

Mont Alto

    62      

     27

    34

     3

    64       

New Kensington

    39      

     25

    15

     1

    41       

Shenango Valley

    34      

     19

    14

     1

    34       

Wilkes-Barre

    42      

     24

    16

     1

    41       

Worthington Scranton

    65     

     37

    30

     2

    69       

York

    59

     36

    26

     2

    64

Subtotal

  604

   349

  254

   22

  625       

 


SENATE COUNCIL

Report on Fall 2001 Campus Visits

       (Informational)

 

Each fall, the Senate Officers visit half of the campus locations to meet with students, faculty and administrators.  Chair John Nichols, Chair Elect John Moore, Secretary Deidre Jago, and Executive Secretary Susan Youtz completed visits to ten campus locations between October 16 and November 20, 2001.  Executive Secretary Emeritus George Bugyi participated in half of the visits.  The campuses visited were Dubois, Lehigh Valley, Berks, Schuylkill, Harrisburg, Abington, Delaware, Fayette, New Kensington and McKeesport.

 

A typical campus visit began with a meeting with representatives from student Leadership, followed by a meeting with faculty, and ended by meeting with members from the administrative staff.  Not all meetings were organized in the same sequence.  Professor Nichols briefed each group prior to opening the floor for discussion.  Faculty and administrators were invited to respond to comments or issues raised by prior groups.

 

On November 27, 2001, the Senate Officers met with Commonwealth College Dean Diane Disney, Dr. Nancy Heron and Dr. Sandra Gleason to present a report on findings from visits to Commonwealth College locations.  That afternoon a similar report was given to Executive Vice President and Provost Rodney Erickson.  The report to Dr. Erickson covered all locations visited.

 

Common issues that emerged as topics of discussion or concern at most locations included the following:

 

·        Proposed changes to the calendar

·        Concerns about the intent and/or implementation of First Year Seminar classes

·        Critical shortage of classroom space and the resulting scheduling difficulties

·        Use of part-time faculty to cover additional sections of courses

·        Advising issues, especially as related to change of assignment to other locations

·        Tuition hikes and surcharges

·        Enrollment based budgeting model

·        The perceived quality of the education students were receiving

·        Technology concerns

·        Reorganization of the former Commonwealth Education System

·        The increasing number of multiple pathways to obtain a Penn State degree (including more non-UP four-year degrees) and the implication of seamless changes of assignment, disciplinary unity, and educational quality control

·        Competition that campus locations face in light of growing number of four-year programs

·        Need to improve educational opportunities and administrative procedures for non-traditional students

·        Importance and desirability of international programs

 

The Senate leaders are among a very small number of people who have the opportunity to visit all of the campus locations and colleges over a two-year period.  Penn State is an extremely complex institution and these visits enable the Senate, through its leadership, to better understand this complexity.  We are pleased to present this summary of the findings from our recent campus visits.

 

SENATE COUNCIL
John W. Bagby
Connie D. Baggett
Robert L. Burgess
Wayne R. Curtis
W. Travis DeCastro
Gordon F. De Jong
Caroline D. Eckhardt
Rodney A. Erickson
Dennis S. Gouran
Elizabeth A. Hanley
Deidre E. Jago
Peter C. Jurs
Alphonse E. Leure-duPree
Salvatore A. Marsico
Ronald L. McCarty
Louis Milakofsky
John W. Moore
Jamie M. Myers
John S. Nichols, Chair
P. Peter Rebane
Winston A. Richards
Alan W. Scaroni
Cara-Lynne Schengrund
Loanne L. Snavely
Graham B. Spanier
Stephen W. Stace
Brian B. Tormey

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

Update on Classroom Conditions

(Informational)

 

The Office of Physical Plant will give a presentation on maintenance, repair and updating of general purpose classrooms.  The presentation will discuss janitorial service standards and issues, noise disruptions and how they are being addressed, and finally examples of recent classroom upgrades followed by a discussion of the process used to design and upgrade classrooms.

 

A similar, but more detailed, presentation was given to the University Planning Committee (UPC) on December 4, 2001 in response to their request to discuss Physical Plant issues relating to General Purpose classrooms.  The UPC requested that a similar presentation be given to the full Senate.  Suggestions had been made by the UPC to combine the maintenance and improvement structure, increase resources for maintenance and repair, improve advocacy for teaching environments, measure customer satisfaction, increase emphasis on teaching aspects of facilities, assess performance of existing systems and assign maintenance workers to specific buildings.  The presentation addresses how classrooms are maintained and modernized, reviews initiatives to improve these processes and discusses issues related to maintenance of classrooms.

 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING
P. Richard Althouse
William J. Anderson, Jr.
Anthony J. Baratta, Chair
John P. Boehmer
Michael J. Cardamone
Eric B. Cowden
Gordon F. De Jong
Peter B. Everett
Joseph K. Ferenchick
William M. Frank
Daniel R. Hagen
Ali R. Hurson
Rodney Kirsch
Karen H. Morin
Robert N. Pangborn
Paula J. Romano
William A. Rowe, V-Chair
Louise E. Sandmeyer
Gary C. Schultz
Paul J. Tiaklsky
Marley W. Watkins
Daniel E. Willis
Gregory R. Ziegler


 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

MINUTES OF SENATE COUNCIL

Tuesday, January 15, 2002     1:30 PM   102 Kern Graduate Building


MEMBERS PRESENT

C. D. Baggett

W. R. Curtis

G. F. De Jong

R. Diehl

C. D. Eckhardt

R. A. Erickson

D. S. Gouran

E. A. Hanley

D. E. Jago

A. E. Leure-duPree

R. L. McCarty

L. Milakofsky

J. W. Moore

J. M. Myers

J. S. Nichols

P. P. Rebane

W. A. Richards

A. W. Scaroni

C. L. Schengrund

L. L. Snavely

S. W. Stace

B. B. Tormey

 

B. S. Hockenberry

V. R. Price

S. C. Youtz

 

ACCOUNTED FOR

J. W. Bagby

R. L. Burgess

W. T. DeCastro

S. A. Marsico

G. B. Spanier

 

GUESTS

C. Bise

J. Cahir

M. Casteel

G. Franz

T. Jones

B. MacEwan

G. Miller

L. Pierce

J. Romano

R. Secor


 

Chair John Nichols called the meeting to order at 1:35 PM on Tuesday, January 15, 2002, in Room 102 Kern Graduate Building.  It was moved and seconded (Tormey/Scaroni) that the minutes of the November 13, 2001 Senate Council meeting be approved as distributed.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND REMARKS

 

Dr. Nichols introduced Dr. Renee Diehl who will be the Eberly College of Science Senate Council representative for Spring 2002 semester, substituting for Dr. Peter Jurs who is on sabbatical.

 

Chair Nichols encouraged Council members to participate in and otherwise support Martin Luther King, Jr., activities and the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon 2002.  The Dance Marathan will be held February 22-24, 2002.

 

Dr. Nichols provided a brief update on the status of the Calendar proposal including a summary of the numerous opportunities that faculty and students have had for providing in-put.  For example, Dr. Nichols noted that he has met with Academic Assembly, USG, and CCSG leadership to discuss proposed changes to the calendar.  Two Senate committees, University Planning and Undergraduate Education currently have the proposal and will be reviewing it further at their January 29 meetings.

 

Dr. Nichols announced that the Faculty Advisory Committee to the President met on November 14, 2001, and again on January 15, 2002.  The topics discussed at the November 14 meeting are:  Student-Centered University; General Education Course Recertification; ESACT Requirement; Diversity Update; Proposal on an Institute for Legislative Education; Federal Monitoring of Foreign Students; and Graduate Student Unionization Update.  Issues addressed at the January 15 meeting were:  Appropriation Hearings; Tuition Discussion; Calendar Conversion Issues and Decision-making Process; Status of Searches; Update on Review of Progress Reports on Framework to Foster Diversity. 

 

The next meeting of FAC is scheduled for February 19, 2002.  If Council members have any items they want FAC to address, contact one of the Senate Officers or one of the three elected members: Gordon De Jong, Elizabeth Hanley and Peter Rebane.

 

The Senate Officers’ first visits to colleges/units at University Park will be on January 28 to the Smeal College of Business Administration and on January 31 to the School of Information Sciences and Technology.  Please go to the Senate’s web page to find the dates of these meetings (www.psu.edu/ufs - important dates). 

 

The Handbook for Part-time Faculty, developed by a jointly appointed work group of the Senate and administration and chaired by Dean Douglas Anderson, is now complete.  Hard copies will be distributed to deans and it will be available on the web.  This handbook incorporated the recommendations from last year’s Senate Committee on Faculty Affairs report that was approved by the Senate and the report of the working group on part-time faculty.  The intent is that individual units will modify the handbook for part-time faculty to meet their specific needs.

 

The Senate Self-Study Committee met on January 15, 2002.  Please continue to submit ideas, recommendations, etc., to George Franz, the chair of the committee.  Senate standing committees are encouraged to examine their duties and responsibilities and forward any recommendations to Dr. Franz.

 

At Council’s last meeting, Jean Landa Pytel, Chair of the Committee on Committees and Rules, asked for suggestions for nominees to place on the ballot for the three committees that CC&R is the nominating committee for.  The specific committees are: Faculty Rights and Responsibilities, Standing Joint Committee on Tenure, and the University Promotion and Tenure Review Committee.  If Councilors have nominees, please inform Dr. Pytel.

 

Provost Erickson reported that Undergraduate Admissions has received nearly 37,000 applications this year and that number is consistent with last year at this time.  Nearly 17,000 of these applications have been electronically submitted, up from 8,000 in 2001.  It was noted with concern that African-American student applications are down approximately 15 percent from last year and that this appears to be associated with the events of last spring.

 

Dr. Erickson and Dr. Jones commented on the recent charge meetings held for the evaluation teams that will be assessing the Diversity Plans. The Senate has four representatives on the evaluation teams.  Feedback will be shared with budget executives and posted on the web.   

 

Provost Erickson expressed concern about the current budget situation in Harrisburg and with revenue collections coming in below forecast, the estimated budget shortfall for the Commonwealth will be about $660 million.  There is uncertainty about the use of the rainy day fund to ameliorate the shortfall and Penn State administration is concerned about the possibility of future budget cuts.  February 5 is when the Governor’s budget proposal will be unveiled.  

 

Dr. Erickson noted that the final report from the Tuition Task Force would be released in the next six to eight weeks.

 

Provost Erickson commented briefly on the following topics:

 

 

Dr. Nichols called on Immediate past-chair Schengrund to provide a report from the Nominating Committee that met earlier in the day.  Dr. Schengrund noted that none of the nominees have given their consent and that names may be deleted and/or added at the next meeting of the Nominating Committee (February 12).  The following list represents the first round of nominations:

 

Chair-elect:  Christopher Bise, Deidre Jago, Jamie Myers

Secretary:  Mark Casteel, Margaret Goldman, Salvatore Marsico

Faculty Advisory Committee:  Wayne Curtis, Terry Engelder, Winston Richards, Andrew Romberger, Thomas Seybert

Committees and Rules:  Deborah Atwater, Richard Ammon,  Melvin Blumberg, Michael Cardamone, Lynn Carpenter, JoAnn Chirico, Paul Clark, Dwight Davis, Peter Georgopulos, Sabih Hayek, Billie Jo Jones, Harvey Manbeck, Arthur Miller, Sallie McCorkle, Dennis Scanlon, Roger Shouse, Stephen Smith.

 

Dr. Youtz reminded Senate Council representatives to submit the process used by their voting units to elect Senate Council Representatives.  This information should be sent as soon as possible to Dr. Susan Youtz (scy1@psu.edu).   

REPORT OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL

Professor Caroline Eckhardt, the liaison to the Graduate Council, reported on the Graduate Council meetings of November 14 and December 12, 2001.  Dr. Eckhardt had no comments on the meetings.  Summaries of the meetings are attached to these minutes. 

AGENDA ITEMS FOR JANUARY 29, 2002

Legislative Reports - None
Advisory/Consultative Reports - None

Informational Reports

 

Admissions, Records, Scheduling and Student Aid – “Change of Campus Location to University Park.”  The report was placed on the agenda on a Tormey/Scaroni motion.  Dr. Romano commented on the increase in the number of students enrolled at campus locations and said that he would be available to answer any questions following Dr. Chirico’s introduction of the report.   

 

Faculty Affairs – “Best Practices for Recruitment and Retention of Women and Minority Faculty.”  The report was placed on the agenda on a Tormey/Scaroni motion. Dr. Secor presented the report on behalf of the committee. Formatting and presentation recommendations were made by three Councilors and will be communicated to Dr. Varadan.  The report will be 10 minutes in length plus questions.  

 

Libraries – “Trends in the University Libraries’ Budget Allocation.”  The report was placed on the agenda on a McCarty/Snavely motion.  Dr. Casteel presented the report and will communicate to Dean Eaton that the report will be 10 minutes in length plus questions.

 

Outreach Activities – “Update on the Status of Penn State’s World Campus.”  The report was placed on the agenda on a Scaroni/Tormey motion.  Dr. Gary Miller made some introductory comments and then responded to questions in the following areas:

1.        Impact of the new budget model in relation to revenue sharing

2.        Campus course exchange and concerns about collaboration with all campus colleges to avoid unnecessary competition; implications for campus viability

3.        Need to show data on faculty participation in World Campus, including return faculty involvement

4.        Document numbers of resident instruction student enrollment

5.        Can World Campus courses be used in fulfillment of residency requirement for graduate students?

 

The report will be given by Dr. Miller and be 10 minutes in length plus questions.

 

Senate Council – “University Faculty Census Report 2002-03.”  Professor Jago presented the Census report and responded to a question from Dr. Schengrund regarding the College of Medicine census.  The Senate Office will follow-up on Dr. Schengrund’s question.

 

Senate Council – “Report on Fall 2001 Campus Visits.”  The report was placed on the agenda on a McCarty/Snavely motion.  Professor Jago noted this report would be brief and highlight the 10 campuses that the Senate Officers visited this fall.

 

University Planning – “Update on Classroom Conditions.”  The report was placed on the agenda on a Tormey/Rebane motion.  A question was asked if the report could be representative in including classroom conditions at all University locations.  Dr. De Jong will consult with Bill Anderson and Tony Baratta to determine if the report can be adjusted. 

APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA FOR JANUARY 29, 2002

On a McCarty/Tormey motion, the Senate Agenda was approved for January 29, 2002.

ACTION ITEMS -- None. However, Dr. Nichols did call the Councilors’ attention to an attachment sent to them regarding a P-3 action at the New Kensington Campus to drop the associate degree program in Medical Laboratory Technology (2MLT).  The program at that campus is now closed. 

NEW BUSINESS -- None.

ADJOURNMENT

Senate Chair Nichols thanked Council for their attention to their duties and adjourned the meeting at 2:55 P.M.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Susan C. Youtz

Executive Secretary

 

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Graduate Building

University Park, PA  16802

(814) 863-0221 – phone   (814) 863-6012 – fax

 

 

 

Date:                December 7, 2001

 

To:                Members of Senate Council

 

From:     Caroline D. Eckhardt, Senate Liaison to the Graduate Council

Re:                Minutes of the Graduate Council Meeting of November 14, 2001

 

The Graduate Council, chaired by Dean Eva Pell, met on Wednesday, November 14, 2001, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 102 Kern Graduate Building.  This summary concentrates on items that may be of particular interest to Senators.  Complete minutes are available from Mary Hosband in the Graduate School (meh1@psu.edu). 

 

1.  Communications and Announcements

 

Dean Pell will be asking the Committee on Committees and Procedures to review the Articles of Authority, Bylaws, and Standing Rules of the Graduate Council.  It is been six years since the articles were last reviewed and a number of editorial changes need to be added. 

 

Dean Pell reported data on graduate enrollments, admissions, and degrees over a six-year period:

 

·         Admissions statistics by calendar year (offers are up again this year at University Park,

but down somewhat University-wide)

·         Total graduate enrollments by campus and official University Park graduate

enrollments by college

·         Total graduate enrollments by degree

·         Total graduate enrollments conferred by academic year beginning in 1995 through 2001

·         Total graduate enrollments by citizenship, and countries represented by international students enrolled

·         Total female graduate enrollments by campus

·         Underrepresented minority enrollments (fairly steady over the past six years) 

·         Quality indicators for incoming students admitted fall 1996 through fall 2001 (GPA has improved from 3.39 to 3.42 and GRE scores have gone up from 1809 to 1870)

·         Number of graduate students with assistantship or fellowship support at University Park (70% of the graduate students enrolled at University Park are full-time and 60% are supported on either an assistantship or fellowship) 

                The number of master’s degrees conferred (steadily increasing over the past several years)

                Ph.D. time-to-degree nationwide (this figure is 7.3 years, including all time enrolled in graduate school; Penn State’s figure is slightly below the national time-to-degree at 7.05 years).

 

2.  Reports of Standing Commitees

 

Among other reports, the Committee on Academic Standards, chaired by Mark Wardell, brought forward a proposal for a change in the requirements for the M.Ed. in Training and Development (Penn State Harrisburg).  It was suggested that the program revise its application deadlines for international students to allow more time for security checks and visa processing.  The program was asked to specify minimum GPA requirements for entrance, and to adjust the admissions language to reflect that quality standards will be upheld.  Due to lack of a quorum, no action could be taken.  The proposal will again be presented to the Council and at that time will include the proposed editorial changes.

 

There being no further items of business, Graduate Council adjourned at 4:24 p.m.

 

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Graduate Building

University Park, PA  16802

(814) 863-0221 – phone   (814) 863-6012 – fax

 

 

Date:      January 15, 2002

 

To:                Members, Senate Council

 

From:     Caroline D. Eckhardt, Senate Liaison to the Graduate Council

Re:                Minutes of the Graduate Council Meeting of December 12, 2001

The Graduate Council, chaired by Dean Eva Pell, met on Wednesday, December 12, 2001, at 3:30 PM in Room 102 Kern Graduate Building.  This summary concentrates on items that may be of particular interest to Senators.  Complete minutes are available from Mary Hosband in the Graduate School (meh1@psu.edu). 

 

1.  Communications and Announcements

 

Dean Pell commented on the problem of falsified credentials submitted for admission to graduate study, especially the difficulty of evaluating credentials from foreign institutions.  She explained that the Graduate School has a new procedure for reviewing international students’ documents.  There have been instances of falsified transcripts or diplomas, etc., and these situations are not always easy to recognize.    There will be a workshop for graduate programs to provide guidance, and the Graduate School will work with programs as needed.  

 

2.  Reports of Standing Committees

 

Among other reports, the Committee on Academic Standards, chaired by Mark Wardell, brought forward the following proposals:

 

• Change in requirements for the M.Ed. in Training and Development (Penn State Harrisburg), unanimously approved

 

• New program:  Master of Science in Industrial Health and Safety, tabled pending further information and consultation

 

• Program name change, from MFA in Theatre Arts, to MFA in Theatre, unanimously approved

 

• New program / extended access:  Executive Master of Business Administration to be offered in the Philadelphia area, unanimously approved after discussion

 

3.  Comments and Recommendations for the Good of the Graduate Community

 

It was pointed out that the University Faculty Senate recently approved changes to Policy 47-20, and that these changes should be called to the attention of the Graduate Council’s Committee on Academic Standards, as that Committee is looking at various University policies, including grades.

 

It was recommended that the Graduate School consider establishing an award to recognize excellence by graduate program officers, e.g. in their impact on recruitment. 

 

There being no further items of business, Graduate Council adjourned at 4:17 p.m.

 

 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

INTER-OFFICE CORRESPONDENCE

 

 

Date:       January 18, 2002

 

From:      Susan C. Youtz, Executive Secretary

 

To:          All Senators and Committee Personnel

      

 

Please note the scheduled time and location of your committee.  If you are unable to attend, notify the Senate Office prior to Senate Day -- if possible.

 

 

    MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2002     7:00 PM

 

                          Officers' and Chairs' Meeting                                            Faculty/Staff Club, NLI

 

          8:00 PM

 

    Commonwealth Caucus     Alumni Lounge, NLI

 

        TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2002     7:30 AM

 

     Intercollegiate Athletics     330 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center

 

          8:00 AM

 

     Faculty Affairs     106 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center

 

     Outreach Activities     502 Keller Building

 

     Student Life     301 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center

 

                                                   8:30 AM

 

     Admissions, Records, Scheduling and

     Student Aid                                                    203 Shields Building

     Curricular Affairs     102 Kern Building

                    Committees and Rules                                            16 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center

     Intra-University Relations     233 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center

 

     Research                                      237 HUB/Robeson Cultural Center 

 

Undergraduate Education                Penn State Room, NLI

 

     University Planning     Ballroom C, NLI

 

                                                   9:00 AM

 

     Faculty Benefits     101-A Kern Building

 

     Libraries                                    E510 Paterno Library

 

                                                  9:30 AM                     

 

     Computing and Information Systems     201 Kern Building

 

                                                   1:30 PM

                   University Faculty Senate                                     112 Kern Building

 

There will be a Commonwealth Caucus meeting at 11:00 AM on TUESDAY,

JANUARY 29, 2002, it the Alumni Lounge of the NLI.  At approximately 12:00 Noon,

a buffet luncheon will be served.

 

The Pennsylvania State University

The University Faculty Senate

101 Kern Building (814) 863-0221

Fax: (814) 863-6012

 

Date:       January 18, 2002

 

To:                Commonwealth Caucus Senators (This includes all elected Senators from

                Campuses, Colleges, and Locations Other Than University Park)

 

From:                Salvatore Marsico and Irwin Richman

 

 

  MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2002

 

8:00 PM – ALUMNI LOUNGE, NLI

GUEST SPEAKER:  DIANE DISNEY, DEAN,

 COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2002 -- 11:00 AM --

ALUMNI LOUNGE, nli

 

     The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, January 29, 2002, in the Alumni Lounge of the NLI.  A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

 

     The tentative Agenda includes:

 

Call to Order

Announcements and Reports from co-chairs of the caucus

         (Richman & Marsico)

Reports from Committee Chairs

Upcoming Senate Elections

Nominees for Caucus Co-chairs

Other Items of Concern/New Business

Adjournment and Lunch