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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

AGENDA

Tuesday, March 28, 2000, at 1:30 PM in

112 Kern Graduate Building

[In the case of severe weather conditions or other emergencies, you may call the Senate Office at (814) 863-0221 to inquire if a Senate meeting has been postponed or canceled. This may be done after normal office hours by calling the same number and a voice mail announcement can be heard concerning the status of any meeting. You may also leave a message at that time.]

A. MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING -
Minutes of the February 29, 2000, Meeting in The Senate Record 33:5

B. COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE - Senate Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets) of
March 14, 2000

Senate Calendar for 2000-2001

C. REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL - Meeting of March 14, 2000

D. ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR -

E. COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY -

F. FORENSIC BUSINESS -

G. UNFINISHED BUSINESS -

H. LEGISLATIVE REPORTS –

Committees and Rules

Revision of Bylaws, Article III, Section 5

Revision of Constitution, Article I, Section 1

I. ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS -

Faculty Affairs

HR-21 - Definition of Academic Ranks

Research

Report of the Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows

University Planning

Parking Report

J. INFORMATIONAL REPORTS -

Committees and Rules Nominating Report - 2000-2001

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities
Standing Joint Committee on Tenure
University Promotion and Tenure Review committee

Election Commission

Roster of Senators for 2000-2001

Intercollegiate Athletics

Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 1998-99

Intra-University Relations

Non-Tenure-Line Faculty

Research

A Primer on Indirect Costs

Senate Council Nominating Committee Report - 2000-2001

Senate Officers - Chair-Elect and Secretary
Faculty Advisory Committee to the President

Student Life

Report on Credit Card Overuse

Undergraduate Education

University Advising Council Web Site

K. NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

L. COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY

-----------------

Note: The next regular meeting of the University Faculty Senate will be held on Tuesday,
April 25, 2000, at 1:30 PM in Room 112 Kern Building.

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

Birch Cottage

University Park, PA 16802

(814) 863-1202 – phone (814) 863-6012 – fax

Date: March 17, 2000

To: Murry R. Nelson, Chair, University Faculty Senate

From: Louis F. Geschwindner, Chair, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

The Senate Curriculum Report, dated March 14, 2000, has been circulated throughout the University. Objections to any of the items in the report must be submitted to the University Curriculum Coordinator at the Senate Office, Birch Cottage, e-mail ID sfw2@psu.edu, on or before April 13, 2000.

The Senate Curriculum Report is available on the web. It can be accessed via the Faculty Senate home page (URL http://www.psu.edu/ufs). Since the Report is available on the web, printed copies were not distributed to the University community. An electronic mailing list is used to notify individuals of its publication. Please contact the Curriculum Coordinator at the e-mail ID indicated above if you would like to be added to the notification list.

The University Faculty Senate Calendar

2000-2001

Reports DueSenate CouncilSenate

August 8, 2000August 22, 2000September 12, 2000

September 19, 2000October 3, 2000October 24, 2000

October 31, 2000November 14, 2000December 5, 2000

December 12, 2000January 16, 2000January 30, 2001

February 2, 2001February 13, 2001February 27, 2001

March 2, 2001March 13, 2001March 27, 2001

March 30, 2001April 10, 2001April 24, 2001

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Revision of Bylaws, Article III, Section 5

(Legislative)

[Implementation upon passage by the Senate]

INTRODUCTION

This report deals with the section of the Bylaws that requires Senators to resign their seat (or requires their seat to be vacated) if they will miss more than three consecutive meetings because of professional activities that prevent Senate attendance. The most common such situation is a sabbatical leave. This section of the Bylaws is reproduced below, with the proposed changes shown in caps.

The problem associated with this section, as it is presently written, is two-fold. First, there are many Senators who do not regularly attend the Senate (some of them are absent for periods exceeding three consecutive meetings), yet the Bylaws do not require these Senators to resign their seats because they are not officially on leave or otherwise definitely assigned to professional activities that prevent Senate attendance. Second, some Senators who go on leave would find it quite feasible to complete the rest of their elected terms after returning from a leave, and often the Senate would benefit significantly from their return.

Thus, if a Senator is on sabbatical, he or she is now required to vacate his/her seat for the duration of the unexpired term, even if it would be feasible for such a Senator to then resume Senate service; while those Senators who do not regularly attend but are not officially on leave, are not asked to resign their seats.

RECOMMENDATION

The Committee on Committees and Rules proposes the following change to Bylaws, Article III, Section 5, to address this concern.

Section 5

An elected Senator who is engaged in any type of PROFESSIONAL activity making it impossible to carry out Senate responsibilities for a period exceeding three (3) consecutive months, excluding June, July and August, MAY RESIGN IF HE OR SHE WISHES, BUT OTHERWISE shall be replaced by an alternate to fill the unexpired term PERIOD OF TIME THAT THE SENATOR WILL BE ABSENT FROM THE SENATE.

If no letter of resignation is received, the Senate Chair may, after appropriate consultation, declare the Senator’s office vacant and direct the Executive Secretary to request the voting unit to select an alternate.

RATIONALE

By making this proposed change, a Senator who is away from the University can be replaced by an alternate for the time the Senator will be absent and then he/she will be able to resume their seat upon their return, if the Senator so wishes. In the meantime, the alternate would represent the voting unit and receive some Senate experience. The present differential treatment, whereby active Senators who temporarily go on leave must lose their seats, while inactive senators (not on leave) can retain theirs, would no longer exist.

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES
Leonard J. Berkowitz
Christopher J. Bise
Edward W. Bittner
Barton W. Browning
Mark A. Casteel
Caroline D. Eckhardt, Vice Chair
Terry Engelder
Deidre E. Jago
Murry R. Nelson
Jean Landa Pytel
Cara-Lynne Schengrund
Tramble T. Turner
Nancy J. Wyatt, Chair

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Revision of Constitution, Article I, Section 1

(Legislative)

[Implementation: Upon Approval by the President]

INTRODUCTION

Article I of the University Faculty Senate Constitution defines the three functions of the Senate as Legislative, Advisory and Consultative, and Forensic. In 1985, the Senate passed legislation under the title "New Categories of Senate Actions" that specified five kinds of actions that the Senate could take. It was that legislation which created the distinction between Legislative reports and Advisory and Consultative reports. However, the rest of the legislation is not reflected in the Constitution. This legislation is intended to bring the Constitution into line with the 1985 legislation and with historical practice by adding two additional categories to the functions of the Senate--Informational and Recognition.

RECOMMENDATION

Revise Article I of the Constitution of the University Faculty Senate by adding the following to Section 1:

(d) Informational

To receive and disseminate information to the Senate and the University that is

deemed important by the Senate or its committees.

(e) Recognition

To recognize or honor those individuals, organizations, or institutions the Senate deems worthy of special recognition by the University Faculty Senate. Such courtesy actions normally shall originate from Senate Council or the Senate Officers.

RATIONALE

The current Constitution recognizes only three functions of the University Faculty Senate. However, by historical practice, the Senate has also served other functions such as receiving and disseminating information and honoring those persons it wishes to recognize for their contributions to the Senate or the University. In fact, those functions are listed under the order of business in the Standing Rules, Article I, Section 2 of the Senate. Furthermore, those functions were formally included in the legislation passed by the Senate at its March 26, 1985 meeting. The present legislation is intended to bring the Constitution in line with historical practice, the 1985 legislation, and its own Standing Rules by including informational and courtesy functions in Article I of the Constitution.

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES
Leonard J. Berkowitz
Christopher J. Bise
Edward W. Bittner
Barton W. Browning
Mark A. Casteel
Caroline D. Eckhardt, Vice Chair
Terry Engelder
Deidre E. Jago
Murry R. Nelson
Jean Landa Pytel
Cara-Lynne Schengrund
Tramble T. Turner
Nancy J. Wyatt, Chair

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AFFAIRS

HR-21 – Definition of Academic Ranks

(Advisory/Consultative)

[Implementation Date: Upon Approval by the President]

Rationale

On March 3, 1998, the Faculty Senate passed an advisory/consultative report entitled HR-21 - Definition of Academic Ranks. This revision was in response to a request by the University Libraries to add the rank of Affiliate Librarian. The affiliate librarian would not be a faculty member on the tenure track. After the Senate’s legislation was approved and the change in HR-21 made, it was brought to our attention that the title was in conflict with another University policy (HR-85) that restricts the affiliate title for "certain administrative or staff members . . . who may on occasion perform educational services." As a result, the Libraries were asked to make an alternative request. Their recommendation is to remove the title of "Affiliate Librarian," but to allow the use of the "Assistant Librarian" title, as well as those of "Associate," and "Librarian," for fixed-term faculty. This can be accomplished by revising the final paragraph in HR-21 to include those three titles in the list of professorial titles that may be available for faculty on fixed-term contracts. The Committee also recommends moving the listing for "Assistant Librarian" from its current place to precede that for "Associate Librarian."

Recommendation:

The Faculty Affairs Committee recommends that the following changes be made in HR-21:

ACADEMIC RANK:

1. Affiliate Librarian. The Affiliate Librarian should possess a graduate degree in library or
information studies or other appropriate degree

2. Assistant Librarian. The Assistant Librarian should possess the same degree as the Affiliate
Librarian; must have demonstrated potential, ability as a librarian; and must have shown
promise of growth in scholarship.

3.1. Lecturer/Instructor. A lecturer/instructor should possess at least a master's degree or
equivalent, or be an active candidate for an advanced degree, in an academic field related to his/her teaching specialization.

4.2. Senior Lecturer/Senior Instructor. The senior lecturer/senior instructor should possess at
least a master's degree or its equivalent in an academic field related to his/her teaching specialization; must have demonstrated ability as a teacher and adviser; and must have shown evidence of professional growth, scholarship, and mastery of subject matter.

5.3. Research Assistant. The research assistant should possess a master's degree or equivalent,
or be an active candidate for an advanced degree, in an academic field related to his/her
research.

6.4. Senior Research Assistant. A senior research assistant should possess a master's degree
or its equivalent in an academic field related to his/her research; must have demonstrated
ability as a researcher; and must have shown evidence of professional growth and scholarship in his/her discipline.

5. Assistant Librarian. The Assistant Librarian should possess a graduate degree in
Library or information studies or other appropriate degree; must have
demonstrated potential, ability as a librarian; and must have shown promise of
growth in scholarship.

7.6. Assistant Professor (or Research Associate). The assistant professor (or research
associate) should possess a doctor's degree or its equivalent in organized research or
professional practice; must have demonstrated ability as a teacher or research worker; and
must have shown definite evidence of growth in scholarship.

The research associate rank is limited to a faculty member in an academic unit who devotes a major fraction of time to the personal conduct of research in which individual initiative, creativity and responsibility are required.

8.7. Associate Librarian. The Associate Librarian should possess the same qualifications as
the Assistant Librarian, demonstrate mastery of librarianship, and show evidence of an
established reputation in scholarly achievement.

9.8. Associate Professor (or Senior Research Associate). The associate professor (or senior
research associate) should possess the same qualifications as the assistant professor (or
research associate), but must also give evidence of an established reputation in scholarly,
artistic, or professional achievement.

10.9. Librarian. The Librarian should possess the same qualifications as the Associate
Librarian, give evidence of a marked capacity for creative work, and show leadership in his/her field of specialization. The rank of Librarian should be reserved for persons of proven stature in the library profession.

11.10. Professor (or Senior Scientist). In addition to the characteristics of the members of the
lower ranks, the professor (or senior scientist) should give evidence of a marked capacity for creative work and of leadership in his or her field of specialization. This rank should be reserved for persons of proven stature in teaching and/or research.

The senior scientist title for this rank should include the field of research specialization of the individual as appropriate for the college or intercollege unit.

NOTE: For example, in a college; Senior Scientist--Biology Research; Senior Scientist--Sociology Research; Senior Scientist--Soil Research; etc. In Intercollege Research Programs: Senior Scientist--Toxicology Research; Senior Scientist--Materials Research; Senior Scientist--Policy Research; etc.

PROFESSORIAL TITLES FOR RESEARCH FACULTY:

Research faculty who profess are entitled to professorial titles in accordance with HR24

(Professorial Dual Titles for Research Faculty).

The equivalency of rank, indicated above, is followed in granting such titles.

FIXED-TERM TITLES:

Titles vary among units for fixed-term faculty; most units use the titles of instructor, lecturer, or senior lecturer; some may use the professorial titles of assistant professor, associate professor, and professor, or assistant librarian, associate librarian, and librarian. Units should have some clear rationale of the different titles they choose to use and their expectations for faculty to achieve these various titles.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AFFAIRS
Shelton S. Alexander
Syed Saad Andaleeb
Melvin Blumberg
Robin B. Ciardullo
Traivs DeCastro
Renee D. Diehl
James M. Donovan
Dorothy H. Evensen
Margaret B. Goldman
Elizabeth A. Hanley
Sabih I. Hayek
Charles W. Hill
Sallie M. McCorkle
Louis Milakofsky
David J. Myers
John S. Nichols, Chair
Amy L. Paster
Denise Potosky
Victor Romero
Robert Secor
Jeffery M. Sharp
Stephen W. Stace
Kim C. Steiner
Valerie N. Stratton, Vice-Chair

SENATE COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH

Report of the Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows

(Advisory and Consultative)

[Implementation Date: Upon Approval by the President]

The attached report was prepared by The Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows. Recommendation six of the Report of the Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows reads:

The Committee recommends that a college associate dean for research (or equivalent administrator) provide academic and administrative oversight for all postdoctoral fellows appointed in that college.

and:

The Committee recommends that a central administrative officer in the Office of the Provost should be responsible for monitoring postdoctoral appointments to assure consistent application of Penn State policies. In addition, this central administrative officer will be responsible for monitoring policies and procedures, as well as development of programs and materials for postdoctoral fellows.

In the supporting text, The Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows recommends that the central oversight "be provided independent of The Graduate School, although still reporting to the Provost." Although the Vice President for Research and the Dean of the Graduate School positions are currently joined at Penn State, The Senate Committee on Research believes there is sufficient independence in these functions to allow proper supervision of postdoctoral fellow programs and materials by the Vice President for Research. Therefore:

The Senate Committee on Research recommends that the Vice President for Research be charged with the responsibility for monitoring postdoctoral appointments to assure consistent application of Penn State policies. In addition, the Vice President for Research will be responsible for monitoring policies and procedures, as well as development of programs and materials for postdoctoral fellows. With this minor change, the Senate Committee on Research recommends that the Senate endorse the recommendations of the Report of the Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH
Guy F. Barbato, Vice-Chair
James J. Beatty
Frank A. Behum
Phillip R. Bower
Roy B. Clariana
Stephen E. Cyran
Thomas N. Jackson, Chair
Ernest W. Johnson
John D. Kissick
Rajen Mookerjee
Eva J. Pell
Gary W. Rogers
Joan S. Thomson
Vasundara V. Varadan
SusanWelch

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING

Parking Report

(Advisory/Consultative)

[Implementation Date: Upon Approval by the President]

INTRODUCTION

Automobile traffic and congestion are accelerating radically in the U.S. Evidence tells us that building more road and parking capacity only exacerbates the problem. Indeed, the University’s long range Transportation Demand Management plan recognizes this and stresses the encouragement of alternative modes of travel to the single occupant vehicle. The plan includes parking lots peripheral to the main campus, and travel in the campus core would be accommodated primarily by pedestrian and bicycle systems and public transportation.

The proposed parking plan recognizes this and therefore does not favor the building of additional parking capacity. The plan is a short term one, and it is envisioned that, in the future, parking strategies will be adjusted to encourage less use of the automobile on central campus.

BACKGROUND

The Senate Committee on University Planning has had a presentation by Betty J. Roberts, Assistant Vice President for Business Services, on the parking Aspects of the Transportation Demand Management at Penn State. The plan presents 5 options and the administration anticipates to implement one of them in the Summer of 2000.

OPTION #1 – Status Quo, No Change.

OPTION #2 – Status Quo with Enhancements.

OPTION #3 – Area Concept 3 Core Areas, 1 Open Staff Area

OPTION #4 – 4 Core Areas, 1 Open Staff Area

OPTION #5 – 5 Core Areas, 1 Open Staff Area

The UPC has examined these five options from the point of view how well they address the following issues.

    1. Reduce the over subscription rate close to 1:1 (minimizes frequency with which a full lot is encountered)

2. The size of the area over which a permit would be valid should be kept as small as possible. (Minimizes time of trying to locate an empty parking space)

3. Overflow lots should be available within a reasonable distance from the assigned lot (minimizes hunting time and traffic congestion)

4. Distribution of nighttime reserved spaces needs to be distributed in such a manner as to ensure minimum transit time to offices for safety considerations.

5. The reconstruction of parking should be as close to area where it is being lost.

Below is an attempt to analyze each of these 5 issues followed by a response by the Parking Office (starting in bold and continuing in smaller type)

Issue #1. From the data supplied with the report (Table1) Fig .1 and Fig.2 have been prepared which indicate that the overall design of the parking plan addresses item #1 to a significant extent. Options #2 through #5 plan to reduce the over subscription rate from the current 33% to 11%. Achievement of a closer match between available parking spaces and parking demand would mean construction of more parking spaces and additional expenses (increased parking fees?).

Response by Parking Office

Issue #1: We are pleased that this subscription rate is being viewed as a positive step.

Table #1

Year

Loss

New need

New spaces

Total

Demand

Demand/Total

99/00

366

268

0

7951

10570

1.33

00/01

569

353

613

7995

10923

1.37

01/02

610

283

1383

8768

11206

1.28

02/03

0

0

0

8768

11206

1.28

03/04

61

269

0

8707

11475

1.32

04/05

53

259

800

9454

11734

1.24

05/06

0

66

0

9454

11800

1.25

06/07

0

0

0

9454

11800

1.25

07/08

0

0

1200

10654

11800

1.11

Figure #1

Figure. #2

Issue #2. An optimal plan would have areas of about the same size with similar numbers of parking spaces across the core campus, under the assumption that the distribution of work locations is approximately uniform across the central campus. The question was analyzed with the aid of data supplied by the parking office (Tables #2 & #3)

Under options #1 and 2 the distributions of lost spaces across the central campus is most uniform, followed by option #3. Option #5 has on average the lowest number of spaces per unit area,most across the campus. It would appear that options #1,2 and 3 would be preferable from the point of view of issue #2.

Response by Parking Office:

Issue #2:
As we understand it, the committee is suggesting that Parking maintains smaller zones rather than large ones, the argument being that smaller zones will decrease the amount of time spent looking for a parking spot. In the various options we presented to the committee we list options with 3, 4 and 5 core zones. It is not clear whether the committee is thinking about even smaller core zones than those presented. If the desire is to create more than 5 core zones, then the option is to maintain the status quo as all advantages derived from a zone system, i.e., user flexibility, would be eliminated. From our perspective, the 3 zone system is optimal. The smaller the zone the more disruptive for constituent groups because the Master Plan, within the next 5 to 7 year period is scheduled to remove many of the surface lots that constitute the smaller zones.

In response we have prepared the spreadsheet, Table # 2 and 3. This matrix shows the distribution of spaces by zone according to the various options presented to the committee. Equally spaced zones would be virtually impossible to attain due to the fact that campus is scheduled to lose lots to academic buildings and building parking decks for replacement across campus, over the next 5 to 7 years. We do not want to force an artificial number equality to the zones as zones that are equal today will not be equal in the very near future because of scheduled building.

Table #2 Available parking area on the central campus, in square miles

Area

Red

Yellow

Green

Brown

Purple

Blue

Total area

Option 1/2

0.053

0.129

0.108

0.094

0.000

0.384

Option 3

0.143

0.129

0.138

0.000

0.000

0.410

Option4

0.119

0.122

0.098

0.000

0.103

0.441

Option5

0.152

0.116

0.051

0.081

0.067

0.401

Table #3 Parking spaces in each area

Red

Yellow

Green

Brown

Purple

Blue

Total spaces

Option 1/2

548

1203

1306

343

0

3400

Option 3

571

1203

1626

0

0

3400

Option4

397

1339

1312

0

0

3400

Option5

397

1203

314

0

1312

174

3400

Table #4 Parking density on Central Campus( cars/acre)

Mean

std

Red

Yellow

Green

Brown

Purple

Blue

Option 1/2

16.1

14.6

18.8

5.7

13.8

4.9

Option 3

6.3

14.6

18.4

13.1

5.1

Option4

5.2

17.2

21.0

14.5

6.7

Option5

4.1

16.2

9.6

25.2

4.1

11.8

8.0

Issue #3. The overflow is planned to be taken care of by the construction of new
parking decks, or additions to existing ones. In so far as these have been planed fairly evenly across the central campus concern #3 will be addressed in the overall planning. There are no differences among the options on this point. A major question is, however, the timing of funds becoming available for the construction of new buildings and the funds becoming available for the construction of the replacement parking spaces. The latter should precede the former, however there is no guarantee that this will be the case.

Response by Parking Office

Issue #3: We are in total agreement with this statement and our goal will be to keep open staff (overflow) parking within a reasonable distance to the assigned zone

Issue #4. Attention should be paid to parking for students in the evening. Many students use faculty/staff parking lots after 5:00. There is a concern of safety for students going to and from their offices/labs at night. We note that a goal of the TDM plan is to make parking within a 5-minute walk of faculty/staff offices. The committee strongly supports this goal.

Response by Parking Office

Issue #4: It is agreed that the lots that will be reserved 24 hrs per day, 7 days a week, need to be as centrally located as possible for each zone and with consideration of transit and safety issues.

Issue #5. The loss of parking spaces will be made up through construction of additions to or new parking structures, apparently there is a lack of space to construct additional surface lots. In the long run the parking plan addresses concern #5. The location of the addition of additional spaces is more or less even across the central campus. However the timing of building vs. parking space construction remains an open question.

Response by Parking Office

Issue #5: It will be impossible to place temporary parking in close proximity to those areas lost due to construction or expansion of garages. There simply is no extra parking space in the core or west campus. Because of this dilemma, there will have to be a coordinated effort to lessen the impact caused by such disruptions by offering transit support.

In addition to the five issues discussed, the University Planning Committee notes the following.

1. The red area presents an additional issue in Option #4 and #5. While in Options #1, #2, and #3, the red area is fairly coherent and compact, under Option # 4 and #5 the area becomes so dispersed, that it will become a daunting task to find an open space, if none is available on the central campus or in close proximity. It might be wiser to zone those parts of the red area that are west of Atherton Street and south of College Avenue as separate areas.

The Committee is particularly concerned about the construction of the new deck on the west side of Atherton. If faculty and staff we are to benefit from this structure, its construction date needs to be moved up considerably from that in the plan. The committee assumes that the construction of the deck across Atherton is moved to within 3-4 years, so as to make any zone system work. Consistent enforcement of the existing parking regulations would address to a significant extent faculty and staff dissatisfaction with the availability of parking spaces in areas for which they hold parking permits.

RECOMMENDATION

The Committee feels that Option #2 is the best alternative for the near term and recommends its adoption..

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PLANNING
P. Richard Althouse
William J Anderson, Jr.
Anthony J. Baratta, V-Chair
Elizabeth Billingsley
David Chao
Peter Deines, Chair
Peter B. Everett
William M. Frank
John T. Harwood
Brandon B. Hunt
Ali R. Hurson
Rodney Kirsch
Philip A. Klein
Larry J. Kuhns
Jeffrey S. Mayer
B. Tracy Nixon
Winston A. Richards
Lola Rodriguez
Louise E. Sandmeyer
Michael C. Saunders
Dennis C. Scanlon
Derek R. Schuelein
Gary C. Schultz
Beno Weiss

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

NOMINATING REPORT - 2000-2001

STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE ON TENURE - (Three-year term, two [2] to be elected; one [1] member and one [1] alternate)

Deines, Peter - Professor of Geosciences, College of Earth & Mineral Sciences, UP

Ellis, William - Associate Professor of English & American Studies, College of the Liberal Arts, Hazleton Campus

Goldman, Margaret - Associate Professor of Medicine/Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center

Nolan, James - Associate Professor of Education, College of Education, UP

Trevino, Linda - Professor of Organizational Behavior, Smeal College of

Business Administration, UP

Turner, Tramble - Associate Professor of English, Abington College

UNIVERSITY PROMOTION AND TENURE REVIEW COMMITTEE - (Two-year term, three [3] to be elected)

Bittner, Edward - Professor of Chemistry, Commonwealth College, McKeesport Campus

Harris, Susan - Professor of English, College of the Liberal Arts, UP

Heid, Mary - Professor of Education, College of Education, UP

Kenney, W. Larry - Professor of Physiology & Kinesiology, College of Health & Human Development, UP

Miller, Arthur - Professor of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, UP

Miller, Linda - Professor of English, Abington College

Nichols, John - Professor of Communications, College of Communications, UP

FACULTY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES -

FACULTY - UNIVERSITY PARK (Three [3] to be elected; two members and one alternate) Three-year term

Baratta, Anthony - Professor of Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering

Coraor, Lee - Associate Professor of Computer Science & Engineering, College of Engineering

Engel, Renata - Associate Professor of Engineering Design & Graphics and Engineering Science & Mechanics, College of Engineering

Green, David - Professor of Ceramic Science and Engineering, College of Earth & Mineral Sciences

Rambeau, James - Associate Professor of English & American Studies, College of the Liberal Arts

Steven, John (Jack) - Professor of Management, Smeal College of Business Administration

FACULTY - OTHER THAN UNIVERSITY PARK (One [1] to be elected; one alternate) Three-year term

Hall, Arlene - Associate Professor of Kinesiology, Commonwealth College, New Kensington Campus

McCarthy, William - Professor of English, Commonwealth College, DuBois Campus

Smith, Sandra - Associate Professor of Kinesiology, Commonwealth College, Fayette Campus

Stratton, Valerie - Associate Professor of Psychology, Altoona College

DEANS - (Two [2] to be elected; one member and one alternate) Three-year term

Hanes, Madlyn - Penn State Harrisburg, Capital College

Monk, David - College of Education

Pell, Eva - Graduate School

Wormley, David - College of Engineering

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES
Leonard J. Berkowitz
Christopher J. Bise
Edward W. Bittner
Mark A. Casteel
Caroline D. Eckhardt, Vice-Chair
Terry Engelder
Deidre E. Jago
Murry R. Nelson
Jean Landa Pytel
Cara-Lynne Schengrund
Tramble T. Turner
Nancy J. Wyatt, Chair

ABINGTON COLLEGE
SENATORS (5)
Term Expires 2001
Ozment, Judy P.
Term Expires 2002
Rebane, P. Peter
Term Expires 2003
Stace, Stephen
Turner, Tramble T.
Term Expires 2004
Smith, James F.
Representative on the Senate Council: Tramble T. Turner

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
SENATORS (14)
Term Expires 2001
Kuhns, Larry J.
Scanlon, Dennis C.
Term Expires 2002
Barbato, Guy F.
Flores, Hector
Manbeck, Harvey B.
Saunders, Michael C.
Term Expires 2003
Baggett, Connie D.
Hock, Winand K.
Rogers, Gary W.
Steiner, Kim C.
Term Expires 2004
Adams, Phyllis F.
Daniel R. Hagen
Stephen M. Smith
Joan S. Thomson
Representative to the Senate Council: Connie D. Baggett

ALTOONA COLLEGE
SENATORS (6)
Term Expires 2001
Atkinson, Ann
Term Expires 2002
Su, Mila
Tormey, Brian B.
Term Expires 2003
Borzellino, Joseph E.
Stratton, Valerie N.
Term Expires 2004
Brown, Douglas
Representative on the Senate Council: Brian B. Tormey

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE
SENATORS (8)
Term Expires 2001
DeCastro, Travis
Drafall, Lynn E.
Term Expires 2002
Kunze, Donald E.
Lindberg, Darla
Term Expires 2003
McCorkle, Sallie
McGregor, Annie K.
Term Expires 2004
Curran, Brian
Willis, Daniel
Representative on the Senate Council:

PENN STATE ERIE - THE BEHREND COLLEGE
SENATORS (9)
Term Expires 2001
Irwin, Zachary T.
Term Expires 2002
Burchard, Charles
McCarty, Ronald L.
Power, Barbara L.
Term Expires 2003
Andeleeb, Syed Saad
Term Expires 2004
Blasko, Dawn G.
Burchard, Charles
Roth, David
Troester, Rod
Representative on the Senate Council: Ronald L. McCarty

BERKS-LEHIGH VALLEY COLLEGE
ALLENTOWN CAMPUS
SENATORS (1)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
Gutgold, Nikki
Term Expires 2004
None
Representative on the Senate Council: Andrew B. Romberger

BERKS-LEHIGH VALLEY COLLEGE
BERKS CAMPUS
SENATORS (4)
Term Expires 2001
Milakofsky, Louis
Term Expires 2002
Patterson, Henry
Term Expires 2003
Romberger, Andrew B.
Term Expires 2004
Ridley, Sheila
Representative on the Senate Council: Andrew B. Romberger

SMEAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SENATORS (7)
Term Expires 2001
Christy, David P.
Term Expires 2002
Harrison, Terry P.
Woolridge, J. Randall
Term Expires 2003
Crum, Robert
Everett, Peter B.
Term Expires 2004
Novack, Robert
Sharp, Jeffery
Representative to the Senate Council:

PENN STATE HARRISBURG - THE CAPITAL COLLEGE
SENATORS (7)
Term Expires 2001
Richards, Winston A.
Term Expires 2002
De Rooy, Jacob
Term Expires 2003
Blumberg, Melvin
Richman, Irwin
Term Expires 2004
Ammon, Richard I.
Cecere, Joseph J.
Sachs, Howard G.
Representative on the Senate Council: Irwin Richman

PENN STATE SCHUYLKILL - THE CAPITAL COLLEGE
SENATORS (3)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Urenko, John B.
Term Expires 2003
Cardamone, Michael J.
Lippert, John R.
Term Expires 2004
None
Representative on the Senate Council: Irwin Richman

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS
SENATORS (3)
Term Expires 2001
Bettig, Ronald V.
Term Expires 2002
Nichols, John S.
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
Calvert, Clay
Representative on the Senate Council:

COLLEGE OF EARTH AND MINERAL SCIENCES
SENATORS (8)
Term Expires 2001
Alexander, Shelton S.
Bise, Christopher J.
Term Expires 2002
Crane, Robert G.
Scaroni, Alan W.
Term Expires 2003
Engelder, Terry
Frank, William M.
Term Expires 2004
Deines, Peter
Green, David J.
Representative on the Senate Council: Alan W. Scaroni

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
SENATORS (6)
Term Expires 2001
Chellman-Alison Carr-
Term Expires 2002
Evensen, Dorothy H.
Nelson, Murry R.
Term Expires 2003
Hunt, Brandon
Myers, Jamie
Term Expires 2004
Marshall, J. Daniel
Watkins, Marley W.
Representative on the Senate Council: Alison Carr-Chellman

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SENATORS (23)
Term Expires 2001
Bernecker, Craig A.
Coraor, Lee D.
Curtis, Wayne R.
Jackson, Thomas N.
Lesieutre, George A.
Pauley, Laura L.
Term Expires 2002
Hayek, Sabih I.
Mayer, Jeffrey S.
Ovaert, Timothy C.
Pangborn, Robert N.
Stoffels, Shelley M.
Ventura, Jose
Term Expires 2003
Aydin, Kultegin
Baratta, Anthony J.
Dong, Cheng
Hurson, Ali R.
Miller, Arthur C.
Pytel, Jean Landa
Varadan, Vasundara V.
Term Expires 2004
Carpenter, Lynn A.
Geschwindner, Louis F.
Pietrucha Martin
Sathianathan, Dhushyanthan
Representative on the Senate Council:

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
SENATORS (13)
Term Expires 2001
Burgess, Robert
Fosmire, Gary J.
Ricketts, Robert D.
Term Expires 2002
Caldwell, Linda
Frank, Thomas A.
Holt, Frieda
Preston, Deborah
Term Expires 2003
Kenney, W. Larry
Shea, Dennis
Smith, Carol A.
Term Expires 2004
Hanley, Elizabeth A.
Corwincca
Slobounov, Semyon
Representative on the Senate Council:

COLLEGE OF THE LIBERAL ARTS
SENATORS (21)
Term Expires 2001
Clark, Paul F.
LaPorte, Robert
Myers, David J.
Olson, Jon
Strasser, Gerhard F.
Term Expires 2002
Bord, Richard
Browning, Barton W.
Derickson, Alan
Eckhardt, Caroline D.
Wanner, Adrian J.
Term Expires 2003
Beaupied, Aida
Block, Alan
Foti, Veronique
Gouran, Dennis
Hewitt, Julia
Moore, John W.
Welch, Susan
Term Expires 2004
Atwater, Deborah
De Jong, Gordon F.
Harvey, Irene
Weis, Beno
Representative on the Senate Council:

EBERLY COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
SENATORS (14)
Term Expires 2001
Beatty, James J.
Cao, Wenwu
Mitchell, Robert B.
Term Expires 2002
Ciardullo, Robin
Diehl, Renee D.
Farber, Gregory K.
Jurs, Peter C.
Minard, Robert D.
Term Expires 2003
Anderson, James B.
Term Expires 2004
Fisher, Charles R.
Gilmour, David
Laguna, Pablo
Nistor, Victor
Ware, Roger
Representative on the Senate Council: Peter C. Jurs

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
SENATORS (24)
Term Expires 2001
Abendroth, Thomas W.
Cyran, Stephen E.
Ferriss, John A.
Kelley, David K.
Pees, Richard C.
Romano, Paula J.
Sassani, Joseph W. III
Vary, Thomas
Term Expires 2002
Burkhart, Keith
Term Expires 2003
Carey, Chris
Demers, Laurence M.
Fedok, Fred G.
Johnson, Ernest W.
Leure-duPree, Alphonse
Rowe, William
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
Hill, Charles
Schengrund, Cara-Lynne
Davis, Dwight

Representative on the Senate Council:

COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE

BEAVER CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Chirico, JoAnn
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
DELAWARE CAMPUS
SENATORS (3)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Wyatt, Nancy J.
Term Expires 2003
Franz, George W.
Georgopulos, Peter D.
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
DUBOIS CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
May, James E.
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
Hufnagel, Pamela P.
Term Expires 2004
None
FAYETTE CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Gapinski, Andrzej J.
Term Expires 2003
;Smith, Sandra R.
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
HAZLETON CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Jago, Deidre E.
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
MCKEESPORT CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
Bittner, Edward W.
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
MONT ALTO CAMPUS
SENATORS (3)
Term Expires 2001
Bardi, John F.
Term Expires 2002
Galligan, M. Margaret
Term Expires 2003
Donovan, James M.
Term Expires 2004
None
NEW KENSINGTON CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Krochalis, Jeanne
Term Expires 2003
Bridges, K. Robert
Term Expires 2004
None
SHENANGO CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
Berland, Kevin
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
WILKES-BARRE CAMPUS
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Seybert, Thomas A.
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
WORTHINGTON SCRANTON CAMPUS
SENATORS (3)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
Barnes, David
Barshinger, Richard
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results
YORK CAMPUS
SENATORS (3)
Term Expires 2001
Sutton, Jane S.
Term Expires 2002
Casteel, Mark A.
Term Expires 2003
Berkowitz, Leonard J.
Term Expires 2004
No Election Results

The Senate Council representative for the Commonwealth College is

OTHER VOTING UNITS

PENN STATE GREAT VALLEY
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
Potosky, Denise
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
Clariana, Roy B.
Term Expires 2004
None
Representative on the Senate Council:

THE DICKINSON SCHOOL OF LAW
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
Romero, Victor
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
Navin, Michael J.
Term Expires 2004
None
Representative on the Senate Council:

COMBINED DEPARTMENTS OF MILITARY SCIENCES
SENATORS (1)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
Paladini, Steven M.
Term Expires 2004
None
Representative on the Senate Council:

LIBRARIES
SENATORS (2)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
Snavely, Loanne
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
Esposito, Jacqueline R.
Representative on the Senate Council:

SCHOOL OF INFORMATION SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY
SENATORS (1)
Term Expires 2001
None
Term Expires 2002
None
Term Expires 2003
None
Term Expires 2004
Thomas, James
Representative on the Senate Council:

ROSTER OF EX OFFICIO AND APPOINTED SENATORS: 2000-2001
Ex Officio Senators: (7)
Erickson, Rodney A., Executive Vice President/Provost of the University
Cahir, John J., Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education
Pell, Eva J., Vice President for Research/Dean of the Graduate School
Spanier, Graham B., President of the University
Wager, J. James, University Registrar
Dutton, John A., Chair, Council of Academic Deans
White, Eric R., Director, Division of Undergraduate Studies

Appointed Senators: (15)
Cheryl Achterberg
P. Richard Althouse
Ingrid M. Blood
Patricia A. Book
Arthur W. Carter
Mary Beth Crowe
John T. Harwood
W. Terrell Jones
John M. Lilley
John J. Romano
Karen Wiley Sandler
Louise E. Sandmeyer
Robert Secor
Joseph C. Strasser
Billie S. Willits
ROSTER OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SENATORS

Dennis ShifrinAbington
Marcus A. FedeliAltoona
Frank A. BehumBerks-Lehigh Valley College
Erik B. TraverCollege of Agricultural Sciences
David ChaoCollege of Arts and Architecture
William CampbellSmeal College of Business Administration
Alissa J. ShirkCollege of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Tara GernerCollege of Education
Lisa HatcherCollege of Engineering
Gracie ZayasCollege of Health and Human Development
Allison BuskirkCollege of the Liberal Arts
Jacob KosoffEberly College of Science
Jummy BullockCollege of Communications
Jenny ZhangPenn State Erie - The Behrend College
Sean LimricPenn State Harrisburg - The Capital College
Derek R. SchueleinCommonwealth College
Quinn MortonDivision of Undergraduate Studies

ROSTER OF GRADUATE STUDENT SENATORS
Phillip R. Bower - University Park
Lola Rodriguez - Dickinson
Daniel G. Kiefer - College of Medicine
Lucia Rohrer-Murphy - Great Valley

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 1998-99

(Informational)

INTRODUCTION

Each year the Senate Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics is mandated to provide reports of NCAA activities to the Senate, One report usually addresses NCAA eligibility numbers and the other, later in the academic year, offers insights gained from recently passed NCAA legislation. This report focuses on the former and is reasonably self-explanatory. Please note that, as always, a number of athletes are counted twice if their sports overlap two seasons or if they compete in more than one sport. The latest graduation data is also included with comparisons to other Big Ten Universities.

1 . Total Number of Athletes Screened for Eligibility (Fall 98 & Spring 99)
1998-99 - 1598

2. Total Number of Athletes Not Approved for Participation (Fall 98 & Spring 99)
1998-99 - 47

3. Total Number of Exceptions to Normal Progress Rule (Fall 98 & Spring 99)
1998-99 - 35

4. Total Number of Scholarship Athletes (Academic year 1998-99)
1998-99 - 490

5. Comparison of Data for Annual Report

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

Athletes Screened

1628

1584

1788

1534

1598

Athletes Not Approved

39

58

45

43

47

Exceptions to Normal Progress

30

34

38

30

35

Scholarship Athletes

410

471

470

475

490

SENATE COMMITTEE ON NTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
William Asbury
Robert Burgess
John Cahir
Linda Caldwell
J. Louis Campbell
Joseph Cecere
David Christy
John Coyle
Tineke Cunning
Timothy Curley
Laurence Demers
James Elder
Diana Kenepp
Darla Lindberg
Harvey Manbeck
Douglas McCullough
Ellen Perry
John Romano
Dennis Shea
Timothy Smaby
Thomas Vary
Thomas Whittam
Jerry Wright

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTRA-UNIVERSITY RELATIONS

Non-Tenure-Line Faculty

(Informational)

INTRODUCTION

Over the past twenty-five years, American colleges and universities have substantially increased their reliance on part-time and non-tenure-track faculty. The share of part-time faculty has increased from 22% of all appointments in 1970 to 42.5% in 1997. Much of the growth in part-time faculty numbers may be found at two-year colleges where 65% of faculty in 1997 were part-time. Nevertheless, at all four-year institutions, 32.6% of faculty were on part-time appointments in 1997 compared to 31% in 1995; and according to the National Center for Education Statistics report Fall Staff in Post Secondary Institutions, 1997, (http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2000164) at public four-year institutions, 26.6% of faculty (instruction, research, service) were part-time. Richard Moser, a national field representative for the AAUP has noted a pattern of incremental change, and a recent Chronicle article (1/28/00, p. A18) states "We’re not looking at episodic change; we’re not looking at short-term changes; we’re looking at historical changes."

This informational report began as an attempt to examine the extent to which part-time faculty are used at Penn State colleges and locations. However, we have expanded the study to include both FT-I and FT-II faculty, since questions of academic quality, faculty qualifications, equity, and the future of tenure itself are implied by an increasing reliance upon non-tenure-line faculty, whether part-time or full-time.

At Penn State, full-time employment includes standing appointments which are continuing (they do not specify an ending date) and are supported by permanently budgeted funds. The overwhelming majority of faculty having standing appointments are tenure-eligible, although there are some instructors who have standing appointments. Faculty on the following types of appointments are not eligible for tenure: Fixed-term multi-year appointments (FT-MY) are full-time, supported by permanent funds, specify an ending date, and may be renewed. Fixed-Term I (FT-I) appointments are yearly full-time contracts that specify an ending date and may be supported by temporary funds. Such appointments are also renewable. Fixed-Term II appointments (FT-II) are essentially part-time; they are funded in the same way as FT-I appointments and may be "full-time but less than six calendar months" or "less than full-time."

USE OF NON-TENURE-LINE FACULTY AT PENN STATE

Because the information that follows may be new to most Senators, we have decided to present two different ways of examining the use of non-tenure-line faculty. The first data at our disposal were the Program and Performance Indicators assembled each year by the University. In this way, we were able to examine annual data points showing the production of student credit hours by various classes of instructors during an academic year. This information was most useful in discussing historical trends internal to Penn State and allowed us to project a trend line based on the data. The second data set was provided by Mike Dooris and Bob Barlock of The Center for Quality and Planning. This information, based on fall semester assignments, is most useful when comparing Penn State to other institutions since the data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics also use a fall semester "snapshot."

An examination of the Program and Performance Indicators for each academic year from 1989-90 to 1997-98 by the IRC committee yielded the following information regarding the student credit hour (SCH) production by various faculty categories. Data concerning the percent of total student credit hours produced for these categories during this period depict a situation of relative stability for most categories of employment and locations, except for the growing share of credit hours taught by FT-II faculty outside University Park and a corresponding decline in the share of credit hours produced by full-time faculty.

 

University Park

Total Full- time

(includes FTI)

Total Part- Time

(includes, FT II, Grad. Asst and "other")

FT-I

FT-II

Graduate Assistants

1989-1990

71.2

28.8

13.7

8.7

17.4

1997-1998

69.0

31.0

12.7

13.9

13.9

Outside University Park

(except Hershey)

1989-1990

71.7

28.3

15.2

24.9

.1

1997-1998

62.8

37.2

14.9

37.7

0

Total University

1989-1990

71.8

28.2

14.2

14.6

10.3

1997-1998

66.4

33.6

13.5

27.3

8.3

Table I - Percent of Total Student credit hours produced (excluding Hershey)

Total part-time credit hours at University Park reflects an increase in FT-II hours taught and a decline in graduate assistant hours, although there is no necessary relation between the two. Differences between total full- and part-time credit hours taught, moreover, are relatively small (2.2%) between 1989 and 1998. However, outside University Park the total full-time share declined almost nine percent; FT-I hours changed only slightly (.3%); but FT-II hours increased by 12.8%. It is possible that the higher share of hours taught by part-time faculty outside University Park reflects a greater share of introductory courses offered at these locations taught by these faculty.

The data contained in the Program and Performance Indicators for 1989-90 to 1997-98 are summarized in graphs 1-3 which follow. The projections beyond 1997-8 represent simple linear regression lines plotted with "E-view," a standard regression analysis package. The share of total credit hours produced by FT-I, FT-II and graduate assistants shows relatively little variation between 1990 and 1998, a fact that supports the reliability of the projections. The distribution of full-time academic ranks in graphs 1 and 2 reveal a gradual increase in dependence on non-tenure track appointments at all locations.

More recently, The Center for Quality and Planning has provided extensive information on faculty numbers by category and student credit hours (SCHs) derived from fall semester "snapshots." We provide the complete data sets comparing fall 1992 to fall 1998 in the attached tables. Table 2 summarizes the percentage change in faculty numbers and SCH production by location. Tables 3-21 present specific information for each college. Full-time appointments, both standing and fixed-term, are classified by function; part-time appointments are similarly described. Across the University, full-time faculty increased by 10.9% over all; however a 76% increase in the number of fixed-term faculty is compared to a 1.1% increase in standing appointments. At the same time, there was an 11.8% increase in the number of part-time faculty and an 8.1% increase in the number of graduate assistants. The percent of SCHs produced by standing faculty decreased by 2.9%, while the percent of SCHs produced by fixed-term (full-time) faculty and part-time faculty and graduate assistants increased by 83% and 8.1% respectively. While the overall totals of full-time faculty numbers and credit hour production have kept pace with the increase in part-time faculty numbers and SCHs, there is a clear trend toward the use of non-standing faculty appointments to teach a greater share of student credit hours. The number of part-time faculty, not including graduate assistants, accounted for 31.8% of all faculty in fall 1998, compared to 31.6% in 1992; the number of fixed-term faculty, not including graduate assistants, accounted for 46% of all faculty in 1998, compared to 40.6% in 1992. Although the years of the "snapshots" may differ, the data are comparable to the figures reported above by the National Center for Education Statistics. The attached tables provide a breakdown of Penn State data by college and location.

CONCLUSION

It is not possible for us to identify a single explanation for the increasing use of non-tenure-line faculty at Penn State. The percentage of our faculty appointments classified as part-time is comparable to the national data for four-year institutions, although it is higher than the national average for "public four-year institutions." Market forces, budget constraints, enrollment spikes, changes in "mission" (e.g., in the campus colleges), new programs, and/or rapid growth of existing programs may account for the variations among different colleges and locations. In addition, the available data may not adequately reflect Penn State’s recent initiatives to establish and fill new standing appointment lines.

Nevertheless, because the use of fixed-term faculty, both part- and full-time, may have many implications for academic life at Penn State, we believe that the trends merit the attention of the Senate as a whole. This report is intended to establish a baseline against which future data can be measured.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON INTRA-UNIVERSITY RELATIONS
Kultegin Aydin
K. Robert Bridges
Wenwu Cao
Dwight Davis
Richard Dempsey
Thomas Frank
Sandra Gleason
Zachary Irwin
Rorbert LaPorte
John Lippert
Louisa Marshall
Richard Nath
Michael Navin (Vice-Chair)
Robert Pangborn
David Richards
Andrew Romberger
Dennis Shifrin
James Smith (Chair)
Loanne Snavely
Robert Walters

SENATE COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH

A Primer on Indirect Costs

(Informational)

The following report to the Senate provides an introduction to indirect costs (also known as facilities and administrative costs).

SENATE COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH
Guy F. Barbato, Vice-Chair
James J. Beatty
Frank A. Behum
Phillip R. Bower
Roy B. Clariana
Stephen E. Cyran
Thomas N. Jackson, Chair
Ernest W. Johnson
John D. Kissick
Rajen Mookerjee
Eva J. Pell
Gary W. Rogers
Joan S. Thomson
Vasundara V. Varadan
SusanWelch

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

The University Faculty Senate

REPORT OF NOMINATING COMMITTEE FOR 2000-2001

The Nominating Committee consisting of the elected representatives of Senate Council met on January 18 and February 15, 2000. The following list of nominees will be transmitted to the Chair of the University Faculty Senate prior to the March 14, 2000, Senate Council meeting for subsequent distribution with the Agenda for the March 28, 2000, meeting of the University Faculty Senate. Additional nominations may be made from the floor of the Senate on March 28, 2000.

SENATE OFFICERS

CHAIR-ELECT OF THE SENATE

Bise, Christopher J. - College of Earth & Mineral Sciences, University Park

Gouran, Dennis S. - College of the Liberal Arts, University Park

Manbeck, Harvey B. - College of Agricultural Sciences, University Park

SECRETARY OF THE SENATE

Moore, John W. - College of the Liberal Arts, University Park

Smith, Sandra R. - (HHDEV), Commonwealth College, Fayette Campus

FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE PRESIDENT

(1 to be elected - term to expire in 2003)

Barbato, Guy F. - College of Agricultural Sciences, University Park

Hanley, Elizabeth - College of Health & Human Development, University Park

Rebane, P. Peter - (LA), Abington College

NOMINATING COMMITTEE
John Bagby
Leonard Berkowitz, Chair
Michael Broyles
Lynn Carpenter
Alison Carr-Chellman
Dennis Gouran
Zachary Irwin
Peter Jurs
Larry Kenney
Alphonse E. Leure-duPree
Felix Lukezic
P. Peter Rebane
Robert Richards
Irwin Richman
Andrew Romberger
Alan W. Scaroni
Sandra Smith
Brian B. Tormey

SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE

Report on Credit Card Overuse

(Informational)

Student credit card debt has become a growing problem among universities nationwide, including Penn State. Many school administrators and parents have become increasingly worried about how much of an impact credit card debt can have on academic performance and commitment, and have become more concerned with what kind of role colleges should play in educating students about the potential dangers of credit cards. Even though the ultimate responsibility lies with the students and parents, colleges need to recognize and help mitigate the pernicious effects that mounting credit card debt can have.

Take, for example, a student who was a National Merit Scholarship Finalist and who attended the University of Texas at Dallas on a full scholarship. Despite his/her seemingly bright future, the student committed suicide in February 1998 under the pressure of mounting credit card debt that was approaching $10,000. (The Philadelphia Inquirer 6/9/99)

Although this is an extreme case, it is not that uncommon. Because it is incredibly easy for students to get credit cards, many students take advantage of free offers and seemingly innocent credit opportunities. Numerous college students face not only a growing debt due to student loans, but also substantial credit card balances when they graduate from school. The effects of credit card debt are apparent while the student is still attending a university. Imagine having to worry about your grades, a part time job, extracurricular activities, and a couple of thousand dollars in credit card debt. In addition to the psychological effects of credit card debt, poor credit decisions can drastically affect a person’s financial future. Paul Richard, Vice President of the National Center for Financial Education in San Diego, said, "Credit based decisions have the potential to make a greater negative impact on a young adult’s financial future than any other investment decision they’ll ever make." Poor credit ratings can lead to difficulty in obtaining things ranging from cell phone service to a car loan. Also, employers are increasingly looking at credit ratings to determine the reliability of a prospective employee.

In the beginning of this academic year, the Undergraduate Student Government (USG) Senate at the University Park campus established many semester goals, one of which was addressing credit card debt among Penn State Students. A special project committee was then formed, and decided to produce a pamphlet outlining the responsible use of credit. The pamphlet would include explanations of how credit cards work, paying the minimum balance, credit ratings, what to do about stolen credit cards, and tips for avoiding credit card debt. The committee also resolved to bring credit counselors to campus in order to offer personal assistance to students with credit troubles.

The committee contacted the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Northeastern Pennsylvania (CCCS), a non-profit, fully accredited, community service organization for help in producing the pamphlet. With its headquarters in Scranton, as well as a local office here in State College, CCCS was eager to help the committee’s efforts. CCCS had previously done a similar project with Bloomsburg University, and using the Bloomsburg University’s pamphlet as a guide, the committee customized a pamphlet for use at Penn State. This pamphlet was entitled, "Credit Cards 101." After a productive meeting with the regional president of CCCS, Mike Elick, it was decided that 10,000 pamphlets would be produced, and CCCS would underwrite the costs.

In conjunction with the pamphlet, the special committee of the USG invited representatives from CCCS to come to campus and run an informational booth on the ground floor of the HUB. Counselors and members of CCCS’ education department were on hand to answer questions about credit and give out the pamphlet on Monday, January 24, 2000.

It is the intention of the committee to continue these educational efforts throughout the rest of this academic year, by the continued distribution of the "Credit Cards 101" pamphlet. In addition, the committee hopes to continue in coming years, programs similar to the event, which took place on January 24th. These can be directed especially to incoming freshmen. It is also hoped that the Council of Student Governments for campus locations other than University Park will encourage comparable efforts to educate their peers.

In closing, a copy of the credit card pamphlet is available in various places on campus such as the high traffic area of the HUB, the bookstore, and the USG office.

SENATE COMMITTEE MEMBERS ON STUDENT LIFE
Wiiam W. Asbury
John Bardi
David Barnes
Dennis D. Calvin
Nicholas Carter
Wayne R. Curtis
Joanna Floros, Chair
Arthur E. Goldschmidt, Jr. Vice Chair
Nichola Gutgold
Quinn Morton
Laura Munro
Jon Olson
Deborah Preston
Joseph Puzycki
Mario Sznaier
Matt Roan, USG Town Senator

SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

University Advising Council Web Site

(Informational)

At the April 22, 1997 University Faculty Senate meeting, the Senate approved our current Advising Policy 32-00 (Appendix G). As part of this new Advising Policy, the University Advising Council was established through the Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education (Policy 32-10 describes this Council membership and duties). Over the last three academic years, the University Advising Council has created various supports to accomplish the nine goals of an effective advising system:

    1. POLICY. An advising policy stating the system’s philosophy and practice and what students can expect from the advising system.
    2. STRUCTURE. An organizational model for the delivery of effective advising.
    3. SUPPORT. Appropriate information, resources, and electronic systems to work effectively with students.
    4. TRAINING. On-going training for all advisers within a comprehensive development program.
    5. DELIVERY. Strategies to accommodate the specific advising needs of the unit’s advisees.
    6. FIRST YEAR STUDENTS. Assurance that all students in their first two semesters of study at the university, including all transfer students, will consult with an academic adviser.
    7. FREQUENCY OF CONSULTATIONS. Workable guidelines concerning
    8. the ratio of advisees to adviser and the frequency with which they should consult.
    9. RECOGNITION AND REWARD. Recognition of the place of advising in
    10. the general rewards structure.
    11. ASSESSMENT. A comprehensive assessment program to measure the effectiveness of the advising system.(Senate Policy 32-20)

      It is an appropriate time for members of the University Advising Council to update the University Faculty Senate on the progress they have made over the last three years. Marilyn Keat, convener of the Council, will provide a brief overview of the resources available at the University Advising Council web site: www.ed.psu/dus/uac.

      SENATE COMMITTEE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION
      Cheryl Achterberg
      James Brasseur
      John J. Cahir
      William J. Campbell
      Joseph J. Cecere
      Paul F. Clark
      Gregory K. Farber
      Erika R. Fullerton
      M. Margaret Galligan
      Andrzej J. Gapinski
      David J. Green
      Catherine Harmonosky
      Lynn Hendrickson
      Gary L. Hile
      William C. Lasher
      Jamie M. Myers, Chair
      Robert D. Ricketts, Vice Chair
      Thomas A. Seybert
      Carol A. Smith
      Jane Sutton
      Eric R. White
      Charles E. Yesalis
      Robert Zelis

      THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

      The University Faculty Senate

      MINUTES OF SENATE COUNCIL

      Tuesday, March 14, 2000------1:30 PM------101 Kern Graduate Building

      MEMBERS PRESENT
      J. W. Bagby
      L. J. Berkowitz
      C. J. Bise
      P. Deines
      R. A. Erickson
      D. S. Gouran
      Z. Irwin
      P. C. Jurs
      L. Kenney
      P. A. Klein
      F. Lukezic
      L. P. Miller
      M. R. Nelson
      P. P. Rebane
      R. D. Richards
      I. Richman
      A. B. Romberger
      A. W. Scaroni
      C. L. Schengrund
      S. R. Smith
      G. J. Bugyi
      B. S. Hockenberry
      V. R. Price
      ACCOUNTED FOR
      M. E. Broyles
      L. A. Carpenter
      A. Chellman
      G. F. De Jong
      A. E. Leure-duPree
      G. B. Spanier
      B. B. Tormey
      GUESTS
      J. Brasseur
      J. Cahir
      C. Eckhardt
      Goldschmidt
      T. Jackson
      M. Keat
      J. Nichols
      J. Romano
      R. Secor
      J. Smith
      J. Weaver
      Chair Nelson called the meeting to order at 1:33 PM on Tuesday, March 14, 2000, in Room 101 Kern Graduate Building.  The minutes of the meeting of February 15, 2000 were approved as distributed on a Jurs/Richman motion. 

      ANNOUNCEMENTS AND REMARKS

      Chair Nelson announced that the Faculty Advisory Committee met this morning. Agenda items discussed were: Update on Searches; Update on Legislative Hearings; the new Druce Commission, which is now the Krebbs Commission; Distance Education Policy Updates; Report on Post-Doctoral Fellows; Professionalization of Intercollegiate Sports; General Education Funding; Policy Questions on the Cancellation of Classes; and finally, Intellectual Property.

      The next meeting of FAC is scheduled for Thursday, April 6. If you have any items you want FAC to address, please contact one of the Senate Officers or one of the three elected FAC members; Peter Deines, Linda Miller or Gordon de Jong.

      The Senate Officers last visit for the spring will be on Tuesday, March 21. That visit will be to the Eberly College of Science.

      We received a memo from President Spanier accepting the legislative report from the Committee on Committees and Rules passed at the February 1, 2000 meeting. It was entitled "Revision of Standing Rules, Article II, Section 6(f). Two memos were appended to the Council Agenda today. The first is a response from Robert Pangborn regarding the Action Item from the last Council meeting entitled "Proposal to Form a Bioengineering Department." The concerns that Council had regarding this proposal have been answered appropriately. The second memo was from Nancy Wyatt, Chair of Committee on Committees and Rules, which was a response to appoint three members of the Outreach Activities Committee to the Council Subcommittee on External Matters. The Committee on Committees and Rules voted against this request.

      Next Dr. Nelson readdressed the FAC item of Intellectual Property. The hope at the FAC meeting was that the report would go to the Libraries, Research and Faculty Affairs committees for their meetings on March 28. Following, would be a Forensic Session on the Senate floor on April 25.

      Chair Nelson also announced that Council will not be meeting in 101 Kern for the April 11 meeting.  The renovations to convert this space into the new Senate Office will start on April 3.  Council will be meeting in the Nittany Lion Inn in a room to be announced.  [The location is Ballroom C, NLI.]

      Provost Erickson announced that since the passage of the Academic Integrity report at the last Senate meeting, he has been working with the Council of Academic Deans regarding its implementation.  The college committees on academic integrity should be in place by the fall.  Dr. Erickson noted that there will be efforts to create equity of this policy across the colleges. 

      Provost Erickson next noted that the recommendation to have all incoming freshmen have their own (or have access to) computer is moving along nicely.  He is working with the Center for Academic Computing on this, and he also met with Terry Peavler, Chair of the Committee on Computing and Information Systems, and the Senate Officers to discuss the intent and application of this report. 

      He also related to Council that in late February he completed his visits to locations other than University Park.  He stated that this was time very well spent and that he learned a lot about the University as a system.  The students were concerned about advising issues and the numbers of part-time faculty.  Provost Erickson noted that he is in the process of appointing a subgroup from CADs that will develop guidelines for part-time faculty. Students were also concerned with curriculum coordination, more student services and parking.  The faculty and the issues they addressed were very positive.  They expressed concerns for the need for resources for new baccalaureate degrees, faculty development, and heavy teaching loads.  A major issue was disciplinary and curricular unity.  The faculty was also concerned with the employment of technology, curricular approvals and salaries. 

      He concluded his remarks by sharing his thoughts concerning the tremendous resources we have in our Advisory Boards at all the campuses and campus colleges.  The several types of resources that these boards bring to the campuses are extremely important and we are thankful for their work. 

      George Bugyi introduced Jim Weaver who is a Councilor at the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student Athletes.  Jim is this year's University Faculty Senate Intern. 

      REPORT OF THE GRADUATE COUNCIL

      Philip Klein attended the February, 2000 Graduate Council meeting and his summary of that meeting is attached to these minutes.

      AGENDA ITEMS FOR MARCH 28, 2000

      Legislative Reports

      Committees and Rules -- "Revision of Bylaws, Article III, Section 5."  Caroline Eckhardt represented CC&R and indicated that this report is intended to fix an anomaly.  At the present time, if a Senator is going to be absent by reason of a leave, he or she must give up his or her seat because of the number of Senate meetings the person will miss.  However, other Senators can miss an indefinite number of meetings and are not required to resign.  With this legislation, if a Senator is going to be absent for professional activities, he or she can choose to either to resign their seat or be replaced by an alternate for the duration of the absence.  Council had no questions concerning this report and a Scaroni/Bagby motion was passed to place this on the Senate Agenda.

      -- "Revision of Constitution, Article I, Section 1."  Dr. Eckhardt continued her remarks by stating that this is a housekeeping report.  The Senate deals with not only Legislative and Advisory/Consultative reports and also Forensic sessions, but also Informational reports and matters of Recognition.  Although we have many Informational reports and also offer courtesy actions (Recognition), the Senate Constitution does not presently list these two reports/actions.  So this report will correct that omission. 

      Dr. Nelson added that since this is a proposed change in the Constitution, this report will be presented at the March 28 Senate meeting but must lay on the table at the Senate until the meeting of April 25, at which point it will be voted on.  This report was accepted on a Richman/Gouran motion without discussion. 

      Advisory/Consultative Reports

      Faculty Affairs -- "Definition of Academic Ranks."  John Nichols presented the report by saying that University Libraries requested that the rank of Affiliate Librarian be dropped and that the rank of Assistant Librarian be redefined.  There were no questions or comments from Council, and a Richman/Bagby motion was passed.

      Research -- "Report of the Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows." Thomas Jackson asked the Council to note that his Research Committee is endorsing the work of the Committee on Postdoctoral Fellows and are recommending that the Vice President for Research be the responsible University officer for postdoctoral oversight. A Richman/Roberts motion put this report on the Agenda.

      Undergraduate Education --  "Toward a More Vibrant Learning Culture at Penn State."  James Brasseur gave the history, vision and focus of the report.  He also laid out the overview of the proposal and the recommendations.  Council discussed the report at length. It was decided by consensus to have the report returned to committee with the expectation that it will come back to Council next month.  Thus, no action was taken on the report. 

      University Planning -- "Parking Report."  Peter Deines had a handout entitled "Transportation Demand Management at Penn State: Parking Aspects" that included the five options that are referred to in this report. He stated that they be integrated into the report.  He also introduced some editorial changes and Council suggested others.  The report was passed for the Senate on a Jurs/Richman motion. 

      Informational Reports

      Committees and Rules --  "Nominating Report -- 2000-2001." Chair Nelson shared with Council that this is a report of the work of CC&R to establish the slates of nominees for election to the Standing Joint Committee on Tenure, the University Promotion and Tenure Review Committee and the Faculty Rights and Responsibilities Committee.  Without discussion, a Jurs/Romberger motion was passed accepting the report.

      Election Commission -- "Roster of Senators by Voting Units - 2000-2001." Professor Nelson also addressed this report and asked the Councilors to check their own voting unit information and if elections have not been held to make efforts to hold them.  This report was passed on a Jurs/Gouran motion. 

      Intercollegiate Athletics -- "Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships of 1998-99."  Chair Nelson asked if there were any questions regarding this report. There were none, and a Smith/Rebane motion put this report on the Senate Agenda.

      Intra-University Relations -- "Non-Tenure-Line Faculty."  James Smith informed Council that this report was started three or four years ago.  There was a concern that there appeared to be a trend of the full-time faculty decreasing while the part-time faculty was increasing.  He also noted that the number of full-time faculty has increased, but to a large extent, that increase was in the non-tenure-line faculty.  Council suggested some additions to the report and passed it on a Jurs/Lukezic motion. 

      Research -- "A Primer on Indirect Costs."  Dr. Jackson stated that this report was developed in the Office of Sponsored Programs in cooperation with the Research Committee. The University has been moving to reduce the indirect cost rate and trying to do a better job of recovering real expenditures. The report was accepted on a Roberts/Jurs motion.

      Senate Council --  "Report of the Nominating Committee for 2000-2001." Leonard Berkowitz asked whether Council had any questions.  There were none, and the report was accepted on a Richman/Romberger motion.

      Student Life --  "Report on Credit Card Overuse."  Arthur Goldschmidt presented the report.  He emphasized the need for the members of the Penn State community to be informed of the pitfalls of overuse of credit cards. Council suggested that the same type of report might be done for all locations of the University and the fact that a student’s name was used in the report should be omitted. This report was accepted on a Rebane/Jurs motion.

      Undergraduate Education -- "University Advising Council Web Site." Marilyn Keat, Convener of the Advising Council, addressed this report. She stated that the University Advising Council has been following closely the 1997 Senate policies on advising and providing information on that policy. This web site is part of that effort. She spoke to the several examples of parts of the web site described in the report. A Jurs/Gouran motion was passed regarding this report.

      Next Professor Nelson asked Council to consider a resolution recognizing John Coyle for his 30 years of service as the NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative. This was done on a Jurs/Romberger motion.

      ACTION ITEMS

      The fist of two action items was the acceptance of the University Faculty Senate Calendar for 2000-2001. Without discussion, the calendar was adopted by consensus.

      The second action item was the election of members of the Committee on Committees and Rules. The Nominating Committee of Council established the slates of nominees. Ballots were distributed and voting took place. The results of the election are as follows: Two-year terms - Leonard Berkowitz, Dwight Davis, Terry Engelder, Sabih Hayek, Dennis Scanlon and for the one-year term - Joseph Cecere.

      ADJOURNMENT

      Senate Chair Nelson thanked the members of Council for their attention to the Agenda and adjourned the meeting at 3:33 PM.

      Respectfully submitted,

      George J. Bugyi

      Executive Secretary

      THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

      The University Faculty Senate

      Birch Cottage

      University Park, PA 16802

      (814) 863-0221 – phone (814) 863-6012 – fax

      Date: March 7, 2000

      To: Members, Senate Council

      From: Philip A. Klein, Senate Council/Graduate Council Liaison

      Re: Graduate Council Meeting of February 16, 2000

      The Graduate Council met on February 16, 2000. In the absence of Eva Pell, the meeting was run by Dr. Lynne Goodstein.

      The status of several searches was given to the Council--Dr. Mary Jane Irwin is heading the committee to find a new Senior Associate Dean for the Graduate School. Dr Ellen Foster-Curtis heads the committee to find a new Associate Dean and CEO at Penn State Great Valley. Dr. Madlyn Hanes is the new Provost and Dean at Penn State Harrisburg.

      Dr. Goodstein reported that the new Teaching Assistant Working Group that she co-chairs continues to meet and is considering ways to implement the Cahir Task Force suggestions for ways to improve the performance of teaching assistants.

      Dr. Goodstein announced that the Department Head/Program Chair meeting has been scheduled for April 5th to consider a variety of critical topics including graduate recruitment and retention, teaching assistant preparation programs, development and mentoring programs for graduate students, etc.

      Dr. Goodstein reminded the Council that the first of the new Graduate Student Convocations will be held Sunday, August 20, 2000.

      Reports of Standing Committees

      Dr. Gary Rogers of the Committee on Academic Standards reported that his committee is considering appropriate restrictions to place on the simultaneous offering of the same course at the 400 and 500 level in the same classroom. The Council discussed appropriate restrictions and ways to enforce them. A general discussion of the appropriate distinctions to maintain between 400 and 500 level courses was held.

      Dr. Carla Mulford reported on the ongoing preparations for the Graduate Exhibition to be held March 22nd-23rd. She indicated that there is still a need for more judges and encouraged the faculty to volunteer.

      Mr. Frank Von Willet reported that the Graduate Student Association is pursuing several concerns in connection with the electronic presentation of theses and dissertations.

      Special Reports

      Dr. Joan M. Lakoski, Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Anesthesia and Chair, Committee on Post Doctoral Fellows, presented some recommendations to the Council.

      She began by noting that the climate for post docs has been influenced by the doubling of the number of post docs both nationally and at Penn State. They are also serving for a longer periods.

      She included seven recommendations for changes in the handling of post docs at Penn State. They included: a specific definition of a post doc; recommend that a letter of appointment be prepared for each post doc which defines conditions of employment, salary, benefits, expectations; establish a minimum salary and benefits package; a web-based handbook for post docs should be prepared; professional development of post doc opportunities at all levels in the University was to be encouraged; both academic and administrative oversight of the programs should be provided through the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education but also through the Provost's Office. Finally, there should be a committee concerned with continuous improvement in the program.

      The meeting was adjourned at 4:48.

      THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY
      INTER-OFFICE CORRESPONDENCE

      Date: March 17, 2000

      From: George J. Bugyi, Executive Secretary

      To: All Senators and Committee Personnel

      Please note the scheduled time and location of your committee. If you are unable to attend, notify the Senate Office prior to Senate Day -- if possible.

      MONDAY, MARCH 27, 20007:00 PM

      Officers' and Chairs' Meeting Board Room I, NLI

      MONDAY, MARCH 27, 20008:00 PM

      Commonwealth Caucus MEETING CANCELLED

      TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 20007:30 AM

      Intercollegiate Athletics205 Shields Building

      8:00 AM

      Outreach Activities502 Keller Building

      Student Life112 Shields Building

      8:30 AM

      Admissions, Records, Scheduling and
      Student Aid203 Shields

      Committees and Rules517 Thomas Building

      Curricular Affairs101 Kern Building

      Intra-University Relations301 Ag. Admin. Bldg.

      Research 114 Kern Building

      Undergraduate EducationNantucket Room, Findley Hall

      University Planning256 Hammond Building

      9:00 AM

      Faculty Affairs404 Old Main

      Libraries E510 Paterno Library

      9:30 AM

      Computing and Information Systems101-A Kern Building

      Faculty BenefitsBirch Cottage

      1:30 PM

      University Faculty Senate112 Kern Graduate Building

      The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, March 28, 2000, in Penn State Room of the Nittany Lion Inn. A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

      The Pennsylvania State University

      The University Faculty Senate

      Birch Cottage (814) 863-0221

      Fax: (814) 863-6012

      Date: March 17, 2000

      To: Commonwealth Caucus Senators (This includes all elected Senators from

      Campuses, Colleges, and Locations Other Than University Park)

      From: Irwin Richman and Sandy Smith

      MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2000 --

      MEETING CANCELLED

      TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2000 -- 11:00 AM --

      PENN STATE ROOM, NITTANY LION INN

      The Caucus will meet at 11:00 AM on Tuesday, March 28, 2000, in the Penn State Room of the NLI. A buffet luncheon will be served at noon.

      The tentative Agenda includes:

      I. Call to Order

      II. Announcements and reports from co-chairs of the caucus
      (Richman & Smith)

      III. Reports of Senate Committees

      IV. Other Items of Concern

      V. Adjournment and Lunch