APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Agricultural Sciences

30-07-001 Change. Name change of major from Agricultural Business Management to Agribusiness Management. Change program description. Reduce minimum number of credits required by 10 credits to 120. Change course abbreviation AG EC to AG BM; add AGBM 102, 106, 302, 308W (new), 320 (new), 338, 408 (new), 440, ECON 002 GS, MATH 140 GQ, SOC 001 GS; remove AG EC 307, 420, 461W, BIOL 110 GN, 011 GN, 012 GN, CHEM 012 GN, 014 GN, CMPSC 101 GQ, ECON 302 GS, 304 GS, 351, MATH 111 GQ. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Agribusiness Management (AG BM)

College of Agricultural Sciences
The Smeal College of Business Administration

PROFESSOR STEPHEN M. SMITH, Program Coordinator

Graduates can be found working in the food production, processing, financial services, wholesaling and retailing industries, both in the United States and abroad. A substantial number are employed by agricultural supply firms. Typically, B.S. degree holders begin their careers in sales or as management trainees, and then progress to management as they develop higher levels of expertise and experience. Not all Penn State Agribusiness Management graduates have chosen careers in the food industry. Many also are employed in banking and the investment and mutual funds industries, and others have gone to law school, graduate school or into rural development. The quality and diversity of the program enables Agribusiness majors to undertake a variety of jobs.

This major, which is offered jointly with The Mary Jean and Frank P. Smeal College of Business Administration, includes a core of courses required of all business administration students. Combining the required specialization area with a minor or electives also allows a student to focus on a particular area of interest.

For the B.S. degree in Agribusiness Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

TO VIEW THE Agribusiness Management Minor (AG BM)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 85 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (63 credits)
ECON 004 GS(3), AG BM 102(3), AG BM 106(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
ACCTG 211(4), AG BM 302(3), AG BM 308W(3), AG BM 320(3), AG BM 338(3), CMPSC 203 GQ(4), M I S 204(2), MS&IS 200(4) (Sem: 3-4)
B A 301(3)[1], B A 302(3)[1], B A 303(3)[1], B A 304(3) (Sem: 5-6)
AG BM 408(3), AG BM 440(3), AG BM 460(3), B A 243(4) (Sem: 5-8)
ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
AG BM 101 GS(3)[1] or ECON 002 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)[77]
R SOC 011 GS(3) or SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)[78]
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in a speciality area, in consultation with an adviser (at least 6 of these credits must be at the 300 or 400 level) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[77] AG BM 101 required unless ECON 002 was taken before entering the AG BM major.
[78] R SOC 011 required unless SOC 001 was taken before entering the AG BM major.

30-07-002 Change. Name change of minor from Agricultural Business Management to Agribusiness Management. Reduce minimum number of credits required by 1 credit to 18 credits. Change course abbreviation from AG EC to AG BM; add AG 301W, AG BM 106, 302, 308, 320 (new), 407, 408 (new), 440, 461W, 495B; remove ACCTG 211, AG EC 306, 490, and R SOC 402 from the program. Change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Agribusiness Management Minor (AG BM)

College of Agricultural Sciences
The Smeal College of Business Administration

PROFESSOR STEPHEN M. SMITH, Program Coordinator

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
AG BM 102(3), AG BM 106(3), AG BM 200(3) (Sem: 2-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from AG 301W(3), AG BM 302(3), AG BM 308(3), AG BM 320(3), AG BM 338(3), AG BM 407(3), AG BM 408(3), AG BM 420(3), AG BM 440(3), AG BM 460(3), AG BM 461W(3), and AG BM 495A(1-3) or AG BM 495B(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

TO VIEW THE Agricultural Business Management Major (AG BM)

COURSE ADDS

30-07-003 AG BM 308
Strategic Decision Making in Agribusiness
AG BUS DEC MAKING (3)
Utilize case studies to investigate strategic decision making among agribusiness firms, highlighting how information and market power shape strategies.
PREREQUISITE: AG BM 101, AG BM 102, AG BM 106
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-004 AG BM 320
Markets and Prices: Analysis and Forecasting
MARKETS AND PRICES (3)
Understand how prices are determined; develop the skill to analyze and forecast how prices change as the underlying conditions change.
PREREQUISITE: AG BM 101, AG BM 102, AG BM 106
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-005 AG BM 408
Financial Decision Making for Agribusiness
FIN DEC FOR AGBUS (3)
Develop financial management and business analysis skills, integrating previous course work and finance training; principles of financial management, planning, control.
PREREQUISITE: AG BM 308, B A 302
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-006 V SC 433
Molecular and Cellular Toxicology
MOLECULAR TOX (3)
In-depth coverage of processes by which drugs/chemicals interact with biological systems and the experimental approaches used to study these interactions.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 401
CROSS LIST: B M B 433
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-007 A S M 207
Turfgrass Irrigation and Drainage
TURF IRRIG/DRAIN (2 credits per half semester)
Turfgrass irrigation especially golf course systems. Sprinkler selection; piping; control systems; pumps; scheduling. Surface and subsurface golf course drainage topics.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 407
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
ADD PREREQUISITE: MATH 021, SOILS 101
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-008 AG EC 101 (GS)
Introduction to Agricultural Economics
INTRO AG ECONOMICS (3)
Application of economic principles to resource allocation problems in the production, marketing, and consumption of food and agricultural products. Students who have passed ECON 002 may not schedule this course.
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE TITLE: Economic Principles of Agribusiness Decision Making (ECON PRIN AGRIBUS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to economic principles and their application to real world examples of agribusiness management issues.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-009 AG EC 102
Introduction to Food and Agricultural Marketing
INTRO AG MKTG (3:3:0)
Comprehensive theoretical and descriptive survey of farm and food products marketing from the perspective of producers, marketing middlemen, and consumers.
APPROVED START: S11981

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE TITLE: Economics of the Food System (ECON FOOD SYSTEM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to topics designed to develop an understanding of how the food production, processing, and marketing system works and evolves.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-010 AG EC 106
Introduction to Farm Management
INTRO FARM MGMT (3:3:0)
Organizing and operating farm businesses for financial success; measuring profits; improving efficiency of labor, land, capital; getting started in farming.
APPROVED START: F21982

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE TITLE: Agribusiness Problem Solving (AGBUS PROB SOLVING)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Development of quantitative problem solving skills applied to specific examples of agribusiness management problems, using EXCEL spreadsheets.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-011 AG EC 302
Food Marketing Field Trip
FOOD MKTG FLD TRIP (1:1:0)
Management of food processing and distribution firms. Two-day tour of food processing, distribution, wholesaling, and retailing establishments.
PREREQUISITE: junior or senior standing.
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE TITLE: Food Product Marketing (FOOD PROD MKTG)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Analysis of economic and psychological determinants of the demand for food; marketing decisions in an increasingly consumer-driven food system.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: AG BM 101, AG BM 102, AG BM 106
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-012 AG EC 338
Food and Agricultural Policy
FOOD AND AG POLICY (3:3:0)
Current policy issues; policy instruments; policy choices; role of participants in the policy process; the foreign dimension and domestic policy.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of general or applied economics
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE TITLE: Agribusiness in the Global Economy (GLOBAL AGRIBUS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Managing agribusinesses in the global food industry, international food product marketing, key public institution and policies affecting food trade.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: AG BM 101, AG BM 102, AG BM 106
PROPOSED START: SP2003
 
OLD
30-07-013 AG EC 407
Farm Planning and Financial Management
FARM PLAN FIN MGMT (3:3:0)
Economic principles applied to the management of farms, with particular emphasis on the financial aspects of management.
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
ADD PREREQUISITE: AG BM 101, AG BM 106
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-014 AG EC 420
Agricultural Prices
AGRICULTURAL PRICE (3:3:0)
Reasons for and consequences of farm price changes, economic instability impact, supply-price relationships, seasonal and cyclical fluctuations, farm price policy.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 302
APPROVED START: SP1985

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-015 AG EC 440
Food Product Innovation Management
INNOVATION MGMT (3)
A problem-based course designed to enhance decision-making skills in the context of industry's approach to developing new food products.
PREREQUISITE: sixth-semester standing in agricultural economics or food science
APPROVED START: S12000

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: AG BM 302 or junior/senior standing in Food Science
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
30-07-016 AG EC 460
Economics of the Food Industry
ECON FOOD INDUSTRY (3:3:0)
Economic analysis of the food industry, food distribution, industrial organization, operational and pricing efficiency, economics of space and time, regulation.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in agricultural economics or economics
APPROVED START: F21982

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
CHANGE TITLE: Managing the Food System (FOOD SYSTEM MGMT)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Firm management in the food system; coordination with suppliers and customers, including supply chain management, strategic thinking, risk management.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: AG BM 320, AG BM 338
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-017 AG EC 461W
Managerial Economics in Agricultural Business Firms
MNGR ECON AG FIRMS (3:3:0)
Economic analysis of management problems encountered in agricultural business firms.
PREREQUISITE: FIN 301, 6 CREDITS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS OR ECONOMICS
APPROVED START: SP1991

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-018 AG EC 495A
Internship in Agribusiness and Rural Development
INTNSHIP AGBUS-RDV (1-6)
Supervised field experience in an agribusiness or rural development setting.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval by department
APPROVED START: SP1991

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-019 AG EC 495B
Internship in International Agribusiness
INTERN INT AGBUS (6)
Supervised field experience related to student's major, minor, or option.
PREREQUISITE: PRIOR APPROVAL BY DEPARTMENT
APPROVED START: S11990

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-020 AG EC 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: AG BM
PROPOSED START: SP2003

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Altoona College

30-07-021 Add new major. New courses COMM 270, 470A, 470B, 470C, 490.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Communications (COMMAL)

The curriculum of this B.A. in Communications provides a general grounding in traditional media forms along with work in the area of media convergence. Students must do coursework at both the practical and theoretical level. On the theory side, coursework will be offered in the areas of media criticism and theory, visual communications, and media history at the introductory and advanced levels. On the applied side, coursework will be offered in video and audio production, news writing and photojournalism, radio and television studio production, and public relations and advertising at the introductory and advanced levels. In the Convergent Media News Service courses, which form the most distinctive component of the program, students will actually produce and deliver a college news service in print, broadcasting (TV and streaming radio), and a multi-media online format. This hands-on experience will provide students an opportunity to create materials suitable for inclusion in a portfolio. Although not required, students will be strongly encouraged to do an internship sometime during their junior or senior years. Finally, the capstone Convergent Media Seminar will bring seniors together to consider the larger, theoretical issues related to the fast-paced changes in communications today and into the future. With a degree in this program, students will be well-positioned to go right into industry, where they will be able to compete in a number of different job markets, or to graduate school for advanced training.

For the BA in Communications, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

TO VIEW THE Communications Minor

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES OR GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 42 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 12 credits)
COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3) (Sem: 1-3)
COMM 260W(3) (Sem: 2-3)
COMM 470(6), COMM 490(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 30 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following, including 6 credits at 400-level: COMM 242(3), COMM 269(3), COMM 270(3), COMM 345(3), COMM 347(3) (Sem: 3-6)
COMM 421W(3), COMM 454(3), COMM 461(3), COMM 467(3), COMM 468(3), COMM 471(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from the following, including 6 credits at 400-level: COMM 180(3), COMM 205 DF(3), COMM 250 GA(3), COMM 261 GH(3), COMM 320(3), COMM 370(3) (Sem: 3-6)
COMM 401(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 408(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 413(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from COMM 470A(3), COMM 470B(3), COMM 470C(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-022 Add new minor.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Communications Minor (not yet assigned)

The Communications minor provides students an academic program of media studies that introduces them to approaches used to understand the mass media. These include aesthetic, cultural, humanistic, social-behavioral, and legal approaches. Students in the minor will have an opportunity to examine the theory and principles of communications systems and processes as well as learn in the advanced courses the research methods used for their systematic analysis. The minor emphasizes the liberal arts core of the Communications program and will equip students with well-developed language and analytical skills.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

TO VIEW THE Communications Major

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
COMM 100 GS(3), COMM 150 GA(3) (Sem: 1-2)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
(At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level.)
COMM 180(3), COMM 205 DF(3), COMM 250 GA(3), COMM 261 GH(3), COMM 320(3), COMM 370(3) (Sem: 3-4)
COMM 401(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 408(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 413(3) (Sem: 5-8)

30-07-023 Add new minor

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Dance Studies Minor

The Dance Studies Minor is designed for students interested in furthering their study and exploration of the many areas of dance; the various techniques--Ballet, Modern, Jazz, the Creative Process and Performance, and Movement Theories. It is also designed to enhance various career opportunities for those majoring in areas such as Integrative Arts, Education, Business, Psychology, and others. Optional directions include areas such as dance therapy and dance medicine with graduate study, or performance, teaching, production, studio or company management, and choreography. Twenty-one credits are required for completion of the minor with a minimum of 7 credits on at the 400 level.

A grade of C or better is required in all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 11 credits)
DANCE 270 GHA(3), DANCE 301(2) (Sem: 2-6)
DANCE 482(3), DANCE 484(3) (Sem: 4-8)
DANCE 432(1), DANCE 442(1), or DANCE 462(1) (Sem: 4-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 10 credits)
DANCE 432(1), DANCE 442(1), or DANCE 462(1) (Sem: 4-8)
Select 6 credits from Dance Technique courses:
DANCE 231(1), DANCE 232(1), DANCE 241(1), DANCE 242(1), DANCE 261GA(1), DANCE 262(1) (Sem: 1-4)
DANCE 331(1), DANCE 332(1), DANCE 341(1), DANCE 342(1), DANCE 361(1), DANCE 362(1) (Sem: 3-6)
DANCE 431(1), DANCE 441(1), DANCE 461(1) (Sem: 4-8)
(All Dance Studies minor students are required to demonstrate proficiency at beginning level technique courses before placement in the intermediate or advanced courses.)
Select 3 credits from Creative Process/Performance courses:
DANCE 280(1), DANCE 296(1-18) (Sem: 1-6)
DANCE 381(1) (Sem: 3-6)
DANCE 485(1) (Sem: 3-8)
DANCE 382(1), DANCE 496(1-18), DANCE 497(1-9) (Sem: 4-8)

COURSE ADDS

30-07-024 COMM 270
Introduction to Multimedia Production
MULTIMEDIA PROD (3)
Introduction to multimedia project activities to explore image editing, layout, the integration of texts and images and web architecture.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-025 COMM 470A
Convergent Media News Service: Newspaper Production
NEWS SERV:NEWSPAPR (3)
Practicum emphasizing newsgathering and reporting for newspaper and for additional media formats.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 260
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-026 COMM 470B
Convergent Media News Service: TV
NEWS SERV: TV (3)
Practicum emphasizing television news package production for periodic campus news program and for additional media formats.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 260
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-027 COMM 470C
Convergent Media News Service: Streaming Radio and Online Publications
NEWS:RADIO/ONLINE (3)
Practicum emphasizing streaming radio news package production or production of news pieces for online publications and for additional media formats.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 260
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-028 COMM 490A
Convergent Media Seminar
CONVERGENT SEMINAR (3)
This seminar examines media convergence issues, trends, and effects on society through discussions, presentations, and creation of a capstone project.
PREREQUISITE: seventh- or eighth-semester standing and 3 credits of COMM 470A, COMM 470B, or COMM 470C
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-029 INART 210
Integrative Approaches to Computer-Aided Music Composition
INT CMPTR MUS COMP (3)
Interdisciplinary introduction to music composition using software to assist with notation; historical perspectives drawn from art, dance, theater, and literature.
PREREQUISITE: MUSIC 008 or instructor permission
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-030 INART 214
Introduction to Web Content and Design
INTRO WEB CONTENT (3)
Introduction to website creation using project activities to explore writing and editing, navigation issues, usability, and overall website architecture.
PROPOSED START: S12002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Arts and Architecture

30-07-031 Change. Drop ART 291 from additional courses.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Art (ARTBA)

PROFESSOR CHARLES GAROIAN, in charge

The B.A. degree in art provides a comprehensive liberal education coupled with professional resident instruction in art. Depending on each student's objectives and course choices, this degree provides preparation for a professional career, a foundation for graduate studies, or a liberal arts education in art. Each student must elect an area of concentration from one of the following: ceramic arts, drawing and painting, graphic design, metals, photography, printmaking, or sculpture.

For a B.A. degree in Art, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

COLLEGE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 48 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
ART 110S(3), ART 111(3), ART 120(3), ART 122W(3) (Sem: 1-2)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)[1]
Select 12 credits from ART 217(3), ART 220(3), ART 223(3), ART 230(3), ART 240(3), ART 250(3), ART 251(3), ART 260(3), ART 270(3), ART 271(3), ART 280(3), or ART 290(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
(Include at least 15 credits[1] at the 400 or equivalent level.)
Select 12 credits from ceramics, drawing and painting, graphic design, metals, photography, printmaking, or sculpture (Sem: 3-8)
Select 12 credits in art history (6 of these credits may also be counted toward the General Education Arts requirement) (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-032 Change. Drop ART 291 from additional courses.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Art (ARBFA)

PROFESSOR CHARLES GAROIAN, in charge

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree requires thorough preparation and is intended to develop a level of competence that will enable persons who wish to pursue professional careers in art to prepare themselves for specialized graduate studies, specialized professional training, and/or immediate participation in creative work.

Students who are enrolled in the B.A. program in art and other students with an art portfolio may apply for entrance into the B.F.A. program no earlier than the second semester and no later than the fourth semester.

There will be a continuous review of portfolio and performance of students enrolled in the B.F.A. program throughout the entire program. Students who do not meet the standards or who do not want to continue in the B.F.A. program may return to the B.A. program in art or choose another program of study.

For the B.F.A. degree in Art, a minimum of 128 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6 of these credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 83 credits
(This includes 6 credits of General Education GA courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 credits)[1]
ART 110S(3), ART 111(3), ART 120(3), ART 122W(3), ART H 111 GA(3), ART H 112 GA(3) (Sem: 1-2)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)[1]
Select 15 credits at the beginning level from ART 217(3), ART 220(3), ART 223(3), ART 230(3), ART 240(3), ART 250(3), ART 251(3), ART 260(3), ART 270(3), ART 271(3), ART 280(3), or ART 290(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (50 credits)
(Include at least 15 credits at the 400 or equivalent level)
Select 44 credits in Art at the 300 or 400 level, 24 of which must be in an area of concentration from the following: ceramics, drawing, graphic design, metals, painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture[1] (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits in art history (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-033 Change. Name change of option from Art Education for Cultural and Social Agencies to Art Education for Museums and Cultural Institutions. Reduce the minimum number of credits required for the Art Education for Museums and Cultural Institutions option by 6 credits to 124 credits and the minimum number of credits required for the Art Education for Schools option by 4 credits to 135 credits. Add new courses A ED 101S, 211, 212, 225, 322, 323, 401, 488, 490; add ANTH 100, PHIL 005, SPLED 400. Change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Art Education (A ED)

PROFESSOR CHARLES GAROIAN, Director

This major offers two options: Art Education for Schools, and Art Education f each option for students is a basic art studio, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics preparation, a variety of observational and participatory experiences in art learning environments, and an extensive pre-practice internship. Upon completion of the option, employment prospects and/or acceptance for advanced graduate studies depends upon individual achievement and qualifications. (See also Teacher Education Programs.)

For the B.S. degree in Art Education with an option in Art Education for Museums and Cultural Institutions, a minimum of 124 credits is required; with an option in Art Education for Schools, a minimum of 135 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12-15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 90-105 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses in the Art Education for Museums and Cultural Institutions option, and 15 credits for the Art Education for Schools option: 6 credits of GA courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3-6 credits of GH courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)[1]
A ED 101S(3), ART H 111 GA(3) (Sem: 1-2)
A ED 201W(3), A ED 211GA(3), A ED 212(1), ART 122W(3), ART H 112GA(3) (Sem: 3-4)
A ED 225 GA;GI(3), A ED 322(3), A ED 401(3), A ED 490(2), PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)[1]
PHIL 005GH(3) or PHIL 109 GH(3) (Sem: 3-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 54-69 credits

ART EDUCATION FOR MUSEUMS AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS OPTION: 54-55 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (19-21 credits)[1]
A ED 440(3), A ED 488(1-3), A ED 495(15) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)[1]
Select 6 credits from ART 110S(3), ART 111(3), ART 120(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits in ART H from department list or ANTH 380(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24-27 credits)
Select 18 credits from one of the following emphases a, b, c, d, e, or f (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)
a. Studio Emphasis: Select 3 credits from ART 110S(3), ART 111(3), ART 120(3); Select 15 credits in ART with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-6)
b. Art History with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
c. Human Development and Family Studies with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
d. Women's Studies with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
e. American Studies with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
f. Individualized cluster of courses approved in advance by the Art Education Program, including at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6-9 credits from non-art education courses (Sem: 3-8)

ART EDUCATION FOR SCHOOLS OPTION: 69 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (36 credits)[1]
ART 110S(3), ART 111(3), ART 120(3), EDPSY 014(3) (Sem: 1-4)
A ED 323(3), SPLED 400(3) (Sem: 3-6)
A ED 489(3) (Sem: 7-8)
C I 495D(7), C I 495E(8) (Sem: 9)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)[1]
Select 3 literature credits in ENG (GH) or CMLIT (GH) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits from ART at the 300 level (Sem: 3-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from one of the following emphases a, b, c, d, e, or f (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)
a. Studio Emphasis with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
b. Art History with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
c. Human Development and Family Studies with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
d. Women's Studies with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
e. American Studies with at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
f. Individualized cluster of courses approved in advance by the Art Education Program, including at least 6 credits at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-034 Change. Name change of major from Graphic Design and Photography to Graphic Design. Change program description. Drop Graphic Design Option and Photography Option. Remove ART 291 (drop), 391, 393 (drop), 491 (drop), 494 from the program. Change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Graphic Design (GD)

PROFESSOR CHARLES R. GAROIAN, Director, School of Visual Arts

This major is intended to prepare students for careers in graphic design. The program includes the technical skills and the creative and intellectual disciplines essential to the practices of graphic design.

The Graphic Design option helps prepare students for employment in design studios, in advertising agencies, for publications, for film and television graphics, and as corporate designers.

For the B.S. degree in Graphic Design, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 81-95 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GA courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (57-59 credits)
ART 110S(3)[1], ART 111(3)[1], ART 120 (3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ART 122W(3)[1], ART H 111 GA(3), ART H 112 GA(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ART 270(3)[1], ART 271(3)[1], ART 290(3)[1], B A 250(3), COMM 100 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ART 370(4), ART 371(4) (Sem: 5-6)
ART 474(4) (Sem: 5-8)
ART 470(4), ART 471(4), ART 495(4-6) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 6 credits from ART H 202 GA(3), ART H 305 GA(3), ART H 307 GA(3), ART H 325 GA(3), ART H 405(3-6), ART H 415(3), ART H 435(3-6), ART H 450(3), ART H 470(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from ENGL 202B GWS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 8 credits from ART 300(1-4), ART 372(3), ART 376(3), ART 473(3), ART 475(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 4 credits from ART 390(4), ART 392(4) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-035 Change Landscape Architecture program. Reduce minimum number of credits required by 5 credits from 156 credts to 151 credits; move BIOL 220W, GEOG 102, 115 from Prescribed to Addtional Courses; add AM ST 100 GH, ENGL 180 GH, EARTH 103 GN, ENT 202 GN, E R M 210 GN, GEOSC 010 GN, 020 GN, HIST 021W GH, PHIL 013 GH, 109 GH. Change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Landscape Architecture (LARCH)

PROFESSOR BRIAN ORLAND, Head of the Department

Landscape architecture is the art of design, planning, or management of the land and of the natural and man-made elements upon it. As an academic discipline, it embodies creative, cultural, philosophical, and scientific knowledge bases. As a professional discipline, the practice of landscape architecture includes site design, urban design, master planning, community planning, regional planning, resource conservation, and stewardship.

For those selected to major in this field, the program is a five-year curriculum leading to a professionally accredited Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree. A minor is strongly encouraged. One semester of the curriculum is spent in a required semester abroad. The program helps prepare graduates for either advanced study or professional careers. The curriculum develops both the creative disciplines and the technical skills essential to practice, as well as to the pursuit of interests in related fields. With appropriate work experience with a registered practitioner, graduates are eligible to take the state licensing examination.

For the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree, a minimum of 151 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 17-20 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 104-107 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GA courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (83-85 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), GEOG 010 GN(3), LARCH 060 GA(3)[1], LARCH 100S(1)[1], LARCH 136(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ARCH 210 GA(3), LARCH 127(3)[1], LARCH 325(3)[1], LARCH 325A(1)[1], LARCH 327(3)[1], LARCH 327A(1)[1], LARCH 336(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
HORT 137(2-3), LARCH 425(3)[1], LARCH 425A(1)[1], LARCH 427(3)[1], LARCH 427A(1)[1], LARCH 435(3)[1], LARCH 437(3)[1], LARCH 444(1)[1], LARCH 457(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
HORT 138(2-3), LARCH 445(4)[1], LARCH 445A(1)[1], LARCH 460W(3)[1], LARCH 499A GI(1)[1], LARCH 499B GI(4)[1], LARCH 499C GI(3)[1], LARCH 499D GI(4)[1] (Sem: 7-8)
LARCH 451(4)[1], LARCH 451A(1)[1], LARCH 453(4)[1], LARCH 453A(1)[1] (Sem: 9-10)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-16 credits)
MATH 026 GQ(3) or higher (except MATH 035) (Sem: 1-2)
ART 010 GA(3) or ART 020 GA(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ART H 201 GA(3), ART H 202 GA(3), ART H 405(3-6), ART H 412(3), ART H 415(3), ART H 420(3), ART H 456(3), ART H 458(3), ART H 497(1-9) (if topic is architectural history), or ARCH 315 GA(3), ARCH 316 GA(3) (Sem: 9-10)
BIOL 220W GN(4), EARTH 103 GN(3), ENT 202 GN(3), E R M 210 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3), GEOSC 010 GN(3) or GEOSC 020 GN(3) (Sem: 1-10)
AM ST 100 GH(3), ENGL 180 GH(3), GEOG 102 GH(3), HIST 021W GH(3), PHIL 013 GH(3) or PHIL 109 GH(3) (Sem: 1-10)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 3 credits in art history (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits in humanities (Sem: 9-10)

30-07-035A Change Integrated BLA-MLA program. Remove BIOL 220W, GEOG 102, 115.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Integrated BLA-MLA Program

The Department of Landscape Architecture offers an integrated BLA-MLA program that is appropriate to those students who already hold a baccalaureate degree and wish to receive an accredited professional undergraduate degree and a post-professional graduate degree focused on advanced critical inquiry. Returning adult students interested in this Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree program will come from a wide array of backgrounds.

The curriculum takes advantage of several efficiencies provided through the IUG program at Penn State. It requires four years of course work, with the first six semesters (3 years) in the BLA, and the seventh and eighth semester (4 years) in the MLA. In effect, the sixth semester serves as an overlap semester offering the content of MLA-level work within the course structure of the BLA. Details of the recommended course sequence are provided in the BLA-MLA Student Handbook available through the department.

It is the expectation of the BLA-MLA program that many or all of the general education requirements currently stipulated by the University will have been met during the applicant's prior undergraduate work. Each applicant's academic record will be carefully reviewed to ensure that it achieves a high degree of equivalency with current Penn State general education criteria. Once this process is successfully completed, incoming BLA-MLA students will already have achieved an undergraduate major, and they will be released from the department requirement of 18 credits of free electives required of regular BLA students. The IUG program format identifies 12 credits required for the MLA to be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. In addition to regular BLA and MLA courses, core courses specifically required of BLA-MLA students include LARCH 400, LARCH 400A, LARCH 455, and LARCH 501. Other non-LARCH courses required by the major include ARCH 210, 3 credits in ART H, BIOL 110, HORT 137, and HORT 138. A faculty BLA-MLA adviser will be assigned to all BLA-MLA students to facilitate application and course selection procedures.

To be admitted to the BLA/MLA program, applicants must be able to meet the following requirements:

-- Must have completed a bachelor's degree from any discipline prior to entry into the BLA-MLA program.
-- Must submit evidence of creativity (portfolio or other), evidence of analytical ability (research paper or other), and an essay explaining why the individual seeks to study landscape architecture at Penn State.
-- Must submit an IUG program application.
-- Must submit items normally required prior to entry in the BLA and MLA programs, including a full undergraduate transcript, both an undergraduate and graduate school application, GRE scores, 3 letters of recommendation and, if applicable, TOEFL scores (minimum score of 600 is required). Applicants to the BLA-MLA program must submit the undergraduate application by December 31 and the graduate application by January 15.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-036 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.A. in Music - M.A. in Music Theory

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.A. in Music and the Master of Arts in Music Theory in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years. In particular, the program encourages the student to integrate the undergraduate thesis with the master's thesis thereby achieving a greater depth of inquiry.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

BA Senior Project (Music 476W) / MA Thesis (Music 600)
Students will be encouraged to select a B.A. Senior Project topic (Music 476W) that will later develop into the M.A. Thesis. It is expected that the Master's Thesis consist of greater depth and specialization than the Senior Project.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-037 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.M. in Music Performance - M.A. in Music Theory

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.M. in Performance and the Master of Arts in Theory in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate - Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-038 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.A. in Music - M.A. in Music Theory and History

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B. A. in Music and the Master of Arts in Music Theory and History in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years. In particular, the program encourages the student to integrate the undergraduate thesis with the master's thesis thereby achieving a greater depth of inquiry.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

B.A. Senior Project (Music 476W) / M.A. Thesis (Music 600)
Students will be encouraged to select a B.A. Senior Project topic (Music 476W) that will later develop into the M.A.Thesis. It is expected that the Master's Thesis consist of greater depth and specialization than the Senior Project.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-039 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.M. in Performance - M.A. in Music Theory and History

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.M. in Performance and the Master of Arts in Music Theory and History in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate - Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-040 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.A. in Music - M.A. in Musicology

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the BA in Music and the Master of Arts in Musicology in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years. In particular, the program encourages the student to integrate the undergraduate thesis with the master's thesis thereby achieving a greater depth of inquiry.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

BA Senior Project (Music 476W) / MA Thesis (Music 600)
Students will be encouraged to select a BA Senior Project topic (Music 476W) that will later develop into the MA Thesis. It is expected that the Master's Thesis consist of greater depth and specialization than the Senior Project.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-041 Add new integrated u.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.M. in Performance - M.A. in Musicology

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.M. in Performance and the Master of Arts in Musicology in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

COURSE ADDS

30-07-042 A ED 101S
Introduction to Art Education
INTRO TO ART ED (3)
This course introduces students to issues, concepts, and ideas in Art Education.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-042A A ED 211 (GA)
Interpreting Art Experience: Social and Behavioral Perspectives
INTERPRET ART EXP (3)
Examination of psychological, cultural, aesthetic, philosophical and educational perspectives on creation and response to art in children, adolescents, and adults.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-043 A ED 212
Interpreting Art Experience: Educational Implications
ART EXP & ED IMPL (1)
In-depth study of the educational implications of the information on art making and response introduced in A ED 211.
PREREQUISITE: A ED 101S, A ED 201W
CONCURRENT: A ED 211
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-043A A ED 225 (GA;GI)
Diversity, Pedagogy, and Visual Culture
DIVERSITY/VIS CULT (3)
Issues of diversity in art, education, visual culture, and pedagogy.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-044 A ED 322
Visual Culture and Instructional Technology
VISCULT/INSTR TECH (3)
An introduction to the world(s) of art as explored and revealed through the medium of technology. Art Education majors only.
PREREQUISITE: A ED 101S, A ED 201W, ART 110, ART 111
CONCURRENT: A ED 323
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-045 A ED 323
Visual Culture and Art Education
VISCULT/ART EDUC (3)
Inquiry into museum/visual culture and its texts, theories, and issues that provide a basis for K-12 art education. Art Education majors only.
PREREQUISITE: A ED 101S, A ED 201W, ART 110, ART 111
CONCURRENT: A ED 322
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-046 A ED 401
Curricula, Pedagogy, and Assessment in Art Education
CURICULA IN ART ED (3)
Preparation of curricula, pedagogical, and assessment strategies for elementary/secondary school and museum art education programs.
PREREQUISITE: A ED 101S, A ED 201W, A ED 211, A ED 212, A ED 225, A ED 322, A ED 323
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-047 A ED 488
Cultural Institutions Practicum
CUL INSTITUTN PRAC (1-3)
Supervised field experience in a museum or other cultural institution, including planning, implementation, and evaluation of an educational project.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 100 or 3 credits of art history courses from department list; A ED 401
CONCURRENT: A ED 490
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-048 A ED 490
Capstone Course in Art Education
CAPSTONE ART EDUC (2)
Synthesis of pre-service art education coursework; introduction to professional practices and standards; completion of teaching and learning portfolio.
PREREQUISITE: admission to Teacher Preparation Program and successful completion of all required courses in the major except Student Teaching or final internship. Prerequisite or concurrent: A ED 488 for majors in the Museums and Cultural Institutions option
CONCURRENT: A ED 489 majors in the Schools option
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-048A ART 090 (GA)
Introduction to Photography
INTRO PHOTO (3)
An introduction to the aesthetics, history, and science of photography including practical and critical approaches to the art of photography.
CROSS LIST: INART 090
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-049 ART 490
View Camera Photography
VIEW CAMERA PHOTO (4)
Experience with diverse camera formats and applications; particular emphasis on view camera.
PREREQUISITE: ART 390
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-049A INART 090 (GA)
Introduction to Photography
INTRO PHOTO (3)
An introduction to the aesthetics, history, and science of photography including practical and critical approaches to the art of photography.
CROSS LIST: ART 090
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-050 A ED 440
Arts Institutions
ARTS INSTITUTIONS (3:3:0)
Survey of arts institutions, including professional associations, cultural delivery systems, governmental programs, the arts media, arts programs in community organizations.
PREREQUISITE: A ED 222, A ED 237
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE:  Cultural Institutions (CULTURAL INSTITUTN)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Role of the educator and educational programming in museums and other cultural institutions.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ANTH 100 or 3 credits of Art History courses from department list; A ED 401
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-051 A ED 489
Art Experiences with Children
ART EXPERIENCES (3)
Supervised observation, unit planning, and teaching in Saturday Morning Arts School: analysis of creative expressions and art programs for learners.
PREREQUISITE: A ED 350, A ED 351W, A ED 352, A ED 353, A ED 354
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE TITLE:  Advanced Practicum (ADV PRACTICUM)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: A ED 401
ADD CONCURRENT: A ED 490
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-052 ART 290
Beginning Photography
BEGIN PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
Fundamental black-white techniques. Introduction to inherent qualities of photographic vision through study of historic/contemporary photography. Camera, light meter required.
APPROVED START: SP2000

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Fundamental techniques and approaches to the art of photography utilizing digital photographic technologies; digital cameral required.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-053 ART 390
View Camera Photography
VIEW CAMERA PHOTO (4:3:5)
Experience with diverse camera formats and applications. Particular emphasis on view camera work and its philosophical implications.
PREREQUISITE: ART 291
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE TITLE:  Introduction to Photochemical Photography (INTRO CHEM PHOTO)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ART 110S, ART 111, ART 120, ART 290, and successful portfolio review
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the fundamentals of black and white photochemical photography.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-054 ART 391
Small-Format Photography
SMALL FORMAT PHOTO (4:3:5)
Focus in development of a photographic project leading to a finished hand-made book.
PREREQUISITE: ART 291
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE:  Photographic Books (PHOTO BOOKS)
CHANGE CREDITS: 4 per semester/maximum of 8
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ART 390
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-055 ART 392
Digital Photography in the Studio
DGITAL PHOTO/STDIO (4:2:6 per semester, maximum of 8)
Concepts and technology of the digital photography studio; large format digital cameras, electronic studio lighting and digital printing.
PREREQUISITE: ART 191 or ART 290
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 4
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ART 110S, ART 111, ART 120, ART 290, and successful portfolio review
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-056 ART 492
Creative Projects in Photography
CREATIV PROJ-PHOTO (4:3:5 per semester/maximum of 12)
Special individual problems related to photographic vision.
PREREQUISITE: ART 390, ART 391
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 4 per semester/maximum of 8
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ART 391, ART 392
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-057 ART 494
Photo Assemblage
PHOTO ASSEMBLAGE (4:3:5 per semester/maximum of 8)
Collage making through collecting and assembling found materials, including photography; origins of photographic manipulation and contemporary uses.
PREREQUISITE: ART 291
APPROVED START: FA1995

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 4
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ART 390
PROPOSED START: SP2003

COURSE DROPS

30-07-058 A ED 238
Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Art Education
PSY & SOC FOUND (2:2:1)
Introduction to art education, including children's psychological and sociological artistic development; observation of learners.
PREREQUISITE: second-semester standing; 12 credits in any combination of art, art education, education, or art history
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-059 A ED 350
Teaching Aesthetics in Schools
AESTHETICS IN SCH (3)
Methods of teaching content from aesthetics in elementary, middle, and senior high school art programs.
CONCURRENT: A ED 351W, A ED 352, A ED 353, A ED 354
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-060 A ED 351W
Teaching Art Criticism in Schools
ART CRIT IN SCH (3)
Application of critical methods and models to the interpretation and judgment of works of art in school art programs.
CONCURRENT: A ED 350, A ED 352, A ED 353, A ED 354
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-061 A ED 352
Teaching Art History in Schools
ART HIST IN SCH (3)
Application of art historical content and inquiry processes in the elementary and secondary schools.
CONCURRENT: A ED 350, A ED 351W, A ED 353, A ED 354
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-062 A ED 353
Studio Practices in the Schools
STUDIO PRACT (3)
The planning of the studio component of art instruction in the elementary and secondary schools.
CONCURRENT: A ED 350, A ED 351W, A ED 352, A ED 354
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-063 ART 190 (GA)
Photography Appreciation
PHOTO APPREC (3:2:2)
The aesthetics of photography, an emphasis on 20th century photographic vision and applications. Camera required, including slide film developed commercially.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-064 ART 191
Beginning Digital Photography
BEGIN DGITAL PHOTO (3:2:4)
Fundamental digital photography techniques; introduction to inherent qualities of digital photographic vision.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-065 ART 291
Photography II
PHOTOGRAPHY II (3:2:4)
Advanced mechanical and photochemical controls related to film and photographic prints; study of historic and contemporary photographers. Camera, light meter required.
PREREQUISITE: ART 290
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-066 ART 393
Color Photography
COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (4:3:5)
Theoretical and practical study of color photographic systems; applying technical knowledge creatively through photographing and printing.
PREREQUISITE: ART 291
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-067 ART 394A
Digital Photography Application
DIGITAL PHOTO APPL (4:2:6 per semester maximum of 8)
Introduction to digital photographic applications for silver halide and digital photography processes; includes Adobe PhotoShop, digital printing, and presentation techniques.
PREREQUISITE: ART 191 or ART 290
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-068 ART 491
Digital Photography in the Field
DIGITAL PHOTO/FLD (4:2:6 per semester/maximum of 8)
The use of professional portable digital cameras; special projects related to digital photographic vision and processes on location.
PREREQUISITE: ART 191 or ART 290
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-069 ART 493
Photography: Portfolio Preparation
PHOTO PORTFOLIO (1:0:2)
The techniques of photographic portfolio preparation: print finishing, editing, and mounting/matting of work.
PREREQUISITE: ART 492
PROPOSED START: S12002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Behrend College

30-07-070 Change. Add EETBS 275, EE T 220, PHYS 150GN, 151GN; remove PHYS 215GN, 265GN. Change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Electrical Engineering Technology (EETBD)

This major helps prepare graduates for careers in such varied areas as electronics, microprocessors, communications, instrumentation and control, and power. The curriculum provides thorough training in applied mathematics, physics, electrical and electronic circuit analysis and design, microprocessors, instrumentation and control theory, communication systems, power systems, and quality control. Graduates may qualify as engineering technologists working side-by-side with engineers, scientists, and other skilled workers in these capacities. Positions include electrical and electronic systems design, microprocessor applications, instrumentation and control, electrical testing, plant engineering, quality control, management, and technical sales and service. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

This program is primarily for graduates of a TAC of ABET-accredited electrical engineering technology associate degree program who want to obtain a baccalaureate degree.

For the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 130 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 105 credits
(This includes 23 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses; and 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (77 credits)
E T 002(1), E T 005(1), EE T 101(3), EE T 109(1), EE T 114(4)[1], EE T 117(3)[1], EE T 118(1)[1], EE T 120(1), EG T 101(1), EG T 102(1), PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
EE T 205(1), EE T 210(2), EE T 211(3), EE T 213W(5), EE T 216(3), EE T 221(1), PHYS 151 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), SPCOM 100 GWS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
EETBD 301(3), EETBD 330(3), EETBD 341(3), EETBD 415(3), EETBD 455(3), MTHBD 210(4), MTHBD 211(4) (Sem: 5-6)
EETBD 416(3), EETBD 440(3), EETBD 480(1), EETBD 490W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
ECON 002 GS(3) or ECON 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-8)
MATH 081 GQ(3), MATH 082 GQ(3), and MATH 083 GQ(4); or
MTHBD 091 GQ(5) and MTHBD 092 GQ(5) (Sem: 1-4)
EETBD 450(3) or Q C 450(3) (Sem: 5-8)
EETBD 275(3) or EE T 220(2) and 1 credit in 200 level or higher of technical electives from school-approved list (Sem: 4-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of technical electives at the 300 or 400 level from school-approved list (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-071 Change. Add new course METBD 307 and remove METBD 306.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Plastics Engineering Technology (PLTBD)

This major is a TAC of ABET-accredited program that may be taken either as a four-year baccalaureate program or in a "2+2" degree format. The latter allows graduates of associate degree programs in plastics engineering technology or related areas to gain greater breadth and depth of knowledge in plastics engineering technology.

Students receive extensive "hands-on" experience in the college's state-of-the-art processing laboratory, where they learn the fundamentals of operating equipment used in the plastics industry and gain an understanding of how the various mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical systems of processing machinery interact to form a plastic product. The curriculum encompasses all of the major processing methods but emphasizes injection molding. Students are encouraged to do original research and to publish in the areas of plastics processing, part design, and mold design. The curriculum includes applied mathematics, physics, inorganic and polymer chemistry, fundamental and advanced topics dealing with chemical and physical properties of plastics materials and their processing characteristics, and an in-depth look at part and mold design utilizing computer-aided technology. Quality control and technical communications are also included. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Graduates are qualified for positions in plastics processing, part design, tooling design, plant engineering, production control, and technical sales in the plastics industry.

For the B.S. degree in Plastics Engineering Technology, a minimum of 133 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(16 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 103 credits
(This includes 16 credits of General Education courses: 7 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (87 credits)
PL ET 050(3), METBD 110(3), METBD 111(3), IE T 101(3)[1], MCH T 111(3)[1], PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), MCH T 213(3)[1], PL ET 205(3)[1], PL ET 206(3)[1], PL ET 217(3)[1], PL ET 234(4)[1], PL ET 270(3)[1], Q C 200(2)[1](Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CHMBD 202(3), METBD 307(3), METBD 317(3), MTHBD 210(4), MTHBD 211(4), PL ET 340(3), PL ET 350(4), PL ET 366(4), PL ET 370(3) (Sem: 5-6)
PL ET 494A(3) (Sem: 5-8)
PL ET 400W(3), PL ET 440(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
MATH 081 GQ(3)[1], MATH 082 GQ (3)[1], MATH 083 GQ(4)[1]; or MTHBD 091 GQ(5)[1], MTHBD 092 GQ(5)[1] (Sem, 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of technical electives from School-approved list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44

COURSE ADDS

30-07-072 METBD 307
Computer-Aided Design
CAD (3:2:3)
Computer-aided drafting and design; computer software solutions to plastics engineering technology design problems.
PREREQUISITE: METBD 111; METBD 050 or PL ET 050
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-073 COMMU 402 (DF)
Intercultural Communication
INTRCULTURAL COMM (3)
Analysis of communication processes as affected by national cultures; effects of differences in language, values, meaning, perception, and thought.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100, fifth-semester standing
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-073A INTST 100 (GS;DF)
Introduction to International Studies
INTRO INT’L STDIES (3:3:0)
An introductory multidisciplinary course designed to familiarize students with critical international issues.
APPROVED START: FA1994

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
RECERTIFY INTERCULTUAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-074 METBD 306
Computer-Aided Design
CAD (3:2:3)
Computer-aided drafting and design. Microcomputer and mainframe software solutions to engineering design problems.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101, CMPSC 201C, CMPSC 201F, or METBD 050; EG T 201 or METBD 111
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Computer-aided drafting and design; computer software solutions to mechanical engineering technology design problems.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-075 PL ET 350
Design of Plastic Parts
DESIGN PLAS PART (4:3:3)
Designing plastic parts utilizing CAD, FEA, and CAE technologies for the design and for structural, dimensional, and process evaluation and optimization.
PREREQUISITE: MCH T 213, METBD 306, PL ET 340
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: METBD 317
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MCH T 213, METBD 307, PL ET 340
PROPOSED START: SP2003

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
The Smeal College of Business Administration

COURSE ADDS

30-07-076 MKTG 416
Electronic Marketing
E-MARKETING (3)
Examination of e-marketing from business strategy perspective.
PREREQUISITE: MKTG 330, MKTG 342
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-077 INFSY 431
WEB Technologies
WEB TECHNOLOGIES (3)
Fundamentals of WEB development for e-business and related project management.
PREREQUISITE: INFSY 307, INFSY 390, or permission of the program
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-078 CAP 120S
First-Year Seminar for Business
F Y S/CAP/BUS (1)
Introduction to the discipline including: ethics, research methods, communications, career opportunities/issues and applied technology.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: CAP 100S
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION:  Introduction to Penn State culture, information literacy and collaboration skills, and introduction to majors and careers relevant to the discipline.
DROP PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-079 CAP 150S
First-Year Seminar for Capital College, The School of Public Affairs
F Y S/CAP/PUB (1)
Introduction to the discipline including: ethics, research methods, communications, career opportunities/issues and applied technology.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT:CAP 100S
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Penn State culture, information literacy and collaboration skills, and introduction to majors and careers relevant to the discipline.
DROP PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT
PROPOSED START: SP2003

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Communications

30-07-080 Change. Revise program description. Reduce minimum number of credits required by 11 credits to 120 credits. Add COMM 370, 418, 420, 425, 462, 464, 468, 496, 499; remove COMM 404, 405, 407, 413, SOC 001 GS Adjust credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Advertising-Public Relations (AD PR)

ROBERT A. BAUKUS, Head, Department of Advertising-Public Relations

This major is designed to provide a balance of theory, research, and practice. The course sequence provides professional skills courses in conjunction with applied theory and critical evaluative courses. Students develop an understanding of the role and effect of advertising and public relations within the business, social, and political arenas. Students develop abilities and skills that prepare them for a wide range of professional opportunities that include: media planning and relations, research, client services. Analytical abilities are equally stressed throughout the curriculum. Critical thinking skills, creative problem-solving and the need to justify decisions are developed. Theory and practice from a wide range of disciplines including business, behavioral sciences, and applied statistics are used to equip the students to make informed decisions in a dynamic environment.

ADVERTISING OPTION: All courses in the advertising major emphasize the critical importance of integrated communication. The objective of the curriculum is to prepare students for entry-level opportunities in the advertising profession and to prepare for eventual managerial roles where an understanding of integrated communication concepts is essential.

The program reflects an integrated marketing communications approach to the design implementation and evaluation of advertising messages. In addition to mastering the core professional courses, students are expected to have an understanding of the convergence of mass communication theory and practice and are encouraged to select from courses in communication theory, communication law, mass media history, ethics, and the impact of advertising and public relations on society.

PUBLIC RELATIONS OPTION: The public relations curriculum prepares students for the challenges of public relations practice in a highly competitive, technological, multicultural, and global environment. In their course of student, students study the role and function of public relations in building cooperative mutually beneficial relations between organizations and their constituent publics through understanding, credibility, and trust.

Students complete a core set of courses that includes news writing, introduction to public relations, public relations methods, mass communication research, and public relations problems (campaigns).

Because of the critical importance of journalistic writing skills and an understanding of news media ethics, public relations majors are encouraged to take additional journalism courses to fulfill their communication electives.

Advertising and public relations students are encouraged to choose a minor from outside the College of Communications. The majority of majors select minors in business, English, sociology, psychology, political science, information systems and statistical analysis, foreign language, and speech communication.

For the B.A. degree in Advertising-Public Relations, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 27 credits

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS: 10 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GS courses; 4 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 16 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
COMM 420(3), ECON 002 GS(3), PSY 002 GS(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of COMM courses (other than COMM 100 GS or 120) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 18 credits

ADVERTISING OPTION: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
COMM 320(3) (Sem: 3-6)
COMM 421W(3), COMM 422(3) (Sem: 5-6)
COMM 424(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from COMM 370(3), COMM 410(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 417(3), COMM 418(3), COMM 425(3), COMM 468(3), COMM 496, COMM 499 (Sem: 5-8)

PUBLIC RELATIONS OPTION: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
COMM 260W(3) (Sem: 3-4)
COMM 370(3) (Sem: 5-6)
COMM 471(3) (Sem: 5-8)
COMM 473(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from COMM 320(3), COMM 401(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 418(3), COMM 462(3), COMM 464(3), COMM 468(3) or COMM 496(3), COMM 499 (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

30-07-081 Change. Drop GEOSC 418 from additional courses.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Environmental Systems Engineering (ENVSE)

PROFESSOR MARK S. KLIMA, Undergraduate Program Officer

Environmental Systems Engineering is an interdisciplinary program concerned with the sources and causes of industrial impact on the environment and the choice of appropriate remediation strategies. The program is designed to address critical environmental problems of the basic industries, especially those involved in the extraction, conversion, and utilization of mineral resources. The undergraduate curriculum in environmental systems engineering has been designed to equip students with the fundamentals necessary to achieve lifelong professional growth. Graduates are prepared to enter both the private and public sectors as environmental systems engineers or to pursue further education at the graduate level.

Integration of knowledge and skills acquired during the course of study enables the students/graduates of the program to do the following: solve environmental systems engineering problems using knowledge of mathematics, basic and engineering sciences, earth and atmospheric sciences, and economics; obtain technical data, interpret them, and apply the results to design environmental engineering systems; integrate professional, ethical, social, and economic issues as they pertain to industrial activity and environmental protection; communicate engineering results effectively and provide experience in team efforts; and undertake a habit of lifelong learning to maintain professional competency and up-to-date knowledge of contemporary issues facing the practice of engineering.

For the B.S. degree in Environmental Systems Engineering, a minimum of 130 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 112-113 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (86 credits)
EM SC 100S GWS(3)[71] (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 013 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), CHEM 034(3), E MCH 011(3), E MCH 012(3), GEOG 030 GS(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), MATH 251(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), MICRB 106(3) (Sem: 1-4)
C E 370(3)[1], EGEE 301(5), GEOSC 071(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3)[1], F SC 430(3), GEOSC 452(3), MNG 401(1), MN PR 301(3)[1], P N G 411(1) (Sem: 5-6)
ECEEM 484W(3), GEOEE 402(1), GEOEE 404(2), GEOEE 406(3), GEOEE 412(1), GEOEE 427(3)[1], GEOEE 480(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (17-18 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3), CMPSC 201F GQ(3), or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2) or MATH 231(2) (Sem: 3-4)
GEOSC 413W(3), SOILS 401(3), or METEO 455(3) (Sem: 6-8)
METEO 454(3), MN PR 401(3), or MN PR 426(3) (Sem: 7-8)
GEOEE 408(3), M E 470(3), or MN PR 425(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply up to 6 credits of ROTC.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

30-07-082 Change. Add GEOSC 021, EM SC 470W; remove GEOSC 002 GN, 004. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Geosciences Minor (GEOSC)

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

PROFESSOR TANYA FURMAN, Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs

The Geosciences minor provides a foundation in the physical and material aspects of the solid Earth, as well as an introduction to field techniques and technical writing. Advanced coursework should reflect the studentsí individual interests. Areas of focus include, but are not limited to: earth materials, evolution of the Earth and life, hydrogeology, environmental geology, natural hazards, plate tectonics, geophysics, climate change. The minor consists of 18 credits of coursework, some of which are filled through specific courses as indicated below.

A grade of C or better is required in each course in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (7 credits)
GEOSC 021 GN(3) (Sem: 1-6)
GEOSC 201(4) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 3 credits from GEOSC 001(3), GEOSC 020 GN(3), or GEOSC 071(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOSC 470W(3), EM SC 470W(3-6) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (5 credits)
Select 5 credits from a number of courses covering a variety of disciplines and fields of interest. Consult with your adviser. At least 3 credits in this category must be taken at the 400 level; the remaining 2 credits may be at the 200 level or above. (Sem: 5-8)

TO VIEW THE Geosciences Major (GSCBS)

30-07-083 Change. Drop Mining option and Mineral Processing option. Change program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Mining Engineering (MNG E)

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER J. BISE, Undergraduate Program Officer

The Mining Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

The undergraduate curriculum in mining engineering has been designed to enable students to apply the fundamentals necessary to achieve lifelong professional growth. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to pursue employment opportunities in both the private and public sectors as mining engineers, or will be able to pursue advanced education.

The courses are sequenced so that an appropriate blend of theory, applications, and project design is achieved. This enables the mining engineering student to appreciate and comprehend that a successful engineering design project requires a sound theoretical foundation, supported by experimentation and good engineering judgment. The program is designed such that the fundamentals of mathematics, earth, and engineering sciences are integrated into traditional mining engineering topics. Design projects, culminating in the capstone design project, are required throughout the curriculum. The proper execution of these projects requires an awareness of acceptable problem-formulation strategies, the testing of alternative design methodologies, feasibility studies, environmental impacts, and overall economic considerations.

Graduates of the program will be prepared to perform in the various steps of mineral extraction, including exploration, evaluation, development, recovery, and processing. The mining engineering faculty is committed to an interactive teaching and learning environment to ensure that the student plays an active role in the learning process. The general education opportunities are sufficiently broad and diverse in nature and scope to enable the student to tailor the educational experience to particular interests, backgrounds, and expected roles in society.

The integration of knowledge and skills acquired during the course of study enables the student and, ultimately, the graduates of this program to do the following:

STUDENT-TRAINEE PROGRAM: A five-year work-study plan is available to incoming students in Mining Engineering. Alternating periods of employment in industry and schooling at Penn State, the student-trainee obtains the BS degree in five years instead of four, following a rearranged major. Numerous mining and manufacturing companies as well as governmental agencies are cooperating with the University in providing employment during work periods. In addition to earning sufficient funds to finance their education, student-trainees acquire two years of valuable, practical, and professional experience. Additional information can be obtained from the department.

For the B.S. degree in Mining Engineering, a minimum of 130 credits is required.

TO VIEW THE Mining Engineering Minor

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 109 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (92 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), EM SC 100S GWS(3)[71] (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), MATH 250(3), STAT 301 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-6)
E MCH 210(5), GEOSC 071(3)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
MNG 030(2)[1], MNG 402(3), MNG 422(3), MNG 431(3) (Sem: 3-8)
C E 360(3), MN PR 301(3)[1], MN PR 413(1)[1], MNG 404(2), MNG 412(3) (Sem: 5-6)
GEOSC 201(4), MNG 023(2), MNG 410(2), MNG 411(2), MNG 441(3)[1], MNG 451W(5)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
A E 401(3), M E 030(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (11 credits)
Select 11 credits, one course from each category a, b, c, and d:
a. ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
b. PHIL 103 GH(3) or PHIL 106 GH(3) or PHIL 107 GH(3) or PHIL 233 GH(3)/S T S 233 GH(3) (Sem: 1-4)
c. CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or CMPSC 201F GQ(3) or E MCH 012(3) or E MCH 112H(3) (Sem: 3-4)
d. MATH 220 GQ(2) or MATH 231(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Engineering students are expected to take at least one sequence of humanities, social science, or arts courses of either 6 or 9 credits, which culminates in a higher-level course. Humanities, arts, and social science courses (both breadth and depth) should compose an integral part of the engineering program and not be limited to a selection of related introductory courses. Close consultation with advisers on these issues is warranted.

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-084 MATSE 463
Characterization and Processing of Electronic and Photonic Materials Laboratory
EPM LAB II (1:0:3)
Provides experience with key processing methods for EPM materials and advanced characterization methods for EPM materials and simple device structures.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 400, MATSE 430, MATSE 461
CONCURRENT: MATSE 450, MATSE 455
APPROVED START: S11994

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: .5-1
PROPOSED START: SP2003

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Engineering

30-07-085 Change. Add two options to the Associate Degree program: General Option and Manufacturing Option. Add seven new courses: ELOP 201, 202, 203, MFET 202, 205, 206, 210W.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Mechanical Engineering Technology (2 MET)

WAYNE HAGER, Professor and Head, School of Engineering Technology and Commonwealth Engineering, Penn State University Park
WES GREBSKI, Professor and Program Coordinator, General Option, Penn State Hazelton
KAREN HARRIS, Instructor and Program Coordinator, Manufacturing Option, Penn State New Kensington

This major helps graduates prepare for technical positions in manufacturing, machine and tool design, computer drafting and design, computer integrated manufacturing, materials selection and processes, technical sales, and other related industries in mechanical applications. The general option provides a broad foundation in mechanical systems and applications; computer systems in drafting (CAD), manufacturing (CAM), and automation and robotics (CIM); production and product design; and mechanics, dynamics, and strength of materials. The manufacturing option provides courses in manufacturing processes and quality control along with technical elective specialization in either tool and die or electro-optics: tooling and part design, geometric dimensioning and tolerances, hydraulics and pneumatics, programmable logic controllers, sensors and detectors, lasers and applications, fiber optics, and high vacuum technology. This program articulates with Pennsylvania Department of Education-approved Tech Prep programs. Secondary students who have graduated from a program covered by a signed Penn State Articulation Agreement may be eligible for special admission procedures and/or advanced placement.

Graduates of the general option may qualify for admission to the baccalaureate degree majors in Mechanical Engineering Technology and Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology programs at Penn State Harrisburg, Capital College; the Mechanical Engineering Technology program at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College; or the baccalaureate degree major in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Altoona, Penn State Berks-Lehigh Valley, Penn State New Kensington, and Penn State York.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 67 credits is required. The general option is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology at each campus where the full two years of the program are offered.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 58-60 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 40 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (40 credits)
EE T 101(3), EE T 109(l), ENGL 015 GWS(3), EG T 101(l), EG T 102(l), EG T 114(2), IE T 101(3)[1], MATH 081 GQ(3), MATH 082 GQ(3), ET 002(l), MCH T 111(3)[1], PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
EG T 201(2), IE T 215(2), IE T 216(2), MCH T 213(3), MCH T 214(l), SPCOM 100 GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTIONS: 18-20 credits

GENERAL OPTION: 18-20 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
ME T 206(3)[1], ME T 210W(3), PHYS 151(3), MATH 083 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (5-7 credits)
Select 5-7 credits from the following technical courses: AE T 297(1-9), CE T 261(3), CE T 297(1-9), CHEM 011(3), CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(l), CMPSC 101 GQ(3), EE T 100(3), EE T 114(4), EE T 118(l), EG T 297(1-9), IE T 105(2), IE T 109(3), IE T 297(1-9), ME T 207(3), ME T 281(4), ME T 297(1-9), STAT 200(4), or SUR 111(3) (Sem: 3-4)

MANUFACTURING OPTION: 18-19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
MFET 210W(3), IE T 109(3)[1], STAT 200(4) (Sem:3-4)

ADDITIONAL TECHNICAL ELECTIVE COURSES: (8-9 credits)
Select 8-9 credits from the following technical elective courses: MFET 205(3), MFET 206(2-3), METBD 050(3), EE T 220(2), MFET 202(3), ELOP 201(3), ELOP 202(3), ELOP 203(3) (Sem: 3-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

30-07-085A CH E 302A
Process Fluid Mechanics
PROC FLUID MECH (3)
An integrated study of the fundamentals and the quantitative design techniques involving flow of fluids in chemical processes.
PREREQUISITES: CH E 301, MATH 230 or MATH 231
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: CH E 303
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-085B CH E 302B
Process Heat Transfer
PROC HEAT TRANS (2)
An integrated study of the fundamentals and the quantitative design techniques involving heat transfer in chemical processes.
PREREQUISITES: CH E 301, MATH 230 or MATH 231
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: CH E 302A, CH E 303
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-086 ELOP 201
Industrial Applications of Lasers
INDUST APPL LASERS (3:2:2)
Introduction to principles of operation of lasers, properties, and propagation of laser beams, laser/material interactions and industrial applications of low/high power lasers.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 150
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-087 ELOP 202
Sensors and Detectors
SENSORS&DETECTORS (3:2:2)
Introduction to principles of operation of sensors and detectors.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 150
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-088 ELOP 203
Introduction to Electro-Optics
ELECTRO-OPTICS I (3:2:2)
Introduction to electro-optics, properties and fabrication of materials in electro-optics.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-089 MFET 202
Hydraulics and Pneumatics
HYDRAUL & PNEUM (3:2:2)
Introduction to principles of hydraulic and pneumatic systems as applied to practical problems with emphasis on operation, assembly, and checking.
PREREQUISITE: MCH T 111, PHYS 150
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-090 MFET 205
Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerances
GD&T (3:1:4)
Introduction to principles of methods of geometric dimensioning and tolerances used in technical graphics.
PREREQUISITE: EG T 114
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-091 MFET 206
Tooling and Part Design Principles
TOOL & PART DSGN (3:2:2)
Introduction to relationship between tooling and part design and processing techniques.
PREREQUISITE: EG T 101, EG T 102, MCH T 111
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE DROPS

30-07-091A CH E 302
Principles of Chemical Engineering II
PRIN CHEM ENG 2 (5:5:0)
An integrated study of fundamentals and quantitative design techniques involving flow of fluids and transfer of heat.
PREREQUISITES: CHE 301
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: 303
PROPOSED START S12002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Health and Human Development

30-07-092 Change. Reduce minimum number of credits required by 10 to 120 credits. Change program description; add H P A 470; change H P A 301 to 301W and H P A 394W to 390W. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Health Policy and Administration (H P A)

PROFESSOR S. DIANE BRANNON, Head of the Department

This major helps prepare students for management and policy positions or graduate study in the field of health care. Students in the major develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand the complex societal problem of providing access to quality health care at reasonable cost. All Health Policy and Administration students complete an internship in a health-care-related setting, giving them valuable experience and contacts in the industry. HPA students study a multidisciplinary curriculum that prepares them to work in many health care organizations including: (1) health care providers (hospitals, physician practices, nursing facilities, home health agencies, etc. ); (2) health insurers (nonprofit and commercial insurers, health maintenance organizations, etc.); (3) health care consultants; (4) health care supply companies (pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, etc.); (5) health services research and policy organizations (health policy research groups, industry trade groups, etc.); and (6) local, state, and federal health agencies (local health departments, state Department of Health, federal Department of Health and Human Services, etc.). HPA students have also used the degree to prepare for graduate study in business, law, medicine or allied health fields, health administration, health services research or policy, and public health.

The requirements for the major are outlined below. Students may select courses in the Supporting Courses and Related Areas category to fulfill requirements for a minor, to develop a specialization, or to complete courses required for admission to medical, dental, law, or other graduate schools.

For the B.S. degree in Health Policy and Administration, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-2 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: (85-87 credits)
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (31 credits)[1]
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 002 GS(3), PL SC 001 GS(3), SOC 023 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
H P A 101(3), H P A 301W(3), H P A 310(3), H P A 332(3), H P A 390W(3), H P A 395(3) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-20 credits)[1]
STAT 200 GQ(4) or STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
FIN 100(3) or INS 301(3) (Sem: 1-6)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 9 credits from H P A 401(3), H P A 410(3), H P A 420(3), H P A 431(3), H P A 433(3), H P A 440(3), H P A 442(3), H P A 445(3), H P A 447(3), H P A 450(3), H P A 455(3), H P A 460(3), H P A 470(3), or H P A 497 (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (36 credits)
(Must include at least 9 credits at the 400 level)
Select 30 credits from University-wide offerings on department list in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits in economics and/or political science on department list in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-092A Change H P A 301 to H P A 301W; add "Note: Some courses have additional prerequisites that must be met."

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Health Policy and Administration Minor (H P A)

College of Health and Human Development

PROFESSOR S. DIANE BRANNON, Head of the Department

The minor in Health Policy and Administration (H PA) is designed to allow students to learn more about the health care system, health policy, and health administration. The minor is most appropriate for students interested in clinical and health related fields (e.g., nursing, nutrition, biobehavioral health, or medicine), professional fields (e.g. business administration or law), or the social sciences (e.g., economics, sociology, political science, psychology), giving these students an understanding of the health care industry and the impact of business and government on that industry. Students must take 6 credits of prescribed courses including H P A 101(3), which introduces the organization of the health care system, and H P A 057 GHS(3), which considers the role of the health care consumer in the health care system. Students then focus their study on either health policy or health administration, choosing among courses at the 300 and 400 level. Students select 3-6 credits from H P A 301(3), H P A 310(3), and H P A 332(3) and 6-9 credits from 400-level H P A courses.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (6 credits)
H P A 057 GHS(3) and H P A 101(3) (Sem: 3-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (12 credits)
Select 3-6 credits from H P A 301W(3), H P A 310(3), H P A 332(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6-9 credits from 400-level H P A courses (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Some courses have additional prerequisites that must be met.

TO VIEW THE Health Policy and Administration Major (H P A)

30-07-092B Change. Add "Note: The H P A courses have additional prerequisites that must be met."

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Information Sciences and Technology in Health Policy and Administration Minor (ISHPA)

PROFFESOR DENNIS G. SHEA, in charge, Department of Health Policy and Administration
PROFESSOR JOSEPH LAMBERT, in charge, School of Information Sciences and Technology

The learning objectives of the minor in Information Sciences and Technology in Health Policy and Administration (IST/HPA) are to equip students with the skills and knowledge to meet the critical need for persons with expertise in health care information technology. Specialists in this field assist health care organizations develop and apply the information technologies needed to develop Web-based systems for patient education, physician-patient interaction and physician-physician consultation, securely transmit sensitive medical information electronically, and even pioneer efforts for advanced technologies like remote robotic surgery. The IST/HPA minor provides students with a solid base in the information sciences and technology through courses in IST's core curriculum. This core is then supported by selections from a group of HPA courses studying the application of information technology in health planning, financing, or marketing. Students must apply for entrance to the minor no later than the beginning of their seventh semesters. A one-time tuition surcharge will be applied to all students enrolled in the minor. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in this minor.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENT FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
IST 110(4) (Sem: 1-2)
IST 210(3) (Sem: 3-4)
IST 220(3) (Sem: 5-6)
H P A 470(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from H P A 431(3), H P A/BB H 440(3), H P A 447(3), or H P A 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

30-07-093 Change. Name change of major from Nutrition to Nutritional Sciences and name change of options from Applied Nutrition Option to the Applied Sciences Option and from the Nutrition Science Option to the Basic Sciences Option. Reduce the minimum number of credits required by 10 to 120 credits. Add AG EC 101, BIOL 110 GN, 230W, CHEM 038, 039, H P A 332, 460, PHYS 250 GN, 251 GN, PSY 231; remove CMPSC 203 GQ, NUTR 421 DF, 430 DF, 454, PHYS 215 GN, SOC 001. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Nutrition Nutritional Sciences (NUTR)

PROFESSOR JOHN MILNER, Head of the Department

The study of nutrition involves an in-depth knowledge of the physiological and biochemical aspects of nutrition and the role of social and economic factors as determinants of nutrition practices and their effect on physical well-being.

The student may select the Applied Sciences option and apply knowledge of nutrition and human behavior to improve the nutritional status of individuals and communities or apply nutrition principles and counseling skills to medical problems in clinical dietetics. Other emphases in nutrition education and communications, nutrition and food science, or nutrition and exercise science are possible within the Applied Sciences option. All graduates with the Applied Sciences option satisfy the current Didactic Program in Dietetics requirement for application to a dietetic internship accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Dietetics Education (CADE). Upon satisfactory completion of an accredited dietetic internship, graduates are eligible to take the registration examination to earn the credential Registered Dietitian.

The Basic Sciences option emphasizes the laboratory aspects of nutrition and is recommended for students preparing for laboratory-based research, and graduate study, medicine and related health careers such as dentistry, optometry, physician assistant, physical therapy and chiropractic. Students enrolled in the Basic Sciences option who want to become a Registered Dietitian should select all of the additional courses in the Didactic Program in Dietetics. A list of courses recommended for developing a specific competence within each option or to meet the academic requirements for a dietetic internship is available from the department office.

For the B.S. degree in Nutrition, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

APPLIED SCIENCES OPTION: This option integrates knowledge of psychology, anthropology, and sociology with nutrition and emphasizes the study of eating behaviors and their relationship to nutritional status. The option includes practical experience in food service management. Graduates of this option usually work in community agencies, the food industry, schools, clinics, hospitals, wellness centers, and private practice or continue to graduate study in public health, exercise physiology, communications, business, nutrition or related fields.

BASIC SCIENCES OPTION: This option emphasizes laboratory research and incorporates knowledge from chemistry, physiology, and physics. This option usually leads to a career in laboratory research in the pharmaceutical or food industry, government, or academia. Students wishing to enter medicine or other health-related professions should check with an adviser as early as possible for appropriate selection of supporting courses and co-curricular experiences.

TO VIEW THE Nutrition Minor (NUTR)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18-19 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87 or 90 credits
(This includes 18-19 credits of General Education courses: Applied Sciences Option: 6 credits of GN courses; 4 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GHA courses; or Basic Sciences Option: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GHA courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)
BIOL 141 GN(3), CHEM 012 GN(3), NUTR 251 GHS(3)[1], NUTR 358(2)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-3)
B M B 211(3)[1], NUTR 445(3)[1], NUTR 446(3)[1], NUTR 451(3)[1] (Sem: 5-7)
NUTR 452(3), NUTR 490W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
CHEM 034(3) or CHEM 038(3)
(Sem: 2-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 51 or 54 credits

APPLIED SCIENCES OPTION: 54 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), NUTR 120(3), NUTR 360(3) (Sem: 4-6)
HR&IM 329(2), HR&IM 330(2), NUTR 456(2) (Sem: 5-6)
NUTR 370(1), NUTR 400(1), NUTR 453(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
AG EC 101GS, ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
H D FS 129GS(3) or PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
H P A 332(3) or MGMT 100(3) (Sem: 3-5)
H P A 460(3), HR&IM 365(3), MGMT 321(3), or PSY 231 GS(3) (Sem: 5-7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 21 credits, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. See program list of recommended courses. (At least 9 6 credits must be at the 400 level and, of those, no more than 6 3 credits may be NUTR 496.) (Sem: 3-8)

BASIC SCIENCES OPTION: 51 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 142(1), BIOL 230W GN(4), CHEM 013 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), CHEM 015 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-3)
B M B 212(1), MICRB 201(3), MICRB 202(2), PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
CHEM 035(3) or CHEM 039(3) (Sem: 4-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (16 credits)
Select 16 credits, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. See program list of recommended courses. (At least 9 credits must be at the 400 level and, of those, no more than 6 credits may be NUTR 496.) (Sem: 3-8)


[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-094 Change. Name change of minor from Nutrition to Nutritional Sciences. Change of credits for NUTR 358 from 1 credit to 2 credits. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Nutrition Nutritional Sciences Minor (NUTR)

College of Health and Human Development

PROFESSOR JOHN MILNER, Head of the Department

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (11 credits)
NUTR 251 GHS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
NUTR 358(2) (Sem: 3-6)
NUTR 445(3), NUTR 446(3) (Sem: 5-6

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (7 credits)
Select 7 credits from NUTR courses (Sem: 5-8)

TO VIEW THE Nutrition Major (NUTR)

COURSE ADDS

30-07-095 BB H 146 (GHA)
Introduction to Health and Human Sexuality
HLTH 7 HUM SEX (3)
An examination of human sexuality as it relates to health.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-096 KINES 020 (GHA)
Modern Dance
MODERN DANCE (1.5)
A course designed to teach the basic skills of modern dance and to develop a further appreciation of modern dance.
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-096A CMDIS 100 (GHA)
Preventing Vocal Abuse, Misuse, and Disorders
PREV VOCAL ABUSE (1)
Principles of the voice mechanisms, preventing vocal abuse, and promoting vocal health across the life span.
APPROVED START: SP2000

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CSD
CHANGE CREDITS: 1.5
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GHA
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-096B CMDIS 101 (GHA)
Preventing Hearing Loss
HEARING LOSS (1)
Assessment, intervention, and prevention of permanent hearing loss caused by loud music and recreational and industrial noise.
PROPOSED START: SP2000

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CSD
CHANGE ABBREIVIATED TITLE: PREV HEARING LOSS
CHANGE CREDITS: 1.5
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Assessment, intervention, and prevention of hearing loss caused by loud music and recreational and industrial noise.
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GHA
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-096C DANCE 481
Introduction to Bartenieff Fundamentals
INTRO TO BF (3)
Physical and theoretical approach to movement: facilitates efficiency, and expression through dynamic alignment, mobility, kinesthetic awareness; reduce physical injuries.
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER: 270
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GHA
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-097 NUTR 358
Assessment of Nutritional Status
ASSESS NUTR STATUS (1:0:2)
Introduction to purpose, methods, and scientific basis for assessment of nutritional status in total health care for individuals and groups.
PREREQUISITE: NUTR 251
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS:  2
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-098 NUTR 360
Disseminating Nutrition Information
DISSEM NUTR INFO (2:2:0)
Theory and practice of providing nutrition information across the lifespan. Open only to Health and Human Development majors.
PREREQUISITE: NUTR 251
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2003

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Intercollege Programs

30-07-099 Add new minor. One new course was created--CBLS 400.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Community-Based Learning and Scholarship Minor

The minor in Community-Based Learning and Scholarship is an intercollege program appropriate to undergraduate students at all campus locations seeking to apply domains of knowledge from their majors and/or General Education programs to issues of consequence beyond the classroom. In particular, the minor provides students with a flexible framework for integrating traditional classroom-based coursework with substantial experience with community service or public problem- or case-based research and fieldwork. Supporting coursework and a program of fieldwork experience are selected with the consent of a minor adviser, and must be followed by capstone seminar or its equivalent on community-based learning and scholarship.

A grade of C or higher is required for all courses in the minor.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Applicants to the minor in Community-Based Learning and Scholarship program:

  1. Must have declared a major field of study.

  2. Must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.0.

  3. Must present a proposed plan of study in the application process. The plan of study should include student's contact information and GPA, a brief statement of student's learning objectives in connection with the major, proposed formal courses (include description of course and syllabus if available), proposed fieldwork courses (include information about fieldwork, supervision, and reflection), and faculty endorsement of plan of study.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
CBLS 400(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 6-7 credits of supervised fieldwork (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-9 credits of supporting coursework; at least 3 credits must be at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

NOTE: No more than 9 credits toward the minor may also count toward the major.

Last Revised by the Department: Fall Semester 2002

COURSE ADDS

30-07-100 CBLS 400
Public Scholarship Capstone Seminar
PUBLIC SCHL SMNR (3)
Interdisciplinary examination of university scholarship applied to issues of social/civic consequence in urban/rural communities with reflection drawn from theoretical, case-based and experiential examples.
PREREQUISITE: must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in a minimum of three credits of approved field work
PROPOSED START: S12002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of The Liberal Arts

30-07-101 Proposal was withdrawn by Department.

30-07-102 Add new major.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Archaeological Science (ARSCI)

PROFESSOR DEAN R. SNOW, Head, Department of Anthropology
(The Bachelor of Science degree in Archaeological Science is offered by the Archaeology Program in the Department of Anthropology.)

This degree provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, field methods, and laboratory science. It prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue careers in cultural resource management. Students contemplating futures in nonacademic archaeology should consider this degree or some of its recommended courses.

For the B.S. degree in Archaeological Science a minimum of 123 credits is required.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(14 of these 45 credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selections, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6-12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 80-86 credits[1]
(This includes 14 credits of General Education courses: 4 credits of GQ courses; 4 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GH courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (55-61 credits)
ANTH 002 GS(3), ANTH 011 GS;DF(3), ANTH 021 GN(3), ANTH 045 GS;GI(3), ANTH 380(3), ANTH 285 GS;GI(3), ANTH 321W(3), ANTH 423(3), ANTH 428(3), ANTH 456(3), GEOG 121 GS(3), GEOG 357(3), GEOSC 001(3), SOILS 101(3), STAT 200 GQ(4), STAT 460(3) (Sem: 1-6)
ANTH 492(3-6), ANTH 493(3-6) (Sem 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (25 credits)
Select 3 credits from ANTH 146 GS;DF(3) or ANTH 152(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 4 credits from the following: BIOL 110 GN(4), CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 013 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(l), or CHEM 015 GN(l) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from the following: PHIL 011 GH(3), PHIL 116 GH(3), PHIL 132 GH(3), or PHIL 221 GH(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from GEOSC 340(3) or GEOSC 418/SOILS 419(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from ANTH 410(3) or ANTH 411(1) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits in consultation with adviser from the following ranges: ANTH 320-329 or ANTH 420-429 (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser either in ANTH electives other than ANTH 001, ANTH 492, and ANTH 493, or carry out a senior project under ANTH 496(6) (Sem: 3-8)

NOTE: Internships will be counted as elective credits.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-103 Change. Change name of program from Speech Communication to Communication Arts and Sciences. Change program description and course abbreviation from SPCOM to CAS. Add CAS 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 214, 215, 216, 252, 271 (new), 283, 494, 496, 126, 195 (new); remove SPCOM 210, 220 GH, 230, 305, 312, 313, 350, 352, 380W. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Communication Arts and Sciences

Commonwealth College (SPCAS)
College of the Liberal Arts (CAS)

PROFESSOR MICHAEL HECHT, Head

This major provides increased understanding and practice in the ways humans use symbols to influence people and the world around them. The ability to communicate effectively with others in personal, social, work and multicultural situations is essential in modern society. A student of Communication Arts and Sciences will learn to think critically, analyze and solve problems, understand and manage conflict, argue persuasively, influence people, form and keep relationships, give effective presentations, and participate in the civic and political life of a community. The flexibility of the program offers preparation for a variety of careers such as administration, law, business, health, and human services fields. A CAS degree also lends itself well to a simultaneous degree program in which students prepare themselves in several fields of study.

For the B.A. degree in Communication Arts and Sciences, a minimum of 124 credits is required.

TO VIEW THE Communication Arts and Sciences Minor

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 25 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 30 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
CAS 200 GI(3), CAS 201 GH(3), CAS 202 GS(3), CAS 204(3) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of skills courses from CAS 203(3), CAS 211(3), CAS 213(3), CAS 214(3), CAS 215(3), CAS 216(2), CAS 252(3), CAS 271 GI(3), CAS 280W(3), or CAS 289(3) 283(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 15 credits of other CAS courses; at least 12 credits must be at the 400 level. A maximum of 6 credits from CAS 494, 495, 496, and 499(GI) may satisfy this requirement. CAS 126(3) and CAS 195(1) may not be counted as part of the major (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-104 Change. Change name from Speech Communication to Communication Arts and Sciences. Add CAS 126, 195 (new), 200, 201, 203, 214, 215, 252, 271 (new), 280W, 283; remove COMM 408, SPCOM 210 (dropped), 220, 350, 352.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Communication Arts and Sciences Minor

Abington College (SPCAS)
Commonwealth College (SPCAS)

College of the Liberal Arts (CAS)

PROFESSOR MICHAEL HECHT, Head

This minor provides understanding and practice in the ways humans achieve their personal and career goals by means of communication. Students may choose any of the department's pathways of specialization, such as Interpersonal, Family, Intercultural, Organizational, Legal, Political Communication and Presentation Skills, Communication and Technology, or Rhetoric. For example, Legal Communication focuses on communication within the legal system, and provides students with the theory and skills to understand the uses, evaluation, and structure of public policy and legal disputes. Students learn how perception, meaning, and conflict function in human communication if they choose to specialize in Interpersonal Communication, while Organizational Communication critically examines leadership, decision-making, interviewing, and teamwork in formal organizations. In coordination with an adviser, a student of any major may tailor this minor to complement his or her educational and career goals by pursuing a particular pathway.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 3 credits from CAS 203(3), CAS 211(3), CAS 213(3), CAS 214(3), CAS 215(3), CAS 252(3), CAS 271 GI(3), CAS 280W(3), or CAS 283(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from CAS 200(3), CAS 201 GH(3), or CAS 202(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 6 credits of Communication Arts and Sciences courses (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits of Communication Arts and Sciences courses at the 400 level (Sem: 1-8)
Note: CAS 100 GWS(3), CAS 126(3), or CAS 195(1) may not be counted as part of the minor.

TO VIEW THE Communication Arts and Sciences Major

30-07-105 Add new major.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Human Biology (HUBI)

PROFESSOR DEAN R. SNOW, Head, Department of Anthropology

(The Bachelor of Science degree in Human Biology is offered by the Human Biology Program in the Department of Anthropology.)

The Bachelor of Science degree provides the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in research methods, quantification, and laboratory science. It prepares students with the skills and competencies needed to pursue graduate study or careers in professions associated with human biology. Students contemplating futures in biomedical, anthropological, or forensic sciences should consider this degree or some of its recommended courses.

For the B.S. degree in Human Biology a minimum of 123 credits is required.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these credits are included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selections, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 81 credits [1]
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits GN courses; 6 credits GQ courses; 3 credits GH courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (43 credits)
ANTH 002 GS(3), ANTH 021 GN(3), ANTH 045 GS;GI(3), BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 129(4), BIOL 240W GN(4), B M B 251(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), STAT 200 GQ(4) STAT 460(3) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (38 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from ANTH 460(3) or ANTH 460H(4) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 15 additional credits in consultation with adviser from the following ranges: ANTH 401-419(3) or ANTH 460-473(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 4 credits from the following: CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 013 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(l), or CHEM 015 GN(l) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3-4 credits from the following: CHEM 039(3), BIOL 230W GN(4), or BIOL 141 GN(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 4 credits from the following: B M B 401(2), BIOL 440(4), or KINES 202(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from the following: PHIL 011 GH(3), PHIL 116 GH(3), PHIL 132 GH(3), PHIL 221 GH(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 additional credits in consultation with adviser either in ANTH electives other than ANTH 001, or carry out a senior project under ANTH 496(6), as advised (Sem: 3-8)

NOTE: Internships will be counted as elective credits.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-106 Add new major.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Organizational Leadership (OLEAD)

PROFESSOR RONALD L. FILIPPELLI, in charge

The degree draws on many of the disciplines of the liberal arts to illuminate the issues that all leaders face regarding work and employment issues in the 21st Century. Students select courses in English, crime, law, and justice, economics, political science, sociology, labor and industrial relations, communication arts and sciences, and psychology. The goal is to provide a broad education that introduces methods of analysis used in the disciplines of the liberal arts, and prepares students to understand the complex social, cultural, and organizational issues that they will confront in leadership positions in the modern world. This degree program requires that students develop competency in four critical areas and then apply those skills in disciplinary perspectives. All students are expected to develop proficiency in research methodology, critical analysis, communication skills, and the application of theory. Students can expect to learn and practice skills that focus on understanding of how organizations function both formally and informally and how individuals function within organizations.

For the B.S. in Organizational Leadership, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(4 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(In>WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selections, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 64 credits[1]
(This includes 4 credits of General Education GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (22 25 credits)
CAS 283(3), ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), ENGL 215(3), L I R 136 DF(3), PSY 231 GS(3), PSY 451(3), SOC 207(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-5)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (42 39 credits)
Select 42 39 credits:
Choose at least 12 credits in each of the 3 following areas.
Choose at least 18 15 credits at the 400 level.
1. Employer and Employees
L I R 136 GS;GI(3), PHIL 010 GH(3), PHIL 103 GH(3), PSY 002 GS(3), PSY 231 GS(3), SOC 035(3) (Sem: 1-6)
HIST/L I R 458W(3), PSY 441(3), PSY 451(3), SOC 456(3) (Sem: 5-8)
2. Law, Policy, and Organizations
ADM J 111(3), L I R 100 GS(3), L I R 201 GS(3), PL SC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
ADM J 482(3), L I R 424(3), L I R 435(3), PL SC 420(3) (Sem: 5-8)
3. Workplace Dynamics
CAS 352(3), CAS 452(3), CAS 475(3), ECON 315 GS(3), ECON 342 GS(3), SOC 404(3), SOC 455(3) (Sem: 4-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

30-07-107 Change. Add SPAN 100A, 301W, 490, 491, and footnote to program. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Spanish (SPNBA)

PROFESSOR JOHN LIPSKI, Head

This major is designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. In addition, the program aims to acquaint students with the literature and civilization of the Hispanic world. Enough flexibility is provided to permit a degree of concentration in either Hispanic literature or linguistics. Specialized courses are offered in translation techniques and in the use of Spanish for social services. Courses taken in the University's Education Abroad Program in Spain may be applied to the major. In conjunction with the College of Education, students may take work leading to certification as Spanish teachers in the secondary or elementary schools.

An integral part of the major is the inclusion of two courses (8 credits) in another Romance language (Italian, Portuguese, or French) or Latin. Students are encouraged to use these courses as a basis for acquiring greater proficiency in a second language.

Combined with course work in business, social welfare, or bilingual education, the B.A. in Spanish can facilitate entry into a number of professional areas. In addition, it provides the traditional foundation for advanced degree work required for such careers as college teaching and government service.

For the B.A. degree in Spanish, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

TO VIEW THE Spanish Minor (SPAN)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
SPAN 200(3) (Sem: 2-6)
SPAN 253(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 414(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
SPAN 100(3) or SPAN 100A(3)* (Sem: 1-6)
SPAN 210(3) or SPAN 220(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 300W(3) or SPAN 301W(3)* (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 353(3) or SPAN 354(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 355(3) or SPAN 356(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from groups a and b. You must select at least 3 credits in each group.
a. SPAN 412(3), SPAN 415(3), SPAN 418(3), SPAN 420(3), SPAN 497 (linguistics) (Sem: 5-8)
b. SPAN 439(3), SPAN 472(3), SPAN 476(3), SPAN 497 (literature) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
* Heritage speakers (students with Spanish language in family background but not necessarily a native speaker) should take SPAN 100A and SPAN 301W instead of SPAN 100 and SPAN 300W.

30-07-108 Change. Add SPAN 100A, 301W, 440, 490, 491 and footnote to program. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Spanish (SPNBS)

PROFESSOR JOHN LIPSKI, Head

This major encourages students to prepare for careers in which fluency in Spanish can be combined with training in other academic disciplines.

For the B.S. degree in Spanish, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

TO VIEW THE Spanish Minor (SPAN)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-13 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 60-74 credits[1]
(This includes 0-13 credits of General Education courses: 0-6 credits of GS courses, 0-3 credits of GWS courses, 0-4 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 30 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
SPAN 200(3) (Sem: 2-6)
SPAN 253(3), SPAN 305(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 412(3), SPAN 414(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
SPAN 100(3) or SPAN 100A(3)* (Sem: 1-6)
SPAN 210(3) or SPAN 220(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 300W(3) or SPAN 301W(3)* (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 353(3) or SPAN 354(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 355(3) or SPAN 356(3) (Sem: 3-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30-44 credits

APPLIED SPANISH OPTION: 30 credits
This option is designed to develop basic skills in Spanish (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) and to provide Spanish majors with concentration in a professional area where a command of Spanish can be particularly relevant and useful.

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from SPAN 410(3), SPAN 415(3), SPAN 418(3), SPAN 420(3), SPAN 439(3), SPAN 440(3), SPAN 472(3), SPAN 476(3), SPAN 490(3), SPAN 491(3), SPAN 497(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 21 credits in consultation with the adviser in related areas such as social services, the teaching of English as a second language, or in another professional area where competency in Spanish is desirable. At least 6 credits of such courses must be at the 400 level. (Sem: 1-8)

BUSINESS OPTION: 43-44 credits
This option is designed to develop basic skills in Spanish (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) and to acquaint students with a number of fields essential to business, especially in the international area. Courses in translation techniques, Spanish civilization, and Ibero-American civilization are an integral part of the option. Students are eligible to participate in the University's Education Abroad Programs in Salamanca, Spain; San Germán, Puerto Rico; Puebla, Mexico; and in the International Business Program in San José, Costa Rica.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (34 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), FIN 100(3), MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ECON 333 GS(3), I B 303 GI(3), I B 322(3), MGMT 100W(3), SPAN 420(3) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
Select 3 credits from MS&IS 201(3) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from SPAN 410(3), SPAN 415(3), SPAN 418(3), SPAN 439(3), SPAN 472(3), SPAN 476(3), SPAN 490(3), SPAN 491(3), SPAN 497(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

* Heritage speakers (students with Spanish language in family background but not necessarily a native speaker) should take SPAN 100A and SPAN 301W instead of SPAN 100 and SPAN 300W.

30-07-109 Change. Add SPAN 100, 100A, 301W, and footnote to program; change SPAN 400 to 300W; remove SPAN 210, and 220 from additional courses. Adjust credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Spanish Minor (SPAN)

College of the Liberal Arts

PROFESSOR JOHN LIPSKI, Head

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor. Courses taught in English may not be counted toward the minor.

Scheduling recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (3 credits)
SPAN 200(3) (Sem: 2-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
SPAN 100(3) or SPAN 100A(3)* (Sem: 2-8)
SPAN 300W(3) or SPAN 301W(3)* (Sem: 2-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 3 credits of Spanish courses (Sem: 2-8)
Select 6 credits of 400-level Spanish courses (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Courses taught in English may not be counted toward the minor.

* Heritage speakers (students with Spanish language in family background but not necessarily a native speaker) should take SPAN 100A and SPAN 301W instead of SPAN 100 and SPAN 300W respectively.

TO VIEW THE Spanish Major BA (SPNBA)
TO VIEW THE Spanish Major BS (SPNBS)

COURSE ADDS

30-07-109A AAA S 240 (GH;GI)
Harlem: History, Culture, and Politics, 1890-Present
HARLEM (3:3:0)
This course will explore the history of Harlem as a major Black urban community and a cultural center.
PREREQUISITES: AAA S 100 or HIST 152
CROSS LIST: HIST 240
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-109AA AAA S 415 (GI)
Race, Gender, and Politics in the United States and South Africa
US-SAFR COMP HIST (3:3:0)
This thematic course will compare key issues, figures, and events in the historical development of the US and South Africa.
PREREQUISITES: AAA S 100, AAA S 102, AAA S 110, AAA S 192, OR HIST 152
CROSS LIST: HIST 415
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-109AAA ANTH 242 (GI)
Peasant Societies
PEASANT SOCIETIES (3:3:0)
A critical examination of anthropological approaches to the study of peasantry around the globe.
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 001 OR ANTH 045
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-109B APLNG 083S (GS;GI)
1st Year Seminar in Applied Linguistics
1ST YEAR SEMINAR (3:3:0)
Introduction to the application of theories of language to cognition, culture, gender, society, and second language acquisition.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-109C CAMS 104 (GH;GI) (not approved for the GI designation)
Ancient Egypt
ANCIENT EGYPT (3:3:0)
The history and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the dawn of history to the Greco-Roman period.
CROSS LIST: HIST 104
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-109D CAS 084S (GH)
First Year Seminar in communication Arts and Sciences
FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR (3:3:0)
Introduction to significant issues surrounding effective human communication; humanities emphasis.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-110 CAS 195
Careers in Communication
CAREERS IN COM (1:1:0)
An introduction to a variety of careers in the field of communication arts and sciences.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-111 CAS 302
Social Influence
SOCIAL INFLUENCE (3:3:0)
Explores how humans influence others through communication.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-112 CAS 311
Methods of Rhetorical Criticism
MTHD RHTRCAL CRIT (3:3:0)
Principles for the analysis and evaluation of public discourse.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-113 CAS 353
Health Communication
HEALTH COM (3:3:0)
To introduce students to principles of health message design and the general theories and models used to guide these efforts.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-114 CAS 375
Rhetoric and Public Controversy
RHET & CONTROVERSY (3:3:0)
Survey of important events in the history of public address, including speeches, debates, and persuasive campaigns and movements.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-115 CAS 383
Culture and Technology
CULTURE&TECHNOLOGY (3:3:0)
This course will examine the area of cyber-culture as it relates to communication studies.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-116 CAS 398
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-117 CAS 405
Family Communication Theory and Research
FAM COMM THRY RSCH (3:3:0)
Explores the nature and functions of communication in family life; emphasis on meaning, patterns, and styles of family communication.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 101, CAS 202
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-118 CAS 453
Health Communication Theory and Research
HEALTH COMM (3:3:0)
Principles of communication about health across the lifespan and within health-care contexts.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 353
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-118A ENGL 226 (GH;GI)
Latina and Latino Border Theories
LATIN BORDER THEOR (3:3:0)
English 226 will constitute a wide-ranging examination of contemporary texts (1960-present) central to the construction of contemporary Latino/a culture.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-118B HIST 104 (GH;GI) (not approved for the GI designation)
Ancient Egypt
ANCIENT EGYPT (3:3:0)
The history and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the dawn of history to the Greco-Roman period.
CROSS LIST: CAMS 104
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-118C HIST 240 (GH;GI)
Harlem: History, Culture, and Politics, 1890-Present
HARLEM (3:3:0)
this course will explore the history of Harlem as a major Black urban community and a cultural center.
PREREQUISITES: AAA S 100 or HIST 152
CROSS LIST: AAA S 240
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-118D HIST 415 (GI)
Race, Gender, and Politics in the United States and South Africa
US-SAFR COMP HIST (3:3:0)
This thematic course will compare key issues, figures, and events in the historical development of the United States and South Africa.
PREREQUISITES: AAA S 100, AAA S 102, AAA S 110, HIST 192, OR HIST 152
CROSS LIST: AAA S 415
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-119 L I R 437
Workplace Dispute Resolution
WORK DISPUTE RESOL (3:3:0)
Dispute resolution practices and procedures used in the workplace and employment law settings.
PREREQUISITE: L I R 100
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-120 MEDVL 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignments by instructor
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-121 PSY 443
Psychology of Human Emotion
PSY HUMAN EMOTION (3:3:0)
Reviews, critiques, and applies major historical and contemporary psychological theories of emotion experience, understanding, and expression.
PREREQUISITE: PSY 002
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-122 WMNST 438
Feminist Philosophy
FEMINIST PHIL (3)
Examines the central currents of feminist philosophy, selected problems and concepts regarding difference, gender and sex, identity, and political culture.
PREREQUISITE: 9 credits of philosophy, including 6 credits of philosophy of the 200-level
CROSS LIST: PHIL 438
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-122A AM ST 105 (GH;DF)
American Popular Culture and Folklife
POP CUL & FOLKLIFE (3:3:0)
Survey of popular culture, folklife, and ethnicity, synthesizing material from such areas as literature, media, entertainment, print, music, and film.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003


OLD
30-07-122B AM ST 140W (GH)
Religion in American Life and Thought
RL IN AM LIFE (3:3:0)
The function, contributions, tensions, and perspectives of religion in American culture.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 140W
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
ADD INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-122C ANTH 001 (GS)
Introductory Anthropology
INTRO ANTHROPOLOGY (3:3:0)
Prehistoric and traditional peoples and their cultures; traditional customs and institutions compared with those of modern society.
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
ADD INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-122D ANTH 011 (GS;DF)
Introductory North American Archaeology
INTRON A ARCHY (3:3:0)
Introduction to archaeology of the North American Indians; sites, methods, and results of research interpreted in cultural history.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-122E ANTH 146 (GS;DF)
North American Indians
NORTH AMER INDIANS (3:3:0)
An introduction to the cultures of the indigenous peoples of North America, north of Mexico, and the effect of contact.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123 ANTH 409
Quantitative Analysis of Anthropological Data
QUANT ANLY/DATA (2:1:2)
The application of quantitative methods to anthropological problems: populations of humans, genes, artifacts, and traits.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in anthropology
APPROVED START: FA1986

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Quantitative Analysis of Morphological Data (QUANANLY/MORPHDATA)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3:3:0
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The application of morphometric methods to anthropological data: phenotypes of organisms, artifacts, and traits.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ANTH 002 or ANTH 021; STAT 200; 3 additional credits in anthropology
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123A CAMS 015 (GH)
Wonders of the Ancient World
WONDERS ANC WORLD (3:3:0)
Overview of ancient world by focusing on the famed “Seven Wonders” and similar achievements from 3000 B.C.E.-1st Century C.E.
APPROVED START: S11997

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
ADD INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI (not approved for the GI designation)
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123B CAMS 050 (GH)
Word Power: Classical Sources of English Vocabulary
WORD POWER (3:3:0)
An introduction to English word forms stressing the most frequently occurring Latin and Greek elements and their derivatives.
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123C CMLIT 001 (GH)
Masterpieces of Western Literature Through the Renaissance
MASTERS WEST LIT (3:3:0)
Universal themes and cultural values in such writers as Homer, Sappho, Chaucer, Dante, Christine DePizan, Marguerite DeNavarre, Cervantes.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Introduction to Western Literatures Through the Renaissance (INTRO WEST LIT I)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introductory comparative survey of European and American literatures of Ancient through Renaissance periods, considering genre, themes, cultural and literary values.
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
ADD INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI (not approved for the GI designation)
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123D CMLIT 002 (GH)
Masterpieces of Western Literatures Since the Renaissance
MASTERS WEST LIT (3:3:0)
Universal themes and cultural values in such writers as Voltaire, Goethe, Ibsen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Dickinson, Mann, Duras, Borges, and Rich.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Introduction to Western Literatures Since the Renaissance (INTRO WEST LIT II)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introductory comparative survey of European and American literatures, post-Renaissance through Modern, considering genre, themes, cultural and literary values.
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
ADD INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123E CMLIT 184 (GH)
The Short Story
THE SHORT STORY (3:3:0)
Lectures, discussion, readings in translation, with primary emphasis on major writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
CROSS LIST: ENGL 184
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-123F ECON 004 (GS)
Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy
MACROEC ANLY (3:3:0)
National income measurement; aggregate economic models; money and income; policy problems.
APPROVED START: S11988

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

NEW
30-07-0123G ECON 014 (GS)
Principles of Economics
PRINS OF ECON (3:3:0)
Analysis of the American economy, emphasizing the nature and interrelationships of groups including consumers, business, governments, labor, and financial institutions.
APPROVED START: S11988

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
APPROVED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124 ENGL 001 (GH)
Understanding Literature
UNDERSTANDING LIT (3:3:0)
Explores how major fiction, drama, and poetry, past and present, primarily English and American, clarify enduring human values and issues.
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124A ENGL 134 (GH)
American Comedy
AMERICAN COMEDY (3:3:0)
Studies in American comedy and satire, including such writers as Mark Twain, Faulkner, Vonnegut, Ellision, O’Connor, Welty, and Heller.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124B ENGL 135 (GH;DF)
Alternative Voices in American Literature
ALT VOICES AM LIT (3:3:0)
United States writers from diverse backgrounds offering varying responses to issues such as race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124C ENGL 139 (GH;DF)
Black American Literature
BLACK AMERICAN LIT (3:3:0)
Fiction, poetry, and drama, including such writers as Baldwin, Douglass, Ellison, Morrison, and Wright.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124D ENGL 180 (GH)
Literature and the Natural World
LIT 7 NATURE (3:3:0)
Literary representations of the natural world, focusing on English language traditions.
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124E ENGL 184 (GH)
The Short Story
THE SHORT STORY (3:3:0)
Lectures, discussion, readings in translation, with primary emphasis on major writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
CROSS LIST: CMLIT 184
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-124F ENGL 262 (GH)
Reading Fiction
READING FICTION (3:3:0)
Elements of fiction including plot, character, viewpoint, and fictional genres in British, American, and other English-language traditions.
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or 030
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD

30-07-124G ENGL 263 (GH)
Reading Poetry
READING POETRY (3:3:0)
Elements of poetry including meter, rhyme, image, diction, and poetic forms in British, American, and other English-language traditions.
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or 030
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH

PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-125 ENGL 265 (GH)
Reading Nonfiction
READING NONFICTION (3:3:0)
Forms of nonfictional prose such as autobiography, biography, essay, letter, memoir, oration, travelogue in British, American, and other English-language traditions.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 OR ENGL 030
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126 ENGL 268 (GH)
Reading Drama
READING DRAMA (3:3:0)
Elements of drama including plot, character, dialogue, staging, and dramatic forms in British, American, and other English-language traditions.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 OR ENGL 030
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126-1 ENGL 431 (DF)
BLACK AMER WRITERS (3:3:0)
A particular genre or historical period in the development of Black American literature.
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: FA2002

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126-2 ENGL 461 (DF)
The Vernacular Roots of African American Literature
VERN ROOT AFAM LIT (3:3:0)
The relationship between oral tradition and literary texts and the double consciousness of African American voice in “print.”
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP3002

OLD
30-07-126-3 ENGL 466 (DF)
African American Novel I
AFRICAN AM NOVEL I (3:3:0)
Thematic, structural, and stylistic characteristics of the African American novel from residually oral forms to satiric realism.
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126-4 ENGL 467 (DF)
AFR AM NOVEL II (3:3:0)
Thematic, stylistic, and structural characteristics of the African American novel from naturalism to modernism and postmodernism.
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126-5 ENGL 468 (DF)
African American Poetry
AFRICAN AM POETRY (3:3:0)
African American Poetry within the contexts of the black oral tradition and transformed European literary tradition.
PREREQUISITES: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126A GER 200 (GH;DF)
Contemporary German Culture
CONT GER CULTURE (3:3:0)
Survey of divided and unified Germany after WW II, her politics, economics, society, arts, and educational system in the international context; conducted in English.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE DECRIPTION: Germany since WWI, its politics, economics, society, arts, and educational system in the international context; conducted in English.
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126B HIST 001 (GH)
WESTERN HERITAGE I (3:3:0)
A survey of the western heritage from the ancient Mediterranean would to the dawn of Modern Europe.
APPROVED START: S11988

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126C HIST 116 (GS)
Family and Sex Roles in Modern History
HIST FAM SEX ROLES (3:3:0)
Historical perspectives on the western family since 1500; gender roles, marriage, sexuality, child rearing, and old age; emphasis in US.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 116
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126D HIST 120 (GS)
Europe Since 1848
EUROPE SINCE 1848 (3:3:0)
Political, social, and ideological developments; origin and impact of two World Wars; totalitarianism and democracy; changing role in the world.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126E HIST 141 (GH)
Medieval and Modern Russia
MEDVL & MOD RUSSIA (3:3:0)
Introductory survey, including political, social, economic, and cultural development of Kievan, Muscovite, and Imperial Russia.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126F HIST 151 (GS)
Technology and Society in American History
TECH IN AM HIST (3n social, economic, and political life.
CROSS LIST: S T S151
APPROVED START: FA1995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126G HIST 153 (GH;DF)
The Indian in North America
INDIAN IN AMERICA (3:3:0)
A survey of the American Indian from prehistory to the present.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126H HIST 154 (DF)
History of Welfare and poverty in the United States
US WLFARE&POVERTY (3:3:0)
History of care of impoverished (emphasis on gender, race, nationality, age of poor, and welfare givers), 18th century to present.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-126I HIST 174 (GH;DF)
The History of Traditional East Asia
HIST TRADTL E ASIA (3:3:0)
Comparative cultural, institutional and social history of traditional China and Japan to their contact with the industrialized West.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: S11995

OLD
30-07-126J HIST 175 (GH;DF)
The History of Modern East Asia
HIST MOD E ASIA (3:3:0)
Comparative survey of the internal developments and external relations of China and Japan since their contact with the industrialized West.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-127 PHIL 438
Feminist Philosophy
FEMINIST PHIL (3)
Examines the central currents of feminist philosophy, selected problems and concepts regarding difference, gender and sex, identity, and political culture.
PREREQUISITES: 9 credits of philosophy, including 6 credits of philosophy at the 200-level
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
ADD CROSS-LIST: WMNST 438
PROPOSED START: S12002

OLD
30-07-128 PL SC 305H
Introduction to Independent Thesis Research
INTRO THESIS RES (1-3)
Assist juniors in the Department's honors program choose a thesis topic, write the prospectus and begin the thesis.
PREREQUISITE: 9 credits of philosophy, including 6 credits of philosophy at the 200 level
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to research design, principles of social science research, and development on honors theses research proposal.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-129 PL SC 415
International Organization: Political and Security Functions
INTERNATIONAL ORGN (3-6)
Theory and evolution of international organization; political and security functions of the United Nations and regional organizations.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 014
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-130 PL SC 431
Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance Political Theories
AN/MED/REN PL THRS (4:4:0)
Political theories of Plato and Aristotle; selected Greek, Roman, medieval, and Renaissance theorists through Machiavelli.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 017 or PL SC 117
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-131 PL SC 432
Modern and Contemporary Political Theories
MOD/CONTMP PL THRY (4:4:0)
Political theories of the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, Mosca, Weber, and selected theorists.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 017 or PL SC 117
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-132 PSY 002 (GS)
Psychology
PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0)
Introduction to general psychology; principles of human behavior and their applications.
APPROVED START: S11988

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-132A RL ST 003 (GH;DF)
Introduction to the Religions of the East
RELIGIONS OF EAST (3:3:0)
Religious experience, thought, patterns of worship, morals,and institutions in relations to culture in Easter religions.
APPROVED START: S11991

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-132B RL ST 103 (GH;DF)
Introduction to Hinduism
INTRO TO HINDUISM (3:3:0)
Historical development of Hinduism to the present.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-132C RL ST 104 (GH;DF)
Introduction to Buddhism
INTRO TO BUDDHISM (3:3:0)
A general survey of the basic doctrine, practice, and historical development of Hinayana and Mahayana Buddhism.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
RECERTIFY INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-132D RL ST 140W (GH)
Religion in American Life and Thought
RL IN AM LIFE (3:3:0)
The function, contributions, tensions, and perspectives of religion in American culture.
CROSS LIST: AM ST 140W
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
ADD INTERCULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL CODE: GI
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-132E S T S 151 (GS)
Technology and Society in American History
TECH IN AM HIST (3:3:0)
Development of technology in America from colonial times; its reception and its influence on social, economic, and political life.
CROSS LIST: HIST 151
APPROVED START; FA1995

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-133 SOC 300
Preceptorship in Sociology
PRECEPT SOC (3)
Supervised experience as a teaching assistant under the supervision of an approved faculty member.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in course work related to the subject of the course
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-8, maximum of 4 per semester
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-133A SPAN 230 (GH)
Masterpieces of Spanish Literature in English Translation
SP LIT IN TRANS (3:3:0)
Emphasis on works and authors of international importance; lectures, readings, and written work in English.
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Study of works and authors of international importance; lectures, readings, and written works in English.
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-133B SPCOM 150
Persuasion and Propaganda
PERSUASION/PROPAG (3:3:0)
An examination of how symbols have been used to create belief and action in revolutionary, totalitarian, and democratic settings.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 175
CHANGE ABBREVIATED TITLE: PERSUASN PRPGNDA
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: An introductory examination of how symbols have been used to create belief and action in revolutionary, totalitarian, and democratic settings.
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GH
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-134 SPCOM 199 (GI)
Foreign Studies--Speech Communication
SPCOM FOREIGN STDY (1-9)
Individual or group instruction conducted in a foreign country.
PREREQUISITE: departmental approval
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Foreign Studies (FOREIGN STUDIES)
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-12
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Course offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-135 SPCOM 201 (GH)
Rhetorical Theory
RHETORICAL THEORY (3:2:2)
Communication analysis using rhetorical theories of contemporary and earlier scholars; implications for social interaction.
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: History and theory of public advocacy and civic discourse.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-135A SPCOM 230
Introduction to Communication Theory
INTRO COMM THEORY (3:3:0)
Study of human communication in interpersonal, organizational, and mass communication systems.
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 202
CHANGE TITLE: COMMUNICATION THEORY (COMM THRY)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Survey of human communication studies in relational, interpersonal, group, organization, intercultural, health, technology and communication systems.
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-136 SPCOM 299 (GI)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-137 SPCOM 300H
Honors Course in Speech Communication
HONORS COURSE (3-6)
Individual study and seminar in selected areas or issues of speech communication.
PREREQUISITE: an all-University average of B; approval of the departmental Honors Committee
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 406
CHANGE TITLE: Honors Course in Communication Arts and Sciences (HONORS CAS)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-138 SPCOM 301
Argumentation
ARGUMENTATION (3:3:0)
Theory of influencing belief and conduct, gathering of material, analysis of proposition, case building, briefing, outlining, evidence, cross-examination, refutation, rebuttal, composition and delivery of the argumentative speech.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 215
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Theory of argument: gathering of evidence, analysis of proposition, case building, cross-examination, refutation, composition and delivery of argumentative speech.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-139 SPCOM 303
Parliamentary Law
PARLIAMENTARY LAW (2:2:0)
Presiding and participating in meetings conducted under rules of order.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 216
CHANGE TITLE: Parliamentary Procedure (PARLIAMNTRY PRCDRE)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Practice in presiding over and participating in meetings conducted under rules of order.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-140 SPCOM 305
The Voice and Its Use
VOICE AND ITS USE (3:3:0)
Individual voice improvement through group procedures; designed for students who wish to improve vocal effectiveness in personal and professional communication.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 205
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Emphasis on procedures to improve vocal effectiveness in personal and professional communication; not offered at University Park campus.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-141 SPCOM 312
Informative, Technical, and Presentational Speaking
INFO TECH PRES SPK (3:3:0)
Organizing, adapting, and presenting informative speeches and oral reports on technical and scholarly projects, both by manuscript reading and extemporaneously.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 211
CHANGE TITLE: Informative Speaking (INFORMATIVE SPKNG)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Planning, organizing, adapting, and presenting informative speeches and oral reports on technical/scholarly projects, both by manuscript reading and extemporaneously.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-142 SPCOM 313
Persuasive Speaking
PERSUASIVE SPKNG (3:3:0)
Organizing and adapting the techniques of persuasion to achieve personal and public goals.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 213
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Planning, organizing, and adapting techniques of persuasion to achieve personal and public goals; engaging in critical assessment of persuasive messages.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-143 SPCOM 314W
Speech Writing
SPEECH WRITING (3:3:0)
Writing speeches for delivery in political, professional, and ceremonial contexts; emphasis on composition and language for persuasive purposes.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 214W
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Writing speeches for delivery in political, professional, and ceremonial settings; emphasis on composition and language for oral presentation.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-144 SPCOM 352
Speech Communication in Organizations
SPCOM IN ORGNS (3:3:0)
Interviewing, briefing, conferring, and decision making; analyzing and evaluating formal and informal patterns of communication in organizations.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Organizational Communication (ORGANIZATION COMM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the function and structure of communication in both formal and informal situations.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-145 SPCOM 380W
Oral Interpretation
ORAL INTRP (3:3:0)
Principles of oral interpretation of the printed page with practice in oral reading of poetry, prose, and drama.
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 280W
CHANGE TITLE: Storytelling and Speaking (STORYTELLING/SPKNG)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Principles of oral performance from storytelling to the printed page; includes oral performance of stories, speeches, prose, drama, and poetry.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-146 SPCOM 399 (GI)
Foreign Studies--Speech Communications
SPCOM FOREIGN STDY (1-9)
Individual or group instruction conducted in a foreign country.
PREREQUISITE: departmental approval
APPROVED START: S11991

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Foreign Studies (FOREIGN STUDIES)
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-12
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-147 SPCOM 400
Speech Communication Training in Business
SPCOM TRNG IN BUS (3:3:0)
Presents issues and methods of communication training appropriate to business and the professions. Participants assess methods for training and consulting.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100; 3 credits in speech communication
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 242
CHANGE TITLE: Business and Professional Communication (BUS PROFESSION COM)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Interviewing, briefing, conferring, and decision making; analyzing and evaluating formal and informal patterns of communication in organizations.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-148 SPCOM 401
Speech Communication Research Methods
SPCOM RES METHODS (3:3:0)
Survey of research methods used in studying the processes of human communication.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 201 or SPCOM 230
APPROVED START: SP1987

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 204
CHANGE TITLE: Communication Research Methods (COMM RSCH MTHDS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Overview of the skills necessary to evaluate commonly reported communication research.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-149 SPCOM 402
Speech and Human Behavior
SPCH & HUM BEHAV (3:3:0)
Relationship between language use and thought and behavior. Introduction to general semantics.
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: General semantics, thought, and human behavior; not offered at University Park campus.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-150 SPCOM 403
Interpersonal Oral Communication Theory
INT ORAL COMM TH (3:3:1)
Use of informative and persuasive techniques in dyads. Use of speech to influence people in semipublic and private settings.
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research (IP COMM THRY RSCH)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Examining behavior within interpersonal encounters, with emphasis on both theoretical/applied explanations for how and why people act during such interactions.
ADD PREREQUISITE: CAS 203
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-151 SPCOM 404
Communication in Conflict Resolution and Negotiation
COM CONFL RES/NEG (3:3:0)
Elements, assumptions, and issues relevant to the conceptualization, development, and management of conflict, negotiation, and third party intervention; communication emphasis.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: S11990

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Conflict Resolution and Negotiation (CONFLICT RES NEG)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Theories and strategies important for conceptualizing, developing, and managing conflict negotiation, mediation, and third-party intervention.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-152 SPCOM 412
Speech Criticism
SPEECH CRITICISM (3:3:0)
Principles of rhetorical criticism in critiques of selected, chiefly oral, rhetorical communications.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100 or SPCOM 201
APPROVED START: FA1985

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE NUMBER: 411
CHANGE TITLE: Rhetorical Criticism (RHETORICAL CRIT)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Principles of rhetorical criticism examined through analysis of selected texts and critics.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CAS 201 or SPCOM 100
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-153 SPCOM 415
Rhetoric of Film and Television
RHETORIC FILM & TV (3:2:2)
Rhetorical analysis of how film and television reflect and influence society, with critiques of both fictional and documentary examples.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100 or COMM 150
APPROVED START: FA1986

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE CREDITS: 3:3:0
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Rhetorical analysis of the artistic forms and cultural structures of film and television; intensive study of selected examples.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-154 SPCOM 420
Systems and Theories of Rhetoric
SYST & THRY RHET (3:3:0)
Comparison of major ancient, eighteenth-century, and contemporary rhetorical theories; influence of intellectual and socio-political environment on rhetorical theory.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 201
APPROVED START: FA1985

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Rhetorical Theory (RHETORICAL THEORY)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Ancient, medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and contemporary theories of rhetoric.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CAS 201
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-155 SPCOM 426W
Communication and Responsibility
COMM & RESPNSBLTY (3)
Ethical issues in public and private communication; role of communication in expressing and realizing individual and social values.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Communication Ethics (COMM ETHICS)
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-156 SPCOM 438
Rhetoric of Documentary
RHET OF DOCUMENTRY (3:3:0)
Rhetorical aspects of the documentary. Emphasis on historical and critical analysis of functions and form.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 201
APPROVED START: SP1987

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Rhetorical analysis of the documentary in film, television, and other media; historical and critical analysis of functions and form.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CAS 201
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-157 SPCOM 450W
Group Communication Theory
GRP COMMU THRY (3)
Selected theories of problem solving through group discussion emphasizing participation and leadership.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100 or SPCOM 350
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Group Communication Theory and Research (GRP COMM THRY RSCH)
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-158 SPCOM 452
Organizational Communication
ORG COMM (3:3:0)
Explores the nature and function of communication in organization; emphasis on concepts, tools, and skills for effective management of communication.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 230 or SPCOM 352
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Organizational Communication Theory and Research (ORG COMM THRY RSCH)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Explores the nature and functions of communication in organizations; emphasis on concepts, tools, and skills for effective management of communication.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CAS 202 or CAS 452
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-159 SPCOM 470
Nonverbal Communication
NONVERBAL COM (3:3:0)
Communication in nonverbal sign systems, such as gesture, posture, facial expression, eye movement, and apparel.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in speech communication
APPROVED START: FA1981

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Examining ways nonverbal messages, such as gestures, posture, vocal intonation, and facial expressions, affect us on a daily basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-160 SPCOM 475
Studies in Public Persuasion
STUDIES PUB PERS (3:3:0)
Methods for analyzing persuasive techniques in the messages of political, professional, business, and other special interest groups.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Studies in Public Address (PUBLIC ADDRESS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: History and criticism of public discourse; intensive analysis of selected public addresses and social movements.
ADD PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-161 SPCOM 478
Contemporary American Political Rhetoric
CONTEMP AMER RHET (3:3:0)
Analysis of how contemporary political rhetoric concerning social issues has reflected, reinforced, and altered public opinion.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: FA1984

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Analysis of selected speeches, debates, and persuasive campaigns and movements in recent American political history.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-162 SPCOM 480
Oral Tradition of Interpretation
ORAL TRAD INTERP (3:3:0)
Theories and movements in history or oral interpretation from Plato to contemporary scholars; individual practice in one of these traditions.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 380W
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Group Performance of Literature (GRP PERFORM LIT)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Applying storytelling skills and performance theory to the group presentation of literature; criticism of literature through group presentations.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-163 SPCOM 495
Communication Internship
COMM INTERNSHIP (1-9)
Directed and supervised practicum at broadcasting stations.
PREREQUISITE: approval of the department
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Internship (INTERNSHIP)
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-18
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-164 SPCOM 499 (GI)
Foreign Study--Speech Communication
SPCOM FOREIGN STDY (1-9)
Studies abroad in speech communication.
PREREQUISITE: departmental approval
APPROVED START: S11991

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION: CAS
CHANGE TITLE: Foreign Studies (FOREIGN STUDIES)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-164A WMNST 116 (GS)
Family and Sex Roles in Modern History
HIST FAM SEX ROLES (3:3:0)
Historical perspectives on the western family since 1500: gender roles, marriage, sexuality, child rearing, and old age; emphasis in US.
CROSS LISTED: HIST 116
APPROVED START: S11994

NEW
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2003

COURSE DROPS

30-07-165 SPCOM 187
Speech Communication Freshman Seminar
SPCOM FRESHMAN SEM (3:3:0)
The meaning and advantages of a Liberal Arts education in context of a specific discipline.
PREREQUISITE: first-semester standing and enrollment in the College of the Liberal Arts
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-166 SPCOM 210
Introduction to Speech and Language Science
INTRO SP/LANG SCI (3:3:0)
Introduction to basic characteristics of the linguistic code and their realization at the physiological and acoustic levels.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-167 SPCOM 413
Experimental Linguistics
EXPER LING (3:3:0)
Linguistic acoustic theory. Experimental verification of discrete components of language on acoustical and perceptual levels and their articulatory correlates.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 210 or SPCOM 410
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-168 SPCOM 414
Speech Science
SPEECH SCIENCE (3:2:2)
Introduction to acoustics of speech, including vocal frequency and pitch, vocal intensity and loudness, and vocal spectra and quality.
PREREQUISITE: CMDIS 346, SPCOM 410
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-169 SPCOM 440W
Systems and Theories of Human Communication
HUMAN COMMUN (3:3:0)
Analysis of biological, cognitive, social, and cybernetic theories in interpersonal, organizational, and mass communication systems.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 230
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-170 SPCOM 460
Foundations of Rhetorical Theory
FOUND OF RHET THY (3:3:0)
Fundamental approaches to building theoretical and critical frameworks for the study of rhetoric.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 201, SPCOM 412, or SPCOM 420
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-171 SPCOM 481
Computer Applications to Communications Studies
CMP APP/COMM STDS (3:2:2)
Use of existing computer programs for text processing, including bibliographic storage and retrieval, language analysis, stylistic analysis, and content analysis.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-172 SPCOM 485
Advanced Oral Interpretation of Literature
ADV ORAL INTRP LIT (3:3:0)
Principles of interpreting literature orally; analyzing and arranging materials for individual and group presentation; critical evaluation based on aesthetic principles.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 380
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-173 SPCOM 490
Psychology of Speaking and Listening
SPKG&LISTENING PSY (3:3:0)
Development and function of internal control systems in speaking and listening, with application to various areas of speech.
PREREQUISITE: PSY 002
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-174 SPCOM 492
Development of Communication Behavior in Children
DEV COM BEH CHILD (3:3:0)
Teaching strategies for the development of oral communication competencies in children at various age levels.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in speech communication
PROPOSED START: S12002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Eberly College of Science

COURSE ADDS

30-07-175 B M B 433
Molecular and Cellular Toxicology
MOLECULAR TOX (3)
In-depth coverage of processes by which drugs/chemicals interact with biological systems and the experimental approaches used to study these interactions.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 401
CROSS LIST: V SC 433
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-176 ASTRO 001 (GN)
Astronomical Universe
ASTRO UNIVERSE (3:3:0)
Nonmathematical description of the astronomical universe and the development of scientific thought. For nonscience majors. Students who have passed ASTRO 010 may not schedule this course.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The development of modern understanding of the astronomical universe from planets and stars to galaxies and cosmology. Student who have passed ASTRO 010 may not take this course.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-177 BI SC 002 (GN)
Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution
GENET ECOL EVOL (3:3:0)
How living organisms pass on their inheritance, how plants and animals came to be what they are, and how they now react. Students who have passed BIOL 033, 101, 102, or 222 may not schedule this course.
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: The study of how living organisms inherit their traits, how plants and animals evolved, and how they now interact. Students who have passed BIOL 033, 110, 220W, or 222 may not schedule this course.
RECERTIFY GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GN
PROPOSED START: SP2003

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

30-07-178 Drop the D.Ed. degree in Art Education.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Art Education (A ED)

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed.

The Graduate Faculty

This program helps students prepare for careers in college teaching, administration, research, public school art teaching, and art supervision.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Admission to Candidacy. Once admitted to the doctoral program, all students must take a candidacy examination, which is given during the first year that the student is in residence. During the candidacy examination there is a rerests and possible areas of thesis inquiry; (3) completed graduate courses; (4) proposed course of study for subsequent semesters; (5) selected graduate papers written by the student; (6) slides or original work if studio inquiry is part of the student's program of study.
    English competence. At or before the candidacy exam, all candidates for doctoral degrees are required to demonstrate high-level competence in the use of the English language, including reading, writing, and speaking, as part of the requirement for the doctoral program. Competency must be formally attested to by the student's committee before the comprehensive examination is held.
    Course requirements. All doctoral students are expected to complete the following 3-credit core courses: A ED 502, 505, 536, 588; and A ED 590 (1 credit for each two semesters enrolled in course work.)
    Additional Ph.D. requirements. All Ph.D. students must complete at least 2 continuous semesters of residency after being admitted to candidacy. Although not required by the program, Ph.D. students are strongly encouraged to complete a minor area of study. A foreign language is not required of Ph.D. candidates. Instead, the inquiry and foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. is met through 12 credits of graduate-level course work in a related discipline as determined by the student's committee. All Ph.D. students are required to complete 18 credits of course work in art education. These 18 credits comprise the core courses plus two other courses in art education.
    Comprehensive examination. Ph.D. candidates are required to take a written and oral comprehensive examination once their course work is substantially completed. The examination, prepared by the student's doctoral committee, covers all phases of the student's doctoral work both inside and outside the field of art education.
    Doctoral dissertation. Ph.D. candidates are required to complete a dissertation on a topic of research approved by the student's doctoral committee. The dissertation must be defended before the academic community at a final oral examination.

30-07-179 Change. Add option in Chemical Biology.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Chemistry (CHEM)

The Chemical Biology Option introduces graduate students to training with more active, multidisciplinary, and group learning experience. Students in the option will have the opportunity to participate in the Life Sciences Consortium seminars and will have dual mentorship. The addition of the option will provide the Chemistry Program with a powerful recruiting tool to bring in excellent graduate students.

30-07-180 Change. Name change from Communication Disorders to Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD)

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

The goals of the program in Communication Sciences and Disorders are to train professionals to conduct research and be consumers of research in communication sciences and disorders and to prepare competent professionals to habilitate and rehabilitate individuals who have speech, language, and/or hearing problems. The program also serves to provide students in other curricula at Penn State with orientation toward and information about communication sciences and disorders.    

Facilities for student training and research include in-house clinical therapy and diagnostic services, laboratories in speech science and audiology, and affiliated schools and clinics. The program enjoys academic, research, and clinical relationships with a number of related programs at Penn State and draws upon academic work from related areas as part of the graduate training in communication sciences and disorders. Preparation is given for school and professional certifications and licensure. The CSD academic program is accredited by the Council of Academic Affairs of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The program is also accredited by the Professional Services Board of the American Board of Examiners in Speech Pathology and Audiology (ABESPA) for speech pathology and audiology for both academic training and clinical services. Graduate study requires a full-time externship experience, ordinarily occurring during the final semester of study.

30-07-181 Change the M.F.A. in English.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

English (ENGL)

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.A., M.F.A., M.Ed.

Candidates for the MA and Ph.D. in English may choose from a variety of courses in literature in the English language, rhetoric and composition, and theory/cultural studies. The M.F.A. In English helps prepare candidates for professional careers as writers of fiction, poetry, or nonfiction. The M.Ed. is offered in cooperation with the College of Education.
    The department offers a strong college-level teacher-training program, and most graduate students in English have the opportunity to serve as teaching assistants. Students usually begin by teaching basic composition courses, but there are opportunities for advanced students to teach courses in business writing, technical writing, fiction writing, poetry writing, literature, and humanities, and to serve as tutors in the Writing Center.

Master's Degree Requirements

Candidates for the MA take at least 30 credits of course work. MA candidates must fulfill the language requirement in one foreign language. All master's candidates are required to take ENGL 501, one course in literary or rhetorical theory, two courses in periods prior to 1800, and two courses in periods after 1800. Students are also required to complete a Writing Project that will demonstrate mastery of the field.
M.F.A. candidates are required to take 48 credits, distributed as follows: Candidates for the M.Ed. take at least 33 credits, 6 of which must be in a field of professional education. There are no foreign language or thesis requirements. All M.Ed. candidates must submit a final paper to the department.

30-07-182 Change M.A. in German.

30-07-183 Change. Drop M.Ed. in German.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

German (GER)

Degree Conferred: Ph.D., M.A.

Master's Degree Requirements

The M.A. in German is designed to offer students a general foundation in German culture, language, linguistics, and literature. After completing a small set of core requirements, students may pursue their individual interests from among the courses offered by faculty who specialize in German Applied Linguistics, Culture, Linguistics, and Literature. The M.A. degree requires a minimum of 36 credits. Qualified candidates may continue their studies toward a Ph.D. degree after completing the M.A., or enroll in the program with an M.A. as a terminal degree.

The following courses are required for the M.A. degree:

Practical experience in supervised teaching is required for all graduate degrees. Students who wish to earn a Master's Degree must write a research paper of between thirty and fifty pages on a topic defined in conjunction with a faculty adviser. The research paper should demonstrate mastery of primary and secondary literature, interpretative skills, and academic prose in both German and English. A one-hour oral defense of the paper shall be scheduled two weeks after its formal submission to the adviser. A committee consisting of faculty adviser and two other members of the German program selected by the M.A.candidate shall evaluate the student's knowledge of the subject matter.

30-07-184 Change.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Health Policy and Administration (H P A)

Graduate degrees in this program are offered by the faculty of the Department of Health Policy and Administration (HPA) in the College of Health and Human Development. The program's focus is on management, policy, and research in health care systems, with particular attention to recurrent problems of cost, quality, and access to health services.

The professional Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) provides management training within the context of organizations that plan, finance, and deliver health care. The M.H.A. curriculum covers the nature of health and illness, the structure of health service systems, health policy, and specific issues related to the management of health care organizations. A concurrent M.B.A./M.H.A. is also offered.

The doctoral and M.S. programs provide advanced training in health services research, policy, and administration, leading to positions in universities, governmental agencies, and other research and educational settings. In addition to active research mentoring by HPA full-time faculty, Ph.D. students also may work with faculty from diverse units across the University, such as economics, statistics, management, rural sociology, and finance.

HPA faculty members have research projects in long-term care, rural health services, medical care organizations, consumer choice in health care markets, information systems, and national and state health care policies. Additional opportunities for research and other scholarly activities are available through the University's Center for Health Policy Research and Gerontology Center which has strong ties to the HPA department.

M.H.A. Admission and Degree Requirements

Satisfactory scores from either the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required for admission. In addition, a junior/senior grade-point average of 3.00 or better, a relevant personal statement, and three letters of recommendation are necessary. Some work experience in health care is preferred, and an introductory course in finance or accounting is required prior to enrollment.

The Master of Health Administration degree is designed to prepare graduates for leadership positions in organizations that plan, finance, and deliver health care. The curriculum focuses on the development of management skills and problem solving within the distinctive clinical, ethical/legal, and financial contexts of health care organizations. The 49-credit program can be completed on a full-time basis in 21 months, or part-time. A ten-week residency in a practice setting is required.

30-07-185 Change. Drop Penn State Great Valley M.Eng. program .

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Electrical Engineering (E E)

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

The principal areas of graduate research in Electrical Engineering are communications, control systems, electromagnetics, electro-optics, electronic materials and devices, power systems, remote sensing and space systems, and signal and image processing.

For information about areas of specialization, laboratory and research facilities, fellowships, assistantships, and other sources of financial assistance, write directly to the Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Electrical Engineering, 121 Electrical Engineering East, University Park, PA 16802-2705, or review the Web pages at www.ee.psu.edu.

30-07-186 Change. Drop Penn State Great Valley M.Eng. program.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Engineering Science (E SC)

 

Degree Conferred: M.Eng.

A program leading to the degree of Master of Engineering with a major in Engineering Science is offered at Penn State Harrisburg. The program is designed to provide a broad, advanced education in the engineering sciences with some specialization permitted in the area of the student's major interest. It is offered specifically to permit practicing engineers to pursue advanced studies through evening classes while in full-time employment in industry in the area. Courses offered for the program are all established and authorized by the resident departments at the University Park Campus.

30-07-187 Change. Drop Penn State Great Valley M.Eng. program.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Environmental Engineering (ENV E)

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., M.Eng.

This specialty prepares students for careers in the design of treatment facilities, environmental monitoring, process development for water quality control, industrial waste treatment, management of hazardous and toxic substances, monitoring and management of environmental quality, air pollution control, and water resource systems.

30-07-188 Change. Drop Penn State Great Valley M.E.P.C. program.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Enviornmental Pollution Control (E P C)

Degrees Conferred: M.S., M.E.P.C., M.Eng. (Penn State University Park)
     M.S., M.E.P.C., M.Eng. (Penn State Harrisburg)

This intercollege master's degree program, available at Penn State University Park and Penn State Harrisburg, deals with the various aspects of air, land, and water pollution control. Graduate instruction is under the direction of an interdisciplinary faculty committee and the departments participating in the program. The EPC faculty have teaching and research interests in the area of environmental pollution control, and where projects are being funded, support opportunities may be available. Currently, forty-two faculty from sixteen departments in six colleges are participating in the program at University Park and fourteen faculty from four graduate programs participate at Penn State Harrisburg. A student is affiliated with one of these departments on the basis of his/her specific area of interest and is advised by an EPC faculty member in that department. Maximum flexibility is maintained by the program in an effort to meet both the needs of the individual student and the pollution control activity in which he/she wants to participate.

30-07-189 Change. Drop Penn State Great Valley M.Eng. program.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2002

Industrial Engineering (I E)

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., M.Eng.

Graduate study and research are conducted in manufacturing process, information engineering, operations research-management science, production engineering, process design, systems engineering, human factors, ergonomics, and robotics.

Degree Requirements

Three degrees are offered: the Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (M.Eng.--Manuf.Engr.), the Master of Science (MS), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). For the M. Eng.--Manuf. Engr. degree, 30 credits of course work beyond the baccalaureate level are required of which 15 credits must be from the department. At least 15 credits must be at the 500 level. In addition, a paper is required for which 1 credit of I E 594A must be used. For the MS degree, 24 credits of course work are required, of which at least 15 credits must be from the department. At least 9 of the 15 credits must be at the 500 level. Also, a thesis is required, for which 6 credits of I E 600 must be used. In addition to the above, all MS students are required to enroll for two I E colloquiums. For the MS degree, options are available in Human Factors/Ergonomics Engineering and Manufacturing Engineering. For the Ph.D. degree, 30 credits of 500-level, 6 credits of 400-level industrial engineering courses beyond the baccalaureate level and 9 technical credits from other departments are required. In addition to the above, all Ph.D. students are required to enroll for three I E colloquiums if entering with a M.S. and four I E colloquiums if entering with a B.S.

Continuous registration is required for all graduate students until the thesis is approved.

30-07-190 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.A. in Music - M.A. in Music Theory

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.A. in Music and the Master of Arts in Music Theory in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years. In particular, the program encourages the student to integrate the undergraduate thesis with the master's thesis thereby achieving a greater depth of inquiry.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

BA Senior Project (Music 476W) / MA Thesis (Music 600)
Students will be encouraged to select a B.A. Senior Project topic (Music 476W) that will later develop into the M.A. Thesis. It is expected that the Master's Thesis consist of greater depth and specialization than the Senior Project.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-191 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.M. in Music Performance - M.A. in Music Theory

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.M. in Performance and the Master of Arts in Theory in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate - Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-192 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.A. in Music - M.A. in Music Theory and History

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B. A. in Music and the Master of Arts in Music Theory and History in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years. In particular, the program encourages the student to integrate the undergraduate thesis with the master's thesis thereby achieving a greater depth of inquiry.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

B.A. Senior Project (Music 476W) / M.A. Thesis (Music 600)
Students will be encouraged to select a B.A. Senior Project topic (Music 476W) that will later develop into the M.A.Thesis. It is expected that the Master's Thesis consist of greater depth and specialization than the Senior Project.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-193 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.M. in Performance - M.A. in Music Theory and History

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.M. in Performance and the Master of Arts in Music Theory and History in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate - Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-194 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.A. in Music - M.A. in Musicology

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the BA in Music and the Master of Arts in Musicology in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years. In particular, the program encourages the student to integrate the undergraduate thesis with the master's thesis thereby achieving a greater depth of inquiry.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

BA Senior Project (Music 476W) / MA Thesis (Music 600)
Students will be encouraged to select a BA Senior Project topic (Music 476W) that will later develop into the MA Thesis. It is expected that the Master's Thesis consist of greater depth and specialization than the Senior Project.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

30-07-195 Add new integrated undergraduate/graduate program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2002

Integrated B.M. in Performance - M.A. in Musicology

The School of Music offers a limited number of academically superior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music the opportunity to enroll in an integrated program leading to both the B.M. in Performance and the Master of Arts in Musicology in a continuous program of study culminating in both degrees. The ability to coordinate as well as concurrently pursue the two degree programs enables the student to achieve greater depth and comprehensiveness than if the degrees are pursued sequentially and to earn the two degrees in five years.

Application Process

To initiate the application process, students must submit a transcript, faculty recommendation, writing sample, and statement of goals. A faculty adviser will help undergraduate candidates determine a sequence of courses that will prepare them for acceptance into the IUG program. Normally a student would apply after the fourth semester and before the end of the sixth semester. For acceptance into the program students must successfully complete the following courses or their equivalent with a minimum average of 3.5 in their music courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

4 semesters of music theory (MUSIC 131, MUSIC 132, MUSIC 231, MUSIC 331)
4 semesters of musicianship (MUSIC 121, MUSIC 122, MUSIC 221, MUSIC 222)
3 semesters of music history (MUSIC 162, MUSIC 261, MUSIC 262)

Reduced course load. As many as twelve of the credits required for the master's degree may be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. A minimum of 50% of the courses proposed to count for both degrees must be at the 500 level. Thesis credits may not be double counted.

Eligibility for a Graduate Assistantship
Students in the IUG program will be eligible for a graduate assistantship starting in the beginning of the fifth year.

Tuition charges. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student received financial support, for example, an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition (from "Information and Guidelines for Establishing Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Degree Programs" - approved by the Graduate Council, May 8, 1996).

COURSE ADDS

30-07-196 ARCH 541
Topics in Theory
TOPICS IN THEORY (3)
A series of presentations on the development of contemporary architectural theory.
PREREQUISITE: ARCH 511
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-197 ARCH 542
Topics in Community and Urban Design
TPCS COM&URBAN DSG (3)
Community and urban design as an area of design inquiry and interdisciplinary practice.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing or consent of instructor
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-198 ARCH 543
Topics in Digital Design
TPCS IN DIGITL DSG (3)
Inquiry into digital design paradigms of architecture and related disciplines; exploration design principles and operations supported in digital/virtual design environments.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing or consent of instructor
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-199 ARCH 550
Ethics in Architecture
ETHICS IN ARCH (3)
Ethics in Architecture focuses on the nature of human interactions with natural and artificial worlds.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing or consent of instructor
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-200 BIOE 517
Biomaterials Surface Science
BIOMAT SURFACE SCI (3)
Special properties of surfaces as an important causative and mediating agent in the biological response to materials.
CROSS LIST: MATSC 517
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-201 HLHED 553
Multicultural Health Issues
CULTURE & HEALTH (3)
This course is designed to explore cultural factors influencing the health status among racial/ethnic groups in the United States.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-202 IN SC 521
Database Design Concepts
DB DSGN CONCEPTS (3)
The requirements capture, design, and development of relational database applications; analysis of business requirements and development of appropriate database systems.
PREREQUISITE: completion of all IN SC or SWENG core courses or with instructor or division approval
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-203 IN SC 525
Applied Data Mining
APLIED DATA MINING (3)
Functional overviews of algorithms used in data mining will be presented and contemporary data mining software used to conduct a project.
PREREQUISITE: MS&IS 510 or with instructor or division approval
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-204 IN SC 531
Information Technology Law
INFO TECH LAW (3)
Examines the legal concepts/issues applicable to the field of information technology and to information technology, software engineering, and computer professionals.
PREREQUISITE: completion of all IN SC core courses or with instructor or division approval
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-205 IN SC 533
Cyberlaw
CYBERLAW (3)
Course examines the legal concepts and issues applicable to the Internet and Internet-related activities.
PREREQUISITE: students should have taken IN SC 531 or have a basic understanding of the concepts discussed in that course
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-206 IN SC 535
Information Technology: Economic Aspects
INFO TECH:ECON ASP (3)
Course examines how changes in information technology affect established organizations and the development of new firms, products, and markets.
PREREQUISITE: completion of IN SC core courses or with instructor or division approval
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-207 MATSC 517
Biomaterials Surface Science
BIOMAT SURFACE SCI (3)
Special properties of surfaces as an important causative and mediating agent in the biological response to materials.
CROSS LIST: BIOE 517
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-208 SWENG 541
Advanced Database Design Concepts
ADV DB DSGN CONCEP (3)
Practical benefits of a Database Management System; three-stage process to create and implement a relational database to meet defined requirements.
PREREQUISITES: IN SC 521 or approval of instructor or department
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-209 SWENG 545
Data Mining
DATA MINING (3)
Practical benefits of data mining will be presented; data warehousing, data cubes, and underlying algorithms used by data mining software.
PREREQUISITE: IN SC 521 or approval of instructor or department
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-210 SWENG 582
Real-Time Software Design and Analysis
REAL-TIME SOFTWARE (3)
A holistic, systems-based approach to design and analysis of real-time systems; design and implementation of a small real-time system.
PREREQUISITE: completion of all IN SC or SWENG core courses or with instructor or division approval
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-211 SYSEN 540
Intelligent System Applications
INTEL SYS APPLICTN (3)
Mathematical foundations of intelligent control and systems; linear quadratic self-tuning regulation and model reference adaptive control.
PREREQUISITE: approval of instructor or department
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-212 SYSEN 545
Neural Networks
NEURAL NETWORKS (3)
Artificial neural network architectures; perceptrons including training algorithms; extensive use of applications and simulations.
PREREQUISITE: approval of instructor or department
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-213 SYSEN 566
Advanced Telecommunications
ADV TELECOMM (3)
Review of digital communications and in-depth discussions on the latest communication architectures, protocols, and applications.
PREREQUISITE: prior coursework in Data Communications or Introduction to Telecommunications or IT Network Management I and IT Network Management II
PROPOSED START: S12002

APPENDIX D
DICKINSON SCHOOL OF LAW

COURSE ADDS

30-07-214 HLTHL 976
Health Law Seminar
HEALTH LAW SMNR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar gives students an opportunity to study in depth one or two topics in health law to give them experience in delving deeply into a health law topic as they would in practice and to supplement the introductory health law courses. The topic(s) studied in any iteration of the seminar would change from year to year depending upon what is current or of particular interest to the participants.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-215 INTER 957
Comparative Constitutional Law
CMPRTVE CONSTL LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The purpose of the course is to bring the techniques and goals of comparative law to bear on the study of different structures for organizing a government, and different approaches to the conception of a just, effective, and stable form of government. The course starts with an introduction to the issues and methodologies of comparative constitutional law. We then consider the role and structure of constitutional courts. The course covers some or all of the following issues: (i)the role of constitutional courts in policing or enforcing boundaries of power among different organs of government; (ii)federalism and constitutionalism; (iii)the protection of the rights of territorial, linguistic, racial, religious, or other minorities within the nation; (iv)protection of religious freedom; (v)protection of speech; (vi)protection of social and economic rights.
PROPOSED START: S12002

30-07-216 INTER 969
International Organizations
INTERNAT'L ORGS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
International organizations play an influential role in the world today. Just a few of the fields they address are peacemaking and peacekeeping, labor relations, food production and distribution, education, health, economic development, monetary affairs, international trade, civil aviation, telecommunications, protection of intellectual property and nuclear energy. This course will examine lawmaking and regulation by international organizations, the regulatory impact of governance by these organizations, issues of legal personality, membership, participation, rights of members and termination of membership, as well as enforcement and dispute settlement. Focus will be on the United Nations and its specialized agencies, including the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, UNESCO and the International Labor Organization.
PROPOSED START: S12002

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
30-07-217 CCLAW 955
Agency and Partnerships
AGENCY&PARTNERSHIP (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course examines various concepts and principles of agency law including agents' and principals' powers, responsibilities, limitations, and liabilities among themselves and third parties and within partnership relations. Other principles of partnership law including formation, dissolution, and termination will be examined. Although not a prerequisite, this course is strongly recommended for students planning to enroll in Enterprise Organization.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Agency, Partnerships, and Limited Liability Entities (AGENCY&PARTNERSHIP)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course surveys the law of unincorporated business entities. The agency law part of the course will focus on agents' powers and responsibilities, liabilities of principals for acts of agents, and termination of the agency relationship. The partnership law part of the course will cover the fiduciary obligations of partners, partners' management and property rights, and partnership dissolutions. The final part of the course will examine the "new" limited liability entities now provided for by the law of all states; with emphasis on the formation, organization, and dissolution of limited liability companies. Although not a prerequisite, this course is strongly recommended for students planning to enroll in Enterprise Organization.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-218 CL&CR 976
Advanced Torts Seminar
ADVANCED TORTS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This two-hour seminar focuses on torts not involving physical injury, such as misrepresentation, defamation, invasion of privacy, interference with business relations, and misuse of legal procedure. These subjects are not ordinarily covered in the four-hour Torts course required in the first year, but have become burgeoning areas of potential liability due to the emergence of electronic communications. An effort will be made to integrate substantive doctrine and practice implications with legal, economic, political and social theory.
APPROVED START: S12000

NEW
CHANGE TITLE: Advanced Torts (ADVANCED TORTS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This two-hour courser focuses on torts not involving physical injury, such as misrepresentation, defamation, invasion of privacy, interference with business relations, and misuse of legal procedure. These subjects are not ordinarily covered in the four-hour Torts course required in the first year, but have become burgeoning areas of potential liability due to the emergence of electronic communications. An effort will be made to integrate substantive doctrine and practice implications with legal, economic, political and social theory.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-219 INTER 970
International Environmental Law Seminar
INTL ENVIRON LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines how traditional public international law and modern environmental law coalesce to control international environmental problems. Still in its infancy, International Environmental Law is developing. However, even now, this discipline serves as the only barrier to many types of global spoliation. This course will examine areas of concern that are considered common heritage resources, such as Antarctica, as well as resources within national territories that are threatened by internationally-based pollution.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-220 INTPR 951
Internet Law
INTERNET LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines the developing body of law arising from the use of the Internet as a medium for communications, information processing, and commerce. The course examines many of the current legal and regulatory quandaries
resulting from Internet-mediation including the consequences of technological and marketplace convergence, Internet governance, new challenges to intellectual property rights protection, electronic commerce, speech and consumer protection. Students should have some background in internet and telecommunications technologies, or an interest in acquiring it.
APPROVED START: SP2000

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course presents the range of legal issues arising from the emergence of cyberspace. The course considers how the law has reacted to challenges posed by the Internet as well as how the law is shaping its future. Specific areas covered include jurisdictional analysis, First Amendment/free speech, digital copyrights, trademarks and domain names, electronic privacy, e-commerce, and Internet governance.
PROPOSED START: SP2003

OLD
30-07-221 INTPR 980
Patents
PATENTS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This is an in-depth treatment of patent protection, including interviewing inventors, drafting patent applications, prosecuting a patent application, patent litigation, conveyancing, and licensing. The course also treats foreign rights and interface with the antitrust laws. This is a survey course for the general practitioner and does not require a science background.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This course is an examination of the legal requirements for obtaining patent protection for an invention. The statutory foundations of United States patent law are examined through an analysis of patent prosecution practice and patent litigation. The course also considers United States patent practice in the context of international intellectual property law.
PROPOSED START: SP2003