APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Abington College

COURSE ADDS

29-04-001 ENGL 010
Newswriting Practicum
NEWS PRACT (2 per semester, maximum of 6)
Practice in writing and editing articles for the campus newspaper.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

 

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Agricultural Sciences

COURSE ADDS

29-04-002 W F S 440
Natural Resources Public Relations
NR PUBL RELATIONS (3)
The course prepares students to integrate public relations concepts with principles of natural resources management at the community level.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100, seventh-semester standing, and 6 credits of W F S, FOR, or R P M
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-003 W F S 450
Wetland Conservation
WETLAND CONSRV (3)
Wetland types, classification, functions and values; hydrology, soils, and plants; introduction to wetland identification and delineation; wetland regulations.
PREREQUISITE: E R M 300 or W F S 209
CROSS LIST: E R M 450
PROPOSED START: FA2001

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
29-04-004 E R M 450
Wetland Conservation
WETLAND CONSRV (3)
Wetland types, classification, functions and values; hydrology, soils, and plants; introduction to wetland identification and delineation; wetland regulations.
PREREQUISITE: E R M 300 or W F S 309
APPROVED START: S12000

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: E R M 300 or W F S 209
ADD CROSS LIST: W F S 450
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-005 W F S 309
Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation
WILDL FISH CONSERV (3:3:0)
Survey of current and historical issues in wildlife and fisheries conservation; emphasis on vertebrate biodiversity, habitat management and protection, and populations.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110, 240W
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: W F S 209
PROPOSED START: SP2002

COURSE DROPS

29-04-006 E R M 475
Water Quality Chemistry
WATER QUAL CHEM (3:2:3)
Chemistry applicable to the understanding and analysis of water quality, pollution, and treatment.
PREREQUISITE: C E 270, CHEM 013, 014
CROSS LIST: C E 475
PROPOSED START: FA2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Behrend College

29-04-007 Change. Decrease minimum number of credits (by two) to 131. Add PHYS 150, 151, ME T 206E, 210W, METBD 050, 110, 111; and remove EE T 100, METBD 301, 306, 360, PHYS 215 and 265 from the program. Move the following courses from Prescribed to Additional Courses CMPSC 101, EG T 101, 102, 114 and 201. Add grade of C requirement to MATH 081, 082, 083, MCH T 213, MET 206, MTHBD 091, 092, 210 and 211. Change program description and credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Mechanical Engineering Technology (METBD)

This major may be taken either as a four-year baccalaureate program or in a "2+2" degree format. The latter allows graduates of associate degree programs in mechanical engineering technology or related areas to gain greater breadth and depth of knowledge in mechanical engineering technology. The baccalaureate program emphasizes applied design and analysis, complementing a hands-on manufacturing and materials focus. The graduate gains valuable knowledge of total manufacturing processes ranging from applied design to manufacture.

This major includes instruction in materials engineering, thermodynamics, heat transfer, hydraulics, finite-element analysis, and use of parametric solids modeling design packages, as well as supporting course work in mathematics and science. Oral and written communications are stressed, as is the ability to work within a team-oriented environment. The major culminates with a capstone design project involving an actual design or manufacturing problem sponsored by regional industry. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Pl., Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202.

Graduates have qualified for careers in a wide variety of industries that manufacture or use mechanical systems. Careers include positions in applied product design, manufacturing process development, field service support, supervision of manufacturing facilities, tool and die design, quality control, plant supervision and management, and technical sales.

For the B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 131 credits is required. A student enrolled in this major must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

ELECTIVES: 0-1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 103-104 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (75 credits)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), IE T 101(3)[1], MCH T 111(3)[1], PHYS150 GN(3), 151 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MCH T 213(3), 214(1), IE T 215(2), 216(2), ME T 206(3)[1], 210W(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), IETBD 333(2), MTHBD 210(4), 211(4), METBD 301(3), 306(3), 320(3), 330(3), 331(4), 341(3), 350(3) (Sem: 5-6)
METBD 430(3), 450(3), 470(3), 480(1), 490(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (22-23 credits)
EETBD 100(3); or EE T 101(3) and 109(1) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 081 GQ(3)[1], 082 GQ(3)[1], 083 GQ(4)[1]; or MTHBD 091 GQ(5)[1], 092 GQ(5)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
METBD 050(3); or CMPSC 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
METBD 110(3), 111(3); or EG T 101(1), 102(1), 114(2), 201(2) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of technical electives from School-approved list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

02-29-007A METBD 440
Vibrations for Technologists
VIBRATIONS (3:2:2)
Principles of basic vibration theory, vibration measurement, data acquisition and analysis, and the effective presentation of vibration data.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 012 or ME T 206; MATH 231 and MATH 250 or MTHBD 211; METBD 341
PROPOSED START: FA2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Capital College

29-04-008 Change ENVE 413 to ENVE 413W; remove C E 472W; and change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Environmental Engineering (ENVE)

PROFESSOR Samuel A. McClintock, Program Chair

The Environmental Engineering major helps graduates obtain the skills necessary to analyze, design, and manage air pollution control, water supply, waste water treatment, solid waste handling, and hazardous waste systems. A thorough background in engineering fundamentals is provided by a broad core of courses in basic science and mathematics emphasizing sciences such as chemistry and microbiology.

A sequence of environmental engineering design courses distinguishes the undergraduate program. In the senior year, a majority of the environmental engineering courses such as, Solid Waste Management, Treatment Plant Design, Hydraulic Design, and Hazardous Waste Management utilize a team approach to meet project design objectives. These courses also emphasize written and oral communication of engineering concepts and project results. There is a considerable emphasis on conservation, reuse, and pollution prevention as pollution control strategies in these courses.

Environmental Engineering students are qualified to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination leading to certification as an Engineer-in-Training (EIT) and, with appropriate experience after graduation, sit for the Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) examination leading to registration as a Professional Engineer. They are also qualified to pursue graduate education in Environmental Engineering or other related majors such as Environmental Pollution Control. ENVE graduates are qualified to work at the entry level in a variety of jobs related to environmental protection and management in government and private industry.

For a B.S. degree in Environmental Engineering a minimum of 132 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Environmental Engineering major requires that the student has completed: MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), and CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1). A 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average is required.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who meet entry to major requirements but need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of the 45 credits are included among the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-1 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107-109 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (83 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), CHEM 013 GN(3), 015 GN(1), ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
E E 220(3), MATH 250(3), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
E MCH 011(3)[1], 012(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
CHM 301(3), ENVE 301(3), M E T 433(3), C ENG 302(2), M ENG 322(3) (Sem: 5-6)
ENVE 411(3)[1], 413(3)W, 415(3), 416(3), 417(3), 424(3), 425(3), 451 (3), 470(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21-23 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CSE 103 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from ECON 002 GS(3) or 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from C ENG 322(3)[1] or E MCH 013(3)[1] (Sem: 2-6)
Select 3 credits from CHEM 034(3) or 038(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from MA SC 422(3) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from C E 261(3)[1], C ENG 361(3)[1], or C E T 361(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from SUR 111(3) or C ENG 201(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following areas: C E, E E, M E, I E, C ENG, E ENG, I ENG, MATH, COMP, CSE, M ENG (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

29-04-009 Change name from General Humanities (G HUM) to Interdisciplinary Humanities (I HUM). Add I HUM 300W and 400; remove courses HUM 311, 312, 313, PHIL 408W and remove the Additional Courses category; and revise section under Supporting Courses and Related Areas. Change program description. Change credits as indicated with underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Interdisciplinary Humanities (I HUM)

PROFESSOR LOUISE E. HOFFMAN, Program Coordinator

This major helps students appreciate, understand, and interpret relationships among the arts, ideas, media, and values that have shaped Western and world cultures. Students are expected to be active learners who can synthesize, interpret, and communicate knowledge and experience through writing, speaking, and creative expression in a variety of media. The School helps students meet these goals by offering a range of interdisciplinary and discipline-based courses in the arts, art history, communication studies, English, history, literature, music, philosophy, theatre, and writing.

For a B.HUM. degree in Interdisciplinary Humanities a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Interdisciplinary Humanities major requires the completion of 28 or more credits and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their general education requirements. Penn State campuses in the area offer a wide range of general education courses; a limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg campuses for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63 60-64 credits
(At least 36 of the last 60 credits must be earned at Penn State, according to University Policy 83-80.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 6 credits)
I HUM 300W(3)[1], 400(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (54-58 credits)
(At least 12 credits of Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)
Select 12-16 credits: 1 course each from 4 different major/program offerings in AMSTD, C ART, ART H, A&A, CAMS, CMSTD, COMM, HCOMM CMLIT, ENGL, ENLSH, C HIS, HIST, HUM, LIT, C MUS, MUSIC, PHIL, PHLOS, RL ST, SPCOM, THTRE, or choice(s) from a School of Humanities approved list. (Sem: 3-8)
Select 15 credits from AM ST, AMSTD, C ART, CMSTD, COMM, HCOMM, CMLIT, ENGL, ENLSH, C HIS, HIST, HUM, LIT, C MUS, MUSIC, PHIL, PHLOS, RL ST, SPCOM, THTRE, or choice(s) from a School of Humanities approved list. (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits
[1] from Interdisciplinary Humanities (HUM or I HUM) courses (Sem: 4-8)
Select 18 credits from the School of Humanities approved list in consultation with an academic adviser or select a Capital College minor in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

29-04-010 ENGL 200W
Introduction to Critical Reading
INTRO CRIT READ (3)
Responses to a variety of literary texts written in English that evoke different approaches.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL, ENLSH, or LIT
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-011 I HUM 400
Expressions in the Humanities
EXPRESS IN HUMANIT (3)
Capstone course for School of Humanities majors: students synthesize and apply approaches to a topic in creative expression and knowledge.
PREREQUISITE: I HUM 300W, seventh-semester standing
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-012 I HUM 491
Seminar in Interdisciplinary Humanities
SMNR INTER HUM (3)
Interdisciplinary studies dealing with selected periods of world culture. (May be repeated for credit.)
PREREQUISITE: I HUM 300W, seventh-semester standing
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-013 I HUM 499 (GI)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-014 MRKT 488
Online Marketing
ONLINE MARKETING (3)
Concepts of electronic marketing such as online Web Sites that are being integrated into traditional marketing mix concepts.
PREREQUISITE: INFSY 390, MRKT 370
PROPOSED START: FA2001

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
29-04-015 BUS 360
Elements of Management Science
ELEM/MNGMT SCI (3)
Decision making under uncertainty, linear programming, waiting line models, game theory, and simulation.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in calculus, 3 credits in statistics
APPROVED START: FA1988

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MATH 110; MS&IS 200 or STAT 200
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-016 BUS 361
Operations Management
OPERATIONS MGMT (3)
Methods for analyzing alternatives aimed at optimizing scarce resources. Emphases in standards, measures, processes, and systems.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in statistics, 3 credits in calculus
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MATH 110; MS&IS 200 or STAT 200
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-017 BUS 430
Insurance and Estate Planning
INS ESTATE PLNG (3)
Guides to the organization and distribution of an estate by its owner.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in business law, 6 credits in accounting principles
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: ACCTG 211, BUS 340
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-018 HUM 302
Technology and the Humanities
TECH & HUMANITIES (3)
An interdisciplinary study of the effects on the individual of scientific and technological change.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-019 HUM 311
The Western Tradition I
WESTRN TRADITION 1 (3)
From prehistory through the Roman world.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-020 HUM 312
The Western Tradition II
WESTRN TRADITION 2 (3)
The Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-021 HUM 313
The Western Tradition III
WESTRN TRADITION 3 (3)
The making of the modern mind.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-022 HUM 430
Philosophy and Literature
PHIL AND LIT (3)
The study of philosophical viewpoints in literature.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-023 HUM 453
Literature and Society
LIT AND SOCIETY (3)
Selected readings from literature, history, sociology, etc., to illustrate the interrelationships between literature and society.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
CHANGE TITLE TO: Texts and Culture (TEXTS & CULTURE)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Study of art, literature, film, and other creative genres to illustrate the interrelationships between creative expression and cultural practices.
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-024 HUM 460
Thematic Studies
THEMATIC STUDIES (3)
Analysis of a group of related ideas in art, music, literature, and/or philosophy. (May be repeated for credit.)
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-025 HUM 461
Selected Periods in the Humanities
SEL PER IN HUMAN (3)
Interdisciplinary studies dealing with selected periods of world culture. (May be repeated for credit.)
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
ADD PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-026 HUM 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-027 HUM 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-6)
Supervised internship for undergraduate or graduate Humanities majors in state offices, educational institutions, arts agencies, community organizations, or humanities councils.
APPROVED START: SP1987
PREREQUISITE: senior-level status for undergraduate students; 18 credits of course work for graduate students; approval of program required

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-028 HUM 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-029 HUM 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE DESIGNATION TO: I HUM 497
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-030 MNGMT 451
Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
ENTREP SM BUS MGMT (3)
Entrepreneurship, new ventures, and management of small firms.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310, MRKT 370, 4 credits in accounting principles
APPROVED START: FA1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: ACCTG 211, MNGMT 310, MRKT 370
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-031 P ACC 300
Accounting Cycles and Controls
ACCTG CYCLES&CNTRL (3)
Study of procedures to gather, to record, to aggregate, and to report accounting data to managers and external readers.
PREREQUISITE: P ACC 211
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: ACCTG 211
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-032 P ACC 310
Principles of Taxation
PRIN OF TAXATION (3)
Study of income determination concepts for individuals and corporations, impact of taxation on decisions, elementary research techniques, and ethical standards.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in accounting principles
APPROVED START: FA1993

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: ACCTG 211, P ACC 300
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-033 P ACC 340
Cost Accounting
COST ACCTG (3)
Accounting for manufacturing concerns; actual and standard cost systems, and managerial uses of cost data.
PREREQUISITE: 4 credits in principles of accounting and permission of program
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: ACCTG 211
PROPOSED START: S12001

OLD
29-04-034 TRDEV 432
Video Production in Training
VIDEO PROD IN TRNG (3)
Introduces learners to the equipment, design, and production of video instruction for the workplace.
PREREQUISITE: admission to graduate degree candidacy
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: TRDEV 418, 431, or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

COURSE ADDS

29-04-034A GEOG 298
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START:

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Engineering

29-04-035 Change. Increase minimum number of credits from 132 credits to 134 credits. Add C E 300, 421W, 422, 423, 424, 436, 438W, 448W, 465W, 472W and add 12 credits of Supporting Courses and Related Areas; change C E 211 to 310, C E 231 to 332, C E 244 to 335, C E 280 to 336, C E 240 to 340, C E 261 to 360, C E 351 to 361, C E 270 to 370, C E 433 to 410 W, C E 345 to 435; move ED&G 100 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses; remove CE 221W, 380, and CHEM 034. Change program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Civil Engineering (C E)

PROFESSOR PAUL P. JOVANIS, Head, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

The program in Civil and Environmental Engineering provides the basic undergraduate education required for private practice and public service in civil and environmental engineering, and/or continued formal education at the graduate level. The goals of the program are identical to those described under the heading of the College of Engineering. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of civil engineering principles and design techniques. Students learn the basic engineering science concepts needed for this major through required Civil Engineering course work. They are given the opportunity to become familiar with the main discipline of the field (construction, environmental, hydrosystems, structures, and transportation) through a series of elective courses. Courses in communication skills, arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and other engineering disciplines broaden the program. Students gain experience in working as members of a team and in using interdisciplinary approaches to solve problems. These experiences, as well as those related to engineering principles and design, are taught through exercises in the classroom, laboratory, and field. The program culminates with capstone design courses in which the students' knowledge and skills are applied to actual engineering problems.

For the B.S. degree in Civil Engineering, a minimum of 134 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 108 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (71 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), E MCH 011(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 012(3)[1], 013(3)[1], STAT 401(3), GEOSC 001(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
C E 300(1), 310(3)[1], 335(3)[1], 336(4)[1], 340(3)[1], 360(3)[1], ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (37 credits)
C E 100S(1), 1 credit of First-Year Seminar or elective (Sem: 1-2)
ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
M E 023(3) or CH E 303(3)[30] (Sem: 5-6)
E E 220(3) or 305(3)[30] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 18 credits from C E 321(3), 332(3), 341(3), 342(3), 361(3), 362(2), 363(1), 370(3), 371(3), 422(3), 423(3), 424(3), 432(3), 435(3), 436(3), 447(3), 462(3), 475(3), 476(3), 479(1) (Sem: 5-8)[#]
Select 3 credits of C E 410W(3), 421W(3), 438W(3), 448W(3), 465W(3), 472W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (12 credits)
Select 3 credits of general elective from approved department list[30] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9 credits of technical elective from C E 300-level courses, 400-level courses, or department list. (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[30] Students may substitute 6 credits of ROTC for 3 credits of 400-level C E courses and 3 credits of M E or E E .
[#] Those courses must be selected from at least 4 of the 5 technical areas in the Civil Engineering program--transportation (x20), construction (x30), structures (x40), hydrosystems (x60), and environmental (x70).

29-04-036 Change. Add ET 002, CE T 261, SUR 313; remove M I S 103, BA 243, 250, CHEM 012, FOR 203, MATH 140, 141, S T S 200. Change program description. Reduce minimum number of credits by 1 to equal 67 credits.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Surveying Technology (2 SRT)

PROFESSOR WAYNE HAGER, Head, School of Engineering Technology and Commonwealth Engineering, Penn State University Park
PROFESSOR CHARLES D. GHILANI, Program Coordinator, Penn State Wilkes-Barre

This major provides the basic undergraduate education required for private and public service as a survey technician in the surveying profession. Basic knowledge is provided in the areas of land, construction, geodetic, photogrammetry, and topographic surveys. The curriculum is designed to develop an individual appreciation of the skills and equipment needed to make precise measurements in the field of surveying.

Graduates of the Surveying Technology major may qualify for admission to the baccalaureate degree major in Surveying at Penn State Wilkes-Barre or the Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Harrisburg.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Surveying Technology, a minimum of 67 credits is required. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Pl., Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 58 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (56 credits)
EG T 101(1), 102(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), ET 002(1), MATH 081 GQ(3), 082 GQ(3), PHYS 150 GN(3), SUR 111(3)[1], 112(3), 162(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), MATH 083 GQ(4), PHYS 151(3), SPCOM 100A GWS(3), SUR 211(2), 222(3), 241(3), 262(2), 272(3), 313(3), 372W(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (2 credits)
Select a minimum of 3 credits from the following technical courses: CE T 261(3), MCH T 111(3), SUR 362(3), 375(2) (Sem: 3-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

29-04-037 BIOE 100S
Bioengineering Seminar
BIOE SEMINAR (1)
First-year seminar to introduce the role of engineering in biomedical research and in instrument development for the medical device industry.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-038 C E 300
The Civil Engineering Profession
C E PROFESSION (1)
Introduction to the profession of civil engineering and its practice, including social obligations and ethical challenges.
PREREQUISITE: Civil Engineering major
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-039 C E 424
Optimization in Civil Engineering Systems
OPTIMIZATION IN CE (3)
Mathematical modeling; linear programming; dynamic programming; network optimization, including network flows, shortest paths, scheduling; decision-making; civil engineering systems applications.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 201C or 201F
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-040 C E 436
Construction Engineering Materials
CONSTR MATERIALS (3)
Design, production, application, specification, and quality control of construction materials unique to civil engineering.
PREREQUISITE: C E 336, STAT 401
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-041 E E 008S
Introduction to Digital Music
DIGITAL MUSIC (1)
First-year seminar that discusses digital music from an electrical engineering perspective; topics include sampling, digital filtering, compression, and music synthesis.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-042 E SC 130S
Selected Topics in Engineering Science
SELECTED TPCS E SC (1)
Introduction to basic concepts of engineering practices, processes, and research across the engineering sciences.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-043 EMET 396
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-044 EMET 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-045 I E 468
Optimization Modeling and Methods
OPTIM MOD & MTHD (3)
Mathematical modeling of linear, integer, and nonlinear programming problems and computational methods for solving these classes of problems.
PREREQUISITE: I E 405, MATH 231
PROPOSED START: FA2001

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
29-04-046 C E 211
Civil Engineering Measurements
CIVIL ENGR MEASURE (3:2:3)
Fundamental surveying measurements, traverse computations, coordinate geometry, mapping, GPS and GIS, circular and parabolic curves, earthwork, boundary surveys, CAD applications.
PREREQUISITE: ED&G 100, MATH 141
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 310
CHANGE TITLE TO: Surveying (SURVEYING)
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-047 C E 231
Civil Engineering Management
CIVIL ENGR MGMT (3:3:0)
Engineering project evolution to contract award; economic analyses; delivery systems and pricing; contract documents; estimating; professional liability and ethics.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 201C or 201F
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 332
CHANGE TITLE TO: Construction Project Development (CONST PROJECT DEV)
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-048 C E 240
Structural Analysis
STRUCTURAL ANAL (3:3:0)
Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate trusses, beams, and frames; reactions, axial forces, shears, moments, deflections. Introduction to influence lines.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 013
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: CMPSC 201C or 201F
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 340
CHANGE SHORT TITLE TO: STRUCTURAL ANLYSIS
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-049 C E 244
Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering
INTRO TO GEOT ENGR (3:2:3)
Classification of soils, moisture-density relationships, soil stresses, consolidation and settlement, strength, and groundwater flow.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 013; A E 221 or GEOSC 001
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 335
CHANGE TITLE TO: Engineering Mechanics of Soils (ENGR MCH SOILS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Phase relationships, engineering classification, ground water flow, stresses, shear strength, compaction, and consolidation. Laboratory
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-050 C E 261
Fluid Mechanics
FLUID MECHANICS (3:3:0)
Mechanics of fluids; flow in conduits and around bodies, friction and energy loss, fluid measurements.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 012
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 360
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-051 C E 270
Introduction to Environmental Engineering
INTRO ENVIR ENGR (3:3:0)
Nature and scope of environmental issues; air, water, land impacts; fundamentals and processes of pollution control.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 012; MATH 111or 141
APPROVED START: FA1997

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 370
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-052 C E 280
Introduction to Civil Engineering Materials
INTRO C E MAT (3:2:3)
Introduction to civil engineering materials; their structure and behavior: relationship between structure and behavior.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 013; Civil Engineering or Architectural Engineering major
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 336
CHANGE TITLE TO: Materials Science for Civil Engineers (MAT SCI FOR C E)
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 4
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: E MCH 013, STAT 401
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-053 C E 321
Highway Engineering
HWY ENGR (3:2:1)
Highway engineering principles, vehicle and driver characteristics; geometric and pavement design; highway drainage; traffic engineering, capacity analysis, and signal timing.
PREREQUISITE: C E 211, 221W
APPROVED START: S11994

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 310
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-054 C E 341
Design of Concrete Structures
DES OF CONC STR (3:3:0)
Design of reinforced concrete beams, slabs, and columns, with emphasis on ultimate-strength methods; prestressed concrete; building and bridge applications.
PREREQUISITE: C E 240
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: C E 280
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 340
CHANGE PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT TO: C E 336
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-055 C E 342
Design of Steel Structures
DES OF STEEL STR (3:3:0)
Design of steel tension members, beams, columns, beam-columns, and connections; elastic and plastic methods; design applications.
PREREQUISITE: C E 240
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Design and analysis of structural steel tension members, beams, columns, beam-columns, composite beams and connections; project and computer applications.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 336, 340
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-056 C E 345
Foundation Engineering
FOUNDATIONS (3:3:0)
Selection of type of foundations; structural design of shallow foundations; pile and pier foundations; retaining walls and bulkheads.
PREREQUISITE: C E 341or A E 402; C E 244
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 435
CHANGE SHORT TITLE: FOUNDATION ENGR
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Bearing capacity, settlement, and structural design of shallow foundations; lateral earth pressure; retaining and sheet-pile walls; introduction to deep foundations.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 335
CHANGE PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT TO: C E 341
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-057 C E 351
Engineering Hydrology
ENGR HYDROLOGY (3:2:2)
Water sources and losses, evaporation, and infiltration effects on streamflows, hydrographs, flood frequency, reservoir uses in flood protection and water conservation.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: C E 261
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: 361
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 360
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-058 C E 362
Hydraulic Engineering
HYDRAULIC ENGR (2:2:0)
Closed conduits, open channels, dams, spillways, rivers, and waterways.
PREREQUISITE: C E 261
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Fluid mechanics applied to flow in closed conduits, pumping systems, open channels, culvert hydraulics, and basic principles of groundwater flow.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE T0: C E 360
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-059 C E 363
Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
FLUID MECHANCS LAB (1:0:3)
Hydrostatics; the flow of water, air, and oil; calibration of metering devices; pipe friction; elementary hydraulic machinery tests.
PREREQUISITE: C E 261
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 360
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-060 C E 371
Water Treatment and Transport
WATER-TMT TRANSP (3:3:0)
Water treatment; water storage; design of water distribution and sewerage systems; pumping stations.
PREREQUISITE: C E 261, 270; CMPSC 201Cor 201F
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Water and Wastewater Treatment (WATER & WASTEWATER)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Water treatment; water storage; design of water distribution and wastewater systems; pumping stations.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 360, 370
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-061 C E 421W
Highway Design
HIGHWAY DSGN (3:2:2)
Design of streets and highway facilities; emphasis on geometric elements, intersections and interchanges, roadway drainage, and pavement design.
PREREQUISITE: C E 321
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Transportation Design (TRANS DSGN)
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-062 C E 422
Transportation Planning
TRANS PLAN (3:2:1)
Transportation planning, programming, and management; impacts on energy consumption and air quality; modeling methods, sampling, data collection, and survey design.
PREREQUISITE: C E 221W and at least 3 credits in statistics
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Transportation systems planning, programming, and management; modeling and simulation, data collection, analysis, and forecasting.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: 3 credits in probability or statistics
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-063 C E 448W
Advanced Structural Design
ADV STRUC DESIGN (3:3:0)
Design of steel and concrete structures with emphasis on bridges; timber design fundamentals.
PREREQUISITE: C E 341, 342
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Wind, snow, seismic, bridge loads; building design using steel, concrete, and prestressed concrete; advanced steel connections; capstone project; computer applications.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 341, 342, 435
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-064 C E 462
Open Channel Hydraulics
OPEN CHANNEL HYDR (3:3:0)
Free surface flow in rivers, canals, steep chutes, stilling basins, and transitions.
PREREQUISITE: C E 261
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 360
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-065 C E 465W
River and Waterways Engineering
WATERWAYS ENGR (3:3:0)
Hydraulic design of river structures and open channels including supercritical and spatially varied flow; hydrologic/hydraulic computer modeling; design project.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: C E 362
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Hydrosystems Capstone Course (HYDRO CAPSTONE)
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-066 C E 472W
Water Pollution Control Processes
WTR POL CTRL PROC (3:2:2)
Principles and design of unit operations for water; domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; equipment selection and application.
PREREQUISITE: C E 261, 270
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Environmental Engineering Capstone Design (ENV CAPSTONE DSGN)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 370, 371
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-067 C E 475
Water Quality Chemistry
WATER QUAL CHEM (3:2:3)
Chemistry applicable to the understanding and analysis of water quality, pollution, and treatment.
PREREQUISITE: C E 270, CHEM 013, 014
CROSS LIST: E R M 475
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 370, CHEM 012, 014
DROP CROSS LIST
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-068 C E 476
Solid Waste Management
SOLID WASTE MGMT (3:3:0)
Solid waste collection, salvage and disposal techniques for municipalities and industries; cost analyses; legislation; management; financing; design optimization.
PREREQUISITE: C E 270
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Solid and Hazardous Wastes (SOLID & HAZ WASTES)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Characteristics and treatment of solid wastes and hazardous wastes.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: C E 370, 371
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-068A CSE 458
Data Communications
DATA COMMUNICATION (3:3:0)
Data transmission, encoding, link control techniques; communication network architecture, design; computer communication system architecture, protocols.
PREREQUISITE: CSE 271; E E 317 or 350
CROSS LIST: E E 458
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Communication Networks (COMM NETWORKS)
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-068B E E 458
Data Communications
DATA COMMUNICATION (3:3:0)
Data transmission, encoding, link control techniques; communication network architecture, design; computer communication system architecture, protocols.
PREREQUISITE: CSE 271; E E 317 or 350
CROSS LIST: CSE 458
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Communication Networks (COMM NETWORKS)
PROPOSED START: SP2002

COURSE DROPS

29-04-069 C E 143
Elementary Structural Engineering
EL STRUCTURAL ENGR (3:3:0)
Design of timber, steel, and reinforced concrete structures. For non-civil engineering students.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 013
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-070 C E 221W
Transportation Systems Engineering
TRANS SYS ENG (3:3:0)
Introduction to vehicle motion, geometric design, traffic operations, highway capacity, pavement design, signal timing, and environmental issues. Intended primarily for civil engineering majors.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-071 C E 380
Characterization, Evaluation, and Specification of Civil Engineering Materials
CE MATERIALS (3:3:0)
Properties of civil engineering materials, measurements and test methods, relationship of properties to performance, effect of environment on material behavior.
PREREQUISITE: C E 280
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-072 C E 431W
Civil Engineering Construction
CONSTRUCTION (3)
Construction methods, equipment, and cost estimating of the earthmoving, rock excavation, and concrete production phases of civil engineering construction projects.
PREREQUISITE C E 231
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: C E 244, 280
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-073 C E 446
Advanced Soil Mechanics I
ADV SOIL MECHS I (3:3:0)
Subsurface exploration, seepage analysis and control, treatments of soft foundation soils, analyses of earth pressure and bearing capacity; practical applications.
PREREQUISITE: C E 244
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-074 C E 449W
Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures
DSGN PRESTRES CONC (3:2:2)
Design of prestressed concrete structures including bridges and buildings; individual design projects with emphasis on technical communication skills.
PREREQUISITE: C E 341
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-075 C E 451
Hydrologic Process, Analysis, and Design
HYDROL ANALYSIS (3:2:2)
Physical processes and quantitative methods for analysis of the circulation of water in the atmosphere, soils, surface, and groundwater systems.
PREREQUISITE: C E 351
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-076 C E 474
Management of Water Pollution Control Processes
MGMT WPC PROC (3:2:3)
Personnel requirements, record systems, unit process operation and control, laboratory control and equipment maintenance systems.
PREREQUISITE: C E 270
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-077 C E 477
Industrial Hazardous and Residual Waste Management
INDUS HAZ RES WAST (3:3:0)
Data analysis; unit processes to meet regulatory agency requirements; disposal of aqueous, gaseous, and solid residual; and hazardous waste streams.
PREREQUISITE: C E 472W, 476
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-078 C E 481
Pavement Materials and Design
PVMT MATERIALS DSG (3:3:0)
The nature, engineering characteristics, and selection of materials for highway pavements; design procedures for rigid and flexible pavements.
PREREQUISITE: C E 221W, 244, 280
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-079 C E 482
Portland Cement Concrete and Aggregates
PC CONCRETE AGGREG (3:3:0)
Production of Portland/hydraulic cements, aggregates and concrete; composition, engineering properties, and behavior; applications in construction, structural, and pavement engineering.
PREREQUISITE: C E 280
PROPOSED START: FA2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Health and Human Development

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
29-04-080 KINES 457
Exercise Prescription
EX PRESCRIPTION (2)
Principles of exercise prescription based on current practices in physical education, physiology, and medicine, with emphasis on prevention and rehabilitation.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 456
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Exercise Prescription and Case Studies (EX PRESCR/CAS STDY)
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3:3:0
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Principles of exercise prescription; application of fitness appraisal based on current practices using evaluation and discussion of case studies.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: KINES 350, 456
PROPOSED START: SP2002

OLD
29-04-080A NUTR 401
Nutrition Clinic Practicum
NUTR CLIN PRAC (1)
To provide qualified nutrition students with the opportunity to practically apply nutrition counseling skills in a supervised environment.
PREREQUISITE: NUTR 400
APPROVED START: SP2000

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 1-3
PROPOSED START: SP2002

COURSE DROPS

29-04-081 KINES 458
Exercise Science Case Studies
EX SCI CASE STUDY (1)
Application of fitness appraisal and exercise prescription skills in the evaluation and discussion of case studies.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 457
PROPOSED START: FA2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of the Liberal Arts

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
29-04-082 LING 446
First Language Acquisition
FIRST LANG ACQUIS (3:3:0)
Psycholinguistic study of how children learn their first language.
PREREQUISITE: LING 100
APPROVED START: S11993

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: L1 Acquisition (L1 ACQUISITION)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: How children learn their first language; psycholinguistic aspects of lexical, syntactic, semantic, and phonological development.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2002

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Eberly College of Science

COURSE ADDS

29-04-083 MATH 140D 142
Mathematica for Calculus I
MATHEMATICAL I (1)
Problem solving using Mathematica in a UNIX environment.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 022, 026; or MATH 040 or 041
CONCURRENT: MATH 140
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-084 MATH 140E
Calculus with Engineering Applications I
CALC ENGR APPS I (4)
Functions; limits; analytic geometry; derivatives; differentials, applications; integrals, applications.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 022, 026; or MATH 040, 041, or satisfactory performance in the mathematics proficiency examination
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-085 MATH 141D 143
Mathematica II
MATHEMATICA II (1)
Problem solving using Mathematica in a UNIX environment.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 140D
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-086 MATH 141E
Calculus with Engineering Applications II
CALC ENGR APPS II (4)
Integration, applications; sequences and series; parametric equations, application.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 140, 140A, 140B, or 140E
PROPOSED START: FA2001

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

29-04-087 Add new major.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Information Sciences and Technology (IST)

James B. Thomas, Dean, School of Information Sciences and Technology
120 South Burrows Street
504 Rider Building
814-865-3528

Degree Conferred: Ph.D.

The Graduate Faculty
Guoray Cai, Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) Assistant Professor of IST; Assistant Professor of Geography
Chao-Hsien Chu, Ph.D. (Penn State) Associate Professor of IST; Associate Professor of Management Science and Information Systems
Lee Giles, Ph.D. (Arizona) David Reese Professor of IST; Professor Of Computer Science and Engineering
John Harwood, Ph.D. (Nebraska) Associate Professor of IST; Associate Professor of English
Shaoyi He, Ph.D. (North Carolina, Chapel Hill) Assistant Professor of IST
Joseph M. Lambert, Ph.D. (Purdue), Associate Dean, Associate Professor of IST,
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Michael McNeese, Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) Associate Professor of IST
Frank Ritter, Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon) Associate Professor of IST; Associate Professor of Psychology
Steve Sawyer, Ph.D. (Boston) Associate Professor of IST; Associate Professor of
Management Science and Information Systems
Amanda Spink, Ph.D. (Rutgers) Associate Professor of IST, Associate Librarian
James B. Thomas, Ph.D. (UT-Austin) Dean, Professor of IST and Management
James Wang, Ph.D. (Stanford) PNC Bank Career Development Professor of IST

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Information Sciences and Technology offers advanced graduate education for students contemplating careers in academic teaching and research, or research in a non-academic setting. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and expects scholarship at the highest level exhibiting depth of competency in at least one of the core areas of the Information Sciences and Technology and an understanding of the integration of the critical constructs that drive the field: users, information, and technology.

Admissions Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Applicants are required to submit scores from the general portions of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), three letters of reference, and a one-three page personal statement of relevant experience and goals.

Competency in the English Language for candidates whose native language is not English can be demonstrated by a score of 585 (paper based) or 240 (computer based) or better in the TOEFL examination combined with a score of 250 or higher on the Test of Spoken English. Applicants with scores below but close to 585 (or 240) may be admitted provisionally upon the recommendation of the associate dean for research and graduate programs at IST, and allowed to fulfill the TOEFL requirement as specified in the Graduate School admissions policies.

Competency Expectations. Since the program is multidisciplinary in nature, majors from almost any discipline may be acceptable for entry into the program. A master's degree in a related area (e.g., computer science, information science) while not necessary for admissions is helpful in the successful completion of the degree. It is expected that students regardless of type or level of academic background will have a basic level of competency in statistics (a minimum of 6 credits in undergraduate and/or graduate coursework), computer language (a minimum of 6 credits of coursework in a computer language or languages), and information technology (coursework or work experience that demonstrates a basic understanding of information technology beyond a computer language). A student may be accepted into the program with "provisional status" for no more than one year while work is completed to meet these expectations.

The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Core Requirement All candidates are expected to develop a broad understanding of the core elements of users, information, technology, and the significant interactions among those elements.

Primary Field Requirement A candidate is expected to choose one of the following areas as a primary field: The relationship of users and information, the relationship of users and technology, the relationship of technology and information, or the integration of users, information, and technology.

Supporting Field(s) Requirement A candidate is expected to choose one or more supporting fields customized to support the primary field requirement. These supporting fields could be in business, education, engineering, the liberal arts, or science. Some examples include, instructional systems, computer science, psychology, and geography.

Research Methods All candidates must develop a broad understanding of the scientific research process and in-depth competency in the research methods of the primary field. Each candidate's doctoral committee shall specify a minimum of four graduate-level courses to support the primary field research methods. One of these courses must focus on the philosophy of science.

Language and Communication Requirements All candidates must be competent in the English Language and must have demonstrated skills in the communication of ideas both orally and in writing commensurate with the requirement of scholarly and professional work. The candidacy examination will be used as an occasion to assess English proficiency and plan for remediation (including additional courses, mentoring or experiences) for all students. A short essay will be included as part of the assessment process. The foreign language and communication requirement may be fulfilled through demonstrating computer language proficiency (assessed through courses taken) or a minimum of nine credits of 500-level statistics courses.

Admission Requirements

Since the program is multidisciplinary in nature, majors from almost any discipline may be acceptable for entry into the program. A master's degree in a related area (e.g., computer science, information science) while not necessary for admissions is helpful in the successful completion of the degree. It is expected that students regardless of type or level of academic background will have a basic level of competency in statistics (a minimum of 6 credits in undergraduate and/or graduate coursework), computer language (a minimum of 6 credits of coursework in a computer language or languages), and information technology (coursework or work experience that demonstrated an understanding of computer hardware, software and basic infrastructure). A student may be accepted into the program with "provisional status" for no more than one year while work is completed to meet these expectations

29-04-088 Change. Add QMM 591 and 593; remove QMM 597. Change program description. Increase degree requirements by from 30 credits to 32 credits.

Proposed effective date: Summer Semester 2001

Quality and Manufacturing Management (QMM)

Clayton O. Ruud, Professor of Industrial Engineering
Gerald I. Susman, The Robert and Judith Klein Professor of Management
344 Leonhard Building
814-863-5802

Degrees Conferred: M.M.M.

This graduate program is designed to prepare students for careers in manufacturing management. This integrated, interdisciplinary program in quality and manufacturing management is offered jointly by The Smeal College of Business Administration and the College of Engineering. The program is offered on a full-time basis only and requires nine months of continuous study during a normal academic year. An appropriate internship experience is a precondition for entrance to the program. Students take 32 credits of work in eleven core courses. The objective of the program is to develop managers who will lead manufacturing firms in the twenty-first century. Graduates from the program would be able to: span engineering and business specialties in order to integrate skills pertinent to customer-oriented approaches to manufacturing; work with customers in product design, development, and manufacturing; address problems that merge business and technical issues; and understand and champion process improvement across the organization and with suppliers and customers.

Admission Requirements
The program draws its students from two groups: practicing engineers and other professionals from industry and undergraduate students currently enrolled in undergraduate programs in business administration, engineering, and science.

Applicants from industry must have a minimum of one year of relevant industry work experience, must have received a baccalaureate degree in physical science, engineering, business, or management from an accredited university, and must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).

Applicants who are currently enrolled as undergraduates should apply for admission to the program in their senior year. They can be enrolled in any major in engineering, science, or business administration. Applicants must submit GRE or GMAT scores. At the time of application for admission, they should have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0, and before admission must complete an appropriate three-month internship.

All applicants must complete the follow prerequisites or the equivalent before they may matriculate: MATH 140 and 141, STAT 200 or MS&IS 200, CMPSC 201 or 203.

Degree Requirements
The QMM degree requires 32 credits of graduate work on a full-time basis. The courses are as follows:
QMM 491 or 492; 551, 552, 561, 562, 571, 572, 581, 582, 591, 593.
The program director or co-directors are authorized to make suitable substitutions in the above curriculum in consultation with the faculty steering committee.

Student Aid
A limited number of partial scholarships are available for students in the program.

QUALITY AND MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT (QMM)

491. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS CONCEPTS FOR MANUFACTURING (3)
492. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN PRINCIPLES (3)

551. QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3) Concepts of design, assessment, and improvement of quality systems; customer needs analysis, identification of opportunities for application of measurement techniques.
552. APPLIED STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (3) Concepts and techniques of statistical process control and the design of experiments. Prerequisite: QMM 551.
561. MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS PLANNING AND CONTROL I (3) Systems, components and configurations, flow of material and information in a manufacturing system. Prerequisite: admission to the QMM program.
562. MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS PLANNING AND CONTROL II (3) Flow of material and information in a manufacturing system; emphasis on systems integration. Prerequisite: QMM 561.
571. DESIGN PRACTICE FOR MANUFACTURING I (3) Contemporary concepts in design and design practice with emphasis on engineering, business, and human strategy issues. Prerequisite or concurrent: QMM 491 or 492.
572. DESIGN PRACTICE FOR MANUFACTURING II (3) Contemporary concepts in design and design practice with emphasis on logistics, risk, design and manufacturing readiness, and production. Prerequisite: QMM 571.
581. MANUFACTURING PROCESSES AND MATERIALS (3) Characteristics of materials with respect to their properties and associated choices of processing to create a range or products. Prerequisite: admission to the QMM program.
582. MANUFACTURING AND SUPPLY CHAIN STRATEGY (3) Strategic decision context of manufacturing and its supply chains with linkage to corporate and business strategy. Prerequisite: enrollment in the QMM program.
591. COMMUNICATION AND LEADERSHIP SKILLS FOR MANUFACTURING MANAGERS (1-3) Applied principles of managerial, visual, and written communication that support the needs of manufacturing leaders.
593. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN MANUFACTURING (1-2) Experiential learning through the firsthand study of manufacturing plants and by interaction with manufacturing leaders.

COURSE ADDS

29-04-089 IST 501
Integrative Theories and Methods of the Information Sciences and Technology
IST INTEGRATION (3)
An integrative treatment of the research and theories on how technologies are used to meet information needs at multiple levels of analysis.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-090 IST 511
Information Management: Information and Technology
INFORMATION MGMT (3)
Introduction to theoretical, computational, and practical issues involved in managing textual, spatial, temporal, and multimedia information in a computerized system.
PREREQUISITE: IST 501
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-091 IST 521
Human-Computer Interaction: The User and Technology
HCI (3)
Users, models of users, developing the models, technology for creating interfaces; examples of good research and implications for HCI design.
PREREQUISITE: IST 501
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-092 IST 531
Human Information Behavior: Information and the User
HUM INFO BEHAVIOR (3)
Introduction to research into the nature of human information and communication processes at the individual, social, and organizational levels.
PREREQUISITE: IST 501
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-093 IST 594
Research Topics
RESEARCH TOPICS (1-18)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small group basis.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-094 IST 598
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-095 IST 600
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-15)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-096 IST 601
Ph.D. Dissertation Full-Time
PH.D DIS FULL-TIME (0)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-097 IST 602
Supervised Experience in College Teaching
SUPV EXP/COLL TCHG (1-3 per semester, maximum of 6)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-098 IST 610
Thesis Research Off-Campus
THES RES OFF CMPUS (1-15)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-099 IST 611
Ph.D. Dissertation Part-Time
PH.D DIS PART-TIME (0)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-100 METAL 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2001

29-04-101 SOC 573
Demographic Techniques
DEMOGRAPHIC TECH (3)
Models and measures of vital processes (fertility, mortality, migration) and their effects on growth and age structure of human populations.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 200
PROPOSED START: FA2001

APPENDIX C
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

COURSE ADDS

29-04-101A HES 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2001

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
29-04-102 HMN 709
Religion and Health
RELIGION & HEALTH (5)
Relates religious traditions, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and the spiritual lives of "the unchurched," to health and medical care.
APPROVED START: FA1999

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 2.5
PROPOSED START: SP2002