APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Agricultural Sciences

COURSE ADDS

28-08-001 CEDEV 417
Power, Conflict, and Community Decision Making
PWR/CONFL/DEC MKG (3)
Theory and analysis of power, conflict and decision making, and community crisis. Community change illustrations will be used.
PREREQUISITE: R SOC 011 or SOC 001
CROSS LIST: R SOC 417
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-002 CEDEV 420 (DF)
Women in Developing Countries
WOMEN IN DEV (3)
Analysis of women's work, experiences, and development policies and practices in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
CROSS LIST: R SOC 420, WMNST 420
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-003 CEDEV 430
Principles of Economic Development Planning
ECON DEV PLAN PRIN (3:3:0)
Concepts, strategies, and techniques of local economic analysis, planning, and development; case studies and decision-making exercises.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 002, 004; 3 credits in finance; 3 credits at the 400-level in economics, agricultural economics, regional planning, or geography
CROSS LIST: AG EC 430
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-004 CEDEV 432
Techniques of Community Economic Development Planning
ECON DEV PLAN TECH (3:2:2)
Techniques of financial and organizational analysis applied to actual community economic development problems; utilization of innovate economic development strategies and methods.
PREREQUISITE: AG EC 430, ECON 323, 330
CROSS LIST: AG EC 432
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-005 CEDEV 452
Rural Organization
RURAL ORGANIZATION (3:3:0)
Social organization and change in rural communities; use of sociological principles in analysis of rural problems and rural development.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in rural sociology, sociology, or psychology
CROSS LIST: R SOC 452
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-006 CEDEV 460
Introduction to Community Information Systems
COMM INFO SYS (3:3:0)
Introduction to community information systems; information needs; common features; issues in development; organization vs. community-wide systems; current technologies.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101, STAT 100
CROSS LIST: R SOC 460
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-007 CEDEV 462
Community Information Systems Laboratory
COMM INFO SYS LAB (3:3:0)
Laboratory for development of a model community information system.
PREREQUISITE: CEDEV 460
CROSS LIST: R SOC 462
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-008 CEDEV 470
Comparative Community Development
COMPAR COM DEV (3:3:0)
Crosscultural community development projects and the problems encountered in each of the different cultural contexts.
PREREQUISITE: 9 credits in human development or the social sciences
CROSS LIST: R SOC 470
PROPOSED START: FA2000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-08-009 AG EC 430
Principles of Economic Development Planning
PRIN ECON DEV PLNG (3:3:0)
Concepts, strategies and techniques of local economic analysis, planning and development; case studies and decision-making exercises.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 002, 004; 3 credits in finance; 3 credits at the 400 level in economics, agricultural economics, regional planning or geography
APPROVED START: S11993

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 430
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-010 AG EC 432
Techniques of Community Economic Development Planning
TECH ECON DEV PLNG (3:2:2)
Techniques of financial and organizational analysis applied to actual community economic development problems; utilization of innovative economic development strategies and methods.
PREREQUISITE: AG EC 430, ECON 323, 330
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 432
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-011 R SOC 417
Power, Conflict, and Community Decision Making
PWR/CONFL/DEC MKG (3:3:0)
Theory and analysis of power, conflict and decision making, and community crisis. Community change illustrations will be used.
PREREQUISITE: R SOC 011 OR SOC 001
CROSS LIST: COM S 417
APPROVED START: FA1988

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 417
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-012 R SOC 420 (DF)
Women in Developing Countries
WOMEN IN DEV (3)
Analysis of women's work, experiences, and development policies and practices in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 420
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: CEDEV 420, WMNST 420
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-013 R SOC 452
Rural Organization
RURAL ORGANIZATION (3:3:0)
Social organization and change in rural communities; use of sociological principles in analysis of rural problems and rural development.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in rural sociology, sociology, or psychology
APPROVED START: F21981

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 452
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-014 R SOC 460
Introduction to Community Information Systems
INTRO COM INFO SYS (3:3:0)
Introduction to community information systems; information needs; common features; issues in development; organization vs. community-wide systems; current technologies.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101, STAT 100
APPROVED START: S11993

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 460
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-015 R SOC 462
Community Information Systems Laboratory
COM INFO SYS LAB (3:1:4)
Laboratory for the development of a model community information system.
PREREQUISITE: GEOG 457, R SOC 460
APPROVED START: S11993

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3:3:0
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: R SOC 460
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 462
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-016 R SOC 470
Comparative Community Development
COMPAR COM DEV (3:3:0)
Cross-cultural community development projects and the problems encountered in each of the different cultural contexts.
PREREQUISITE: 9 CREDITS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT OR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
CROSS LIST: COM S 470
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 470
PROPOSED START: FA2000

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

028-08-017 ART H 001S (GA)
First-Year Seminar
FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR (3:3:0)
An introduction to the field of art history, through an examination of a selected issue in a seminar setting.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Commonwealth College

28-08-018 Change. Program description change.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Occupational Therapy (OCTCC)

PROFESSOR JANET V. DeLANY, Program Director, Penn State Mont Alto

This major is a professional-level program designed for individuals who have earned an associate degree in Occupational Therapy and successfully pass the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) national certification examination for occupational therapy assistants by the second semester of enrollment in the program. Admission is competitive, limited to thirty-five applicants each year, and is based on academic excellence, involvement in continuing educational and professional activities, work experience, and letters of recommendation.

The program has been granted full accreditation status by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education. Graduates of accredited programs can sit for and must pass the NBCOT national certification examination for occupational therapists to practice as registered therapists. Most states also require licensure. Students must complete Level II fieldwork within twenty-four months of completion of the Occupational Therapy didactic course work.

All applicants must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.75 through completion of 21 credits of occupational therapy assistant didactic course work (such as O T 101-206) and 33 credits of General Education and supporting course work (such as PSY 002 GS(3), 243 GS(3); BIOL 129(4), 141 GN(3), 142(1); HD FS 129 GS(3); SOC 001 GS(3); ENGL 015 GWS(3); KINES 013 GHS(1); other quantitative arts and humanities courses). Full-time applicants can take the remaining General Education/supporting credits concurrently with the 300- to 400-level occupational therapy course work, but part-time applicants must are encouraged to complete them prior to enrollment in this program. All applicants are expected to complete the program within thirty-six months of enrolling in the first 300- to 400-level O T courses.

For the B.S. degree in Occupational Therapy, a minimum of 128 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24-25 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 106-107 credits
(This includes 24-25 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3-4 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses, 3 credits of GHA courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (100-101 credits)
BIOL 129 (4), 141 GN(3), 142(1), HD FS 129 GS(3), KINES 013 GHS(3), O T 101(3), 103(3), 105W(3), 107(3), PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
O T 202(2-3), 204(3), 206(3), PSY 243 GS(3), SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
O T 384(3), [1], 401(2)[1], 402(4), [1], 403(3)[1], 404(3)[1], 405(4)[1], 406(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
O T 407(3), [1], 408(4)[1], 409(4), [1], 410(3)[1], 411(3)[1], 412W(3)[1], 495A(3)[1], 495B(6)[1], 495C(6)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3-4 credits)
STAT 200 GQ(4) or 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of GN courses in natural science (Sem: 5-6)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Education

COURSE ADDS

28-08-019 ADTED 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: S12000

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Liberal Arts

28-08-020 Add new Integrated B.A./M.A. Program in Comparative Literature

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

Integrated B.A./M.A. Program in Comparative Literature

The Department of Comparative Literature offers an integrated B.A./M.A. program that is designed to allow academically superior baccalaureate students to obtain both the B.A. and the M.A. degrees in Comparative Literature within five years of study. The first two years of undergraduate coursework include the University General Education and Liberal Arts requirements in addition to language and literature study in the major. In the third year, students are expected to define areas of interest in two primary literatures in different languages. In addition, students in the B.A./N4.A. program should begin to undertake work in a second foreign language. The fourth year includes graduate level work in methodology and the student's selection of primary literatures which replaces comparable 400-level senior year courses. The fifth and final year of the program typically consists of graduate work in Comparative Literature courses as well as the chosen literatures. The program culminates with an M.A. paper.

By encouraging greater depth and focus in the course of study beginning in the third undergraduate year, this program will help the student more clearly define his/her area of interest and expertise in the otherwise vast field of international literatures. As a result, long-range academic planning for exceptional students pursuing doctoral degrees after leaving Penn State, or other professional goals, will be greatly enhanced. The student may also be more competitive in applying for admission to Ph.D. programs as well as for institutional and national grant monies and scholarships.

Admission Requirements

The number of openings in the integrated B.A./M.A. program is limited. Admission will be selective based on specific criteria and the unqualified recommendation of faculty. Applicants to the integrated program:

  1. Must be enrolled in the Comparative Literature B.A. program.
  2. Must have completed 60 credits of the undergraduate degree program (it is strongly suggested that students apply to the program prior to completing 100 credits).
  3. Must be accepted without reservation into the M.A. program in Comparative Literature.
  4. Should have a recommended overall GPA of 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale) in undergraduate coursework and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in all coursework completed for the major.
  5. Must present a departmentally approved plan of study in the application process.
  6. Must be recommended by the chairs of the Department's undergraduate and graduate committees.

A typical sequence of coursework for the integrated program would appear as follows:

Year One: 3 credits: CMLIT 100
6 credits: Literary Traitions (CMLIT 001, 002, 003, 004, 005)
Year Two: 6 credits: Foreign Language (beyond the 12-credit level)
6 credits: Courses in Period, Theme or Genre
Year Three: 6 credits: 400-level curses in two Literatures (in different languages)
(variable credits) Additional work in a seond foreign language (credits do not count towards the major, but reading proficiency is required for the M.A. degree).
Year Four: 3 credits: CMLIT 501
6 credits: Comparative Literature courses
6 credits: 500-level courses in two Literatures
Year Five: 12 credits: 500-level courses in two Literatures
6 credits: 500-level Comparative Literature Courses M.A. paper

COURSE ADDS

28-08-020A LATIN 400
Latin Prose Composition
PROSE COMP (3:3:0)
Latin style and stylistics and examined and appreciated through standard exercises in composition and parallel selected prose readings.
PREREQUISITE: LATIN 003 or 12th-credit level of proficiency
PROPOSED START: S12000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-08-021 WMNST 420 (DF)
Women in Developing Countries
WOMEN IN DEV (3)
Analysis of women's work, experiences, and development policies and practices in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
CROSS LIST: R SOC 420
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST TO: CEDEV 420, R SOC 420
PROPOSED START: FA2000

 

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Eberly College of Science

28-08-022 Change. Add the requirement of a grade of C or better to the following five courses: CHEM 451, 452, MATH 140, 141, 231.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Chemistry (CHEM)

PROFESSOR ANDREW EWING, Head

This major provides a strong foundation in the facts and principles of chemistry. Mathematics and physics are emphasized, since these subjects are essential to the understanding of chemistry. Courses in English and a foreign language and electives ensure study in non-technical subjects. This arrangement broadens the student's general education and enables him or her to relate the major to other fields of knowledge.

A student wishing to transfer into the Chemistry program must have attained an average of 2.50 in chemistry, physics, and mathematics courses and must have completed at least CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), and 231(2). A Chemistry major may enter the fifth semester of the Chemistry program only if he or she has attained an overall average of 2.50 or better in chemistry, physics, and mathematics courses.

For the B.S. degree in Chemistry, a minimum of 125 credits is required.

CHEMISTRY MINOR: Students must take CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), 038(3), 039(3), 451(3), 452(3); select 2 credits from CHEM 036(2), 457(2); and any two courses from CHEM 402(3), 405(3), 408(3), 410(3), 411(3), 425(3), 426(3), 431W(3), 439(3), 448(3), 453(3), 454(3), 455(3), 457(2) if not used in above category, 463(3), for a minimum of 27 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 94 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (55 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3)[1], 013 GN(3)[1], 014 GN(1)[1], 015 GN(1)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 201 GN(4) or 211 GN(4); 202 GN(4) or 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
CHEM 016(1), 036(2)[1], 038(3)[1], 039(3)[1], 431W(3), 451(3)[1], 452(3)[1], 457(2), MATH 231(2)[1], 250(3) (Sem: 3-4)
PHYS 204 GN(4) or 213 GN(2) and 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-6)
MATH 220 GQ(2) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)
CHEM 425(3) or 426(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 18 credits of chemistry at the 400 level. Up to 3 co-op credits (1 each of SC 295, 395, 495) may be used in this category. CHEM 489(1-10) may be used, but the total of CHEM 489 credits plus co-op credits may not exceed 8. (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Up to 8 credits may be used to achieve the II level of a foreign/second language in which a significant chemical literature is produced. (German or Russian is recommended.) The remaining 10-18 credits may include any courses not on the Department list of courses that do not count towards graduation. Only one credit of each of SC 295, 395, and 495 is allowed in this category. Chemical Research (Chem 489 or 496) does not count in this category. (Sem: 3-6)

____________
[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

28-08-023 Add new M.S. program in Community and Economic Development

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

Community and Economic Development (CEDEV)

The graduate program in Community and Economic Development prepares students to confront the multidimensional challenges faced by community development practitioners, and provides a background for further graduate work in a variety of fields. The program's main objective is educating professionals who will assume leadership roles in helping establish and maintain viable communities. Graduates will become deeply involved in assisting localities with a variety of issues, including: research and education, Cooperative Extension, developing new organizations and new industries, growth management, protecting the environment, revitalizing downtown areas, enhancing the local quality-of-life, assistin- educational, social, health and human service systems, and developing vital infrastructure--in short, helping communities shape their own futures.

Students in Community and Economic Development gain a broad understanding of the dynamics of communities and their social, economic and political systems. The program emphasizes teaching the theory, skills and tools that allow practitioners to address the important issues in development practice. The program stresses three areas critical to professional success:

Leaming is through a combination of formal classes, case studies, field experiences, and field projects. An important part of this degree is a professional internship or field project leading to a master's paper, or research leading to a thesis. The program is multi-disciplinary, with students taking courses not only in the Community and Economic Development program, but also in such subjects as rural sociology, sociology, agricultural economics, economics, computer science, political science, public administration, real estate, geography, demography, landscape architecture and environmental resource management.

Graduates of the Community and Economic Development program have a wide range of academic and professional career opportunities, including: teaching and research positions in universities, local and state government agencies, planning commissions, major corporations, nongovernmental organizations and consulting firms. While the degree emphasizes practical experience, the program is flexible enough to provide students the requisite skills that will enable them to commence and make rapid progress toward advanced degrees in areas such as law, public administration, agricultural economics, rural sociology, and urban and regional planning.

Degree Requirements

The M.S. requires at least 35 credits, including an internship or field project leading to a paper, or a Master's thesis. All students are required to complete a core program of required community and economic development courses, statistics and research methods. Choice of electives will be based on a plan of study worked out between the student and faculty advisor. The CEDEV core consists of CEDEV 500, R.Soc. 452, Ag.Ec. 430, CEDEV 509, CEDEV 502, and CEDEV 505/R.Soc. 552 for the M.S. The statistics, methods, and techniques requirement includes at least AG 400, CEDEV 575, CEDEV 576, and three credits in an internship or field project culminating in a MS paper, or research leading to a Master's thesis. Students wishing to pursue a project and MS paper through foreign study may do so with approval of the graduate committee. There is no foreign language requirement for the degee; the student is expected to comp4ete such statistics and research courses and instruction necessary to generate superior capabilities of inquiry into and analysis of applied community and economic development issues.

Students wishing to prepare for the Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics or Rural Sociology are encouraged to include advanced economics or rural sociology courses identi 'fied by the program and to choose the thesis option. Students planning to work in multi-cultural or international settings are encouraged to gain competency in the appropriate language(s).

28-08-024 Drop M.Eng. degree program in Engineering Science.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

THE BEHREND COLLEGE

Engineering Science (E SC)

28-08-025 Add new M.Eng. program in Manufacturing Systems Engineering.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

THE BEHREND COLLEGE

Manufacturing Systems Enginneering (MFGSE)

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required.

REQUIRED COURSES: 21 credits

Core Courses (12 credits)

The program of study will consist of four core courses which focus on the structure and operation of a manufacturing business, the development of the skills required to identify newly emerging process and systems technologies, and the managed integration of these technologies into today's modem manufacturing environment. In addition, emphasis would be directed toward reinforcing the latest quality practices currently being adopted by U.S. manufacturers. Core courses include:

B ADM 500 The Business Enterprise
MANGT 510 Project Management
MFGSE 520 Analytical Techniques in Manufacturing and Design
MFGSE 540 Manufacturing Systems

Additional Manufacturing Systems Engineering Courses (6 credits)

The student must also select a minimum of two 500-level manufacturing system engineering courses (6 credits) from the following

MFGSE 530 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems
MFGSE 550 Design for Manufacturability I
MFGSE 551 Design for Manufacturability II

Required Project (3 credits)

Each candidate must complete three credits of MFGSE 580, Masters Project. Typically this would be conducted in conjunction with a manufacturing company as a manufacturing capstone case study, a manufacturing technology project or a manufacturing research project. All final products must include a final report written in a scholarly manner.

Manufacturing Capstone Case Study

The case study would focus on the analysis of a problem facing a manufacturer. The case study approach would enable the student to view all aspects of manufacturing and have a greater understanding of the problems associated with an actual manufacturing enterprise.

Manufacturing Technology Project

The project would focus on the technical and business issues related to the adoption of a new technology into a manufacturing enterprise. In addition to the written report, the study must be presented orally to the client.

Manufacturing Research Project

This research project would focus on the application of a new manufacturing engineering technology to a current industrial problem. This project may be focused on a particular company or on a broader industry.

ELECTIVES: 9 credits

The electives must be selected from a school approved list. Courses offered from outside the School would be considered on an individual basis and in consultation with the graduate adviser.

It should be noted that the electives allow the candidate to strengthen his or her capabilities in the business arena by continuing to take additional graduate business courses, or in the technical arena by focusing on one of several technical areas for which Behrend College's School of Engineering and Engineering Technology (SEET) is already well-known.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

The student's program of study must represent a coherent plan appropriate to the student's academic background and experience. The program must be pre-approved by the graduate program adviser before starting the elective courses.

COURSE SCHEDULING
Courses would be scheduled at times most convenient for the students. Most classes would be held in a late afternoon/evening time frame or on weekends, since the vast majority of students are expected to be part-time students who work full-time in industry.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The applicant should have an appropriate undergraduate degree in engineering or engineering technology from an ABET-accredited program. Students who lack specific technical or mathematical background deemed necessary for success in this program would be required to take foundation courses as prerequisites.

Primary criteria for acceptance into the graduate program would include:

Exceptions will be made at the discretion of the program.

28-08-026 Add new concurrent degree program in Master of Business Administration and Master of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management, The Smeal College of Business Administration and The Graduate School Program of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management in the School of Hotel, Restaurant and Recreation Management.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

THE SMEAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Concurrent Degree Program in Business Administration and Hotel, Restaurant and Recreation Management

This program will facilitate the completion of both a master of hotel, restaurant, and institutional management and master of business administration degree. The lodging, restaurant, and hospitality industries increasingly seek experienced business professionals who have graduate training that addresses both broad-based business knowledge and more focused industry-specific knowledge. This concurrent program provides highly motivated students with an opportunity to enhance their understanding of and ability to manage the issues that are unique to these types of businesses in the context of the larger economic arena. Faculty and students involved in the classroom will benefit from the diversity of interests these students bring. Furthermore, the program will provide opportunities for faculty to expand their scholarly interests as a result of the interactions generated.

28-08-027 Change Master of Science degree in Information Systems. Delete ECNMS 510, MNGMT 522, and MRKT 520 from listing of business core courses; other changes are indicated by underlined text.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

CAPITAL COLLEGE
School of Business Administration

Informational Systems (INFSY)

Operating under the auspices of the School of Business Administration, Penn State Harrisburgís masterís degree program in Information Systems is designed to meet the rapidly increasing need for technically grounded, upper level information resources managers within business organizations. With the exception of a small percentage of students who are full-time, the students served by the MS/IS program are employees of area businesses, state and local governments, and not-for-profit organizations, who study on a part-time basis. In order to accommodate both full- and part-time students, courses are primarily offered in the evening.

The two-fold nature of the program requires a manager to have competence both in information technology and in management theory; therefore, the curriculum combines the highly technical content of information science with the managerial emphasis of information systems. Unlike computer science programs, which tend to focus on computer hardware and architecture, this program is organized around applied computer-based activities, the development of communication skills, and managerial principles.

Admission Requirements
Those wishing to apply to the program must hold a baccalaureate degree in any field from an accredited, college-level institution. Decisions are based primarily on undergraduate junior-senior grade-point average and the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) scores. Post-baccalaureate course work, professional experience, and the statements provided in the application are also taken into account.

Students are also required to submit: a completed application form; two copies of official transcripts from all college or universities attended; scores from the GMAT test (the test must have been taken within the past five years); application fee; letters of recommendation (optional).

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) must be taken by applicants for whom English is not their first language. The test must be passed with a score of 550 or higher and must have been taken within the last five years.

Please contact the Office of Enrollment Services (717)948-6250 or (800)222-2056 to request an application form or with questions regarding the admissions procedure.

Entrance into the Program
Candidates may enter the program at the beginning of the fall, spring, or summer session. To allow time for applications to be processed, all information, including GMAT score, must be received by Enrollment Services no later than July 18 for admission to the fall semester, November 18 for admission to the spring semester, and April 18 for admission to the summer session. Applicants who wish an early decision must have all information to the Enrollment Services Office no later than April 18 for admission to the fall semester, July 18 for admission to the spring semester, and November 18 for admission to the summer session.

Applications from outside the United States must follow the early-admission dates in order to allow the necessary clearances and paperwork to be processed in time.

Preparation for the Program
Computer Programming Requirement: Students are required to demonstrate competence through satisfactory completion of 3 credits of a high-level programming language, determined by the Information Systems faculty, completed with a grade of "B" or better within five years prior to admission. If this requirement has not been met, 3 credits of the designated language are required.

Mathematics Requirement: Prior to enrolling in their MS/IS course work, students are required to demonstrate competence in quantitative skills.

This may be demonstrated by: (1) satisfactory completion of a college-level calculus course such as QUANT 310, or (2) successful completion of a mathematics proficiency examination approved by the MS/IS program. This requirement must be taken either during the first semester or summer session of the studentís matriculation and completed with a grade of "C" or better.

Credit by examination: Interested students should obtain a Credit by Examination form from Enrollment Services and should consult with mathematics faculty in the School of Science, Engineering, and Technology to schedule the exam and obtain a list of suggested preparatory materials.

Computer Requirement: Students are required to demonstrate competence through a college-level micro-computer applications course within the past six years (and passed with at least a "B") or significant work experience. If this requirement has not been met, a college-level microcomputer course such as INFSY 305 is required. Course work must be taken either during the first semester or summer session of the studentís matriculation and completed with a grade of "B" or better.

Proficiency in Writing: The MS/IS program requires the ability to think clearly and write effectively. If a score of "4" or more on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) is not achieved, then students will need to satisfy this requirement through course work in college-level English and/or other remedial work taken either during the first semester or summer session of the studentís matriculation and completed with a grade of "B" or better.

Business Core: Although students in the MS/IS program are not required to have prior course work in business administration for admission, given that each student will interact within the business community, he/she needs to be familiar with a number of business-related topics. The ability to understand financial accounting and how people relate to others in various organizations helps to merge two related disciplines: business and information systems. Business statistics, the other core prerequisite, provide skills necessaray to the comprehension of the literature in the field. These requirements may be satisfied by prior undergraduate or graduate course work completed with a grade of "B" or better within seven years prior to admission, or college-level coursework, or college-level course work validated by recent work experience. Coursework not meeting these tests of relevancy, grade or currency, must be taken at the graduate level and early in the Program.

Prerequisite Business Core Courses (9 credits)

Transfer Credits, Substitutions and Course Waivers

Transfer Credits.

Up to 10 transfer credits may be applied toward the degree. These courses must have been taken within the past five years, appear on a graduate transcript, and have been passed with a "B" grade or better. It must be the opinion of the reviewing faculty that these courses are the equivalent in quality to those offered at Penn State Harrisburg. Credit will not be given for any class used to complete a previous degree.

Course Substitutions.

Except for INFSY 554, which must be taken at the College, INFSY prescribed and additional courses, in cases where there is equivalent knowledge, must be replaced with more advanced courses in the same field. Substitutions are based on a minimum of six credits of advanced undergraduate coursework in an area of concentration or credits earned in an equivalent graduate-level program at an accredited, college-level instiution. These courses must have been completed within the past five years and have earned a grade of "B" or better. Required coureses must be replaced with other advanced graduate courses in the field for which the replaced course is the foundation/prerequisite. Additional courses in the program should be replaced with other coureses in this category. Substitutions are based on past academic performance. An examination cannot be used for earned graduate course credit.

Course Waivers.

Waivers are given for prerequisite courses and are based on undergraduate course work or credits earned in an equivalent graduate-level program at a regionally accedited college-level institution. These courses are waived without replacement according to the guidelines stated above. Students will be informed of this in a letter received from the program office.

Graduation Requirements
The MS/IS program requires, excluding prerequisite requirements, 30 credits of course work at the graduate level (500 level or higher).

28-08-028 Drop Master of Recreation and Parks degree program.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

CAPITAL COLLEGE

Recreation and Parks

28-08-029 Drop M.Ed. Adult Education program at Penn State Erie, New Kensington, Shenango Valley, and Monroeville.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Adult Education (ADTED)

28-08-030 Add new Biomolecular Transportation Dynamics Option to the Bioengineering intercollege graduate program.

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Bioengineering (BIOE)/Biomolecular Transport Dynamics Option

The Biomolecular Transport Dynamics Option requires the following courses in addition to the doctoral dissertation, candidacy and comprehensive exams:

The Doctoral degree in Bloengineering requires the following courses in addition to the doctoral dissertation, candidacy and comprehensive exams:

By comparing the BioE and BTD requirements it is clear that a student satisfying the BioE requirements need only take IBIOS 590 (2), IBIOS 596 (1), IBIOS 591 (1) and IBIOS 602 (2) to also satisfy the BTD requirements. The Internship course (IBIOS 595) is optional. These six extra credits beyond the minimum BioE requirements are not considered excessive for BTD students since most BioE students graduate with more than the minimum requirements completed. It should also be noted that the required teaching experience (2 semesters of TA) can be fulfilled in Bioengineering undergraduate courses that will be established along with the new undergraduate program in Bioengineering which is scheduled for start up in Fall 2001.

Again by comparing the BioE and BTD requirements it is clear that the differences between BTD student and a general BioE student are the following courses:

The total credits for these courses is 15 or 16. This is more than one-third of the course credits required for the major. Therefore BTD satisfies the definition of an "Option".

28-08-031 Add New Ventures and Entrepreneurial Studies Option in the Master of Business Administration Program

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSAD)

ELLEN FOSTER CURTIS, Academic Division Head
Penn State Great Valley
School of Graduate Professional Studies
30 East Swedesford Road
Malvern, PA 19355-1443
(610) 648-3200

Degree Conferred: M.B.A.

This program enables students interested in management in the public, private, or nonprofit sectors to pursue integrated programs of study covering the fundamentals of management, the interfaces of the several sectors with one another, and a choice of specializations applicable to one or more of these sectors. Program options are offered in health care administration and New Ventures and Entrepreneurial Studies. Required research in these areas of specialization may be conducted in Penn State Great Valley's Library and Computer Center, which provide local research support as well as access to the library and computer resources of the entire Penn State system.

The MBA program is geared toward the needs of part-time students who are employed full-time. Courses in the program, which are offered at Great Valley, are scheduled for the convenience of adult learners, in the early morning, evening or on Saturday.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to the Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) are required for admission. At the discretion of the admissions committee, a student may be admitted provisionally to the program without these scores.

Applicants with a 3.00 junior/senior grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. Special consideration will be given to students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests. Applicants should have had at least one year of quantitative analysis or statistics.

Admission decisions are based on the quality of the applicant's credentials in relation to those of other applicants. Evaluation criteria include professional and academic accomplishments, GMAT scores, recommendations, and personal data from application materials that provide indications of future academic and professional accomplishment. Application Filing Dates: Applications for fall semester admission may be submitted through August 1, and applications for spring semester may be submitted through December 1.

Degree Requirements

The M.B.A. degree requires 42 hours of graduate-level study. The program consists of a series of core courses, elective courses, and a capstone course.

  1. Core courses (27 credits): Core courses provide a foundation for business studies. They include MGMT 501, M I S 53 1, B A 517, MS&IS 5 10, ACCTG 51 1, B A 533, MKTG 500, FIN 531, and B A 555.
  2. Elective courses (12 credits): Elective courses provide an opportunity to obtain more depth in specific functional areas of business, health care administration and entrepreneurship to meet the career needs and interests of students.
  3. Capstone course (3 credits): The capstone course MGMT 571 provides a strategic focus and integrates the business disciplines.
  4. Health Care Administration option courses (42 credits): The core courses listed in No. 1 (above) with H P A 535 replacing FIN 531 and B A 533 not required. H P A 520, H P A 524, one H'P A elective plus three additional electives. H P A 5 5 6 replaces MGMT 5 7 1.
  5. New Ventures and Entrepreneurial Studies Option Courses (42 credits): The core courses in No. 1 (above), with BA 578 or BUSAD 511 replacing an elective, and BUSAD 522 replacing FIN 531. BA 533, MKTG 500, and BA 555 plus three electives required. BUSAD 512 replaced MGMT 571.

28-08-032 Add new Integrated B.A./M.A. Program in Comparative Literature

Proposed Effective Date: Fall Semester 2000

COLLEGE OF THE LIBERAL ARTS

Integrated B.A./M.A. Program in Comparative Literature

The Department of Comparative Literature offers an integrated B.A./M.A. program that is designed to allow academically superior baccalaureate students to obtain both the B.A. and the M.A. degrees in Comparative Literature within five years of study. The first two years of undergraduate coursework include the University General Education and Liberal Arts requirements in addition to language and literature study in the major. In the third year, students are expected to define areas of interest in two primary literatures in different languages. In addition, students in the B.A./N4.A. program should begin to undertake work in a second foreign language. The fourth year includes graduate level work in methodology and the student's selection of primary literatures which replaces comparable 400-level senior year courses. The fifth and final year of the program typically consists of graduate work in Comparative Literature courses as well as the chosen literatures. The program culminates with an M.A. paper.

By encouraging greater depth and focus in the course of study beginning in the third undergraduate year, this program will help the student more clearly define his/her area of interest and expertise in the otherwise vast field of international literatures. As a result, long-range academic planning for exceptional students pursuing doctoral degrees after leaving Penn State, or other professional goals, will be greatly enhanced. The student may also be more competitive in applying for admission to Ph.D. programs as well as for institutional and national grant monies and scholarships.

Admission Requirements

The number of openings in the integrated B.A./M.A. program is limited. Admission will be selective based on specific criteria and the unqualified recommendation of faculty. Applicants to the integrated program:

  1. Must be enrolled in the Comparative Literature B.A. program.
  2. Must have completed 60 credits of the undergraduate degree program (it is strongly suggested that students apply to the program prior to completing 100 credits).
  3. Must be accepted without reservation into the M.A. program in Comparative Literature.
  4. Should have a recommended overall GPA of 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale) in undergraduate coursework and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in all coursework completed for the major.
  5. Must present a departmentally approved plan of study in the application process.
  6. Must be recommended by the chairs of the Department's undergraduate and graduate committees.

A typical sequence of coursework for the integrated program would appear as follows:

Year One: 3 credits: CMLIT 100
6 credits: Literary Traitions (CMLIT 001, 002, 003, 004, 005)
Year Two: 6 credits: Foreign Language (beyond the 12-credit level)
6 credits: Courses in Period, Theme or Genre
Year Three: 6 credits: 400-level curses in two Literatures (in different languages)
(variable credits) Additional work in a seond foreign language (credits do not count towards the major, but reading proficiency is required for the M.A. degree).
Year Four: 3 credits: CMLIT 501
6 credits: Comparative Literature courses
6 credits: 500-level courses in two Literatures
Year Five: 12 credits: 500-level courses in two Literatures
6 credits: 500-level Comparative Literature Courses M.A. paper

COURSE ADDS

28-08-033 ANTH 521
Current Literature in Archaeology
CURRENT LIT ARCH (1)
Seminar designed to expand general knowledge of archaeology through exposure to current research and related issues in contemporary archaeology.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-034 B ADM 500
The Business Enterprise
BUS ENTERPRISE (3)
A problem-based interdisciplinary introduction to basic business concepts needed to start, operate, and grow a business.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-035 BUS 555
International Business
INTL BUSINESS (3)
Studying theories and practices of international business activities, strategies, structures and operations of multinational companies across nations.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-036 CEDEV 500
Principles of Community Economic Development and Leadership
COMM & ECON DEV (3)
Understanding principles and strategies of community and economic development in relation to general systems theory, community decision making, and leadership strategies and roles in group and community settings.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-037 CEDEV 502
Economics of Natural Resources and Rural Development
NAT RES RURAL DEV (3)
Emphasis will be placed on the application of economic concepts to problems and policies in rural areas.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 502, 503
CROSS LIST: AG EC 502
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-038 CEDEV 505
Leadership Development
LEADERSHIP DEV (3)
Exploration, understanding, and application of leadership roles, strategies, and principles in group and community settings.
PREREQUISITE: R SOC 305W, 6 credits in social or behavioral sciences
CROSS LIST: R SOC 505
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-039 CEDEV 509
Population, Land Use, and Municipal Finance
LAND USE & FIN (3)
Understanding the interaction of population characteristics, land use, municipal funds, and taxation in a locality and how they impact the operation and management of government jurisdictions.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-040 CEDEV 516
Change in Rural Society
CHANGE RURAL SOC (3)
Social change in rural society, emphasizing prediction and control of the change process; even years.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
CROSS LIST: R SOC 516
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-041 CEDEV 517
International Rural Social Change
INTL SOCIAL CHANGE (3)
Implications of planned change for international rural societies, considering basic structural constraints, known institutional linkages, and potential synergetic consequences.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
CROSS LIST: R SOC 517
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-042 CEDEV 533
Rural Development Research Methods and Topics
RURAL DEVELOPMENT (3)
Advanced theories and methods for rural economic development research.
PREREQUISITE: AG EC 502, 511, ECON 521
CROSS LIST: AG EC 533
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-043 CEDEV 575
Methods and Techniques for Community and Economic Development
METHODS & TECH (3)
Understanding and applying methods and hands-on experience with techniques used in community and economic development. Lab.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing and approval of the instructor
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-044 CEDEV 576
Applications and Practices for Community and Economic Development
APPL & PRACTICES (1-6)
Consideration of community and economic development applications in communities and practices of public and private organizations and agencies.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing and approval of the instructor
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-045 CEDEV 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-046 CEDEV 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-047 CEDEV 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or semester.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-048 CEDEV 599 (GI)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12, maximum of 24)
Full-time graduate-level foreign study at an overseas institution with whom linkages have been established.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-049 CEDEV 600
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-15)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-050 CEDEV 602
Supervised Experience in College Teaching
SUPV EXP/COLL TCHG (1-3)
Supervised experience in teaching and orientation to other selected aspects of the profession at The Pennsylvania State University.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-051 CEDEV 610
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-15)
No description.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-052 CLJ 591
Teaching Sociology/Crime, Law, and Justice
TEACHING SOC/CLJ (1)
Preparation for teaching sociology and/or crime, law, and justice at the college level.
CROSS LIST: SOC 591
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-053 COMM 584
International Telecommunications and Trade Policy
INTL TELCM & TRADE (3)
An interdisciplinary perspective that investigates contemporary debates and ongoing or anticipated conflicts in international telecommunications and trade policy.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-054 COMM 594
Research Topics
RESEARCH TOPICS (1-15)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-08-055 COMM 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, non-group instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-08-056 EDADM 555
Microcomputer Applications in Educational Administration
MICRO APPS IN EDAD (3)
Development and use of simple to complex spreadsheet models to analyze common problems faced by educational administrators.
PREREQUISITE: EDADM 480 or teaching, supervisory, or administrative experience or permission of instructor
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-057 EDTHP 557
Sociology of Higher Education
SOC OF HIGHER ED (3)
Reviews theory and current sociology research on student access, achievement, and governance in postsecondary education, with applications to policy analysis.
PREREQUISITE: graduate students only, except with permission of instructor; EDTHP/SOC 416 is recommended
CROSS LIST: HI ED 557, SOC 557
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-058 HES 515
Introduction to Biostatistics
INTRO BIOSTAT (4)
The basic theory and methods for statistical analysis, data presentation and experimental design, with a focus on biomedical applications.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 451 and one semester of calculus
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-059 HES 516
Statistical Genetics
STAT GENETICS (4)
Probabilistic and statistical methods in analyzing genetic data arising from human and animal studies, gene mapping, molecular genetics, and DNA sequencing.
PREREQUISITE: HES 515, one semester of calculus, linear algebra, and probability theory
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-060 HES 545
Quality Management
QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3)
Emphasizes approaches, concepts, and methods used to effect quality improvement in health care settings.
PREREQUISITE: enrollment in the Master's Program in Health Evaluation Sciences and satisfactory completion of Biostatistics I and Clinical Epidemiology I, equivalent preparation, or by permission of instructor
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-061 HES 570
Health Care Economics and Policy
HEALTH ECON (3)
This is an introductory course that surveys the major United States health policy issues as background for both health services research and clinical investigation.
PREREQUISITE: enrollment in the Master's Program in Health Evaluation Sciences or at the discretion of the instructor
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-062 HI ED 557
Sociology of Higher Education
SOC OF HIGHER ED (3)
Reviews theory and current sociology research on student access, achievement, and governance in postsecondary education, with applications to policy analysis.
PREREQUISITE: graduate students only, except with permission of instructor; EDTHP/SOC 416 is recommended.
CROSS LIST: EDTHP 557, SOC 557
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-063 IST 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3)
Continuing seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-064 IST 596
Individual Studies
INDIVUAL STDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-08-065 MANGT 510
Project Management
PROJECT MANGT (3)
A problem-based, interdisciplinary course in project management skills and techniques needed to manage projects in a modern business environment.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-066 MFGSE 520
Analytical Techniques in Manufacturing and Design
ANLY MFG DESIGN (3)
Applied statistics, QC, SPC, design for experiments, six sigma, design tolerance and process optimization.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-067 MFGSE 530
Computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems
CIM SYSTEMS (3)
Computer integrated manufacturing; computer networking, process controllers, system hierarchy, distributed data handling, process and quality control monitoring.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-068 MFGSE 540
Manufacturing Systems
MFG SYSTEMS (3)
Basic manufacturing processes from a phenomenological viewpoint to give the student greater insight into the processing of materials.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-069 MFGSE 550
Design for Manufacturability I
DFM I (3)
Introduction to DFM, a review of enabling technologies and the systematic use of quality tools during the DFM process.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-070 MFGSE 551
Design for Manufacturability II
DFM II (3)
Technologies and design methodologies used during the design for manufacturability (DFM) process; case studies involving the implementation of DFM.
PREREQUISITE: MFGSE 550
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-071 MFGSE 580
Masters Project
MASTERS PROJECT (1-3)
Manufacturing capstone or technology study utilizing both manufacturing and management skills.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-072 MFGSE 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-073 MFGSE 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or semester.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-073A NURS 601
Ph.D. Dissertation Full-Time
PH.D DIS FULL-TIME (0)
No description.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-08-073B NURS 611
Ph.D. Dissertation Part-Time
PH.D DIS PART-TIME (0)
No description.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-08-074 SOC 524
The Demography of Human Fertility
DEM HUMAN FERTILTY (3)
Overview of major issues and methodological approaches in the demographic study of human fertility in developing and developed countries.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-075 SOC 528
Homelessness in America
HOMELESSNESS (3)
Survey of social science research on homelessness in the contemporary United States.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-076 SOC 557
Sociology of Higher Education
SOC OF HIGHER ED (3)
Reviews theory and current sociology research on student access, achievement, and governance in postsecondary education, with applications to policy analysis.
PREREQUISITE: graduate students only, except with permission of instructor; EDTHP/SOC 416 is recommended
CROSS LIST: EDTHP 557, HI ED 557
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-077 SOC 560
Urban Sociology
URBAN SOCIOLOGY (3)
Examination of the structure and dynamics of North American cities and of residents' experiences in such settings.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-078 SOC 591
Teaching Sociology/Crime, Law, and Justice
TEACHING SOC/CLJ (1)
Preparation for teaching sociology and/or crime, law, and justice at the college level.
CROSS LIST: CLJ 591
PROPOSED START: FA2000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-08-079 A E 540
Construction Project Organization and Control
CON PRJ ORG&CNTRL (3)
Applications of productivity improvement; organizational; behavioral; and modeling techniques to solve construction project problems; case studies; development of audit manual.
PREREQUISITE: A E 372; A E 475 or 476
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: A E 570
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-08-080 AG EC 502
Economics of Natural Resources and Rural Development
NAT RES & RUR DEV (3)
Emphasis will be placed on the application of economic concepts to problems and policies in rural areas.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 502, 503
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 502
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-081 AG EC 533
Rural Development Research Methods and Topics
RURAL DEVELOPMENT (3)
Advanced theories and methods for rural economic development research.
PREREQUISITE: AG EC 502, 511, ECON 521
APPROVED START: S11987

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 533
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-082 ANTH 559
Behavioral Anthropology III: Ecology
BEHAV ANTH III (3)
Ecological anthropology, emphasizing the adaptive aspects of subsistence, including foraging and settlement pattern.
APPROVED START: SP1987

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Behavioral Anthropology (BEHAVIORAL ANTH)
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-08-083 BB H 501
Theories of Biobehavioral Development and Functioning
BIOB DEV & FUNCT (3)
Examination of theories for understanding individuals as dynamic biobehavioral structural-functional units developing and functioning through continual environmental interactions.
PREREQUISITE: graduate status
APPROVED START: SP1991

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Biobehavioral Systems in Health and Development: Theory and Processes (BIOB SYSTEMS I)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Examination of theories and basic processes for understanding individuals as dynamic biobehavioral complex systems functioning through continual inter-actions.
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-08-084 BB H 503
Biobehavioral Factors in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
BIOB HLTH PROM (3)
Defines health and considers the interaction of biological, behavioral, and environmental factors in cultivating healthy development and preventing illness.
PREREQUISITE: BB H 501
APPROVED START: SP1991

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Biobehavioral Systems in Health and Development: Processes and Integration (BIOB SYSTEMS II)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Examination and integration of basic processes for understanding individuals as dynamic biobehavioral complex systems functioning through continual interactions.
DROP PREREQUISITE
ADD PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: BB H 501
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-08-85 R SOC 505
Leadership Development
LEADERSHIP DEVEL (3)
Exploration, understanding, and application of leadership roles, strategies, and principles in group and community settings.
PREREQUISITE: R SOC 305; 6 credits in social or behavioral sciences
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 505
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-086 R SOC 516
Change in Rural Society
CHANGE IN R SOC (3)
Social change in rural society, emphasizing prediction and control of the change process. Even years.
APPROVED START: S11985

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 516
PROPOSED START: FA2000

OLD
28-08-087 R SOC 517
International Rural Social Change
INT'L R SOC CHANGE (3)
Implications of planned change for international rural societies, considering basic structural constraints, known institutional linkages, and potential synergetic consequences.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CEDEV 517
PROPOSED START: FA2000

COURSE DROPS

28-08-088 ANTH 522
Ecological Theory in Anthropology
ECOLOGICAL THRY (3)
Human biology, culture history, and culture variation from the ecological perspective. Two-semester enrollment required.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in anthropology
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-089 ANTH 523
Ecological Theory in Anthropology
ECOLOGICAL THRY (3)
Human biology, culture history, and culture variation from the ecological perspective. Two-semester enrollment required.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in anthropology
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-090 ANTH 557
Behavioral Anthropology I: Cognition
BEHAV ANTH I (3)
Cognitive anthropology, emphasizing kinship systems, cultural categories, and anthropological linguistics.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-091 ANTH 572
Principles of Human Population Biology II
HUMAN POP BIOL II (3)
How human genetic variation is detected, the assessment of human quantitative genetic traits, and application to the human fossil record.
PROPOSED START: FA2000

28-08-092 ANTH 573
Genetic Epidemiology
GENETIC EPIDEMIOL (3)
Epidemiological and genetic approaches to understanding patterns of difference in disease susceptibility and their evolution in human populations.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 460 or BIOL 428; STAT 250 or 301
PROPOSED START: FA2000