APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Agricultural Sciences

28-04-001 Change program description. Reduce minimum credits to 121. In Minor, delete E R M 200(1), add E R M 151(1) and 300(3), reduce additional credit selection from 11 to 8 credits, and add quantification statement. Change number of credits that double count from 24 to 30 credits. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add AG 150S(2), ENGL 015 GWS(3), SPCOM 100 GWS(3), E R M 151(1), 300(3), GEOG 121 GS(3), GEOSC 303(3); replace STAT 451(3) with 240(3); and delete BIOL 240W GN(4), ECON 004 GS(3), E R M 200(1). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) to 211 GN(4) and delete "Select 2 credits from E R M 421(1), 422(1), 423(1), 424(1), or 426(1)" and replace with "Select 6 credits from E R M 430(3), 431(3), 432(3), or 433(3)." Under SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS, reduce credit selection to 24 credits. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Environmental Resource Management (E R M)

PROFESSOR LAMARTINE F. HOOD, Program Coordinator

Environmental Resource Management (E R M) is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental program in the College of Agricultural Sciences. Students may major or minor in E R M. The major is a science-based curriculum designed to prepare students for environment-oriented careers in the public and private sectors and for graduate school.

The ERM curriculum is three-tiered, beginning with a broad foundation of coursework in communications and the biological, physical and social sciences. In subsequent courses, topical issues associated with the management and sustainability of the environment are addressed from a scientific, social and political perspective. Courses include ecosystem management, environmental law, pollutant impacts, resource economics, soil characterization, systems analysis and water management. The third tier affords the opportunity to specialize. Students select a minor or choose a group of courses (totaling at least 18 credits) that focus on a particular aspect of the environment. Examples include ecology, energy and air pollution control, environmental education, environmental geography, environmental health, environmental toxicology, resource economics and policy, soil resources, and water resources. Courses and minors from across the University can be used in developing a student's area of specialization.

For the B.S. degree in Environmental Resource Management, a minimum of 121 credits is required.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT MINOR: Students must take E R M 151(1), 300(3), 412(3), 413W(3) and select 8 credits from A S M 327(3), SOILS 101(3), AG EC 201(3), or any E R M course for a total of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(30 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 106-108 credits
(This includes 30 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (63 credits)
AG 150S(2), ENGL 015 GWS(3), E R M 151(1)[1], SPCOM 100 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3)[1], 013 GN(3)[1], 014 GN(1)[1], 034(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
BIOL 110 GN(4)[1], 220W GN(4)[1], SOILS 101(3)[1], STAT 240(3) (Sem: 3-4)
AG EC 200(3), AG EC 201(3)[1], ASM 327(3)[1], GEOG 121 GS(3), GEOSC 303(3) (Sem: 5-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), E R M 300 (3)[1], E R M 411(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
E R M 412(3)[1], E R M 413W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19-21 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4), 111 GQ(2); or MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
AG EC 101 GS(3) or ECON 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4) or 215 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 6 credits from E R M 430(3)[1], E R M 431(3)[1], E R M 432(3)[1], or E R M 433(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Select 3 credits in ecology (Sem: 5-6)
Select 18 credits of technical courses in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in communications (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-002 E R M 300
Basic Principles and Calculations in Environmental Analysis
ENVIRON ANALYSIS (3:3:0)
This course will teach basic problem solving skills while using examples taken from environmental media--air, water, and soil.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W; CHEM 013, 014, 034; E R M 151, MATH 111 or 141; STAT 240
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-003 E R M 431
Environmental Toxicology
ENVIRON TOXICOLOGY (3:3:0)
Effects of pollutants on animal health at the chemical, physical, and cellular level.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110, CHEM 012, 013
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-004 E R M 432
Pollution in Aquatic Systems
WATER POLLUTION (3)
Sources, types, impacts of aquatic pollutants; processes regulating pollutant toxicity and fate; major issues in water pollution and its control.
PREREQUISITE: E R M 300
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-005 E R M 499 (GI)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-006 TURF 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-006A YFE 295
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-007 AGESS 134 (GN)
Agroecosystem Science and Policy
AGROECO SCI&POLICY (3)
The science, economics, and politics of managing food production systems; current practices and options for the future.
CROSS LIST: PL SC 134
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Sustainable Agriculture Science and Policy (SUSTAINAG SCI&POLI)
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-008 E R M 200
Environmental Resource Management Orientation
ERM ORIENTATION (1:1:0)
Introduction to environmental resource management.
PREREQUISITE: third-semester standing in Environmental Resource Management
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: E R M 151
CHANGE TITLE TO: Careers and Issues in Environmental Resource Management (ERM CAREERS/ISSUES)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Career opportunities and topical issues in the environmental sciences.
DROP PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-009 E R M 412
Resource Systems Analysis
RESOURCE SYST ANLY (3:2:3)
The concept of systems; techniques of analysis, including input/output, mathematical programming, and simulation; application to resource systems.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W, E R M 200, MATH 111 or 141, STAT 451
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: BIOL 220W, E R M 151 and 300, MATH 111 or 141, STAT 240
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-010 E R M 426
Transformation of Pollutants in Soils
TRANS POLLU SOILS (1:1:0)
Processes regulating fate and transport of metals, organics, nutrients, salts, pathogens, and radionuclides in soil systems.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 013, 014, SOILS 101
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: E R M 433
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-010A EXTED 295
Observation of Cooperative Extension Service Programs
OBSV COOP EXT (1-2)
Supervised observation of extension education in agriculture, community resource development; family living, 4-H programs; appraisal of responsibilities of extension professionals.
APPROVED START: SP1984

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER T0: YFE 295A
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010B EXTED 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA 1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 297
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010C EXTED 298
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 298
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010D EXTED 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 397
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010E EXTED 398
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 398
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010F EXTED 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 496
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010G EXTED 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 497
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010H EXTED 498
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: YFE 498
PROPOSED START: SP2000

OLD
28-04-010I TURF 237
Turfgrass Cultural Systems
TURF CULT SYS (3:3:0)
A study of turfgrass maintenance practices and how their interrelationships can be utilized to develop management systems.
PREREQUISITE: SOILS 200, TURF 235, 236
APPROVED START: S11992

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: TURF 425
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: SOILS 101, TURF 235
PROPOSED START: SP2001

COURSE DROPS

028-04-011 AN SC 295
Internship Planning and Outcome
INTRN PLAN OUTCOME (1 per semester/maximum of 2)
Development of a written plan for an internship experience and preparing a written report after completion of the internship.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-012 E R M 415
Ecotoxicology
ECOTOXICOLOGY (3:3:0)
Major concepts and controversies in the interdisciplinary field of ecological toxicology; toxicity analysis, remediation, and case studies of environmental pollution.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110, 220W; FOR 308 or W F S 309
CROSS LIST: BIOL 415
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-013 E R M 421
Pollutant Impacts on Plants
POLLU IMPACT:PLANT (1:1:0)
Types and bioaccumulation of pollutants, impacts on populations, productivity and plant organs, modes of action.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110, 220W
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-014 E R M 423
Pollutant Impacts on Foods
POL IMPACT: FOOD (1:1:0)
Fate and flow of pollutants; case studies of human exposure to specific pollutants.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in biology or chemistry
CROSS LIST: FD SC 423
PROPOSED START: S12000

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Behrend College

28-04-014A Change. Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), 204 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2). Add quantification statement to the minor. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

BIOLOGY (BIOBD)

The curriculum in biology is designed to provide a strong background in the biological sciences. The major has two options: a General Biology option for those individuals who intend to enter graduate or professional schools or who are interested in work with agencies or firms requiring a biological background; and a Medical Technology option to prepare students for a career in a clinical laboratory. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in faculty-supervised research.

For the B.S. degree in Biology, a minimum of 124 credits is required.

A student enrolled in this major must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

BIOLOGY MINOR: Students must take BIOL 110 GN(4) and two of the following courses: BIOL 220W GN(4), 230W GN(4) or 240W GN(4), and select additional courses at the 400 level in BIOBD for a total of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 96 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 49 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(l), 015 GN(l) (Sem: 1-2)
BIOL 110 GN(4), 230W GN(4), BIOL 240W GN(4), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
CHEM 036(2), 038(4), 039(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BIOBD 322(3), 350W(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3), STAT 250 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 47 credits

GENERAL BIOLOGY OPTION: 47 credits
This option provides a wide background in such areas as genetics, physiology, ecology, morphology, microbiology, systematics, and evolution. From this diversity, students can choose a general program of study or develop strengths in biomedical or environmental studies.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (7 credits)
BIOL 220W GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
BIOBD 429(2) (Sem: 5-8)
BIOBD 494A(l) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14-21 credits)
Select 6-9 credits from the following:
a. MICRB 201(3) (Sem: 3-6)
b. MICRB 202(2) (Sem: 3-6)
c. BIOBD 380(2) (Sem: 3-8)
d. CSE 103 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-6)
e. BIOBD 452(3)/CHMBD 452(3) or BIOBD 453(1)/CHMBD 453(1) or
Select one of the following sequences:
a. PHYS 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4) (Sem: 5-8)
b. PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (19-26 credits)
Select 15 credits of 400-level BIOBD and BIOL courses excluding BIOBD 429(2), 494A(1) 494B(1 - 12), 495(3- 2), 496(1-18), and BIOL 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 4-11 credits from division-approved list (Sem: 1-8)

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION: 47 credits
Students spend approximately twelve months at an affiliated hospital[12] during their senior year to complete the clinical phase of their baccalaureate studies. A fixed number of spaces are available on a competitive basis of grade-point average and hospital approval. The Bachelor of Science degree in Biology is awarded upon successful completion of the clinical study. The graduate is also eligible to take the national examination for certification and registry as a medical technologist.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (44 credits)
MICRB 201(3), 202(2) (Sem: 3-4)
PHYS 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4) (Sem: 5-6)
BIOBD 430A(6), 430B(3), 430C(7), 430D(4), 430E(4), 430F(4), 430G(l), 430I(1), 430K(l) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from BIOBD 424(3), 425(3), 452(3), 460(3) or 469(3) (Sem: 5-6)

PRE-PROFESSIONAL OPTION: 47 credits
Exceptional students who are admitted into a "3+4" accelerated or early acceptance program at an approved or affiliated professional school are granted 21 credits toward the Bachelor of Science degree following the successful completion of the first professional academic year.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23 credits)
MICRB 201(3), 202(2) (Sem: 1-2)
BIOBD 150(1), 250(1) (Sem: 1-4)
BIOBD 420(4), 452(3), 453(1) (Sem: 5-6)
PHYS 215(4), 265(4) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Select 3 credits of 400-level BIOBD courses, excluding BIOBD 494A(l), 494B(1-12), 495(3-12), and 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 21 credits of professional school academic courses (Sem: 7-8)

[12]Current affiliation is with St. Vincent Health Center, Eric, PA.

28-04-014B Change. Under ADDITIONAL COURSE, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), 204 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2). Add quantification statement to minors. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

MATHEMATICS (MTHBD)

PROFESSOR ROGER F. KNACKE, In charge

This major builds a firm foundation in mathematics, computer science, and statistics, with emphasis given to the applications of mathematics and to the development of problem-solving skills. The Applied Mathematics option offers course work in analysis, numerical methods, linear programing, statistics, and operations research. The Business option requires a broad base of statistics and computer courses, in addition to courses in accounting, insurance, economics, management, and management information systems. The Computer Science option provides course work in systems programming, applications programniing, data structures and algorithms. The three options allow a student to concentrate on developing mathematical skills suitable for entry-level positions in the areas of computer programming, applied mathematics, actuarial sciences, statistics, or operations research; for careers in government, business, or industry; or for graduate study in mathematics and related fields.

For the B.S. degree in Mathematics, a minimum of 120 credits is required. A student enrolled in this major must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field and must have earned a minimum 2.00 grade point average.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR: Students must take CSE 103 GQ(4), CMPSC 201C GQ(3), 201F GQ(3), or CMPBD 204(4); CSE 120(3), 231(3), 260(3), and select an additional 6 credits of CMPBD at the 400 level for a total of at least 18 credits.

MATHEMATICS MINOR: Select at least 18 credits of MATH and MTHBD courses at the level of MATH 140 GQ(4) or above, including MTHBD 315W(3) and 6 credits at the 400 level.

STATISTICS MINOR: Students must take MATH l40 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), 230(4) or 231(2). They must also take stabd 303(3), 404(3), 443(3), and 444(3); and select an additional 6 credits of MTHBD, STABD, or STAT courses at the 400 level. A minimum of 18 credits of statistics and related courses, and 10 credits of the calculus sequence are required for the minor.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics minors.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(17-23 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 5-8 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84-90 credits
(This includes 17-23 credits of General Education courses: 8 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses; 0-6 credits of GS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 54 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (40 credits)
CSE 103 GQ(4)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CSE 120 GQ(3)[1], MATHBD 315W(3) (Sem: 3-4)
STABD 303(3) (Sem: 3-6)
MATH 220 GQ(2)[1], 230(4)[1], 251(4)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MTHBD 420(3), STABD 404(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14 credits)
Select 8 credits in one of the following sequences:
a. BIOL 110 GN(4), 220W(4)(Sem: 1-4)
b. CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(l), 015 GN(l) (Sem: 1-4)
c. PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
d. PHYS 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits from MTHBD 422(3), 431(3), 432(3), 434(3), 472(3), or 477(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30-36 credits

APPLIED MATHEMATICS OPTION: 30 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)
Select l2 credits from MISBD 430(3), MTHBD 422(3), 425(3), 428(3), 431(3), 432(3), 434(3), 450(3), 472(3), 475(3), 477(3), STABD 443(3), 444(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits in one of the following:
a. CMPBD 350(3), 410(3), 411(3), 423(3), 424(3), 440(3), 450(3), 460(3), CSE 231(3), 260(3) (Sem: 3-8)
b. MTHBD 423(3), 424(3), 450(3), 472(3), Q C 450(3), or 451(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from a division-approved list (Sem: 3-8)

BUSINESS OPTION: 36 credits
(A maximum of 30 credits through the School of Business may be used to fulfill this requirement. This includes all courses taken for General Education, prescribed, additional, supporting and related areas, and electives.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
M I S 204(2) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 credits from ECNS 460(3), FNC 300(3), MANGT 300(3), 310(3), 330 DF(3), 340 DF(3), or MRKTG 300(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from CMPBD 210(3), 217(3), 350(3), 401(3), 423(3), 440(3), 450(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from MISBD 336(3), 430(3), MTHBD 472(3), STABD 443(3), 444(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from a division-approved list (Sem: 3-8)

COMPUTER SCIENCE OPTION: 33 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
CSE 231(3), 260(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CMPBD 410(3), 423(3), 440(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from CMPBD 350(3), 411(3), 424(3), 450(3), 460(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from a division-approved list (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-014C Change. In Physics Minor change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), 204 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2). In Major under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), 204 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2). Delete footnote #16. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Physics (PHYBD)

The major provides education in the fundamentals of physics and selected advanced topics to prepare graduates for graduate education or for careers in industry. Students have opportunities to participate in research with faculty. In addition to the traditional physics education offered in the General physics option, the option in applied physics, Computational Physics, provides preparation for careers in technological fields.

For the B.S. degree in Physics, a minimum of 123 credits is required. A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better in all 300- and 400-level courses in the major field.

PHYSICS MINOR: Students must take PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2), 237(3), and select 7 credits from 400-level PHYBD courses for a total of 22 credits. The 400-level PHYBD courses cannot include PHYBD 494, 495, 496, and 497. Students must receive a grade of C or better in all courses required in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 95 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR TBE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 67 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (67 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem. 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], 212 GN(4)[1], 213 GN(2)[1], 214 GN(2)[1], 237(3)[1] (Sem. 1-4)
CSE 103GQ(4), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), 230(4), 251(4), PHYBD 400(3), 419(3), 420(3), 421W(3), 458(4), 494(3) (Sem. 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 28 credits

COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS OPTION: 28 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
CSE 120(3) (Sem: 1-8)
MTHBD 423(3), PHYBD 402(4) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from CMPBD 410(3), 411(3), or 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from EE BD 326(4), 471(3), 473 (3), ME BD 241(3), 423(3), MTHBD 424(3), PHYBD 410(3), 412(3), 444(l), 494(1-3), and/or 495(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from a division-approved list (Sem: 1-8)

GENERAL PHYSICS OPTION: 28 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
PHYBD 410(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from MTHBD 422(3), 423(3), 424(3), PHYBD 402(4), 412(3), 444(l), 494(1-3), and/or 495(1-3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (13 credits)
Select one of the following two sequences:
a. Select 8 credits of a foreign language (Proficiency demo by examination or course work to the level of the second semester in a foreign language is required. If fewer than 8 credits are needed to reach the required proficiency, students choose selections from a division-approved list to make a total of 8 credits.) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 5 credits from a division-approved list (Sem: 1-8)
b. CSE 120(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits from CMPBD 410(3), 411(3), or 460(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 7 credits from a division-approved list (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-014D Change. Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), 204 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2). Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

SCIENCE (SCNCE)

This major provides broad, general training with a background in science. It allows students to prepare for graduate studies in their field of interest. Most graduates of the Science major go on to graduate school in order to obtain employment in research. Other students choose this major because of an educational objective more readily obtained by it than by some specific subject matter.

For the B.A. degree in Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

A student enrolled in this major must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-lcvel course.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selections or BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 7-11 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 58-82 credits
(At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level.)
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(l), 015 GN(l), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (8-12 credits)
PHYS 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4) or PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 9 credits of biological sciences from General Education courses (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits of arts or humanities (Sem: 1-8)
Select 15 credits: 12 credits in category a, b, c, or d and 3 additional credits in any one of the categories: (Sem: 5-8)
a. biological sciences
b. earth and material sciences
c. mathematical sciences
d. physical sciences

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
The Smeal College of Business Administration

28-04-015 Change. Under SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS, delete last line (Select 3 credits from related business and economics courses). Adjust credits appropriately.

Proposed Effective Date: Spring Semester 2000

Business Logistics (B LOG)

PROFESSOR JOHN E. TYWORTH, Chair of the Department of Business Logistics

The Business Logistics major helps prepares students for careers in supply chain management with (1) manufacturing, merchandising, and service companies, (2) third-party logistics providers, (3) transport systems, and (4) consulting firms and government agencies involved with the design and management of supply chains. A supply chain or logistics network stretches from the source of raw material to the point of final consumption, involves multiple trading partners, and comprises business processes for acquiring materials and supplies, malting products, and delivering them customers throughout the world. Business logistics focuses on the planning and coordination of product, information, and cash flows along the supply chain to achieve a vision of a market opportunity that is shared by all the trading partners. In addition, because transportation is one of the most vital services in modern society, the major gives special attention to the management and economics of domestic and international freight transportation systems and to policies toward the performance of such systems.

For the B.S. degree in Business Logistics, a minimum of 128 credits is required (at least 15 credits must be taken at the 400 level).

BUSINESS LOGISTICS MINOR: Business Majors must take ECON 002 GS(3), BA 303(3), B LOG 305(3), B LOG 320(3). Non-Business Majors must take ECON 002 GS(3), B LAW 243(3), B LOG 301(3) B LOG 320(3). Both select 6 credits from B LOG 405(3), 410(3), 415(3), 430(3), 432(3), or 455(3). A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 4-16 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 79-91 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses; and 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (51 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), B A 243(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4), ECON 002 GS(3)[1], 004 GS(3), M I S 204(2), MS&IS 200(4) (Sem: 1-4)
B A 301(3), 302(3), 303(3), 304(3), B LOG 305(3), 320(3)[1], 421(3)[1]
ENGL 202D GWS(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
B LOG 425W(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 6 credits[1] from B LOG 400(3), 410(3), 405(3), 415(3), 420(3), 430(3), 432(3), or 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18-30 credits)
(Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)
Attainment of third-level proficiency in a single foreign language (0-12). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. See the admission section of the general information in this bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits from related courses in consultation with adviser (at least 3 credits must be at the 400 level) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits of international courses related to the foreign language area (see department list of approved courses) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-016 Add two new options to the Management major: Human Resources Management Option and Minor General Management Option. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, delete ECON 302 GS(3) and under SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS, delete sentence "Select 12 credits (at least 6 credits at the 400 level) and an area of concentration in consultation with adviser (see department list)."

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000 Fall Semester 2000

Management (MGMT)

PROFESSOR LINDA KLEBE TREVINO, Chair of the Department of Management and Organization

This major helps provide students with knowledge and skills that general managers need to deal with contemporary challenges, such as those related to leading and motivating people from diverse cultures, designing new organizational structures, creating global strategies, and balancing the interest of multiple stakeholders in a complex political, legal, and ethical environment. The management core provides a general overview of the required knowledge and skills required for effectively managing people and organizations. Students then supplement that overview with either the human resources management option or the minor general management option, which requires a Penn State approved minor.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT OPTION: The human resources management option prepares students for a professional career in human resources management, and develops skills and expertise in areas such as planning, staffing, job design, employee development, performance management, compensation, and change management.

MINOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT OPTION: The minor option requires enrollment in a Penn State approved minor, provides students with more in-depth knowledge in an area of expertise from outside the major, and prepares students for career opportunities in managerial and staff positions that utilize the specialized knowledge and skills developed in the minor area.

For the B.S. degree in Management, a minimum of 128 credits is required (at least 15 credits must be taken at the 400 level).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-13 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 85-97 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 67-79 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (57 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), B A 243(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), M I S 204(2), MS&IS 200(4) (Sem: 1-4)
B A 301(3), 302(3), 303(3), 304(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MGMT 321(3)[1], 331(3)[1], 341(3)[1], 451W(3)[1], 461(3)[1], 471(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6-18 credits)
[Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC]
Attainment of third level proficiency in a single foreign language (0-12). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. See the admission section of the general information in this bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. See the admission section of the general information in this bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits of international courses related to the foreign language (see department list) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 18 credits

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT OPTION: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
MGMT 441(3), 442(1.5), 443(3), 444(1.5) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of supporting courses from outside the department (see departmental list).

MINOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT OPTION: 0-18 credits

University-approved Minor (0-18)
(Students majoring in Management with a minor the general management option must take a University-approved minor.)

28-04-017 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, delete ECON 302 GS(3). Under SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS, change credits from 18 to 15 for international business related courses.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Management and International Business (MGTIB)

PROFESSOR LINDA KLEBE TREVINO, Chair of the Department of Management and Organization

This major recognizes that business is becoming increasingly international in scope. Many major corporations routinely conduct business worldwide, and the managers of these firms are drawn from many countries. Therefore, it is essential that students gain both an appreciation and understanding of how business is conducted in other countries. This major contains basic courses in organizational behavior, interpersonal relations, human resource management, etc. In addition, students may take courses that focus on the political, economic, and cultural conditions in selected areas of the world.

For the B.S. degree in Management and International Business, a minimum of 145 credits is required (at least 15 credits must be taken at the 400 level).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12-24 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 91-103 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (57 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), B A 243(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), M I S 204(2), MS&IS 200(4) (Sem: 1-4)
B A 301(3), 302 GS(3), 303(3), 304(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), (Sem: 5-6)
MGMT 321(3)[1], 331(3)[1], 341(3)[1], 451W(3)[1], 461(3)[1], 471(3)[1] (Sem: 5-9)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (30-42 credits)
[Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC]
Attainment of third level proficiency in a single foreign language (0-12). Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work. See the admission section of the general information in this bulletin for the placement policy for Penn State foreign language courses. (Sem: 1-4)
Select 15 credits of business and related non-business courses in an approved study abroad program in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-6)
Select 15 credits of international business related courses in consultation with adviser (see department list) (Sem: 5-9)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-018 MGMT 395
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-019 MGMT 442
HRM Practicum (Part One): Staffing and Development
HRP PRAC 1 (1.5)
This course focuses on students applying the skills and techniques of staffing and development in an applied setting.
PREREQUISITE: B A 301, 302, 304, MGMT 321, 331, 341
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-020 MGMT 443
HRM Professional Seminar (Part 2): Performance Management
PRO SEM 2 (3)
This course focuses on skills and methods managers need to enhance the contribution of employees to organizational performance and effectiveness.
PREREQUISITE: B A 301, 302, 303, 304, MGMT 321, 331, 341, 441, 442
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-021 MGMT 444
HRM Practicum (Part Two): Performance Management
HRP PRAC 2 (1.5)
This course focuses on students applying the skills and techniques of performance management in an applied setting.
PREREQUISITE: B A 301, 302, 303, 304, MGMT 321, 331, 341
PROPOSED START: S12000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-022 B A 302
Manufacturing and Service Operations
MFG SVC OPS (3)
An overview of the strategic role of operations in both Manufacturing and Service Operations.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, ECON 002, 004, M I S 204, MS&IS 200
CONCURRENT: B A 301, 303, 304
APPROVED START: FA1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: ACCTG 211, B A 243, ECON 002, 004, M I S 204, MS&IS 200
CHANGE CONCURRENT TO: B A 303
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-023 M I S 431
Information Processing and Database Management Systems
INFO PROC&DATABASE (3:3:0)
The architecture of business information processing systems and technical aspects of database management.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 101
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: CMPSC 101, M I S 204
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-024 M I S 436
Business Data Communications
BUSINESS DATA COM (3)
Introduction to the principles and techniques of business data communication encompassing transmission concepts, network analysis, design, implementation, and administration.
PREREQUISITE: M I S 431, 432
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: M I S 431
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-025 MGMT 441
Advanced Human Resource Management
ADV HUM RSRCE MGMT (3:3:0)
Focuses attention on personnel/human resource problems in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 100, 100W, or 341
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: HRM Professional Seminar (Part 1): Staffing and Development (PRO SEM 1)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: This course focuses on the skills and methods managers need to manage staffing and development activities in organizations.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: B A 301, 302, 303, 304, MGMT 321, 331, 341
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-026 MS&IS 200
Introduction to Statistics for Business
INTRO STAT BUS DEC (4:4:0)
Introduction to business statistics including topics in probability theory, sampling, inference, quality assurance, regression, forecasting, and simulation.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 203; MATH 018, 110, or 140
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MATH 018, 110, or 140
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-027 MS&IS 402
Regression Analysis and Business Forecasting
REGR & FORECAST (3:3:0)
The development and use of regression and time series models for business and economic analysis.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 111 or 141; MS&IS 391
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MATH 111 or 141; MS&IS 200
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-028 MS&IS 427
Management Decision Theory
MANGRL DEC THRY (3:3:0)
Theoretical concepts for the solution of complex decision problems in business.
PREREQUISITE: MS&IS 200
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MS&IS 200, 391
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-029 MS&IS 450
Models and Methods for Managerial Decision Making
MODELS DECISN MKG (3:3:0)
Decision analytic approaches to problem solving under conditions of certainty and uncertainty including linear programming and decision analysis.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 111 or 141; MS&IS 391 or OPMGT 401W
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MATH 111 or 141; MS&IS 391
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-030 MS&IS 455
Simulation Models of Business Processes
SIM MODEL BUS PROC (3:3:0)
Construction and solution of computer simulation models and probabilistic models with application to management planning, control systems, and decision making.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: MS&IS 402 or OISM 401W
CROSS LIST: OISM 455
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MS&IS 391
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-031 MS&IS 459W
Decision Support Systems
DECSN SUPPORT SYS (3)
Development of computer-based decision aids for supporting managerial decision making.
PREREQUISITE: M I S 432, MS&IS 450, 455
APPROVED START: FA1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: M I S 431, MS&IS 450, 455
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-032 OISM 418
Materials Management
MAT MANAGEMENT (3:3:0)
Design of planning and control systems for managing the flow of materials.
PREREQUISITE: OPMGT 401W
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: OPMGT 455
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: B A 302 or B LOG 305; MS&IS 391
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-033 OISM 455
Simulation Models of Business Processes
SIM MODEL BUS PROC (3:3:0)
Construction and solution of computer simulation models and probabilistic models with application to management planning, control systems, and decision making.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: MS&IS 402 or OPMGT 401W
CROSS LIST: MS&IS 455
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MS&IS 391
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-034 OISM 470W
Total Quality Management
TOTAL QUALITY MGMT (3)
Development of quality systems in organizations; process reengineering, benchmarking and assessment. Fundamentals of statistical quality control.
PREREQUISITE: MS&IS 391; B A 302 or B LOG 301
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: B A 302 or B LOG 301
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-035 OISM 476
Process Analysis
PROCESS ANALYSIS (3)
Design and management of business processes, models of the process and its flows, and implications for managerial actions.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: OISM 470W
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: B A 302 or B LOG 305, MS&IS 391
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-036 OISM 479
Management of Operations Information
MGMT OPNS INFO (3)
Origin and management of product, process, cost, demand, and time databases and their use for decision support systems within operations.
PREREQUISITE: M I S 431, OISM 418, 470W, 476
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: M I S 431
CHANGE PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT TO: OISM 418, 476
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Capital College

28-04-037 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add AM ST 402W(6) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

AMERICAN STUDIES (AMSTD)

PROFESSOR SIMON J. BRONNER, PROGRAM COORDINATOR

Students interested in American culture and history may select this interdisciplinary major for personal enrichment or as a preparation for careers in museums, government, law, communications or education. This major is offered out of the School of Humanities.

Students have many opportunities for individualized study. The core curriculum provides a common intellectual experience for all Humanities students and establishes a foundation for the study of Western and non-Western cultures. Small classes, an outstanding multidisciplinary faculty, and an excellent location for valuable internship experiences are just some of the features of the program.

For a B.HUM. degree in American Studies a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the American Studies major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR.)

ELECTIVES: 12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
HUM 311(3)[1], 312(3)[1], 313(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
AMSTD 301(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
AM ST 402W(6) (Sem: 7-8)
(At least 12 credits of Additional/Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following: C ART 300-499 , C HIS 300-499 , C MUS 300-499 , ENLSH 300-499 , HCOMM 300-499 , PHLOS 300-499 , THTRE 300-499 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 21 credits from AMSTD 340 DF(3), 400(3), 403(3), 411 DF(3), 422(3), 431(3), 442(3), 451(3), 452(3), 453(3), 454(3), 455 DF(3), 456(3), 457 DF(3), 458(3), 459(3), 460(3), 461(3), 462(3), 463(3), 469 DF(3), 470(3), 480(3), 491(3), 494(1-12), 495(1-6), 496(1-18), 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the School of Humanities approved list in consultation with an academic adviser or select a Capital College minor in support of the student's interests.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-038 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add HD FS 312W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (ABESC)

PROFESSOR CLEMMIE GILPIN, Coordinator, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education

The Applied Behavioral Science major helps students prepare for careers that provide direct service to individuals in need of assistance. These careers are in a variety of human services both in the public and private sectors or in personnel-related positions such as human resources.

Graduates may also pursue advanced degrees in fields such as community psychology and counseling. The strengths of the program include: internships directly related to the studentís area of interest, flexibility in course selection that allows students to focus on particular interests, a solid foundation of knowledge on which to build skills, and skill development courses.

For a B.S. degree in Applied Behavioral Science a minimum of 122 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Applied Behavioral Science major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6-12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 68-74 credits
(This includes 3 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GS courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (17 credits)
SCLSC 320(4)[1], BE SC 395(3-12)[1](Sem: 5-8)
BE SC 472(4)[1], PSYC 482(3)[1](Sem: 5-8)
HD FS 312W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 3 credits from: PSY 002 GS(3) or SOC 001GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: PSYC 403(3), 405(3), 406(3) or HDFS 229 GS(3) (Sem: 4-8)
Select 3 credits from: BE SC 370(3) or SOCIO 384(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: BE SC 407(3), 408(3), 410(3), 459(3), or PSYC 421(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from: BE SC 301(3) or 461(3), PSYC 415(3), SOCIO 372(3) or 440(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: AFRAS 412 DF(3), PSYC 465 DF(3), SOCIO 463(3), 484(3) or 486(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from: BE SC 376(3), 468(3) or SOCIO 462 DF(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (30 credits)
(At least 2 credits of Supporting Courses must be at the 400 level.)
Select 6 credits 300-400 level from: CRIMJ or PUBPL (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits 300-400 level from: AMSTD, C ART, C HIS, C MUS, ENLSH, HCOMM, HUM, LIT, PHLOS, THTRE (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits of 300-400 level courses in consultation with an academic advisor and in support of the student'sinterests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-039 Change. Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add 260W(3) or 413W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

COMMUNICATIONS (COMCL)

PROFESSOR VICTOR VISER, PROGRAM CORDINATOR

The communications program helps students prepare for careers in print and broadcast journalism, public relations, video production, and telecommunications. The major combines professional skills with critical examination of the effects of media on society as well as connections between contemporary media and classical literature, drama, and art. Students take courses in varieties of media, writing, professional communications areas, and critical and cultural approaches to communications. Internships in journalism, radio, television, public relations, and other fields are available for qualified students. Small classes, an outstanding multidisciplinary faculty, and an excellent location for valuable internship experiences are just some of the features of the program.

For a B.HUM. degree in Communications a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Communications major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIEMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 66 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)[1]
HUM 311(3), 312(3), 313(3) (Sem: 5-8)
HCOMM 351(3), 453(3) (Sem: 5-8)
(At least 12 credits of Additional/Supporting courses must be taken at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (33 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following: COMM 260W(3) or 413W(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from the following: HCOMM 330(3) or 331(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from the following: AMSTD 300-499 C ART 300-499, C HIS 300-499, C MUS 300-499, ENLSH 300-499, HCOMM 300-499, PHLOS 300-499, THTRE 300-499 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 18 credits from HCOMM 381(3), 382(3), 384(3), 430(3), 433(3), 434(3), 435(3), 436(3), 437(3), 438(3), 450 DF(3), 452(3), 454(3), 455(3), 456(3), 470(3), 472(3), 480(3), 483(5), 486(3), 494(1-12), 495A(1-9), 496(1-18), 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the School of Humanities approved list in consultation with an academic adviser or select a Capital College minor in support of the student's interests.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-040 Add new Computer Science Minor. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add COMP 413W(3) and update General Education information. Add quantification statement to minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

COMPUTER SCIENCE (COMP)

PROFESSOR THANG N. BUI, Program Chair

This program is designed to prepare students for employment as computer scientists in engineering, scientific, industrial, and business environments as software developers, programmers, and systems analysts. While most students will enter the job market directly upon graduation, graduate school in computer science or related areas is also an option. Selection of electives can be tailored for students pursuing this path.

The Computer Science major provides a solid foundation in the areas of systems programming, algorithm design, artificial intelligence, and engineering large software systems using state-of-the-art methodologies and programming languages.

Students may expect to: develop a solid foundation in mathematical studies relevant to computer science; master skills in computer science; enjoy possibilities for internships and part-time employment with local companies; and become problem solvers. These goals are consistent with the goals outlined by the Association of Computing Machinery.

For a B.S. degree in Computer Science a minimum of 120 credits are required.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR: Students must take a minimum of 18 credits in Computer Science. These credits include CSE 120(3) (or both COMP 350(3) and COMP 351(3), COMP 432(3), MA SC 370(3), COMP 410(3) and two 400-level COMP courses from approved department list. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Computer Science major requires that the student has completed: MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), CMPSC 201(3) or CSE 103(4). A 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average is required.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students may request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg from another Penn State location if that location does not offer courses needed to progress in the Computer Science major.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(9 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9-10 6-7 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 74-75 77-78 credits
(This includes 9 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (47 50 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[2], MATH 141 GQ(4)[2](Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 017 GQ(3)[2] (Sem: 3-4)
COMP 401(3), 402(3)[1], 404(3)[1], 410(3)[1], 411(3)[1], 412(3), 413W(3), 416(3), 432(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MA SC 370(3)[1], 420(3), 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
Select 3-4 credits[2] from the following: CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or CSE 103 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 6 credits[2] from the following: CSE 120 GQ(3), 260(3), 271(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following: COMP 403(3), 406(3), 408(3), 409(3), 414(3), 418(3), 419(3), 420(3), 421(3), 430(3), 435(3), 497(1-9), MA SC 421(3), 425(3), 440(3), 441(4), 461(3), 475 DF(3), 477(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of 300-400 level courses in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem. 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

[2] Cumulative GPA of 2.40 required for these courses.

28-04-041 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add 426W(3) and 490W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CRIMJ)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR TONI DUPONT-MORALES, Program Coordinator

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Criminal Justice helps provide its graduates with the communications and analytical skills critical to succeed in criminal justice and related careers. Through an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of crime and society, the program equips students to pursue graduate study in criminal justice or related disciplines, and educates students to become effective problem- solvers as professionals in the field of criminal justice.

The study of criminal justice is approached as an applied interdisciplinary science, teaching students the practical aspects of crime control and the administration of justice. The Criminal Justice program is designed for students who come from other institutions and targets the needs of students who hold an associate degree in Police Science or Criminal Justice, or those who hold an associate of arts degree.

The Criminal Justice curriculum is structured to provide maximum flexibility, enabling students to take advantage of the vast array of career opportunities available in the field today. After completing general education requirements and core degree requirements, students arrange a plan of study in these general areas: law enforcement, jurisprudence, corrections, and research and planning. Criminal Justice majors can participate in a one-semester internship in a criminal justice agency after completing appropriate course work at an acceptable level of performance.

For a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
The student must have a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and an average of C (2.00) or better in any course already taken in the major.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg or Penn State Schuylkill during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0 - 4 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 64 credits
(This includes 0-4 credits of General Education Courses: 0-4 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)[1]
PHLOS 345(3), PUBPL 441(3), CRIMJ 301 DF(3), 302 DF(3), 303 DF(3), 426W(3), 490W(3) (Sem: 5-8)
(At least 6 credits in Additional and/or Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following: ADMJ 111(3), CRIMJ 300(3) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 4 credits from the following: STAT 200 GQ(4), SCLSC 320(4) (Sem: 2-6)
Select 12 credits from the following: CRIMJ 304(3), 401 DF(3), 402(3), 403 DF(3), 404(3),
406 DF(3), 407(3), 408 DF(3), 410(3), 411(3), 430(3), 436 DF(3), 489W(3), 495(3-12), 496(1-18),
497(1-9), PL SC 002(3), PUBPL 304(3), 400(3), 401(3), 420(3), 480(3), SOCIO 372(3), 463(3),
484(3), 486(3), PSYC 406(3), BE SC 408(3), 461(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following: PL SC 001 GS(3), PUBPL 301(3), 350(3), 360(3), 361 DF(3),
397(1-9), 400(3), 403(3), 408(3), 409(3), 410 DF(3), 411 DF(3), 412 DF(3), 413 DF(3), 421 DF(3),
426(3), 437 DF(3), 446(3), 451(3), 452(3), 464 3), 470(3), 481(3), 482(3), 483(3), 484(3),
485(3), 496(1-18), 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from the following: AFRAS 301 to 499(3), BE SC 301 to 499(3), PSYC 301 to 499(3), SOCIO 300 to 499(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-042 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add E E 402W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (E ENG)

PROFESSOR JERRY F. SHOUP, Program Chair

The Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering provides a solid background in electrical engineering sciences. It also provides an opportunity for students to pursue interests in electrical and electronic circuits, including digital circuits and VLSI and its fabrication, microprocessors and their applications, electromagnetics, communications, control systems, and digital image processing and computer vision. Through participation in a senior capstone design, the curriculum emphasizes written as well as verbal communication and teamwork approach among the students to attain a common goal.

This program helps its graduates develop capabilities to analyze and design a variety of electrical and electronic systems found in many industrial and government settings as well as provide a foundation for further graduate studies. A strong background in the fundamentals is built through a broad base core in basic sciences (physics and chemistry) and mathematics as well as engineering sciences.

For a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering a minimum of 128 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Electrical Engineering major requires that the student has completed: MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) or 201 GN(4), and CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1). A 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average is required.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed at least 30-33 credits of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-3 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 101-105 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses; 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (82 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1) (Sem: 1-2)
ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), 220(2), 230(4), 250(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
CSE 271(3)[1], 275(1)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
E MCH 011(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 4-6)
M ENG 312(2) (Sem: 5-6)
E SC 314(3), E ENG 317(3)[1], 361(3), 368(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
CMPEH 449(3), 472(3) (Sem: 7-8)
E E 402W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
E ENG 370(4), 433(3), 443(3), 467(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16-19 credits)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 002 GS(3) or 004 GS(3) or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: CMPSC 201C or F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 7-9 credits from one of the following groups: a) or b):
a) E E 210(4)[1] and E ENG 354(5) [1]
b) E ENG 354(5)[1] and 355(2)[1]
Select 3-4 credits from MA SC 422(3)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 4 - 6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3-4 credits)
Select 3-4 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-043 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EE T 413W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (E E T)

PROFESSOR JERRY F. SHOUP, Program Chair

The Bachelor of Science graduate with a major in Electrical Engineering Technology (E E T) is an engineering technologist who can bridge the gap between scientific advancement and practical electrical devices and systems. Research in all fields of electrical engineering has produced an abundance of new knowledge in recent years. Many of these advanced scientific achievements have been unused due to the shortage of engineering technologists specifically educated to convert scientific information into practical devices and systems.

The E E T major helps equip students with the various skills necessary to adapt new scientific knowledge to new products. Technical selections are offered in the senior year to provide some degree of specialization, but all graduates receive a well-rounded basic education in electrical and electronic design principles. The strengths of the program include: an applied hands-on program; extensive laboratory experience; accreditation by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology; and excellent job placement.

E E T graduates who wish to continue their professional development can take the Fundamentals of Engineering examination in Pennsylvania, a prerequisite for taking the Professional Engineering examination.

For a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering Technology a minimum of 128 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Electrical Engineering Technology major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment/Re-enrollment:
Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Associate degree students should file a re-enrollment form during the final semester of their associate degree. Students re-enrolling from an associate's degree into the bachelor's degree should run a degree audit from CAAIS, using the E E T major code, to determine their curriculum requirements.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(10-18 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-14 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87-97 credits
(This includes 10-18 credits of General Education courses; 3 credits of GWS courses, 7-9 credits of GN courses, 0-6 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 64-70 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (31 credits)
EE T 213W(5) (Sem: 1-4)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1) (Sem: 1-6)
CMATH 320(2) (Sem: 5-6)
CMPET 300(1), E E T 312(4)[1], 330(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E E T 419(1), 420(3), 431(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (33-39 credits)
Select 2-3 credits from EG T 101(1) and 102(1) or ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from CMPSC 101 GQ(3), 110(3), 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 4 credits from: CMATH 220 (4), MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 4 credits from: CMATH 221 (4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 6-8 credits from PHYS 150 GN(3), and 151(3) or PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4)(Sem: 2-4)
Select 2-3 credits from E MCH 011(3) or E T 300(2) (Sem: 2-6)
Select 12-14 credits from one of the following groups: a)or b):
a.) EE T 205(1), 210(2), 211(3), 216(3), 221(1) (Sem: 3-4)
and E E T 311(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6):
b.) E E T 231(5), E ENG 354(5), 355(2) (Sem: 5-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 23-27 credits

COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY OPTION (23-27 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16 credits)
E E T 403(4), 412(4), CMPET 400(4), 401(3), 402(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
Select 3 credits from: COMP 408(3), 430(3), 432(3) (Sem: 7-8)
Select 4 credits of technical electives from: E E T 401(4), 402(4), 403(4), 407(4), 408(4), 409(4), 410(4), 412(4), 413(4), 414(4), 423(4), 456(4), 478(4) (Sem: 7-8)

GENERAL ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY OPTION (26-27 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
E E T 422(3), 433(4), M E T 311(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16-17 credits)
Select 4-5 credits from: EE T 213W(5), E E T 222(4) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 12 credits of technical electives from: E E T 401(4), 402(4), 403(4), 407(4), 408(4), 409(4), 410(4), 412(4), 413(4), 414(4), 423(4), 456(4), 478(4), CMPET 400(4), 401(3), 402(1) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-044 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add SS ED 430W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION & EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ELEM)

PROFESSOR ERNEST DISHNER, Program Coordinator, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education

The Elementary Education program is characterized by its humanistic approach to teaching. The program offers extensive field experiences in the junior year prior to student teaching and emphasizes the problems of urban teachers. An objective of the program is the development of self-awareness and independence in students, which can free them from the typical dependent relationships with instructors. Thus, a student is expected to exhibit initiative and self-direction toward professional goals and demonstrate professional behavior in contacts with school personnel.

Prior to the full-time student teaching experience in the senior year, students are expected to complete all other courses required for certification, including two part-time placements. On-campus courses are scheduled two or three days a week, while field experiences in nearby schools are scheduled part-time, two or four days per week.

For a B. ELED degree in Elementary Education a minimum of 127 credits are required.

For a B. ELED degree in Elementary Education with Early Childhood Education Certification a minimum of 140 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Elementary Education major or the Elementary Education major with Early Childhood Certification requires the completion of 57 or more credits and the state's minimum GPA criteria (presently 2.50). Students thinking seriously about education should plan their freshmen and sophomore years carefully. Semesters 5 through 8 are very structured.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course, selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 7-10 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 99-112 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 3 credits of GH courses, 6 credits of GS courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 96-99 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (73 credits)
MATH 200 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 128 DF,GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
EDUC 302(3), 305(3), 421(3), 462(3), 470(3) (Sem: 5-6)
EDMTH 301(3), EDUC 304(3), 320(3), 352(3), 353(3), 495(1-15) (Sem: 5-6)
EDMTH 302(3), EDUC 303 DF(3), 321(3), 371(3), 495 (1-15), EDSCI 454(3) (Sem: 7-8)
SS ED 430W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
EDUC 385(3), 395(1-12), HLTH 306(2) (Sem: 7-8)

Currently the state requires at least a 2.5 GPA for student teaching.

ADDITIONAL COURSES (20-23 credits)
Select 3 credits of GN physical science from: ASTRO, CHEM, EARTH, EM SC, GEOSC, MATSC, METEO, PHYS (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits of GN biological science from: B M B, BIOL, BI SC (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits of GN environmental science from: BI SC 003 GN(3), BIOL 020 GN,DF(3), 027 GN(3) or HORT 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: HIST 003 GH(3), 012 GH(3), 020 GH(3) or 021 GH(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 2-5 credits from one of the following GQ groups: a) or b):
a) MATH 017 GQ(3), 018 GQ(3), 021 GQ(3), 022 GQ(3), 026 GQ(3), 040 GQ(5) or 220 GQ(2) (Sem: 1-4)
b) STAT 100 GQ(3), 200 GQ(4), 250 GQ(3) or 301 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from: PSY 213 GS(3) or HDFS 229 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits of literature (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 3-13 credits

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION TEACHING OPTION: 3 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
EDUC 315 DF(3) (Sem: 5-6)

EARLY CHILDHOOD CERTIFICATION OPTION: 13 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
EDUC 401(3), 403(3), 404(3), 410(3), 495(1-15) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-045 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add C E 427W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (ENVE)

PROFESSOR Samuel A. McClintock, Program Chair

The Environmental Engineering major helps graduates obtain the skills necessary to analyze, design, and manage air pollution control, water supply, waste water treatment, solid waste handling, and hazardous waste systems. A thorough background in engineering fundamentals is provided by a broad core of courses in basic science and mathematics emphasizing sciences such as chemistry and microbiology.

A sequence of environmental engineering design courses distinguishes the undergraduate program. In the senior year, a majority of the environmental engineering courses such as, Solid Waste Management, Treatment Plant Design, Hydraulic Design, and Hazardous Waste Management utilize a team approach to meet project design objectives. These courses also emphasize written and oral communication of engineering concepts and project results. There is a considerable emphasis on conservation, reuse, and pollution prevention as pollution control strategies in these courses.

Environmental Engineering students are qualified to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination leading to certification as an Engineer-in-Training (EIT) and, with appropriate experience after graduation, sit for the Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) examination leading to registration as a Professional Engineer. They are also qualified to pursue graduate education in Environmental Engineering or other related majors such as Environmental Pollution Control. ENVE graduates are qualified to work at the entry level in a variety of jobs related to environmental protection and management in government and private industry.

For a B.S. degree in Environmental Engineering a minimum of 132 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Environmental Engineering major requires that the student has completed: MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), and CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1). A 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average is required.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who meet entry to major requirements but need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(21 of the 45 credits are included among the Requirements for the Major. )
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-1

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107-109 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (86 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), CHEM 013 GN(3), 015 GN(1), ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1] , MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 250(3) (Sem: 3-4)
PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 220(3) (Sem: 3-4)
E MCH 011(3)[1], 012(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
CHM 301(3), M E T 433(3), C ENG 302(2), M ENG 322(3) (Sem: 5-6)
C E 472W(3), ENVE 301(3), 411(3)[1], 413(3), 415(3), 416(3), 417(3), 424(3), 425(3), 451 (3), 470(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21-23 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CSE 103 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from ECON 002 GS(3) or 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from C ENG 322(3)[1] or E MCH 013(3)[1] (Sem: 2-6)
Select 3 credits from CHEM 034(3) or 038(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from MA SC 422(3) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from C E 261(3)[1], C ENG 361(3)[1] or C E T 361(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from SUR 111(3) or C ENG 201(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (0-3 credits)
Select 0-3 credits from the following areas: C E, E E, M E, I E, C ENG, E ENG, I ENG, MATH, COMP, CSE, M ENG (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-046 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add MGMT 451W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

FINANCE (FINCE)

PROFESSOR Stephen Schappe, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration

This major is designed for students seeking careers in corporate finance, investment finance, banking, public finance, and international finance, as well as for those who intend to pursue graduate study in finance. The graduates may then be prepared to seek certificates in financial analysis (CFA) and financial planning (CFP). Each studentís background is complemented with basic business instruction in accounting, marketing, and information systems. With Business and non-business electives, the program is designed to develop necessary skills to be an effective financial manager. Because the Harrisburg area is the center of industry and economic development for south-central Pennsylvania students are provided with many opportunities to experience the world of business.

For a B.S. degree in Finance a minimum of 122 credits are required. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at the Capital College. No more than 61 credits should be from business and business related courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Finance major requires the completion of 9 entry-to-major courses: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or 030 GWS(3), MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4), ACCTG 211(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3), 204(2), STAT 200 GQ(4) or MS&IS 200(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), B A 243(4) and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average. Additional information about this major is available in the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration at Penn State Harrisburg.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

General Education: 45 credits
(10-12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: Select 3-4 credits of non-business courses.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84-85 credits
(This includes 10-12 credits of General Education Courses: 3 credits of GWS course; 3 credits of GS course; 4-6 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
ENGL 202D GWS(3), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), ACCTG 211(4), M I S 204(2), B A 243(4) (Sem: 1-4)
FINAN 320(3)[1], BUS 361(3), 364(3), 462(3), INFSY 390(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MNGMT 310(3), MRKT 370(3), ECNMS 313(3)[1], FINAN 410(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
MGMT 451W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23-24 credits)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3-4 credits from M I S 103(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from from MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits[1] from the following: FINAN 421(3), 422(3), 426(3), 428(3), 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from 200-400 level business courses from: BUS, FINAN, INFSY, MNGMT, MRKT or P ACC in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-047 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add MGMT 451W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

GENERAL BUSINESS (GNBUS)

PROFESSOR JOHN A. SINISI, Program Coordinator, Penn State Schuylkill

This major in General Business is an upper division, professionally-oriented business program designed for students who want a broad-based, general preparation coupled with applied study in a practical setting such as in the area of small business. It also allows students with specific career goals to develop, in consultation with an advisor, a limited specialty in business administration that meets their personal and professional needs.

For the B.S. degree in General Business, a minimum of 122 credits are required. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at the Capital College. No more than 61 credits should be from business and business related courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the General Business major requires the completion of 9 entry-to-major courses: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or 030 GWS(3), MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4), ACCTG 211(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3), 204(2), STAT 200 GQ(4) or MS&IS 200(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), B A 243(4) and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
This program is available in its entirety only at Penn State Schuylkill.
Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Schuylkill any time through their 6th semester.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem. 1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10-12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of the Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1-5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84-86 credits
(This includes 10-12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 4-6 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 60-61 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ACCTG 211(4), B A 243(4), M I S 204(2) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BUS 305(3)[1], 340(3), 361(3)[1], FINAN 320(3)[1](Sem: 5-6)
INFSY 390(3), MNGMT 310(3)[1], MRKT 370(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
BUS 364 DF(3), 462(3), MGMT 451W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (11-12 credits)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 4 credits from MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 24-25 credits

BUSINESS STUDIES OPTION: 24-25 credits
(At least 12 credits in Additional or Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24-25 credits)
Select 24-25 credits in general business in consultation with an adviser and with program approval to reflect student's professional interests (should include at least one course which emphasizes computer application). (Sem: 5-8)

ENTREPRENEURSHIP OPTION: 24-25 credits
(At least 6 credits in Additional or Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
MNGMT 451(3), MRKT 476(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from B A, BUS, H C M, INFSY, MNGMT, MRKT (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6-7 credits)
Select 6-7 credits in general business in consultation with an adviser to reflect student's professional interests (Sem: 7-8)

FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OPTION: 24-25 credits
(At least 12 credits in Additional or Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
ECNMS 313(3), P ACC 300(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from B A, BUS, FINAN, H C M, INFSY, P ACC (should include at least one course which emphasizes computer application) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6-7 credits)
Select 6-7 credits in general business in consultation with an adviser to reflect student's professional interests. (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-048 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add PHIL 408W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

GENERAL HUMANITIES (G HUM)

PROFESSOR LOUISE E. HOFFMAN, PROGRAM COORDINATOR

The General Humanities program is intended for students who want the greatest flexibility in planning a broad education in the liberal arts. Small classes, an outstanding multidisciplinary faculty, and an excellent location for valuable internship experiences are just some of the features of the program.

For a B.HUM. degree in General Humanities a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the General Humanities major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
HUM 311(3)[1], 312(3)[1], 313(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
PHIL 408W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
(At least 12 credits of Additional/Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (33 credits)
Select 33 credits from the following: AMSTD 300-499, C ART 300-499, C HIS 300-499, C MUS 300-499, ENLSH 300-499, HCOMM 300-499, LIT 300-499, PHLOS 300-499, THTRE 300-499 (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the School of Humanities approved list in consultation with an academic adviser or select a Capital College minor in support of the student's interests.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-049 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add MGMT 451W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

INFORMATION SYTEMS (INFSY)

PROFESSOR Stephen Schappe, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration

This major prepares students to enter rapidly expanding fields associated with technology including programming, systems analysis and design, database administration, network management, support services and training, and management of information resources. Students obtain competence both in information technology and in business theory. Thus, the curriculum combines technical content with managerial aspects of information systems. Each studentís background is complemented with basic business instruction in accounting, marketing, management and finance. With business and non-business electives, the program is designed to develop necessary skills to be an effective Information Systems employee. Because the Harrisburg area is the center of industry and economic development for South Central Pennsylvania, students are provided with many opportunities to experience the exciting and challenging world of business.

For a B.S. in Information Systems a minimum of 122 credits are required. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at the Capital College. No more than 61 credits should be from business and business related courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Information Systems major requires the completion of 9 entry-to-major courses: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or 030 GWS(3), MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4), ACCTG 211(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3), 204(2), STAT 200 GQ(4) or MS&IS 200(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), B A 243(4) and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average. Additional information about this major is available in the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration at Penn State Harrisburg.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10-12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: Select 3-4 credits of non-business courses.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84-85 credits
(This includes 10-12 credits of General Education Courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 4-6 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), M I S 204(2), B A 243(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FINAN 320(3), BUS 361(3), 364 DF(3), 462(3), INFSY 390(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
INFSY 307(3)[1], 450(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
MNGMT 310(3), MRKT 370(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MGMT 451W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23-24 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from: M I S 103(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 12 credits[1] from the following: INFSY 430(3), 435(3), 440(3), 445(3), 446(3), 447(3), 448(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-050 Change. Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add ENGL 221W(3), 222W(3), 231W(3), 232W(3), 487W(4) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

LITERATURE (LIT)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CHERI L. ROSS, PROGRAM COORDINATOR

This program is for students who love literature and want to study various aspects of it in depth. This major is more broadly based than most traditional English studies. Students will explore both individual writers and the cultural contexts of American, English, European, and Latin American literature. Faculty strengths are in Renaissance literature; nineteenth-and twentieth-century British and American literature; contemporary, Latin American, and African American literature.

For a B. HUM. degree in Literature a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Literature major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who meet entry to major requirements but need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63-64 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits [1])
HUM 311(3), 312(3), 313(3) (Sem: 5-8)
LIT 315(3) (Sem: 5-8)
(At least 15 credits of Additional/Supporting courses must be taken at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (33-34 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from the following: ENGL 221W(3), 222W(3), 231W(3), 232W(3), 487W(4) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits from the following: AMSTD 300-499, C ART 300-499, C HIS 300-499, C MUS 300-499, ENLSH 300-499, HCOMM 300-499, PHLOS 300-499, THTRE 300-499 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 21 credits from the following: LIT 345(3), 372(3), 415(3), 427(3), 429(3), 440(3), 445(3), 447(3), 450 DF(3), 460(3), 470(3), 475(3), 477 DF(3), 480(3), 482 DF(3), 485(3), 487 DF(3), 491(3), 494(1-12), 496(1-18), 497(1-9), HUM 430(3), 453(3), AMSTD 452(3), 459(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED COURSES (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the School of Humanities approved list in consultation with an academic adviser or select a Capital College minor in support of the student's interests.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-051 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add MGMT 451W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

MANAGEMENT (MNGMT)

PROFESSOR Stephen Schappe, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration

This major is designed for students who are interested in careers in management, and learning problem-solving skills that will enable them to make sound decisions within a changing business environment. The program emphasizes current practices and technical competence which provides students with skills to organize, establish goals, and control activities. Each studentís background is complemented with basic business instruction in accounting, marketing, information systems and finance. Because the Harrisburg area is the center of industry and economic development for south-central Pennsylvania students are provided with many opportunities to experience the world of business.

For a B.S. degree in Management a minimum of 122 credits are required. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at the Capital College. No more than 61 credits should be from business and business related courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Management major requires the completion of 9 entry-to-major courses: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or 030 GWS(3), MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4), ACCTG 211(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3), 204(2), STAT 200 GQ(4) or MS&IS 200 (4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), B A 243(4) and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average. Additional information about this major is available in the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration at Penn State Harrisburg.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10-12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: Select 0-2 credits of non-business courses.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87-88 credits
(This includes 10-12 credits of General Education Courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 4-6 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (52 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), M I S 204(2), B A 243(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BUS 361(3), 364 DF(3), 462(3)[1], FINAN 320(3), INFSY 390(3), MRKT 370(3), MNGMT 310(3)[1], 450(3)[1], 463(3)[1], 480(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
MGMT 451W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23-24 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from M I S 103(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 9 credits[1] from the following: H C M 361(3), 462(3), MNGMT 441(3), 442(3), 451(3), 460(3), 461(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from 200- 00 level business courses from: BUS, FINAN, INFSY, MNGMT, MRKT, or P ACC in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-052 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add MGMT 451W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

MARKETING (MRKT)

PROFESSOR Stephen Schappe, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration

This major is designed for students interested in careers involving sales, promotion, services, distribution, research, and planning for business and the public sector. The major provides students with key concepts and methods of analysis in marketing. It focuses on understanding customer needs, developing products or services, creating and implementing marketing plans, monitoring customer responses, and projecting marketing activities for the future.

For the B.S. degree in Marketing, a minimum of 122 credits is required. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at the Capital College. No more than 61 credits should be from business and business related courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Marketing major requires the completion of 9 entry-to-major courses: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or 030 GWS(3), MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4), ACCTG 211(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3), 204(2), STAT 200 GQ(4) or MS&IS 200(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), B A 243(4) and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average. Additional information about this major is available in the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration at Penn State Harrisburg.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10-12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: Select 3-4 credits of non-business courses.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84-85 credits
(This includes 10-12 credits of General Education Courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 4-6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), M I S 204(2), B A 243(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202D GWS(3), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
BUS 361(3), 364 DF(3), 462(3), FINAN 320(3), INFSY 390(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MNGMT 310(3), MRKT 370(3)[1], 471(3)[1], 472(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
MGMT 451W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23-24 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from M I S 103(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem. 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem. 1-4)
Select 3 credits [1] from the following: ECNMS 312(3) or 417(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits [1] from the following: MRKT 473(3), 474(3), 475(3), 476(3), 477(3), 478(3), 480(3), 485(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from 200-400 level business courses from: BUS, FINAN, INFSY, MNGMT, MRKT, or P ACC in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-053 Change. Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add MATH 311W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES (MA SC)

PROFESSOR THANG N. BUI, Program Chair

The two options and the variety of the course offerings provide concentrations in various areas such as actuarial science, management science/operation research, statistics and preparation for graduate studies.

Small classes, excellent faculty, opportunities to work with faculty on projects, and strong employment prospects are just some of the strengths of the program. Students will be helped to develop: a solid foundation in mathematical studies; an awareness of the utility of mathematics, statistics and computers; skills in translating practical problems into mathematical terms; a competency in the use of modern mathematical tools; problem-solving skills; and an awareness of the importance of mathematics in society.

The program is designed to prepare students for employment in business, industry, and government immediately after graduation, but graduate study in mathematics or related disciplines is also a viable alternative. Mathematical modeling is emphasized and all students are required to take courses in statistics and computer science.

For a B. S. degree in Mathematical Sciences a minimum of 120 credits is required.
For a B. S. degree in Mathematical Sciences with the Secondary Education option a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Mathematical Sciences major requires that the student has completed: MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4). A 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average is required. Entry to the Mathematical Sciences Secondary Education option requires a 2.5 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who meet entry to major requirements but need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(9 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 78Ė81 credits
(This includes 9 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (BOTH OPTIONS): 45 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (38 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
COMP 350(3), 351(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MA SC 370(3)[1], 422(3), 440(3), 450(3)[1], 460(3)[1], 461(3)[1], 475 DF(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
Select 7 credits from the following: MATH 017 GQ(3), 040 GQ(5), 041 GQ(3), 220 GQ(2), 230(4), 231(2), 232(2), 250(3), 251(4), 311W(3) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 33-36 credits

GENERAL MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES OPTION: 33 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
COMP 401(3)[1], MA SC 420(3), 423(3), 425(3), 477(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 9 credits from: COMP 410(3), 414(3), 419(3) or MA SC 421(3), 427(3), 435(3), 436(3), 437(3), 441(4), 445(3), 455(3), 457(3), 465(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits of 300-400 level courses in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5-8)

SECONDARY EDUCATION IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES OPTION: 36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)
EDUC 314(3), 315 DF(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MA SC 445(3) (Sem: 5-6)
EDUC 417(3), 385(3), 395(1-12)[2] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from: MA SC 425(3) or 477(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[2] A minimum GPA of 2.50 in all previous work is required for admission to EDUC 395.

28-04-054 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add M E T 210W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (M E T)

PROFESSOR GAUTAM RAY, Program Chair

The goal of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program is to provide our students with the necessary training and education so that they can provide high-level technical support to a variety of industrial, commercial, consulting, and governmental organizations. The emphasis of our program is in the application of scientific and engineering principles. Technical communication in oral and written form is also emphasized. Our graduates are expected to appreciate the ethical and societal responsibilities of a technologist, the concepts of Continuous Quality Improvement and the continuing impact of globalization of design, manufacturing and marketing of technical goods and services. Our graduates are trained to deal with choice of materials and methods that are safe, environmentally and aesthetically acceptable and economically competitive. Typical responsibilities that may be assigned to our graduates are the development and evaluation of machines and mechanisms; development, organization and supervision of manufacturing processes and procedures; the instrumentation, control and testing of a process; quality control; technical marketing and sales; design of mechanical systems for heating and cooling and energy management.

The strengths of our program includes: hands-on training; extensive laboratory experience; state of the art computer methods, excellent job placement and accreditation by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Graduates who wish to continue their professional development can take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam in Pennsylvania, a prerequisite for taking the Professional Engineering exam.

For a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology a minimum of 128 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Mechanical Engineering Technology major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment/ Re-enrollment Recommendation:
Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment. A request for an earlier change of assignment will be considered.

Associate degree students should file a re-enrollment form during the final semester of their associate degree. Students re-enrolling from an associate's degree into the bachelor's degree should run a degree audit from CAAIS, using the M E T major code, to determine their curriculum requirements.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(16 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 98-103 credits
(This includes 16 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 9 credits of GN courses, 4 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (46 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-5)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
M E T 210 W(3) (Sem: 3-4)
I E T 308(3) (Sem: 5-6)
M E T 303(2), 312(3), 315(3), 321(2), 331(2), 405(2)[1], 411(3), 413(3)[1], 435(4), 442(4)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
I E T 302(2) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (34-38 credits)
Select 2-3 credits from: EG T 101(1) and 102(1) or ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 credits from: PHYS 150 GN(3) or 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from: E MCH 011(3) or MCH T 111(3) (Sem: 2-3)
Select 3 credits from: IE T 101(3) or IE T 311 (Sem: 2-4)
Select 3-4 credits from: PHYS 151GN(3) or 212 GN(4) (Sem: 2-4)
Select 3 credits from: E MCH 012(3), E T 321(3) or M E T 206(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 1 credit from: E T 323(1) or MCH T 214 (1) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: E T 322(3), E MCH 013(3) or MCH T 213(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from: IE T 215(2) and IE T 216(2) or IE T 321(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: CE T 261(3) or M E T 361(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 7 credits from: EE T 101(3), 109(1), E E T 320(4) (Sem: 3-7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18-19 credits)
Select 9-10 credits from the department approved list. (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from 300-400 level I E T, M E T, M ENG or E MCH courses in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5 - 8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-055 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add MGMT 451W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY (P ACC)

PROFESSOR Stephen Schappe, Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration

This major helps students prepare for careers in auditing and public accounting, industrial and managerial accounting, and in governmental and non-public accounting. It also provides a sound background for students who plan to pursue graduate studies in accounting or related fields. Students who complete the prescribed courses and earn a bachelor of science degree will satisfy the academic requirements. Graduates may also elect to pursue other professional certifications, including certified Managerial Accountant (CMA), the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA), Certified Fraud Examiner (CFA), and Certified Government Financial Manger (DGFM). Because the Harrisburg area is the center of industry and economic development for south-central Pennsylvania students are provided with many opportunities to experience the world of business.

For a B.S. in Professional Accountancy a minimum of 122 credits is required. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be taken at the Capital College. No more than 61 credits should be from business and business related courses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Professional Accountancy major requires the completion of 9 entry-to-major courses: ENGL 015 GWS(3) or 030 GWS(3), MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4), ACCTG 211(4), CMPSC 203 GQ(4) or M I S 103(3), 204(2), STAT 200 GQ(4) or MS&IS 200(4), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), B A 243(4) and a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average. Additional information about this major is available in the office of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, School of Business Administration at Penn State Harrisburg.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10-12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: Select 3-4 credits of non-business courses.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84 - 85 credits
(This includes 10-12 credits of General Education Courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 4-6 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (67 credits)
ACCTG 211(4)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
B A 243(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
M I S 204(2) (Sem: 1-4)
FINAN 320(3), BUS 361(3), 364 DF(3), 462(3), INFSY 390(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MNGMT 310(3), MRKT 370(3) (Sem: 5-8)
P ACC 300(3)[1], 310(3), 340(3)[1], 400(3)[1], 401(3)[1], 420(3), 430(3), 435(3) (Sem: 5-8)
MGMT 451W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (11-12 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from M I S 103(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MATH 110 GQ(4) or 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 4 credits from MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from 200-400 level business courses from: BUS, FINAN, INFSY, MNGMT, MRKT or P ACC in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-056 Change to grade of C grade or better requirement.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

PROFESSOR BARBARA BREMER, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education

The Psychology major emphasizes the scientific study of psychology, including areas such as abnormal psychology, cognition, developmental psychology, learning theory, physiology, and social psychology. Knowledge of research methods and statistics are developed in the study of psychology.

Undergraduate Psychology students typically prepare for careers in human services fields, applied behavioral fields, or human resource management. The Psychology program is also designed to prepare students for graduate education.

Research is encouraged in the program. The curriculum is designed to develop analytical thinking and critical thought to accurately interpret research. In addition, applied or hands-on courses are available for students aiming to develop their clinical and counseling skills. Assisting faculty members in conducting research is strongly encouraged.

For a B.S. degree in Psychology a minimum of 122 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Psychology major requires a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and an average of C (2.00) or better in any courses already taken in the major.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg or to Penn State Schuylkill during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 78 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credtis of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)[1]
BI SC 004 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202A GWS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
PSYC 300W(4), 450(4), 451W(4) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 9 credits from: PSYC 395(1-18), 400(3), 402(3), 403(3), 405(3), 406(3), 409(3), 410 DF(3), 412(3), 415(3), 421(3), 424(3), 425(3), 427(3), 444 DF(3), 465 DF(3), 482(3), 492(3), 494(1-12), 496(1-18), 497(1-9), SCLSC 470(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from: PSYC 402(3), 405(3), 415(3), 482(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from: PSYC 424(3), 425(3), 427(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (33 credits)
Select 3 credits[1] from any GQ mathematics (Sem: 1- 4)
Select 3 credits from any GQ mathematics, computer science or philosophy (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits of foreign language or 300-400 level courses from: AMSTD, C ART, C HIS, C MUS, ENLSH, HCOMM, HUM, LIT, THTRE, WOMST (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6 credits in 300-400 level social science: AFRAS, BESC, SCLSC or SOCIO (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits 300-400 level CRIMJ or PUBPL (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-057 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add PL SC 470W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

PUBLIC POLICY (PUBPL)

PROFESSOR ROBERT BRESLER, Program Coordinator

The Public Policy major, based in the School of Public Affairs, gives students the opportunity to develop skills to make, implement, and analyze public policy. It also helps students prepare for graduate studies and careers in fields of law, public administration, political science, and economics. Public Policy provides students with the flexibility to tailor an academic program to suit their needs. Building on the program core, students may choose electives from a broad array of courses in public policy and other areas. Students with specific goals may choose to take a number of electives in a particular area of study.

Full-time Penn State faculty teach most of the courses. Part-time faculty with particular professional strengths (e.g., a practicing attorney with governmental experience, a correction system administrator) complement the full-time staff.

For a B.S. degree in Public Policy a minimum of 120 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Public Policy major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average and an average of C (2.00) or better in any course already taken in the major.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3-7 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 14-17 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 61-64 credits
(This includes 3-7 credits of General Education Courses: 0-4 credits of GQ courses, 3 credits of GS courses)
(At least 15 credits of 400 level courses must be taken from Additional and/or Supporting courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSE (3 credits)
PL SC 470W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (31-34 credits)
Select 3-6 credits[1] from the following: ECON 002 GS(3) and 004(3), or select PUBPL 350(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits[1] from the following: PL SC 001 GS(3) or PUBPL 301(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits[1] from the following: PL SC 002(3) or PUBPL 304(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 4 credits[1] from the following: STAT 200 GQ(4) or SCLSC 320(4)(Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits[1] from the following: PUBPL 480(3) or 481(3), 482(3), 483(3), 484(3), 485(3) or 490(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits from the following: PL SC 003 GS(3), 014 GS(3) PUBPL 360(3), 361 DF(3), 400(3), 401(3), 403(3), 408(3), 409(3), 410 DF(3), 411 DF(3), 412 DF(3), 413 DF(3), 420(3), 421 DF(3), 426(3), 436 DF(3), 437 DF(3), 446(3), 451(3), 452(3), 454(3), 455(3), 464(3), 470(3), 495(3-12), 496(1-18), 497(1-9), H C M 463(3), 464(3), 465(3), 467(3), INT U 200 GS(3), and any CRIMJ course (Sem: 1-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following: AFRAS 300-499(3), BE SC 300-499(3), PSYC 300-499(3), SOCIO 300-499(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from the following: AMSTD 300-499(3), C ART 300-499(3) , C HIS 300-499(3), C MUS 300-499(3), HCOMM 300-499(3), HUM 300-499(3), LIT 300-499(3), PHLOS 300-499(3), ENLSH 402(3), 407(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-058 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES add, C I 412W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

SECONDARY EDUCATION ENGLISH (EDENG)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CHERI L. ROSS, PROGRAM COORDINATOR

This interdisciplinary major prepares students for careers in teaching English/humanities in the secondary school or for graduate school. The studentís program must meet the minimum requirements established by the Pennsylvania department of Education for Instructional Level I Certification in Communications/ English. Students must have at least two courses each in British and American Literature to qualify for the certificate and at least one of each must be at the junior/senior level. Students should expect to take the majority of their courses in literature or English if they expect to be competitive in the workplace.

For a B. HUM. degree in Secondary Education English a minimum of 123 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Secondary Education English major requires the state's minimum GPA criteria (presently 2.5).

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 72 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (51 credits[1])
EDUC 313(2), 314(3), 315 DF(3), 322(3), 416(3), 435(1), 395(1-12) (Sem: 5-8)
ENLSH 310(3), 402(1-3), LIT 315(3), 429(3) (Sem: 5-8)
HUM 311(3), 312(3), 313(3) (Sem: 5-8)
C I 412W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
(At least 3 credits of Additional courses must be at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)
Select 3 credits of 001-200 level courses from: AAA S, AM ST, ANTH, ECON, GEOG, H DEV, HIST, ITAG, INTST, INT U, HD FS, MN EC, PL SC, R SOC, SPCOM, SOC, SO SC, WMNST, HSTRY, LATAM, POLSC, S T S, ECNS, PSY, PSYCH (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits: 3 credits in American Literature and 3 credits in British Literature from the following: ENGL 002 GH(3), 003 GH(3), 129 GH(3), 133 GH(3), 134 GH(3), 135 GH,DF(3), 139 GH,DF(3), 221(3), 221W(3), 222(3), 222W(3), 231(3), 231W(3) or 232(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from AFRAS, AMSTD, C ART, C HIS, C MUS, ENLSH, HCOMM, LIT, PHLOS, THTRE (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from LIT 470, 475, or 477(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from LIT 480, 482 DF, 485 DF or 487 DF(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from THTRE or HCOMM (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-059 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add HD FS 312W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

SECONDARY EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES (SESST)

PROFESSOR CLEMMIE GILPIN, Coodinator, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education

The Secondary Education: Social Studies major helps students prepare to meet the requirements to be certified for the Comprehensive Social Studies Instruction Level 1 Certificate as established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Students are challenged to prepare for teaching positions in the American classroom that is undergoing profound social change as our schools begin to reflect the increasing diversity of cultural backgrounds of the larger society.

For a B.SOSC. degree in Secondary Education Social Studies a minimum of 122 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Secondary Education Social Studies major requires the state's minimum GPA criteria (presently 2.5).

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001-200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these credits are included in the Requirements for the major)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 81-87 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 0-6 credits of GS courses, 6 credits of GH courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)[1]
HIST 020 GH(3), 021 GH(3) (Sem: 1-2)
EDUC 313(2), 314(3), 315 DF(3), 415(3), 435(1), 395(1-12) (Sem: 5-8)
HD FS 312W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
(At least 11 credits of Additional/Supporting courses must be at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (27 credits)
Select 3 credits from Economics: ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), 014 GS(3), 187(3), 302 GS(3), 315 GS(3), 323 GS(3), 333 GS(3), PUBPL 350(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from Geography: GEOG 010 GN3), 020 GS(3), 030 GS(3), 100 GS(3), 103 GS,DF(3), 105(3), 110 GN(3), 115 GN(3), 120 GS(3), 124 GS(3), 128 GS, DF(3), 200(3), 321(3), 401W(3), 402(3), 405(3), 406(3), 408W(3), 413(3), 415W DF(3), 418(3), 419(3), 420W(3), 421W(3), 422(3), 425(3), 427(3), 432W(3), 433W(3), 440W(3), 442(3), 443(3), 444(3), 450(3), 460(3), 470(3), 475(3), WMNST 415W(3), PUBPL 360(3), 436 DF(3), 437 DF(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits from Sociology: PSY 217 GS(3), SOC 001 GS(3), 007(3), 012 GS(3), 015 GS(3), 023 GS(3), 030 GS(3), 047(3), 055 GS(3), 103 DF(3), 109(3), 110 GS, DF(3), 111(3), 174(3), 309(3), 401(3), 404(3), 405(3), 406(3), 408(3), 423(3), 424(3), 429(3), 430(3), 431(3), 432(3), 435(3), 444(3), 446(3), 454(3), 455(3), 456(3), 461(3), WMNST 456(3), SO SC 001 GS(3), 002(3), SOCIO 384(3), 430(3), 440(3), 462 DF(3), 463(3), 484(3), 486(3), 488(3), RL ST 461(3), R SOC 422(3), 425(3), 444(3), 452(3)(Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from Anthropology: ANTH 001 GS(3), 002 GS(3), 007(3), 008 GS,DF(3), 009 GS(3), 010(3), AMSTD 340 DF(3), 457 DF(3), 469 DF(3), 470(3), BE SC 333 DF(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits from American Government: PL SC 001 GS(3), 002(3), 017W GS(3), 130(3), 137(3), 403(3), 405(3), 417(3), 419(3), 425(3), 426(3), 435(3), 435W(3), 472(3), 473(3), PUBPL 301(3), 408(3), 409(3), 420(3), 421 DF(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits from Psychology: PSY 002 GS(3), 170 GS,Df(3), 202 GS(3), 203(3), 204 GS(3), 213 GS(3), 221 GS(3), 231 GS(3), 236 GS(3), 238 GS(3), 243 GS(3), 300H(1-6), 402(3), 404(3), 405(3), 407(3), 408(3), 410(3), WMNST 471 DF(3), BE SC 302(3), 370(3), PSYC 406(3), 412(3), 415(3), 421(3), 425(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits from Social Psychology: PSY 217 GS(3), 417(3), SOC 003 GS(3), 403(3), BE SC 301(3), 410(3), SOCIO 372(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits from Minority Studies: AAA S 100 GS,DF(3), 102 GH,DF(3), 103 DF(3), 145 GH,DF(3), 146 GH,DF(3), 200 DF(3), 401(3), 409 GS,DF(3), 410(3), 412 DF(3), 422 DF(3), AM ST 104 DF(3), CMLIT 406(3), GEOG 415W DF(3), HIST 117 GH(3), 152 GH(3), 153 GH,DF(3), PSY 170 GS,DF(3), SOC 103 DF(3), 119 GS,DF(3), WMNST 001 GS,DF(3), 101 GH,DF(3), 102 GH,DF(3), 103 DF(3), 104 DF(3), 110 GS,DF(3), 116 GS(3), 136 DF(3), 205 DF(3), 419 DF(3), 420 DF(3), 476(3), J ST 010 GH,DF(3), 102 GH,DF(3), RL ST 114 GH(3), 137 GH,DF(3), 145 GH,DF(3), R SOC 420 DF(3), AFRAS 412 DF(3), BE SC 464 DF(3), PSYC 465 DF(3), PUBPL 410 DF(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from Non-West Studies: AAA S 110 GS,DF(3), 132 DF(3), 403(3), ART H 120 GA,DF(3), 130 GA,DF(3), CMLIT 111 GH(3), 404(3), 422(3), 423(3), GEOG 443(3), 444(3), ECON 372 GS(3), PL SC 002(3), 454(3), 456(3), 457(6), 458(6), 467(3), 468(3), HIST 141 GH(3), 172 DF(3), 173 GS(3),174 GH,DF(3), 175 GH,DF(3), 176 GH,DF(3), 178 GH(3), 179 GH(3), 181 GH,DF(3), 191 GH,DF(3), WMNST 102 GH,DF(3), AFRAS 301 DF(3), PUBPL 412 DF(3), PHIL 111 GH,DF(3), RL ST 003 GH,DF(3), 103 GH,DF(3), 104 GH,DF(3), 107 GH,DF(3), 181 DF(3), 481 DF(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from: PSY, PSYC, SOC, SOCIO, ECON, PL SC, BE SC, PUBPL, ANTH, GEOG, WMNST (Sem: 1-4)

CONCENTRATION (12-18 credits)
The student must select an area of concentration from the social sciences (AFRAS, BESC, CRIMJ, PSYC, PUBPL, SOCIO and selected AMSTD) or history (AFRAS, AMSTD, C HIS).

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[2] Presently the state requires at least a 2.5 GPA for student teaching.

28-04-060 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add SOC 400W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

SOCIOLOGY (SOCIO)

PROFESSOR CLEMMIE GILPIN, Coordinator, School of Behavioral Sciences and Education

This major is intended for students who are interested in graduate work in sociology or who want a strong sociology background in preparation for social or government work. Sociologists are employed in such diverse fields as telecommunications, human resource management, public assistance, research, and college teaching. Indeed, a degree in sociology should be seen as providing an opportunity to work in any environment where an understanding of social structure and social dynamics is required.

For a B.S. degree in Sociology a minimum of 122 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Sociology major requires 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment Recommendation:
Students should generally have completed most of their General Education requirements. A limited number of 001 - 200 level courses are offered at Penn State Harrisburg for students who need lower division courses.

Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their fourth semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-3 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education Course Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9-12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 68 credits
(This includes 0-3 credits of General Education course requirements: 0-3 credits of GS courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (14 credits)[1]
SOCIO 488(3), SCLSC 320(4), BE SC 472(4) (Sem: 5-8)
SOC 400W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
(At least 8 credits of 400 level courses must be taken from Additional and/or Supporting courses.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (27 credits)
Select 3 credits from: SOC 001 GS(3), R SOC 011 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from PL SC 001 GS(3), PUBPL 301(3), GEOG 124 GS(3), ANTH 045 GS;DF(3) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 3 credits from: AFRAS 301 DF(3), 310 DF(3), BE SC 333 DF(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from: AFRAS 412 DF(3), BE SC 301(3), 410(3), 464 DF(3), SOCIO 462 DF(3), 463(3), 484(3), 486(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from: SOCIO 372 (3), 384 (3), 430 (3) or 440 (3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 6 credits of 300-400 level from: AMSTD, C ART, C HIS, C MUS, ENLSH, HCOMM, HUM, LIT, PHLOS, THTRE (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of 300-400 level from: CRIMJ or PUBPL (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits of 300-400 level courses in consultation with an academic advisor and in support of the student's interests. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-061 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add C E 448W(3) and update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

STRUCTURAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (SDCET)

PROFESSOR JOSEPH J. CECERE, Program Chair

The Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology (SDCET) program provides the student with a well-rounded basic education in structural and construction principles. General engineering concepts, the use of construction methods, techniques in estimating and scheduling, aspects of construction management, design principles in steel and concrete relating to structural as well as foundation systems, applied computer methods, and awareness of integrated application of the project are included in the curriculum.

For a B.S. degree in Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology a minimum of 125 credits are required.

Entry to Major Requirements:
Entry to the Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology major requires a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade-point average.

Change of Assignment/Re-enrollment:
Students should request a change-of-assignment to Penn State Harrisburg during their final semester, to be effective for the next semester of enrollment.

Associate degree students should file a re-enrollment form during the final semester of their associate degree. Students re-enrolling from an associate's degree into the bachelor's degree should run a degree audit from CAAIS, using the SDCET major code, to determine their curriculum requirements.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 CREDITS
(13-21 of these 45 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-2 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 99-113 credits
(This includes 13-21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 0-6 credits of GQ courses, 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (45 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1) (Sem: 2-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
C E T 242(2), 243(2) (Sem: 5-6)
C E T 332(3)[1], 430(3)[1], 431(3)[1], 432(3)[1], 434(3), 435(3)[1], 438(3), 452(3)[1], 458(4) (Sem: 5-8)
C ENG 454(3) (Sem: 7-8)
C E 448W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (55-69 credits)
Select 2-3 credits from: EG T 101(1) and 102(1) or ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 credits from: PHYS 150 GN(3), 211 GN(4), 215 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-4 credits from: PHYS 151(3), 212 GN(4), 265 GN(4), CPHYS 251(4) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3-6 credits from: C E T 308(3) or AE T 101(3) and 102(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 2-3 credits from: SUR 111(3), C E 209(2), C E T 201(3), C ENG 201(3) (Sem: 2-4)
Select 3-5 credits from: E T 200(3) or AE T 206(2) and 207(3) (Sem: 2-5)
Select 3 credits from: E T 322(3), E MCH 013(3), MCH T 213(3) (Sem: 2-5)
Select 1 credit from: E T 323(1) or MCH T 214(1) (Sem: 2-5)
Select 2-3 credits from: E T 302(2) or E MCH 012(3) (Sem: 2-6)
Select 3-4 credits from: CMPSC 101 GQ(3), 110(3), 201C GQ(3), 201F GQ(3), CSE 103 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from: ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), 014 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 4 credits from: MATH 140 GQ(4) or CMATH 220(4) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3-4 credits from: MATH 141 GQ(4), CMATH 221(4), STAT 200 GQ(4), MA SC 422(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3-4 credits from: B LAW 243(3), B A 243(4), MNGMT 310(3), 463(3), ACCTG 151(3), 211(4), MRKT 370(3), MGMT 321(3), 100W(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from: C E T 436(3), 437(3), ENVE 451(3), E T 495(1 - 18), M E T 311(3), 402(3), 433(3), EE T 101(3) or E E T 320(4), B LAW 243(3), B A 243(4), MNGMT 310(3), 463(3), ACCTG 151(3), 211(4), MRKT 370(3), MGMT 321(3), 100W(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from: E MCH 011(3), MCH T 111(3)[1] (Sem: 4-6)
Select 3 credits from: CE T 261(3), C E T 361(3), C ENG 361(3) (Sem: 4-7)
Select 2-3 credits from: I E T 302(2) or C ENG 302(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from C E T 454(3), C ENG 454(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-062 COMP 350
Object-Oriented Programming for Mathematics and Science I
OOP MATH & SCI I (3)
Techniques and strategies for object-oriented programming, graphical user interfaces, overview of computer organization.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-063 COMP 351
Object-Oriented Programming for Mathematics and Science II
OOP MATH & SCI II (3)
Advanced techniques and strategies for object-oriented programming, graphical user interfaces, overview of computer organization.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 350
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-064 COMP 404
Formal Languages with Applications
FORMAL LANGUAGES (3)
Regular, context free, and recursive languages; notations for language specification and applications.
PREREQUISITE: MA SC 370 and Ada, Pascal, C, C++, Java, or Fortran
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-065 COMP 440
Object-Oriented Programming with Java
OO PROG JAVA (3)
Inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, applet programming, Java graphics, and an overview of object-oriented design.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of a high-level programming language such as Ada, C, C++, Pascal, or permission of program
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-066 COMP 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-067 COMP 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-068 PSYC 300W
Critical Thinking and Writing in Psychology
WRITING IN PSYC (4)
This course aims to teach psychology majors to think critically and to write clearly using APA writing style.
PREREQUISITE: admission to psychology major and a grade of "C" or higher in ENGL 202A (or its equivalent for students transferring from outside the Penn State system
PROPOSED START: S12000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-069 COMP 401
Numerical Analysis I
NUMERICAL ANLY I (3)
Algorithms and computer methods for systems of linear equalities, inequalities, matrix diagonalization, error analysis, eigenvalues and
eigenvectors, numerical analysis.
PREREQUISITE: ADA, Pascal, C, or Fortran
CONCURRENT: MA SC 460
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Algorithm efficiency and accuracy, function interpolation and polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, initial-value problems, and approximation of eigenvalues.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MA SC 460, Pascal, C, Fortran, or an object-oriented programming language
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-070 COMP 402
Computer Organization and Assembly Language
COMP ORG & ASMBLY (3)
Basic logic design and architecture of computers; coding, number representations, arithmetic, logical operations, machine level functions,
assembly language programming.
PREREQUISITE: Pascal, ADA, C, or Fortran
APPROVED START: FA1988

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Computer Organization and Architecture (COMP ORG AND ARCH)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Data representation, digital logic, instruction set/control logic, machine/assembly languages, advanced architectures, memory hierarchy, I/O devices, overall system design.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-071 COMP 403
Advanced Assembly Language Programming
ADV ASSEMBLY (3)
Binary arithmetic, table handling, editing, bit manipulation and translation, subroutines, macro writing, tape, direct-access programming,
SAM, ISAM, VSAM, JCL.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 402
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Assembly Language Programming (ASSEMBLY LANG PROG)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Program design, addressing modes, subroutines, parameter passing, stacks, bit manipulation, text processing, DOS functions, macros, I/O, high level language interfaces.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: previous experience in a high-level programming language
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-072 COMP 406
Computer Graphics Algorithms I
COMP GRAPHICS I (3)
Coordinate systems, clipping, curves and regions, geometric transformations, parallel and projective projections, hidden line and surface removal, interactive techniques, animation.
PREREQUISITE: MA SC 460; PASCAL
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: MA SC 460, an object-oriented programming language
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-073 COMP 408
Introductory Ada and Program Design
INT ADA & PROG DES (3)
Structured program design using Ada; strong typing, data abstraction, packages, subprograms, separate compilation, visibility, exceptions, generic units.
PREREQUISITE: Pascal, C, or Fortran
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: previous experience in a high-level programming language
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-074 COMP 410
Data Structures
DATA STRUCTURES (3)
Arrays, stacks, queues, linked list, binary trees, memory management techniques, searching and sorting.
PREREQUISITE: Pascal, ADA, C, or Fortran
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Asymptotic notations, lists, stacks, queues, trees, balanced trees, self- adjusting data structures, hash tables, priority queues, bionomial heaps.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: Pascal, ADA, C, C++ or Java. Prerequisite or concurrent: MA SC 370
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-075 COMP 411
Analysis of Computer Algorithms I
ANLY CMP ALG I (3)
Design and analysis of combinatorial computer algorithms.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 410 and introductory statistics
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Design and Analysis of Algorithms (DSGN ANALYSIS ALGS)
CHANG DESCRIPTION TO: Recurrences, algorithms design techniques, searching, sorting, selection, graph algorithms, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 410, MA SC 370, and introductory probability
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-076 COMP 412
Operating Systems I
OP SYSTEMS I (3)
Management of computer resources (CPU sharing, virtual memory, file system), concurrent programming, security.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 403, COMP 410
APPROVED START: FA1993

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Operating Systems (OP SYSTEMS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Process management, synchronization, deadlocks, memory management, virtual memory, CPU and process scheduling, file systems, disk scheduling, security, protection, distributed systems.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 402, 410, programming experience in a high-level language
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-077 COMP 413
Software Engineering and Design
SFTWAR ENGR DESIGN (3)
Structured programming, design and analysis, expectation and testing strategies, development handling, development libraries, approaches to project management, and documentation.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 411
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: COMP 413W
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Requirements analysis, specification, design, expectation and testing strategies, development handling, development libraries, approaches to project management, and documentation.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 410, MA SC 370
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-078 COMP 416
Topics in Programming Languages
TOPICS PROG LANG (3)
Specification, analysis and run-time behavior of higher level (problem solving) computer languages.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 403, 410
APPROVED START: SP1989

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Principles of Programming Languages (PRINC PROG LANG)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Design and implementation of high level programming languages and survey of programming language paradigms.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 402, 405, 410
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-079 COMP 418
Automata, Formal Languages, and Computability
AUTOMATA/LANG/COMP (3)
Context-free and context-sensitive languages, finite and pushdown automata, turing machines, undecidable problems, applications to programming languages.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 411; MA SC 370, a course in logic, or discrete mathematics
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Compiler Construction (COMPILERS)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Programming language structure, basic automata theory, design of a complier, scanning and parsing, semantic processing (including type checking), code generation, and error detection.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 402, 405, 410
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-080 COMP 419
Database Design I
DATABASE DESIGN I (3)
Basic database models: concepts of files, directories associated with database models, inquiries, retrievals using directories, query languages, security, integrity, reliability.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 410; Ada, Pascal, or C
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Relational database model, query languages, integrity, reliability, and normal forms for design.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 410, MA SC 370, Ada, Pascal, C, C++, Java or Fortran
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-081 COMP 420
Artificial Intelligence I
ARTIF INTELLGNCE I (3)
Problem solving, search techniques, game theory, graph theory, knowledge representation, lisp, prolog, facts, objects, databases, recursion, and lists.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 411, MA SC 370
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Artificial Intelligence (ARTIF INTELLGNCE)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: History of AI, problem solving, search techniques, knowledge representation, LISP, learning.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: a high-level programming language such as Ada, Pascal, C, or C++
ADD CONCURRENT: COMP 410
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-082 COMP 421
Communications and Networking
COMMUN NETWORKING (3)
Overview of communications problems, representation of signals, filtering, error and error detection, information transfer, modems, UART, protocols, interfacing.
PREREQUISITE: COMP 403, 410; Ada, Pascal, or C
APPROVED START: S11988

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Data transmission, basic signaling, data encoding, error control, communication protocols, security, network topologies, routing, switching, internetworking, emerging high speed networks.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMP 402, experience in a high-level programming language
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-083 COMP 430
UNIX and C
UNIX AND C (3)
UNIX operating system, functions, libraries, programming style, operators and variables, data types, control statements, pointers, arrays, strings, lists, input/output, macros.
PREREQUISITE: Ada, Pascal, or Fortran
APPROVED START: S11988

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: UNIX operating system, functions, libraries, programming style, operators and variables, data types, control statements, pointers, arrays, strings, lists, input/output, macros. (Students CANNOT take this course after having taken COMP 432.)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: Ada, pascal, or Fortran
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-084 COMP 435
Object-Oriented Design with Ada and C++
OOD ADA/C++ (3)
Object-oriented design methodologies and programming using Ada and C++.
PREREQUISITE: Ada, C++, or C
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Object-oriented Design (OOD DESIGN)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Object-oriented design methodologies and programming.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: 3 credits of an object-oriented programming language such as Ada, C++, or Java
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-085 MA SC 475 (DF)
Introduction to the History of Mathematics
INTRO HIST OF MATH (3)
A global survey of the history of mathematics as viewed as a human response to cultural, political, economic, and societal pressures.
APPROVED START: FA1997

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: MA SC 475W (DF)
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Communications

28-04-086 Add new Media Studies Minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

MEDIA STUDIES MINOR (Not yet available)

Robert D. Richards, In charge

The Media Studies minor is designed for students who want to develop their knowledge of the mass media from a variety of approaches, including aesthetic, humanistic, social-behavioral and legal-policy. This minor is a theory-based rather than a professional program. In fact, students in the minor may not take professional skills communications courses as part of this program. The minor consists of 18 credits, at least 6 of which must be at the 400 level. The minor is not available to students enrolled in any of the majors in the College of Communications. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSE (3 credits)
COMM 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from COMM 150 GA(3) or COMM 180(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 12 credits from COMM 205 DF(3), 250 GA(3), 261(3), 401(3), 403(3), 405(3) 408(3), 409(3), 410(3), 411(3), 413W(3), 419(3), 450(3), 451(3), 452(3), 453(3), 454(3), 455(3), 483(3), 484(3), 485(3), 496(3), or 499(3) (Sem: 5-8)

 

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-087 COMM 467
News Editing and Evaluation
NEWS EDITING (3:1:5)
Concepts and procedures involved in processing news for various news media, but with emphasis on print media editing.
PREREQUISITE: COMM 460, seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START: FA1986

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: COMM 260W
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

28-04-088 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Under SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS increase credits by one. Credits that double count changed from 15 credits to 21 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS".

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Earth Sciences (EARTH)

PROFESSOR TANYA FURMAN, Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs

This major provides a comprehensive program in environmental sciences based on a strong emphasis in earth sciences. It is especially directed toward study of the problems that arise from the complex interaction of man's technological and social activities with the natural environment. Graduates are in demand for positions in government, industry, and consulting. Professional activities include gathering and evaluating data on environments; management and coordination of specialized programs in environmental control and modification; and industrial and government planning. Suitable choices of courses may qualify students for graduate work in several fields.

For the B.S. degree in Earth Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 96 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), EM SC 100S GWS(3)* (Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 110 GN(3)
[1], 115 GN(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
GEOG 406(3), METEO 003 GN(3)
[1], 022(2)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
EARTH 400(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (31-33 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 110 GQ(4)or 140 GQ(4); MATH 111 GQ(2) or 141 GQ(4)
[22] (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4) or 215 GN(4); PHYS 212 GN(4) or 265 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
BIOL 110(4) or [BIOL 011(3) + 012(1)] and BIOL 220W(4) or [MICRB 106(3) + 107(1)] (Sem: 3-6)
GEOSC 001(3)
[1] or 020 GN[1](3) (Sem: 5-6)
GEOSC 002 GN(3)
[1] or 021 GN[1](3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (35-37 credits)
Select 3 credits in computer science
[22] (Sem: 3-4)
Select 4-6 credits in mathematics, statistics, computer science
[22] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in ecology (Sem: 5-8)
Select 7 credits in other approved courses (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits in earth sciences at a more advanced level (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits of writing intensive courses from within Earth and Mineral Sciences to include, but not limited to, GEOG 432W, 433W, GEOSC 470W, METEO 471W (Sem: 7-8)

____________
[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[22] A minimum of 15 credits of mathematics, statistics, and computer science is required.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-089 Change. Name change from GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (GEOEE) to ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (ENVSE). Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3) and delete ENGL 202C GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Credits that double count changed from 21 credits to 24 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS".

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Environmental Systems Engineering (ENVSE)

PROFESSOR RICHARD HOGG, in charge

This interdisciplinary major is designed to provide students with the engineering skills needed to tackle the global-scale environmental issues of modern society arising from the extraction and utilization of minerals and fuels. The major includes a general background in the basic and engineering sciences followed by a core program emphasizing the earth and atmospheric sciences, economics and policy issues, mineral engineering systems, characterization and evaluation of environmental concerns and fundamental study of environmental remediation systems. Students are provided with the opportunity to specialize in the environmental problems associated with land, air, or water.

For the B.S. degree in Environmental Systems Engineering, a minimum of 127 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 106 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (83 credits)
EM SC 100S GWS(3)* (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 034(3), E MCH 011(3), 012(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), 251(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
C E 261(3), 270(3), MATSE 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GEOSC 071(3)
[1], 452(3), METEO 456(3), MNG 401(1), P N G 411(1)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
GEOG 030 GS(3), GEOEE 402(1), 404(2), 406(3), 412(1), 480(3), 494(2)
[1], ECEEM 484W(3), MN PR 301(3)[1], 427(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (17-18 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3), 201F GQ(3), or 203 GQ(4)(Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2) or 231(2) (Sem: 3-4)
GEOSC 004(3) or METEO 455(3) (Sem: 5-6)
F SC 430(3), MN PR 401(3), or 426(3) (Sem: 7-8)
M E 470(3), GEOEE 408(3), or MN PR 425(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply up to 6 credits of ROTC.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-090 Change. Under the listing of Geography courses satisfying the IIC requirement, add GEOG 040 GS;GI and under the courses satisfying the Writing requirement, add GEOG 420W and 421W. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2) and add GEOG 040 GS;GI(3) to the (Sem: 3-6) list and to the (Sem: 5-8) list. Under the GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE OPTION, add SOILS 450. Under the PHYSICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY OPTION, add GEOG 407, 356, and 435. Under the URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTION, add GEOG 356. Credits that double count changed from 6 credits to 12 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered or for students declaring the major after their freshman year: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Geography (GEOG)

PROFESSOR ROGER M. DOWNS, Head of the Department

Geographers describe, analyze, and explain patterns of physical and human phenomena on the Earth's surface. Geography is simultaneously an environmental science and a social-behavioral science. This major helps provide grounding in analytical techniques such as map reading, cartography, and statistics. Substantive course work investigates the ways people use environmental resources and how they arrange themselves and their economic, social, and political activities on the earth's surface.

The Geography major can provide preparation for a career in business, industry, or government. Geographers with bachelor's degrees are currently being placed in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies and in private firms that specialize in planning and development or in environmental and socioeconomic analysis.

For the B.S. degree in Geography, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL OPTION: This option is designed to serve the needs of students who want to learn about the various topics and perspectives that comprise the discipline of geography. The General option is appropriate both for students who intend to pursue postgraduate degrees and for students who want to emphasize a topic for which no option exists.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE OPTION: This option helps prepare students for entry-level positions in public and private mapping/remote sensing agencies and firms. The student may specialize in one or all of the areas covered in the option. This option is appropriate for students intending to pursue advanced degrees with specialization in these fields.

PHYSICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY OPTION: This option is appropriate for students who want a broad understanding of the earth and environmental sciences in preparation for careers in industry, commerce, and government. The option is designed to develop competence in description, analysis, explanation, and management of problems arising from human use of natural resources and natural systems.

URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTION: This option is appropriate for students who want to study urban and regional development, public policy, and other applications of urban, social, and economic geography in industrialized societies, applying geographical analysis to development opportunities and problems.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE MINOR: Students must take GEOG 121 GS; select 6 credits from GEOG 321, 352, or 357; and select 9 credits (at least 6 at the 400 level) from GEOG 330, 356, 421W, 422, 425, 437, 458, 459, 480, or 481, for a total of 18 credits. No credit toward the minor will be given for courses with a grade lower than C.

GEOGRAPHY MINOR: In consultation with a geography adviser, students must select a minimum of 3 credits in physical geography, a minimum of 3 credits in human geography, and select additional courses (at least 6 credits at the 400 level) for a total of 18 credits in Geography. No credit toward the minor will be given for courses with a grade lower than C.

Geography courses satisfying the Cultural Diversity Intercultural and International Competence requirement: GEOG 040 GS;GI, 103 DF;GS, 128 DF;GS, 415W DF.

Geography courses satisfying the Writing requirement: GEOG 401W, 404W, 408W, 415W DF, 420W, 421W, 432W, 433W, and 440W. All students must satisfactorily complete at least one writing-intensive course in Geography.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12-18 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63-69 69-75 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education: 6 credits of GQ courses and 6 credits of GWS courses.

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS):54 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 credits)
EM SC 100S GWS(3)*(Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 010 GN(3)[1], 020 GS(3)[1], 030 GS(3)[1], 121 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 121 GS(3), 454(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 24 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 100 GS[1] or 120 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 105[1], 110 GN[1], or 115 GN[1] (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 040 GS;GI(3), 103 GS;DF, 124 GS, or 128 GS;DF (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 040 GS;GI(3)102 GH, 200, 401W, 404W, 427, 440W, 441, 442, 443, 444, or 445 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from MATH 017 GQ, 018 GQ, 021GQ, 022 GQ, 026 GQ,040 GQ, 041 GQ, 110 GQ, 111 GQ, 140 GQ, 140A GQ or 141 GQ (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from CMPSC 101 GQ, 201 GQ, CSE 103 GQ, or GEOG 356 (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3 credits in quantification (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits in natural sciences (Sem: 1-6)
Select 6 credits in social and behavioral sciences (Sem: 3-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 15-21 credits

GENERAL OPTION: 15 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from 400-level GEOG courses (Sem: 5-8)

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE OPTION: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
GEOG 321(3), 352(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GEOG 357(3), 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from GEOG 330, 356, 421, 422, 425, 437, 453, 458, 459, 480, 481, FOR 455, or SOILS 415 or 450 (Sem: 5-8)

PHYSICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY OPTION: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
GEOG 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 6 credits from GEOG 105, 110 GN, or 115 GN (Sem: 3-6)
GEOG 406, 407, or 408W(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 321, 330, 352, 356, 357, 425, 459, 480, 481 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from two of the following three categories: (Sem: 5-8)
GEOG 432W, 433W, 435, or 437
GEOSC 303, 340, 452, 462, or 489
SOILS 101

URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTION: 21 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)
GEOG 100 GS or 120 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6 credits from GEOG 415W DF, 418, 419, 420, or 470 (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 321, 330, 352, 356, 357, 421, 425, 455, 459, 480, or 481 (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from department list (Sem: 5-8)

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered or for students declaring the major after their freshman year: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-091 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Credits that double count changed from 15 credits to 21 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Add quantification statement to minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Geosciences (GEOSC)

PROFESSOR TANYA FURMAN, Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs

The geosciences are concerned with understanding earth processes and their application to deciphering the evolutionary history of the Earth and its life; to discovering and developing natural resources such groundwater, metals, and energy sources; to solving technology-generated environmental problems such as acid mine drainage and waste disposal; and to predicting geological events, such as the occurrence of earthquakes and volcanism.

The major provides a broad foundation in the physical and natural sciences, and, together with specialized knowledge of the solid Earth, can produce a graduate prepared for immediate employment or for graduate school. A senior thesis is required for all students.

For the B.S. degree in Geosciences, a minimum of 121 credits is required.

GENERAL OPTION: This option is designed to provide sufficient flexibility so that the student has the opportunity to prepare for graduate school by focusing on specialized areas in the geosciences. The option's flexibility also permits students to develop a broad background in the geosciences in preparation for post-graduate majors that require breadth, such as environmental law.

HYDROGEOLOGY OPTION: This option helps prepare the student for entry-level positions in environmental agencies and firms where a specialized knowledge of groundwater and related areas is required. The option is also appropriate for students wishing to pursue and advanced degree in the area of hydrogeology.

GEOSCIENCES MINOR: Students must take GEOSC 001(3), 020 GN(3), or 071(3); GEOSC 002 GN(3) and 470W(3). Select 9 additional credits from GEOSC 004(3) or 201(4) and 300- and 400-level GEOSC courses (6 of these 9 credits must be at the 400 level), for a total of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 97 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 67 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (64 credits)
EM SC 100S GWS(3)*, MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOSC 001(3) [if GEOSC 001 is not available, GEOSC 020 GN(3) may be substituted] (Sem: 1-6)
GEOSC 201(4)
[1], 202(4)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
GEOSC 203(4)
[1], 310(4)[1], 465(4)[1], 472(6) (Sem: 5-6)
GEOSC 494W(3), 496(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30 credits

GENERAL OPTION: 30 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from 300- and 400-level GEOSC courses: GEOSC 303(3), 340(3), 402(3), 416(3), 421(3), 422(3), 423(4), 424(3), 426(3), 434(3), 439(3), 440(3), 451(3), 452(3), 454(3), 461(3), 470W(3), 471(3), 489(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 3 credits of biology, computer science, mathematics [above the level of MATH 141 GQ(4)], or statistics (Sem: 3-6)
Select 12 credits, in consultation with adviser, supportive of the student's interest (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 3-8)

HYDROGEOLOGY OPTION: 30 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSE (3 credits)
GEOSC 452(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 3 credits from CMPSC 201C GQ(3), 201F GQ(3), 203 GQ(4), STAT 250 GQ(3) [if STAT 250 is not available, STAT 200 GQ(4) may be substituted], or 451 (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from CHEM 034(3), 451(3), GEOSC 412(3), 419(3), or 457(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from GEOSC 340(3), 439(3), 454(3), 484(3), or GEOG 352(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from SOILS 101(3), 415(3), or A S M 327(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits, in consultation with adviser, supportive of the student's interest. (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC) (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-092 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3) and change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Credits that double count changed from 21 credits to 24 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Add quantification statement to minor. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Industrial Health and Safety (I H S)

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER J. BISE, Program Chair

This major is designed to provide students with the technical and managerial skills necessary to address the occupational health and safety concerns associated with the extraction and utililization activities of the minerals and fuels industries, the construction industry, and other heavy industries. Employers in the United States are mandated by federal and state laws to provide workplaces that are free of recognized hazards to personnel. Agencies such as OSHA and MSHA have placed increased emphasis on employer responsibilities for the health and safety of their employees. Annually, work-related incidents cost the United States in excess of $40 billion, affecting not only workman's compensation but also reducing productivity. This major includes a general background in the basic sciences, followed by a core program emphasizing the nature of the various industries, as well as the economic, technical, and policy issues of occupational health and safety.

For the B.S. degree in Industrial Health and Safety, a minimum of 129 credits is required.

INDUSTRIAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MINOR: Students must take I H S 400(3), 430(3), and 445(3); select 9 credits from I H S 410(3), 420(3), 425(3), 440(4), 450(3), or 470(3) for a total of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 108 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 9 credits of GN courses, and 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (83 credits)
BIOL 041 GN(3)[1], 042(1), CHEM 012 GN(3)[1], 014(1)[1], CMPSC 203 GQ(4), EM SC 100S GWS(3)*, MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 012(3), 210(5), MGMT 100(3), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
I E 497(3), I H S 400(3)[1], 410(3), 420(3), 425(3), 430(3)[1], 440(4), 445(3) (Sem: 5-6)
I H S 450(3), 470(3), 490(1), 495W(6) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 013 GN(3) or 034(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from the I H S course list of industrial or manufacturing processes (Sem: 5-6)
Select 12 credits from the I H S-approved list, in consultation with adviser, supportive of the student's interests. (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-093 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3) and change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), and 203 GN(3) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Credits that double count changed from 15 credits to 21 credits. Add 1 credit of ELECTIVES. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Materials Science and Engineering (MATSE)

PROFESSOR RICHARD E. TRESSLER, Head, Department of Materials Science
and Engineering

The future can be appropriately termed the age of materials. In addition to the traditional engineering applications of metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers, new materials and composites must be developed by materials scientists to aid progress in the exploration of the oceans and space and to encourage our efficient utilization of energy. These new materials will help meet the demands of society for improved efficiencies and reliable performance at high temperatures and in severe environments.

Students in materials sciences and engineering begin with a background in basic chemistry, mathematics, and physics, the foundation for broad-based materials properties, processing, and applications courses. Commencing with their junior year, students take courses in Materials Science and Engineering and specialized courses in one of four options: Ceramic Science and Engineering, Electronic and Photonic Materials, Metals Science and Engineering, or Polymer Science.

POLYMER SCIENCE MINOR: Students must take PLMSE 406(3); select 12 credits from PLMSE 400(3), 401(3), 407(3), 409(3), and 410(3); and select 3 credits from PLMSE 412(1), 413(1), 416(3), 442(3), 494W(3), 496(1-3), CHEM 455(3), CH E 441(3), E MCH 446(3), or B M B 474(2), for a minimum of 18 credits. No credit toward the minor will be given for courses with a grade lower than C.

CERAMIC SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION

PROFESSOR DAVID J. GREEN, Program Chair

This option covers the manufacture and usage of a wide variety of inorganic materials that usually include high temperatures. The program helps prepare students for operating, research, and development positions in all sections of the ceramic industry and for graduate studies. Graduates also find employment in many other industries that use ceramic materials, such as iron and steel, electrical and electronic, energy generation, automotive, aeronautical, and aerospace. Many find employment in industries that manufacture composite materials such as glass-ceramics, metal-ceramics, or glass-metal structures. The B.S. degree in this option is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET).

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Ceramic Science and Engineering, a minimum of 128 credits is required.

ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC MATERIALS OPTION

PROFESSOR DAVID J. GREEN, Program Chair

This option provides specialized courses dealing with the processing, properties, and performance of semiconductor, optoelectronic, and optical materials and devices. The graduates contribute in the electronics, telecommunications, and computer industries or pursue advanced studies in materials science and engineering. The B.S. degree in this option is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET).

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Electronic and Photonic Materials, a minimum of 127 credits is required.

METALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION

PROFESSOR KWADWO OSSEO-ASARE, Program Chair

The metals option provides an opportunity to explore a broad range of both scientific and engineering principles as applied to metals and alloys. A graduate of this option will thus typically apply basic concepts of chemistry, physics, or engineering science to problems concerning the processing or properties of metals. Although metallurgists are often employed by metals-producing industries, an increasingly large fraction are finding employment in a diverse group of industries that use metals, such as those in the electronics or aerospace fields. Many graduates pursue advanced studies. The B.S. degree in this option is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET).

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Metals Science and Engineering, a minimum of 127 credits is required.

POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION

PROFESSOR PAUL C. PAINTER, Program Chair

This option allows the student to establish a firm foundation in the basic sciences and to apply this knowledge to a study of the synthesis, structure, and physical and mechanical properties of synthetic and natural polymers.

Polymers are a major class of materials consisting of macromolecules of very high molecular weight. Polymers are pervasive in today's technological society and find numerous applications in such diverse fields as plastics, elastomers (rubber), adhesives, surface coatings (paints), textiles, paper, packaging, and composite materials.

This option helps prepare graduates for research, development, and technical sales positions in numerous materials and chemical industries that either produce or utilize polymers; or to proceed to advanced studies in polymer science or related technical fields.

For the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering with an option in Polymer Science and Engineering, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin. Note: The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) does not permit the use of skills courses to satisfy the Arts category of General Education.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 98-104 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 38 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), EM SC 100S GWS(3)* MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
MATSE 201(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTIONS: 60-66 credits

CERAMIC SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION: 65-66 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (50 credits)
I E 424(3), MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4)
MATSE 430(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
CERSE 461(0.5), 462(0.5), MATSE 400(3)[1], 401(3)[1], 402,(3), 410(3)[1], 413(3) (Sem: 5-6)
CERSE 404(1), 406(3), 408(3), 414(3), 415(3), 430(3), 463(1), 464(1), 493W(1), 494W(2), MATSE 435(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
E MCH 011(3), 013(3); or E MCH 210(5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC MATERIALS OPTION: 64-65 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (46 credits)
I E 424, MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4)
MATSE 430(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
E E 418(3), E SC 314(3), MATSE 400(3)[1], 401(3)[1], 402(3)[1], 435(3), 461(1) (Sem: 5-6)
CERSE 404(1), 415(3), 430(3), MATSE 450(3), 493W(1), 494W(2), 455(3), 463(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
E MCH 011(3), 013(3); or E MCH 210(5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

METALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION: 64-65 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (49 credits)
MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4)
MATSE 430(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
CHEM 451(3), E E 220(3), MATSE 401(3)[1], 402(3)[1], 413(3), METAL 310W(2), 405(3)[1], 434(1), 435(1) (Sem: 5-6)
METAL 402(2), 404(3), 406(3), 408(3), 410W(5), 426(3), 436(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
E MCH 011(3), 013(3); or E MCH 210(5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of technical courses from department list. At least 3 credits must be in CERSE or PLMSE and 3 credits must be in the engineering sciences. (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING OPTION: 60 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30 credits)
MATH 231(2), 250(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CHEM 036(2), 038(4), 040(2), STAT 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)
PLMSE 400(3)[1], 406(3)[1], 410(3)[1], 412(1), 413(1), 494W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
CHEM 451(3) or MATSE 401(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from MATSE 400(3), 402(3), 413(3), 430(3) or 435(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select either a or b:
a. Processing Study Track (12 credits)
PLMSE 419(9) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from CERSE, MATSE, METAL, or PLMSE course (Sem: 5-8)
b. Properties Study Track (12 credits)
PLMSE 407(3)[1], 409(3)[1], 442(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from CERSE, MATSE, METAL, or PLMSE courses (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
(Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)
Select either a or b:
a. Processing Study track (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from option-approved list (Sem: 5-8)
b. Properties Study Track (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from option-approved list (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Engineering students are expected to take at least one sequence of humanities, social science, or arts courses of either 6 or 9 credits that culminates in a higher-level course. Humanities, arts, and social science courses should compose an integral part of the engineering program and not be limited to a selection of unrelated introductory courses. Close consultation with advisers on these issues is warranted.

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-094 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Credits that double count changed from 15 credits to 21 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Meteorology (METEO)

PROFESSOR WILLIAM H. BRUNE, Head of the Department

Meteorology is devoted to the attainment of an increased understanding of the atmosphere and the development of methods for applying that knowledge to practical problems. Although this field is usually associated with weather prediction, it also has significance in environmental, energy, agricultural, oceanic, and hydrological sciences.

The major provides a background in the fundamentals of atmospheric sciences and has sufficient flexibility to permit intensive study of several specialties. Since meteorology is an interdisciplinary field, students are encouraged to develop interests in the mathematical or physical sciences or in engineering. The department has particular strengths in weather analysis and prediction; physical meteorology, including instrumentation and atmospheric measurements; and applied areas, including atmospheric diffusion, air pollution chemistry, dynamic meteorology, and remote sensing.

Graduating meteorologists are prepared for professional employment with industry, private consulting firms, government, and the armed forces or for further study toward graduate degrees normally required for research, university, or management positions.

The freshman and sophomore years are largely devoted to preparatory work in science, mathematics, and the liberal arts. The junior and senior years involve a core of basic courses in applied and theoretical topics and a choice of courses offering specialized training.

For the B.S. degree in Meteorology, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 90 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (55 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), EM SC 100S GWS(3)* MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
METEO 300(3), 411(4)[1], 421(4)[1], 422(4)[1], 431(3)[1], 436(3)[1], 437(3)[1], 445(1)[1], 446(1)[1], 473(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3); MATH 230 (4)[1] or 231(2)[1] and 232(2)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
STAT 301 GQ(3) or 401(3) (Sem: 3-4)
METEO 200A(1.5) and 200B(1.5) or METEO 201(3) (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (19 credits)
Select 3 credits from any writing-intensive (W) course offered by the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (Sem: 7-8)
Select 16 credits from 400-level METEO courses and/or 300- or 400-level courses from the Colleges of Agricultural Sciences, Earth and Mineral Sciences, Engineering, and/or Science (Sem: 7-8)

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-095 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, delete ENGL 202A GWS, 202C GWS, OR 202D GWS(3) and add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Credits that double count changed from 22 credits to 25 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Mineral Economics (MN EC)

PROFESSOR ADAM Z. ROSE, Head of the Department

Mineral Economics combines training in economics, physical sciences, management sciences, and quantitative methods with a core of courses centering on the mineral, material, and energy industries. The field helps prepare students for careers in industry, government, financial institutions, nonprofit research groups, or international organizations dealing with mineral resource problems. The curriculum also provides a strong base for further graduate study in business, economics, law, social sciences, and environmental sciences.

The Mineral Economics curriculum provides flexibility that permits the student to pursue a special interest appropriate to his or her career objectives. The core courses in mineral economics cover minerals in the environment, energy and environmental policy, materials markets, and applications of statistical and financial management techniques to the mineral industries two options: (1) Nonrenewable Resource and Environmental Economics and (2) Minerals and Energy Business.

For the B.S. degree in Mineral Economics, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(25 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: (1 credit)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 99 credits
(This includes 25 credits of General Education courses: 7 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; and 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 65 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (62 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), ECON 002 GS(3)[1], 004 GS(3), EM SC 100S GWS(3)*, GEOSC 001(3)[23], MATH 111 GQ(2), 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ECEEM 100(3), GEOG 030 GS(3), MATSC 081 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3)[23], ECON 302 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ECEEM 482(3)[1], 483(3)[1], 484W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
ECON 390(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-8)
ECEEM 490(3), 491(3)[1], 492(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 34 credits

NONRENEWABLE RESOURCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS OPTION: 34 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
AG EC 402(3), ECON 428(3), MNG 400(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
EARTH 001(3) or 002 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
F SC 301(3) or MATSC 101 GN(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (19 credits)
Select 3-9 credits in related areas in consultation with adviser, from supporting course list (may include 9 credits of one foreign language) (subject to college restriction on remedial or technology courses) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 6-9 credits from the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences list (not including courses required in the major) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6-9 credits in agricultural economics, business environmental resource management, economics, or related social sciences from supporting course list[24] (Sem: 5-8)

MINERAL AND ENERGY BUSINESS OPTION: 34 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
ACCTG 200(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MGMT 301(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FIN 301(3), 305W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
B LAW 243(3) or B LOG 301(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (19 credits)
Select 6-9 credits in business from supporting course list (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6-9 credits in economics or other social science from supporting course list[24] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-9 credits in related areas in consultation with adviser, from supporting course list (may include 9 credits of one foreign language) (subject to college restriction on remedial or technology courses) (Sem: 1-8)

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[23] Students at a location other than University Park where CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or GEOSC 071(3) are not available may substitute: CSE 103 GQ(4), CMPSC 201C GQ(3), or 201F GQ(3) for CMPSC 101 GQ(3); GEOSC 020 GN(3) for GEOSC 001(3).
[24]
Students may apply up to 3 credits of ROTC from each of the business and the economics selections for a combined total of 6.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-096 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), and 203 GN(3) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), and 213 GN(2); delete ENGL 202C GWS(3); and add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Under the Mining Option, increase the credits of MNG 451W from 3 to 5 credits and under the Mineral Processing Option, increase the credits in the SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS by 2 credits. Credits that double count changed from 21 credits to 24 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Mining Engineering (MNG E)

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER J. BISE, Section Chair

The major in Mining Engineering consists of two options: Mining and Mineral Processing. Each is pointed at a specific aspect of the mineral industries. The Mining Engineering major is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Engineering Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

For the B.S. degree in Mining Engineering, a minimum of 132 credits is required.

MINING OPTION: This option is concerned with the valuation, development, and exploitation of mineral deposits. Mining engineers examine and value mineral deposits, plan and design mines, and operate and manage mines. They may be employed as supervisors or engineers in operations, as engineers for equipment sales and investment firms of governmental agencies, as research scientists, or as teachers. They follow their profession in the extraction of metallic and nonmetallic minerals as well as solid fuels, in the field or in the office, surface or underground, here or abroad. Graduates are concerned with the total environment, including the health and safety of persons employed in and about the mines, as well as the protection and preservation of property directly and indirectly related to the mining process. The problem of recovering more minerals from low-grade, marginal deposits can be solved by applying the principles of mechanization, technology, scientific management, and mass-production techniques. Traditionally, mining engineers develop, organize, and direct this effort.

MINERAL PROCESSING OPTION: This option offers the student an opportunity to specialize in the chemical and physical processes used in concentrating the valuable minerals and removing the undesirable material from the ore coming from the mine. As rich ore deposits become exhausted, engineering scientists must be specially trained to solve the problems of converting the lower grade ores into usable raw materials. Process engineering involves large plants, which must treat millions of tons of material per year, and is vital to the production of coal, metals, cement, and industrial minerals. The plants must be designed and operated so as to allow for the disposal of huge quantities of waste materials without damage to the environment.

STUDENT-TRAINEE PROGRAM: A five-year work-study plan is available to incoming students in Mining Engineering. Alternating periods of employment in industry and schooling at Penn State, the student-trainee obtains the B.S. degree in five years instead of four, following a rearranged major. Numerous mining and manufacturing companies as well as governmental agencies are cooperating with the University in providing employment during work periods. In addition to earning sufficient funds to finance their education, student-trainees acquire two years of valuable, practical, and professional experience. Additional information can be obtained from the department.

MINING ENGINEERING MINOR: Students must take MNG 030(2), 404(2), 410(2), 412(3), 422(3), 431(3) and 441(3), for a total of 18 credits. A grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 111 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 82 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (65 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), EM SC 100S GWS(3)* (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), 250(3), STAT 301 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-6)
E MCH 210(5), GEOSC 071(3)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
GEOSC 004(3), MNG 030(2)[1], 402(3), 422(3), 431(3) (Sem: 3-8)
C E 261(3), MN PR 301(3)[1], 413(1)[1], MNG 404(2), 412(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (11 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3); E MCH 012(3) or 112H(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2) or 231(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 29 credits

MINING OPTION: 29 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (29 credits)
ECON 002 GS(3), ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOSC 451(3), MNG 023(2), 410(2), 411(2), 441(3)[1], 451W(5)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
A E 401(3), M E 030(3) (Sem: 7-8)

MINERAL PROCESSING OPTION: 29 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
CHEM 013 GN(3), 015 GN(1) (Sem: 1-2)
MATSE 401(3), MN PR 424(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MN PR 401(3)[1], 425(3), 426(3), 451(2)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (5 credits)
Select 5 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 7-8)

Note: Engineering students are expected to take at least one sequence of humanities, social science, or arts courses of either 6 or 9 credits, which culminates in a higher level course. Humanities, arts, and social science courses (both breadth and depth) should compose an integral part of the engineering program and not be limited to a selection of related introductory courses. Close consultation with advisers on these issues is warranted.

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

28-04-097 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), and 203 GN(3) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), and 213 GN(2); and add EM SC 100S GWS(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3). Under SUPPORTING COURES AND RELATED AREAS, change course selection to 8 credits. Credits that double count changed from 18 credits to 24 credits. Footnote added "The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: SPCOM 100S or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS". Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering (PNG E)

PROFESSOR TURGAY ERTEKIN, Section Chair

This major helps prepare students for careers in the oil and gas production industries. Graduates are trained to work in the areas of production, transportation, evaluation, and storage of these two basic commodities.

This major requires a good foundation in mathematics, physical sciences, and engineering science as well as geological sciences in the design and evaluation of the engineering processes involved in the exploitation, production, and transportation of petroleum and natural gas. The Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering major is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

For the B.S. degree in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, a minimum of 128 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (93 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), ECON 002 GS(3) EM SC 100S GWS(3)* (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), 230(4), 251(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
E MCH 012(3), 210(5), GEOSC 001(3) (Sem: 3-4)
C E 261(3), GEOSC 454(3), M E 023(3), P N G 405(2)[1], 406(1)[1], 410(3)[1], 450(3)[1], 451(1)[1], 475(3)[1], (Sem: 5-6)
P N G 420(2), 425(3), 430(3), 440W(3), 480(3), 482(1), 485(2), 493(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (6 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (8 credits)
Select 8 credits in consultation with adviser (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

Note: Engineering students are expected to take at least one sequence of humanities, social science, or arts courses of either 6 or 9 credits, which culminates in a higher level course. Humanities, arts, and social science courses should comprise an integral part of the engineering program and not be limited to a selection of unrelated introductory courses. Close consultation with advisers on these issues is warranted.

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
*The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated courses is not offered: SPCOM 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-098 MATSE 403
Biomedical Materials
BIOMED MATERIALS (3)
Describe properties of materials and composites and their in vivo interactions.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 201
PROPOSED START: S12000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-099 EM SC 100S
Earth and Mineral Sciences First-Year Seminar
EMS FIRST-YR SMNR (3)
Writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills applied to topics of general interest in Environmental and Materials Science.
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
ADD GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GWS
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Education

28-04-100 Change. Under COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, delete EDTHP 401(3), 416(3), and 440(3) and add the statement "Selection 3 credits at the 400 level of any EDTHP course. For the 1) Biological Science Teaching Option, 2) Chemistry Teaching Option, 3) Earth and Space Science Teaching Option, and 4)Physics Teaching Option, add SCIED 410(3) to list of PRESCRIBED COURSES. For the Social Studies Teaching Option, under PRESCRIBED COURSES add HIST 010(3), 012(3), PL SC 014(3), GEOG 040(3), SOC 001(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add a full list of courses. Update Note 1. And finally, update the physics sequence of courses for CHEMISTRY, EARTH AND SCIENCE, and PHYSICS TEACHING OPTIONS.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2000

Secondary Education (SECED)

PROFESSOR THOMAS M. DANA, in charge

The following teaching options are available for majors in Secondary Education: Bilingual Education, Biological Science, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science, English/Communication, French, German, Latin, Mathematics, Physics, Russian, Social Studies, and Spanish. General Science teacher certification requirements may be completed only in conjunction with the Biological Science, Chemistry, or Earth and Space Science Teaching options. Environmental Education teacher certification requirements may be completed in conjunction with the Biological Science, Earth and Space Science, and Social Studies Teaching options.

The Secondary Education major helps prepare students for teaching positions and for other employment in fields related to their content specialties.

The executive vice president and provost of the University has approved administrative enrollment controls for this major. the number of students admitted each year to this major is limited. Additional information about applying for this major is available in the dean's office in the College of Education.

For the B.S. degree in Secondary Education, 120-144 credits are required. (See also Teacher Education Programs.)

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3-18 3-21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-9 0-10 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 75-98 74-113 credits
(This includes 3-18 3-21 credits of General Education courses, i.e., ALL options: 3 credits of GS. Plus ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGE teaching options: 3 additional credits of GS; GERMAN, LATIN, SPANISH, and RUSSIAN teaching options: 3 additiona credits of GH. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE and EARTH & SPACE teaching options: additional 9 credits of GN, 4 credits of GQ, 3 credits of GS; CHEMISTRY and PHYSICS teaching options: additional 9 credits of GN, 6 credits of GQ, 3 credits of GS. MATH teaching option: additional 6 credits of GQ; SOCIAL STUDIES teaching option; additional 3 credits of GS, 6 credits of GH. In the BILINGUAL teaching option; 3 credits of GH may b selected. In the ENGLLISH/COMMUNICATIONS teaching option an additiona 3 credits of GS, 6 credits of GA, and 6 credits of GH may be selected.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 38-39 credits[18]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (35-36 credits)
C I 295(2-3), EDPSY 014(3), EDTHP 115(3), PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
C I 412W(3), 495C(3), PSY 426(3) (Sem: 5-8)
C I 495E(15) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSE (3 credits)
Select 3 credits at the 400 level of any EDTHP course. (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 36-74 36-75 credits

BILINGUAL TEACHING OPTION: 36 credits[18]
Students who complete the requirements for this option will be able to apply for a Bilingual Teaching certificate in thirty-two states. Students selecting this option must be bilingual upon entering this program. Proficiency must be demonstrated by oral and written examination. This option includes 3-6 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 123-127 120 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
LL ED 424(3), 425(3), 445(3), 495(6), SPCOM 470(3), 497(3) (Sem: 5-8)
SOC 430(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
(Advanced language other than English)
Select 12 credits from one group -- A, B, C, D, or E:
A. Spanish
SPAN 200(3), 253W(3), 354(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SPAN 400(3), 414(3), or 440(3) (Sem: 5-8)
B. French
FR 201(4), 202(3), 330(3), 350(3) (Sem: 3-6)
FR 401(3), 417(3), or 440(3) (Sem: 5-8)
C. German
GER 100 GH;DF(3), 201(4), 301(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GER 401(3), 411(3) (Sem: 5-8)
D. Latin
CAMS 033 GH(3), 034(3), or LATIN 496(3-9) (Sem: 5-8)
E. Russian
RUS 100 GH;DF(3), 204(3), 214(3), 221(3), 304(3), 305(3), 360(3) (Sem: 3-6)
RUS 430(3), 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE TEACHING OPTION: 74 74-75 credits[18]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching at the secondary-school level, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 19 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 142-143 138-140 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (69 credits)
B M B 101(3) 211(3), 102(1) 211(1), BIOL 110 GN(4), 220W GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
BIOL 230W GN(4), 240W GN(4), CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4), PHYS 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4), S T S 200 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
MICRB 201(3), 202(2), SCIED 410(3), 411(3), 412(3), 457(3) (Sem: 5-8)
CHEM 034(3), GEOSC 020 GN(3), METEO 003 GN(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (2 credits)
AG SC 296(2), BIOL 496(2), B M B 496(2), MICRB 496(2), or
NUTR 296(2) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 3-4 credits)
BIOL 417 or select 3 credits from 400-level applied fields of biology (Sem: 5-8)

Note 1: The General Science certificate may be earned by completing 3 additional credits--ASTRO 010 GN (2) and 011 GN (1).

Note 2: The Environmental Education certificate may be earned by completing R P M 325(3); AG ED 395(1-13) or R P M 430(3); 3 credits from E R M 411(3), 412(3), or 413W(3); 3 credits from earth or soil sciences; 3 credits from ASTRO 010 GN(2) and ASTRO 011 GN(1) or METEO 003 GN(3); and 3 credits from AG EC 101 GS(3), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3).

Note 3: A laboratory safety module and Red Cross certification in First Aid and CPR must be completed for certification. Red Cross certification may be completed through KINES 303 GHS(3).

CHEMISTRY TEACHING OPTION: 70-71 credits[18]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching at the secondary-school level, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 21 credits of General Educaiton courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 135-138 132-134 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (57-58 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
B M B 101(3), 102(1), CHEM 034(3), 035(3), S T S 200 GS(3) (Sem: 3-8)
CHEM 451(3), 452(3), 457(1-2), SCIED 410(3), 411(3), 412(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
BIOL 011 GN(3) and 012 GN(1); or BIOL 110 GN(4); CHEM 425(3) or 426(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 3 credits in chemistry (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in chemistry or an applied field of chemistry (Sem: 5-8)

Note 1: The General Science certificate may be earned by completing 13 additional credits from ASTRO 010 GN(2), 011 GN(1), GEOSC 020 GN(3), METEO 003 GN(3), SCIED 457(3), and 1 credit selected from ASTRO 296(1-18), BIOL 296(1-18), CHEM 389(1-4), GEOSC 296(1-18), or METEO 296(1-18).

Note 2: A laboratory safety module and Red Cross certification in First Aid and CPR must be completed for certification. Red Cross certification may be completed through KINES 303 GHS(3).

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE TEACHING OPTION: 62-63 credits[18]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching at the secondary-school level, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 19 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 130-133 126-128 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
GEOSC 002 GN(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), METEO 003 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ASTRO 010 GN(2), 011 GN(1), S T S 200 GS(3) (Sem: 3-8)
SCIED 410(3), 411(3), 412(3), 457(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (31-32 credits)
BIOL 011 GN(3), 012 GN(1); or BIOL 110 GN (4) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOSC 001(3) or 020 GN(3) (Sem: 1-5)
GEOSC 040 GN(3) or METEO 022(2) (Sem: 1-5)
Select 6 credits in GEOSC or 6 credits from GEOG 110 GN(3), 115 GN(3), 432W(3), 433W(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select a or b below (16):
a. CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1); CHEM 013 GN(3), 015 GN(1); PHYS 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4) (Sem: 1-5)
b. CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1); PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from GEOSC 200(3), 201(4), 303(3), 330(2), 340(3), 438(3), 445(4), 470W(3) (Sem: 3-8)

Note 1: The General Science certificate may be earned by completing this option.

Note 2: The Environmental Education certificate may be earned by completing R P M 325(3); AG ED 395(1-13) or
R P M 430(3); BI SC 003 GN(3) or BIOL 220W GN(4); 3 credits from E R M 411(3), 412(3), or 413W(3); 5 additional credits from biological and environmental sciences; and 3 credits from AG EC 101 GS(3), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), 014 GS(3).

Note 3: A laboratory safety module and Red Cross certification in First Aid and CPR must be completed for certification. Red Cross certification may be completed through KINES 303 GHS (3).

ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION TEACHING OPTION: 63 credits[18]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching at the secondary-school level, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This program has a Language and Literature Core and a Media Literacies Core. This program is open to students outside the College of Education who desire certification. This option includes 18 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 132-142 128-129 credits are required.

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE CORE: 42 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
LL ED 411(3), 412(3), 420(3) (Sem: 5-8)
ENGL 444(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
(a) Select 3 credits from AM ST 105 GH;DF(3), ANTH 146 GS;DF(3), AAA S 100 GS;DF(3), CMLIT 001 GH(3), 002 GH(3), 003 GH;DF(3), 004 GH;DF(3), 005 GH;DF(3), 010 GH;DF(3), 100 GH(3), 101 GH;DF(3), 105 GH(3), 106 GH(3), 107 GH(3), 108 GH;DF(3), 110 GH;DF, 111 GH(3), 141 GH(3), 184 GH(3), 185 GH(3), 189 GH(3), ENGL 135, 139, 194, 235 DF, 262 GH(3), 263 GH(3), 265 GH(3), 268 GH(3), PHIL 006 GH(3), RUS 110 GH;DF(3), 120 GH(3), 130 DF(3), 141W(3), 142W(3), or WMNST 003 GH;DF(3) (Sem: 1-4)
(b) Select 3 credits from ENGL 221W(3), 222W(3), 231W(3), or 232W(3), or 240W (Sem: 3-6)
(c) Select 3 credits from ENGL 261, 262, 263, 265, 268 (Sem: 3-6)
(d) Select 3 credits from AM ST 493(3), CMLIT 400W, 401W(3), 402W(3), 404(3), 405(3), 406(3), 408(3), 422(3), 423(3), 470(3), 480(3), 486(3), 487(3), 488(3), ENGL 431 DF(3-6), 452(3), 453(3), 461(3), 462(3), 463(3), 464(3), 465(3), 466(3), 467(3), 468(3), 469(3), or 490 DF(3) (Sem: 5-8)
(e) Select 3 credits from ENGL 430(3), 432(3), 433(3), 435(3), 436(3), 437(3), 438(3), or 439(3) (Sem: 5-8)
(f) Select 3 credits from ENGL 441(3), 442(3), 443(3), 445(3), 446(3), 447(3), 448(3), 450(3), 452(3), 453(3), 454(3), 456(3), 457(3), or 458(3) (Sem: 5-8)
(g) Select 3 credits from ENGL 100, 407(3), 417, or LING 100(3) (Sem: 5-6)
(h) Select 3 credits from ENGL 212(3), 213(3), 215(3), 281(3), or 421 or THEA 440(3) or SPCOM 314 (Sem: 5-6)
(i) Select 3 credits from ENGL 470(3), 471, 472, 473, 474, SPCOM 301, 415, 438, 475 (Sem: 7-8)
(j) Select any 3 credit from cluster a, d, g, or i

MEDIA LITERACIES CORE: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
LL ED 480 DF(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
(k) Select 3 credits from COMM 100 GS(3), 150, 205, 405, 411, 413W (Sem: 1-4)
(l) Select 3 credits from SPCOM 380W, 480 or 485 (Sem: 5-8)
(m) Select 3 credits from SPCOM 312, 313, 350

Select 9 credits within one, or across several, of the following media literacy areas:

Multimedia
ART 100 GA(3), 290 GA(3), ARTS ART H 111 GA, 012 112 GA, 120, GA;DF, 130 GA;DF, COMM 100 GS(3), 120(3), 150 GA(3), 180(3), 250 GA(3), 453(3), 454(3), SPCOM 150(3), 415(3), WMNST 205 DF(3), LAS L A 283(3), 483(3) (Sem: 1-8)

Theatre
THEA 102 GA(3), 160, 170(3), 180(3), 210(3), 426(3) , 428(3), or one of the following: THEA 103(3), 104(3), or 110(3) (Sem: 1-8)

Print Journalism
COMM 260W(3), 261(3), 401, 403, 409(3), 462(3), 463(3-6), 464(3) (Sem: 3-8)

Speech Communication
SPCOM 230(3), 220(3), 230(3), 301(3), 312(3), 313(3), 350(3), 380W(3), 412, 422 DF(3), or 455 (Sem: 3-8)

Instructional Systems
INSYS 200, 400, 441, 446, 447, 448, 449 (Sem: 3-8)

Bilingual Education
LL ED 424, 425, 445, SPCOM 471, 482, 491, 493, SOC 430 (Sem: 3-8)

FRENCH TEACHING OPTION: 40-52 credits[18]
This option requires credits in French beyond the intermediate level. In general, students are encouraged to take at least one course in French each semester without interruption. Students are also encouraged to participate in the Education Abroad Program but should declare such intention as early as possible. Completion of this option leads to the Instructional I certificate for teaching, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 6 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 124-137 120-130 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (34-46 credits)
Proficiency in French must be demonstrated by either examination or course work equivalent to the completion of 12 credits. (Sem: 3-4)
ANTH 045 GS;DF(3), FR 201(4), 202(3), 330(3), 401(3), 402W(3), 417(3), 440(3), LL ED 424(3), 445(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of FR at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Proficiency tests in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in French must be satisfied for certification.

GERMAN TEACHING OPTION: 42-54 40-52 credits[18]
This option requires credits in German beyond the intermediate level. In general, students are encouraged to take at least one course in German each semester without interruption. Students are also encouraged to participate in the Education Abroad Program but should declare such intention as early as possible. Completion of this option leads to the Instructional I certificate for teaching, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 9 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 120-136 120-127 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (25-39 25-37 credits)
Proficiency in German must be demonstrated by either examination or course work equivalent to the completion of 12 credits. (Sem: 3-4)
ANTH 045 GS;DF(3), GER 100 GH;DF(3), 201(4), 301(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GER 401(3), 411(3), LL ED 424(3), 445(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 6 credits from GER 200 GH;DF(3), 320(3), 321(3), or 322(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits in GER at the 400 level (Sem: 3-4)
GER 330(3) or 331(3); GER 412(3) or 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Proficiency tests in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in German must be satisfied for certification.

LATIN TEACHING OPTION: 39-51 credits[18]
This option requires credits in Latin beyond the intermediate level. In general, students are encouraged to take at least one course in Latin each semester without interruption. Students are also encouraged to participate in the Education Abroad Program, but should declare such intention as early as possible. Completion of this option leads to the Instructional I certificate for teaching, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 9 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 120-133 120-126 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21-33 credits)
Proficiency in Latin must be demonstrated by either examination or course work equivalent to the completion of 12 credits (Sem: 3-4)
ANTH 045 GS;DF(3), CAMS 033 GH(3), 034 (3), LATIN 100(3) (Sem: 1-4)
LATIN 496(3), LL ED 424(3), 445(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 12 credits in LATIN at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits in LATIN and related courses at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Proficiency tests in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in Latin must be satisfied for certification.

MATHEMATICS TEACHING OPTION: 48-49 credits[18]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching at the secondary-school level, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 9 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 123-125 122-124 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3), MATH 220(2), 231(2), 311W(3) (Sem: 3-6)
MATH 310(3), 418(3), MTHED 411(3), 412(3), 427(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
MATH 435(3) or 470(3); MATH 436(3) or 441(3); MATH 427(3) or 471(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from 400-level MATH or MTHED courses (Sem: 5-8)

PHYSICS TEACHING OPTION: 65 credits[18]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching at the secondary-school level, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 21 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 130-132 127-128 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (61 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), 220 GQ(2), 230(4), 251(4) (Sem: 3-6)
PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2), S T S 200 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
PHYS 237(3), 400(3), 419(3), 457(2), SCIED 410(3), 411(3), 412(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
BIOL 011 GN(3), 012 GN(1); or BIOL 110 GN(4) (Sem: 3-6)

Note 1: The General Science certificate may be earned by completing 13 additional credits: ASTRO 010 GN(2), 011 GN(1); 3 credits from GEOSC 001(3), 002 GN(3), 020 GN(3), or 021 GN(3); METEO 003 GN(3); and SCIED 457(3); and 1 credit from ASTRO 296, BIOL 296, CHEM 389, GEOSC 296, METEO 296, or PHYS 296.

Note 2: A laboratory safety module and Red Cross certification in First Aid and CPR must be completed for certification. Red Cross certification may be completed through KINES 303 GHS.

RUSSIAN TEACHING OPTION: 36-48 credits[18]
This option requires credits in Russian beyond the intermediate level. In general, students are encouraged to take at least one course in Russian each semester without interruption. Students are also encouraged to participate in the Education Abroad Program but should declare such intention as early as possible. Completion of this option leads to the Instructional I teacher certificate, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 9 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 120-133 120-123 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (36-48 credits)
Proficiency in Russian must be demonstrated by either examination or course work equivalent to the completion of 12 credits. (Sem: 3-4)
ANTH 045 GS;DF(3), RUS 100 GH;DF(3), 204(3), 214(3), 221(3), 304(3), 305(3), 360(3), 430(3), 460(3), LL ED 424(3), 445(3) (Sem: 3-8)

Note: Proficiency tests in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in Russian must be satisfied for certification.

SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHING OPTION: 51 credits[21]
This option enables the graduate to meet all of the academic requirements for the Instructional I certificate for teaching social studies in secondary schools, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 12 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree with this option, 129-130 122-123 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (39 credits)
ANTH 045 GS;DF(3), HIST 010(3), 012(3), 020 GH(3), 021 GH(3), PL SC 001GS(3), 014(3), SOC 001(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 020 GS(3), 030 GS(3), 040(3) (Sem: 3-6)
SS ED 411(3), 412(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits) (See also Note 1)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
ANTH 002 GS(3), 011 GS;DF (3), or 146 GS;DF(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits from one cluster with at least 3 credits at the 400-level:
ANTH 008 GS;DF(3), 440(3), HIST 179 GH(3), 178 GH(3), PL SC 456(3), 457(3-6);
ECON 370 GS(3), GEOG 443(3), HIST 174 GH;DF (3), 175 GH;DF (3), PL SC 458(3-6), 468(3);
GEOG 427(3), HIST 141 GH(3), 142 GS(3), PL SC 413(3);
ECON 333 GS(3), HIST 143 GH(3), 423(3), PL SC 020(3), 455(3);
AAA S 200 DF(3), ANTH 012(3), GEOG 444(3), HIST 102 GH;DF(3), 181 GH;DF(3), 192 GH;DF(3), PL SC 454(3), 467(3), RL ST 107 GH;DF(3);
AAA S 100 GS;DF(3), GEOG 103 GS;DF(3), HIST 448(3), PL SC 474(3), RL ST 101 GH;DF(3), SOC 119 GS;DF(4), 409 GS;DF(3);
ANTH 057(3), HIST 154 DF(3), PSY 217 GS(3) , SOC 110 GS;DF(3), 013 GS(3), 030 GS(3), 430(3);
GEOG 128 GS;DF(3), HIST 154 DF(3), 156(3), L I R 136 DF(3), PL SC 125(3), SOC 446(3), SOC 015 GS(3);
ANTH 146GS;DF(3), ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), 315 GS(3), S T S 101 GH(3), 107 GH(3), 047(3), SOC 420/S T S 420(3), SOC 447(3);
HIST 442(3), 452(3), PL SC 002(3), PL SC 125(3), PL SC 130(3), SOC 023 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)

Note 1: Students must complete 3 credits from two different departments (total of 6 credits). These courses are linked by a common conceptual theme. The list of acceptable courses is available in the department with the College advising center or from secondary social studies education advisors.

Note 2: The Environmental Education certificate may be earned by completing 3 credits from E R M 411(3), 412(3), or 413W(3); R P M 325(3); AG ED 395(1-13) or R P M 430(3); SCIED 457(3); S T S 200 GS(3); BI SC 003 GN(3), BIOL 220W(4) or W F S 309(3); 12 credits of additional biological or environmental sciences; 3 credits of earth or soil sciences; ASTRO 010 GN(2) and 011 GN(1) or METEO 003 GN(3); and 3 credits from the physical sciences.

SPANISH TEACHING OPTION: 39-51 credits[21]
This option requires credits in Spanish beyond the intermediate level. In general, students are encouraged to take at least one course in Spanish each semester without interruption. Students are also encouraged to participate in the Education Abroad Program but should declare such intention as early as possible. Completion of this option leads to the Instructional I certificate for teaching, which is issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This option includes 9 credits of General Education courses.

For the B.S. degree in this option, 120-133 120-126 credits are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (27-39 credits)
Proficiency in Spanish must be demonstrated by either examination or course work equivalent to the completion of 12 credits. (Sem: 3-4)
ANTH 045 GS;DF(3), SPAN 200(3), 253W(3), 354(3) (Sem: 1-4)
LL ED 424(3), 445(3), SPAN 400(3), 414(3), 440(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
SPAN 130 GH;DF(3) or 131 GH;DF(3); SPAN 415(3) or 418(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 6 credits in SPAN at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

Note: Proficiency tests in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in Spanish must be satisfied for certification.

[18] A grade of C or better per course is required for teacher certification.
[21] A grade of C or better per course is required for all Special Education prerequisites and teacher certification.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-101 SCIED 410
Using Technology to Enhance Science Teaching
TECH SCIENCE TEACH (3)
This course explores contemporary practice and research associated with applications of technology to enhance science learning and teaching.
PREREQUISITE: admission to one of the science teaching options in SECED
PROPOSED START: S12000

COURSE CHANGES

 

OLD
28-04-101A SCIED 412
Teaching Secondary Science II
TCHG SEC SCI II (3:3:0)
Implementation of science instruction using a variety of modern approaches.
PREREQUISITE: SCIED 411
CONCURRENT: C I 412W
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: SCIED 410, 411
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Engineering

28-04-101B Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4); change PHYS 204 GN(4) to PHYS 213 GN(2) and 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Aerospace Engineering (AERSP)

PROFESSOR DENNIS K. McLAUGHLIN, Head, Department of Aerospace Engineering

This major field of study is designed primarily for students who are interested in the analysis, design, and operation of aircraft and space vehicles. Depending upon the technical course selections made in the senior year, a student may emphasize aeronautics or astronautics, and specific technical areas within these fields, including aerodynamics, structural mechanics, flight mechanics, propulsion, and controls. Course work throughout the curriculum includes material that leads up to the senior design courses in the student's choice of either aircraft or spacecraft design.

If E MCH 012(3), CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), 230(4), and 251(4) or equivalent need to be completed by the start of the junior year, or it is doubtful that graduation requirements can be met in the following two years; i.e., more than four years will be required to complete the program. Otherwise, the first two years of study are similar to those of other engineering majors and provide the student with a basic education for the engineering profession.

Six of the 9 credits of technical courses taken in the senior year must be aerospace engineering courses; however, this requirement may be waived for students with special interests.

For the B.S. degree in Aerospace Engineering, a minimum of 137 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 114 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (90 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 011(3)[1], 012(3)[1], 013(3)[1], M E 030(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), 230(4), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
AERSP 301(3), 302(3), 304(3), 306(3)[1], 309(3)[1], 311(4), 312(4), 313(3)[1], E E 305(3), E MCH 215(2), 216(1) (Sem: 5-6)
AERSP 405W(2), 406W(2), 410(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 7-8)
AERSP 401A(2), 401B(2); or AERSP 402A(2), 402B(2) (Sem: 7-8)
AERSP 413(3) or 450(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)[27]
Select 9 credits of technical courses from department list (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[27]
These courses may have to be chosen so that the engineering design or engineering science requirements for the major are met.

28-04-102 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4) and ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Under the GENERAL OPTION, add the course M E 030(3). Add quantification statement to minor. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Agricultural and Biological Engineering (A B E)

PROFESSOR ROY E. YOUNG, Head of the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering

This major helps prepare students for careers involving the application of engineering principles to agricultural and biological production systems, processing systems, and conservation of land and water resources. Education in mathematics, physics, and engineering sciences common to all engineering disciplines is provided along with specialized training in biological and agricultural sciences. The curriculum covers all areas of agricultural and biological engineering, including food engineering, postharvest handling and processing of commodities, power and machinery development and applications, resource management and utilization, soil and water management, and structures and their environmental modifications. A student can select the General Agricultural and Biological Engineering option or the Food Engineering option. The major is administered jointly by the Colleges of Agricultural Sciences and Engineering.

The goals and objectives of the Agricultural and Biological Engineering program include: (1) providing students with strong fundamental bases in engineering for entering professional engineering careers and/or graduate programs; (2) teaching students to apply engineering fundamentals and develop designs to solve engineering problems in agricultural and biological systems; (3) strengthening the students' abilities to communicate with others in all matters related to the profession and associated social responsibilities; (4) enabling students to develop the necessary skills to become lifelong learners; and (5) providing guidance in nurturing personal professional development, efficient work habits, integrity, willingness to accept responsibility, and leadership skills.

Design experiences are integrated throughout the curriculum by solving problems typical of those to be encountered in Agricultural and Biological Engineering, emphasizing the need to learn how technology affects societal values and structures, and developing an understanding of the humanities as well as technology. The design experiences emphasize that engineering professionals must learn not only how to create and use technology, but also to assess and manage the social and human consequences of that technology. The engineering design experiences culminate with a major design project in A B E 469W(3), the senior design capstone course.

Careers for graduates include design, development, and research engineering positions involving food processing, machinery development, irrigation and drainage, soil and water conservation, materials handling, and structural systems for animals, plants, and crop storage. Agricultural and biological engineers are employed in industry, consulting firms, and governmental agencies in the United States and abroad. Graduates deal with the various engineering aspects associated with production and procesing of food, fiber, and other biological materials, within the constraints of environmental protection and natural resource conservation.

For the B.S. degree in Agricultural and Biological Engineering, a minimum of 130 credits is required.

AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING MINOR: Students must take 6 credits from A B E 400(3), 401(3), 402(3), and 403(3); select 6 additional credits from A B E 461(3), 462(3), 465(4), 467(4), 469W(3), 471(1), and 472(1), for a total of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21-22 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 85 credits
(This includes 21-22 credits of General Education courses: 0-1 credit of GHA courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 76 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (72 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), E MCH 011(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 034(3), E MCH 012(3)[1], 013(3)[1], MATH 231(2), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
A B E 400(3)[1], 401(3)[1], 402(3)[1], 403(3)[1], 404(3)[1], ENGL 202C GWS(3), I E 424(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E E 305(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
A B E 405(3)[1] 469W(3), 490W(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
AG EC 101 GS(3), ECON 002 GS(3), or 004 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30-31 credits

FOOD ENGINEERING OPTION: 31 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23 credits)
M E 030(3)[1], NUTR 100 GHS(1) (Sem: 3-4)
B M B 101(3), M E 033(3)[1], 083(1), MICRB 201(3) (Sem: 5-6)
A B E 465(4),FD SC 400(3), 408(2) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (8 credits)
Select 6 credits in any engineering science/design[26] (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)
Select 2 credits in food science[26] (Sem: 7-8)

GENERAL OPTION: 30 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (4 credits)
C E 261(3)[1], 363(1) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
M E 023(3)[1] or M E 030(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (23 credits)
Select 6 credits in engineering science/design[26] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits in natural/biological/agricultural science[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 8 credits in agricultural and biological engineering[26] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 credits in technical selection[26] (Sem: 7-8)
(Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[26]
Courses to be selected from a list approved by the Agricultural and Biological Engineering faculty. These courses must be chosen so that the engineering design and engineering science requirements for the major are met.

28-04-103 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), and 203 GN(3) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4) and 213 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select A E 124S(1) or 1 credit of another First-Year Seminar." Under the SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS of each option, increase the number of credits for technical courses by 2 credits. Delete reference to E G 030(2) and A E 124(1) in note at bottom of program description. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Architectural Engineering (A E)

PROFESSOR RICHARD A. BEHR, Head, Department of Architectural Engineering

This major emphasizes the scientific and engineering aspects of planning, design, and construction of buildings. The goal of the program is to provide an education in the fundamentals of engineering and their application, which will help give each graduate the ability to practice as a registered professional engineer in a variety of areas, both public and private, related to the planning, design, construction, and operation of buildings.

Four options are available in the ten-semester major: the Construction option, which emphasizes building construction engineering and construction management; the Lighting/Electrical option, which emphasizes the design of lighting and electrical distribution systems for buildings; the Mechanical option, which focuses on the design of building mechanical systems; and the Structural option, which concentrates on the design of structural systems. Courses in architectural design analysis are included in all options to give the engineering student a comprehensive understanding of architectural design. Courses in engineering design are provided throughout the program. The design experience is culminated in a year-long capstone design course. The major is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

The professional degree, Bachelor of Architectural Engineering, is granted upon the satisfactory completion of the five-year program.

For the B.Arch.E. degree in Architectural Engineering, a minimum of 168 credits is required.
For the integrated B.A.E./M.A.E. degrees, a minimum of 180 credits of course work is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 150 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GA courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 106 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (99 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), E G 130(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
A E 202(3), 221(2), 222(3), ARCH 130A(6), E MCH 011(3), 013(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2), PHYS 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
A E 308(4)[1], 309(2), 310(3)[1], 311(3)[1], 372(3)[1], 401(3), ARCH 210 GA(3), 211 GA(3), E E 220(3), E MCH 012(3), M E 023(3), MATH 250(3), STAT 401(3) (Sem: 5-6)
A E 402(3), ARCH 441(4), 443(1) (Sem: 7-8)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 9-10)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
Select A E 124S(1) or 1 credit of another First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 44 credits

CONSTRUCTION OPTION: 44 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26 credits)
A E 475(3), 476(3), ACCTG 211(4), C E 280(3), MGMT 321(3)[19] (Sem: 7-8)
A E 480W(4), 482C(4), C E 209(2) (Sem: 9-10)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 6 credits from technical courses on department list[19] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 8 credits from technical courses on department list (Sem: 9-10)
Select 4 credits of geotechnical courses (Sem: 9-10)

LIGHTING/ELECTRICAL OPTION: 44 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30 credits)
A E 454(3), 461(3), 467(3), E E 365(3), ARCH 442(4)[19] (Sem: 7-8)
A E 464(3), 466(3), 481W(4), 482B(4) (Sem: 9-10)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14 credits)
Select 3 credits from technical courses on department option list [19] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 8 credits from technical courses on department option list (Sem: 9-10)
Select 3 credits from engineering science courses on department option list (Sem: 9-10)

MECHANICAL OPTION: 44 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30 credits)
A E 454(3), 455(3), 467(3) ARCH 442(4)[19], M E 033(3), 412(3) (Sem: 7-8)
A E 458(3), 481W(4), 492B(4) (Sem: 9-10)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14 credits)
Select 3 credits from technical courses on department option list[19] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 11 credits from technical courses on department option list (Sem: 9-10)

STRUCTURAL OPTION: 44 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32 credits)
A E 403(3), 430(3), 475(3), ARCH 442(4)[19], E MCH 215(2), 216(1) (Sem: 7-8)
A E 431(3), 439(3),481W(4), 482A(4), C E 209(2) (Sem: 9-10)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from technical courses on department option list (Sem: 7-8)
Select 5 credits from technical courses on department list[19] (Sem: 7-8)
Geotechnical selection(4) (Sem: 7-8)

Note: The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: ED&G 100(3) can be substituted for E G 130(3).

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[19] Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.

28-04-104 Add new Bioengineering major with four options: Chemical Engineering Option, Electrical Engineering Option, Materials Science Option, and Mechanical Engineering Option.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000 Fall Semester 2001

BIOENGINEERING (BIOE) (BIO E)

PROFESSOR Herbert H. LIPOWSKY, Head of the Department of Bioengineering

Bioengineering is the application of engineering principles to biology and medicine. Graduates of the major assume positions in the healthcare industry, pursue further studies of the biomedical and engineering sciences in graduate school or enter medical school. Industrial employment in design, production, product research and development, technical service and sales are available at the entry level for B. S. graduates. The unique combination of life science and engineering prepare graduates to assume a leadership role in the development of medical devices and technology. The Bioengineering BS requires the student to select an Option, in which engineering science courses are focused.

For the B.S. degree in Bioengineering, a minimum of 131 credits is required.

Students in residence at the Commonwealth campuses may satisfy the course requirements for semesters 1-3. They should then transfer to University Park to begin studies in their major beginning with semester 4.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2).

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR.)
(See description of General Education in front of the Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107-109 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 82 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (72 credits)
BIOL 141 GN(3), 142(1), ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
BIOE 201(3), 301(3), 302(1) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3), E MCH 210 (5) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 230(4) 220(2), 231(2), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
BIOE 303(3), 401(3), 402(3), 403(1) (Sem: 5-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
BIOE 440(1), 45OW(3), 490(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3) or 014(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of BIOE courses (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 25-27 credits

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING OPTION: 25 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (25 credits)
CHEM 038(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CHEM 036(2), 039(3), BIOE 313(3), 413(3), B M B 401(2), M E 030(3) (Sem: 5-6)
BIOE 423(3), CHEM 451(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING OPTION: 27 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
E E 210(4) (Sem: 3-4)
CSE 271(3), 275(1), E E 310(4), M E 030(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 3 credits of electrical engineering from department list (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9 credits of electrical engineering from department list (Sem: 7-8)

MATERIALS SCIENCE OPTION: 26 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26 credits)
PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
MATSE 201(3), 401(3), 402(3), PLMSE 406(3), CHEM 038(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MATSE 403(3), 404(3), 430(3) (Sem: 7-8)

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING OPTION: 27 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (17 15 credits)
E MCH 012(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2) M E 030(3), 050(3), I E 327(3) (Sem: 5-6)
M E 440(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 12 credits)
Select 3 credits from department list (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9 credits from department list (Sem: 7-8)

28-04-105 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Add quantification statement to minor. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4) and PHYS 203 GN(3) to PHYS 213 GN(2) and 214 GN(2); reduce number of credits for CHEM 38 from 4 to 3; and change CHEM 40(2) to CHEM 39(3). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Under the BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING OPTION, replace CHEM 039(1) and B M B 401(2) with B M B 251(3). Under ENGERGY AND FUELS OPTION, change F SC 421(3) to F SC 432/CHE 432(3); add PHYS 214(2); and change information under SUPPORTING COURESE AND RELATED AREAS reducing the credits from 9 to 6. Under the GENERAL OPTION and the POLYMER ENGINEERING OPTION, change PHYS 203 GN(3) to PHYS 214 GN(2). Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Chemical Engineering (CH E)

PROFESSOR J. L. DUDA, Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering relates engineering principles to chemistry. Graduates of the major assume positions in the chemical process industries, the petroleum industry, the food industry, and many other industries of a more specified nature. Areas of special emphasis include the environment, materials including polymers, energy and fuels, and bioprocessing. Employment in design, production, process and product research and development, and in technical service and sales are available at the entry level, while many chemical engineers move to management positions following some experience. Preparation for graduate studies is also an integral part of the curriculum.

The fundamentals of chemical engineering including material and energy balances, unit operations of flow of fluids, heat transfer, mass transfer, and separational processes; the unit processes; physical and chemical thermodynamic equilibria, chemical kinetics and reactor design; and chemical process engineering are presented in the curriculum. Engineering science and analysis are blended with engineering synthesis and design throughout the curriculum and culminate in a senior-level course in design of chemical plants, which integrates much of the material from previous courses.

For the B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering, a minimum of 134 credits is required.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING MINOR: Students must take CH E 301(3), 302(5), 303(3), 304(2), 413(3), and 414(3). If a student exempts any listed course(s) because of prior studies in another area or university, CH E 401(3) or 407W(3) may be used to substitute credit to maintain the minimum 18-credit requirement. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 110-111 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 84 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (77 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), ED & G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CH E 301(3), 302(5)[1], 303(3)[1], 304(2)[1], CHEM 036(2), 038(3), 039(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-6)
CH E 413(3)[1], 414(3)[1], CHEM 451(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
CH E 401(3), 407W(3)[1], 450(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 5-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 26-27 credits

BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING OPTION: 27 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
MICRB 201 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
B M B 251(3), CH E 012(1), 438(3)[1], CHEM 457(2) (Sem: 5-6)
CH E 409(3)[1], 448(3), 455(3), 464(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from department list, in either electrical engineering, mechanics, materials, and transport phenomena (Sem: 5-8)

ENERGY AND FUELS OPTION: 26 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (20 credits)
F SC 012(1), 401(3)[1], 431(3) (Sem: 5-6)
F SC 410(2), F SC 432(3)/CH E432(3), 422(3)[1], 464(3)[1], PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)[31]
Select 3 credits of 400-level chemical engineering courses from department list.
Select 3 credits from department list in electrical engineering, mechanics, materials, or transport phenomena[30]. (Sem: 7-8)

GENERAL OPTION: 26 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (8 credits)
PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
CH E 012(1), CHEM 457(2) (Sem: 5-6)
CH E 464(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits of 400-level chemistry courses from department list (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits of 400-level chemical engineering courses from department list[1][30] (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)[31]
Select 6 credits from department list, including 3 credits in each of two of the four topic areas--electrical engineering, mechanics, materials, and transport phenomena[30] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of other courses from department list (Sem: 7-8)

POLYMER ENGINEERING OPTION: 26 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)[31]
PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
CH E 012(1), 441(3), CHEM 457(2), PLMSE 406(3)[1], 410(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
CH E 464(3)[1], PLMSE 400(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of 400-level polymer science courses from department list[1] (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[30] To include a set of credits in each of engineering science and synthesis-design courses.
[31] Students may substitute 6 credits of ROTC for part of this requirement in consultation with department.

28-04-105A Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4); replace PHYS 203 GN(3) with "select 3 credits of math or science courses from department list." Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Civil Engineering (C E)

PROFESSOR PAUL P. JOVANIS, Head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

This major helps provide the basic undergraduate education required for private and public service in civil and environmental engineering. The goals of the program are identical to those described under the heading of the College of Engineering. Specific emphasis is placed upon the fundamental civil engineering principles and design techniques. A basic introduction to the main divisions of the field (i.e., construction/management, environmental, hydrosystems, materials/pavement design/geotechnical, structures, and transportation) is provided prior to selecting elective courses in order to assist students in choosing an area of specialization for either professional practice or graduate studies. This program is broadened by courses in communication skills, arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and other engineering disciplines. Students gain experience in working as members of a team and using interdisciplinary approaches to solve problems. These experiences, as well as those related to engineering principles and design, come through exercises in the classroom, laboratory, and the field. The experiences culminate in a single capstone design course, wherein all of the student's knowledge and skills are brought to bear on an actual engineering problem.

For the B.S. degree in Civil Engineering, a minimum of 132 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 108 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (71 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), E MCH 011(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 012(3)[1], 013(3)[1], ENGL 202C GWS(3), GEOSC 001(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
C E 211(3)[1], 221W(3)[1], 231(3)[1], 240(3)[1], 244(3)[1], 261(3)[1], 270(3)[1], 280(3)[1], STAT 401(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (37 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3); M E 023(3) or 030(3)[30]; CHEM 034(3) or select 3 credits of math or science courses from department list (Sem: 3-4)
E E 220(3) or 305(3)[30] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits from C E 321(3), 341(3), 342(3), 345(3), 351(3), 362(2), 363(1), 371(3), or 380(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of C E 400-level design courses from epartment list[30] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of C E 400-level courses from department list[30] (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[30] Students may substitute 6 credits of ROTC for 3 credits of 400-level C E courses and 3 credits of M E or E E .

28-04-106 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), and PHYS 203 GN(3) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), and 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Computer Engineering (CMPEN)

PROFESSOR DALE A. MILLER, Head of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Computer Engineering is concerned with the analysis, design, and application of computer systems. It includes VLSI, logic circuit design, microprocessors, computer architectures, operating systems, programming languages, data bases, and various computer applications, including pattern recognition, computer vision, and artificial intelligence. Computers play a vital role in almost every branch of science, engineering, and business applications. Analysis and design of computer hardware, software, and their tradeoffs are important to the manufacturing of efficient and well-engineered computer systems for these applications.

The curriculum proceeds from a freshman year based on science and mathematics common to all engineering students to a core of computer engineering courses that extends through the senior year. The sophomore/junior core provides background and breadth in engineering science and design with the design experience beginning in a sophomore logic design course and laboratory and culminating in a senior-level project design course. A few elective courses are available during the senior year so that students may add depth in their area of specialization, although these electives must include a selection from each of the areas of hardware, software, and laboratory-intensive courses. Students with appropriate preparation in mathematics, science, and social-humanistic courses may enter the program at the junior year with minimal or no delay in completing the requirements for the B.S. in Computer Engineering. Graduates of the program enter professional careers as computer engineers or go on for advanced study at the graduate level.

For the B.S. degree in Computer Engineering, a minimum of 129 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 105-106 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (74 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3)[1], 014 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CSE 120(3)[1], 260(3)[1], 271(3)[1], 275(1), E E 210(4)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2), 250(3), PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
CSE 312(3)[1], 331(3)[1], 465(3)[1], E E 310(4)[1], 317(3)[1], ENGL 202C GWS(3), STAT 418(3) (Sem: 5-6)
CSE 411(3), 428(3), 430W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (25-26 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3)[1] or CSE 103 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3) or 004 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Students must select 18 credits from program-approved lists: one course each from groups a, b, and c and 3 additional courses from lists a, b, and c (must include a minimum of 3 credits of engineering science and 2 credits of engineering design) (Sem: 5-8)
a. CSE 413(3), 418(3), 431(3), 458(3), 471(3)
b. CSE 412(3), 447(3), 477(3)
c. CSE 421(3), 441W(3), 481(3), 485(3), 486(3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
(Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.)
Select 6 additional credits (Theses credits may include co-op credits, additional credits from courses listed under additional courses, or other credits with approval of the program office.)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-107 Change. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Computer Science (CMPSC)

PROFESSOR DALE MILLER, Head of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Computer Science is concerned with the analysis, design, and applications of computing software and systems. It includes a core foundation in computer hardware and software with emphasis on the design of efficient default-free software. It includes programming languages, data structures, compilers, operating systems, data bases, and artificial intelligence.

The major is designed to provide fundamental training in preparing graduates for positions in schools, commerce, industry, and government. Students should consult their advisers in formulating suitable programs.

For the B.S. degree in Computer Science, a minimum of 125 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 95 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (56 credits)
PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CSE 103 GQ(4)[1], 120(3)[1], 231(3)[1], 260(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], 141 GQ(4)[1], 220 GQ(2) (Sem: 1-4)
CSE 271(3)[1], 331(3)[1], MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)
STAT 318(3), 319(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CSE 411(3)[1], 428(3)[1], 465(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CSE 420W(3) or 430W(3) (Sem: 7-8)
Select one course from three of the following lists a, b, c, d: (Sem: 7-8)
a. CSE 413(3), 418(3), 431(3), 458(3), 471(3)
b. CSE 412(3), 447(3), 477(3)
c. CSE 421(3), 441W(3), 481(3), 486(3)
d. CSE 451(3), 455(3), 456(3), 457(3), 467(3)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (26 credits)
Select 3 credits from the approved list of natural sciences courses (Sem: 3-4)
Select 0-8 credits in a foreign language (proficiency demonstrated by examination or course work to the level of the second semester; if fewer than 8 credits are needed to reach the required proficiency, students choose selections from program list to total 8 credits.) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9-17 credits from department list (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits in 400-level non-CSE courses in consultation with adviser (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-108 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4) and PHYS 203 GN(3) to PHYS 213 GN(2) and 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Increase Change minimum number of credits from 130 to 131 129.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Electrical Engineering (E E)

PROFESSOR KEN JENKINS, Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering is the application of electrical science and technology to the needs of society. Students are prepared for careers that include research, product design and development, and manufacturing and sales, with industrial, government, and academic employers. Areas of specialization in the program include antennas, communications, control systems, digital signal processing, electronic device fabrication and circuit design, energy conversion, fiber optics and lasers, image processng, microwaves and radar, optical computing, power systems, and remote sensing.

The curriculum consists of one year of science and mathematics, a year and a half to two years of engineering course work, including a wide variety of electives, and General Education requirements, including verbal and written communications courses, arts, humanities, and social sciences. Design experiences are integrated throughout the curriculum from the first year [ED&G 100(3)] through the fourth-year capstone design course [E E 402W(3) or 403W(3)].

For the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, a minimum of 131 129 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107-108 105-106 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (65 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E E 210(4)[1], CSE 271(3)[1], 275(1), MATH 220 GQ(2), 230(4), 250(3), PHYS 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 310(4)[1], 324(3)[1], 330(4)[1], 350(4)[1], E SC 314(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16-17 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CNMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 002 GS(3) or 004 GS(3); E MCH 011(3), M E 023(3), or PHYS 237(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from I E 424(3), PHYS 410(4), STAT 401(3), 414(3), 416(3), or 418(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E E 402W(3) or 403W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (26 24 credits)
Select 6 credits from program-approved list of 300-level courses (Sem: 5-6)
Select 9 credits from program-approved list of 400-level courses (these courses must be chosen so that engineering design and engineering science requirements for the major are met) (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits of engineering courses from a program-approved list (Sem: 7-8)
Select 8 6 additional credits, which may include up to 6 credits of ROTC, up to 6 co-op credits, and others from a program-approved list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-109 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4); change PHYS 204 GN(4) to PHYS 213 GN(2) and 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Engineering Science (E SC)

PROFESSOR R. P. McNITT, Head of the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics

Engineering Science is the original honors curriculum for the College of Engineering. This interdisciplinary program combines the understanding of basic engineering practices with in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of the engineering sciences: electricity and magnetism, fluid and solid mechanics, mathematics, computer applications, materials, and thermodynamics and heat transfer. Based on this understanding of the fundamentals, students pursue individual specialization through four technical electives and a senior capstone design project. Engineering design concepts are incorporated into the curriculum through courses reserved for Engineering Science students. The results of this program are graduates with an excellent grasp of fundamental physical principles who are able to utilize this knowledge to solve a wide variety of contemporary, interdisciplinary engineering problems. This educational base helps insure the graduate against the obsolescence associated with rapid technological progress. While the majority of graduates immediately go on to graduate schooling, the program also provides excellent training for a broad spectrum of industrial positions where the graduates' broad, in-depth knowledge is effectively utilized in the challenging interdisciplinary problems that are increasingly encountered.

Enrollment is limited to students who have demonstrated that they can benefit from the advanced courses of the curriculum. A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 is partial demonstration of such competence.

For the B.S. degree in Engineering Science, 137 credits and a 2.50 grade-point average are required.

ENGINEERING MECHANICS MINOR: Students must take a minimum of 18 credits in E MCH courses. These may include E MCH 011(3), 012(3), 013(3), 215(2), and 216(1), and must include at least two 3-credit 400-level E MCH courses.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 113 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (83 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 220 GQ(2), 230(4), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
AERSP 308(3), E E 203(4), 340(3), E MCH 416H(3), E SC 400H(3), 407H(3)[1], 414M(3)[1], M E 120(4), NUC E 307(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E SC 404H(3)[1], 410H(3), 411H(4), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3)or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 110H(5)[1] or 210(5)[1]; E MCH 012(3)[1] or 112H(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
I E 424(3) or NUC E 307(3) Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)[32]
Select 12 credits of 400-level technical courses (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 3-4, 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[32]
Three credits in engineering science, 3 credits in engineering design.

28-04-109A Change. Under requirements for entrance to the minor, change the course PHYS 201 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4). Quantification statement added to minor.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Environmental Engineering Minor

PROFESSOR BRIAN A. DEMPSEY, in charge

This minor is designed to provide students in engineering, science, and other majors with a comprehensive study of environmental issues and the skills necessary to solve problems associated with environmental pollution. A certificate is awarded to students who complete the requirements of the minor.

For entrance into the minor, students must be at least fifth-semester standing and have completed CHEM 012 GN(3), MATH 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4). A minimum of 2.0 is mandatory for certification.

The minor consists of 18 credits, at least 6 of which must be at the 400 level. A grade of C or better is required in all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits (2 credits of engineering design are included)

PRESCRIBED COURSE (3 credits)
C E 270(3) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from BIOL 230W GN(4), CHEM 034(3), 038(4), or C E 479(1) and MICRB 400(2) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from AG E 435(3), CH E 301(3), MN PR 301(3), NUC E 307(3), or 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from AERSP 308(3), C E 371(3), CH E 302(5), M E 033(3), METEO 454(3), or NUC E 431W(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits (including at least 2 of engineering design) from A S M 457(3), C E 472W(3), 475(3), 476(3), 477(3), E R M 411(3), 412(3), 413W(3), F SC 430(3), GEOSC 452(3), M E 405(3), 470(3), MN PR 427(3), MNG 444(2), 445(3), NUC E 405(3), 420(3), 428(3), or P N G 405(2) (Sem: 5-8)

28-04-109B Change. Reduce minimum number of credits required to 132. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4); and delete I E 300(1). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Under SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS, delete the 3 credits of general course selection. Change footnote. Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Industrial Engineering (I E)

PROFESSOR A. "RAVI" RAVINDRAN, Professor and Head of the Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

This major helps prepare students who intend to enter the technical area of industrial or commercial enterprises, or government services. The fundamentals of engineering are supplemented by sequences of courses essential to production and management positions where a scientific and engineering background is necessary. The following fields of study are included in the general program: (1) Management Systems: management information systems, manufacturing and distribution systems utilizing mathematical models, programming a computer to do simulations, and related quantitative operations research and management science techniques; (2) Manufacturing Engineering: automation, material removal, casting, forging, plastic working of metals, materials joining, fabrication of polymeric materials, tool engineering, robotics, computer-aided manufacturing, and manufacturing systems analysis; (3) Management Controls: engineering economy, inventory control, quality control and reliability, production control, cost control; (4) Methods: work simplification and measurement, factory planning and materials handling, data processing; and (5) Ergonomics Engineering: human factors, work physiology, biomechanics, industrial safety.

Students are allowed considerable flexibility in selecting their own programs. Interested students may further specialize in one or two of the above areas by appropriate use of 12 credits of engineering and science electives.

For the B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering, a minimum of 136 132 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 112 credits 108 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (86 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3)[1], 014 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CSE 271(3), E MCH 012(3), 210(5)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2), 250(3), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), I E 300(1)[1], I E 302(3)[1], 310(3)[1], 311(3)[1], 322(3)[1], 323(3)[1], 327(3)[1], 328(3)[1], 425(3)[1], MATSE 259(3) (Sem: 5-6)
I E 405(3), 408W(3), 423(3), 450(3), 453(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3) or 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
M E 023(3) or 030 (3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits) (12 credits)
Select 3 credits as a science selection from department list (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits as a general selection from department list[28] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits as a technical selection from department list[28] (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 credits in I E from senior selections from department list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[28]
Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC towards the technical and senior electives or 3 credits 6 credits of ENGR 295(1), 395(1), and 495(1) towards the technical elective. The first 3 credits apply toward the general selection.

28-04-109C Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Mechanical Engineering (M E)

PROFESSOR RICHARD C. BENSON, Head, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering

Mechanical Engineering is the science of understanding, and art of design of mechanisms and engines. Mechanisms are devices composed of solid, fluid, electrical, and optical components that perform specified tasks. Examples include: robots, tape drives, earth movers, clocks, sports equipment, energy-absorbing bumpers, acoustic sensors, low-friction bearings, high-friction brakes, automated inspection equipment, satellite positioners, and artificial hips. Engines are devices that convert (or conserve) thermal and mechanical energy to perform specified tasks. Examples include: internal combusion engines, jet engines, missile launchers, heat exchangers, refrigerators, ovens, ventilators, pumps, turbines, solar heaters, compressors, hydraulic actuators, insulation and explosively deployed air bags.

Students learn the scientific principles governing the operation of mechanisms and engines, and learn a methodology to apply these principles in the design of new machines. Students also learn that "real world" designs carry economic constraints of time, money, and human resources, and are usually conducted in the presence of international competition. The foundation to the discipline includes physics, chemistry, mathematics, electronics, and material science. Students also learn to use computers to perform mathematical computations and to display results graphically. Subjects related to mechanicsms are rigid-body dynamics, kinematics, strength of materials, vibrations, and controls. Subjects related to engines are thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Students are required to undertake laboratories that illustrate physical principles learned in courses in the engineering sciences.

In the senior year, all students enroll in four technical electives to prepare themselves for engineering careers. Available courses include reciprocating engines, heat exchangers, turbomachinery, jet engines, rocket engines, pollution control, combustion, automatic controls, refrigeration and air conditioning, compressible fluid dynamics, vibrations, vehicle dynamics, noise control, reliability, wear, microcomputer interfacing, computer-aided design, and advanced study in machine dynamics, fluid mechanics, and machine design. The strength of the major and its long-standing appeal to employers is that students are required to master both mechanical and thermal science subjects. Implicit in all their studies, students are expected to develop personal skills needed to be leaders in their profession.

Students have the opportunity to participate in the Co-op program, study abroad, and pursue minors and dual majors.

For the B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering, a minimum of 137 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 113 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (88 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 011(3)[1], 012(3)[1], 013(3)[1], M E 030(3)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2), 251(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 305(3), E MCH 215(2), ENGL 202C GWS(3), M E 031(3)[1], 033(3)[1], 050(3)[1], 051(3)[1], 054(3)[1], 082(3)[1], 412(3)[1], MATSE 259(3) (Sem: 5-6)
I E 312(3), M E 440(3)[1], STAT 401(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
M E 414W(4) or 415W(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 2 credits from M E 083(1), 084(1), 085(1), 086(1) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)[33]
Select 12 credits of 400-level courses from department list (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-6)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[33]
These courses may have to be chosen so that the engineering design or engineering science requirements for the major are met.

28-04-110 Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), and PHYS 204 GN(2) to PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), and 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Nuclear Engineering (NUC E)

PROFESSOR RICHARD C. BENSON, Head, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering

PROFESSOR JACK S. BRENIZER, JR., Chair, Nuclear Engineering Program

Nuclear engineering, the practical application of the principles of nuclear science for the benefit of humankind, provides the engineer or scientist with an opportunity to work on challenging problems that are vitally important to the modern world. The goal of the program is to provide students with a strong academic background that enables them to pursue professional careers in nuclear and radiation-based industries, or to pursue graduate study in nuclear engineering or related fields such as medical physics, health physics, or another field of engineering.

The first two years of the program stress fundamentals in mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer programming, and engineering sciences such as mechanics, materials, and thermodynamics. The last two years provide the breadth and depth in nuclear science, behavior of heat and fluids, reactor theory and engineering, and radiation measurement. The laboratory work includes experiments using the University's 1,000-kilowatt research reactor. Engineering design is incorporated in many courses from the freshman year to the senior year, but is particularly emphasized in the senior capstone design course, which integrates the critical elements of reactor theory, reactor engineering, safety considerations, and economic optimization into a reactor design.

Many graduates are employed by electric power companies that use nuclear power plants, or by companies that help service and maintain those plants. They use their knowledge of engineering principles, radioactive decay, interactions of radiation with matter, and nuclear reactor behavior to help assure that the power plants meet the demand for reliable, economic electricity while ensuring a safe environment. To do this, graduates must be problem solvers who could develop and use complex computer models and sophisticated monitoring systems, design systems to handle radioactive waste, determine if the materials in the plant are becoming brittle or corroded, or manage the fuel in the reactor to get the maximum energy from it. Other graduates work in industries that use radioactivity or radiation to detect problems or monitor processes. Jobs are also found in branches of the government as designers of the next generation of reactors for submarines, aricraft carriers, or space probes, or to manage and clean up contaminated wastes. They could also be involved with regulation of nuclear power or radiation uses, or in research to develop advanced technologies that will be used in next-generation power plants. Graduates who want to further their education in the fields of health physics, radiation biology, or nuclear medical applications find this degree to be a useful preparation.

For the B.S. degree in Nuclear Engineering, a minimum of 129 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 105 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (89 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 014 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 011(3), 012(3), 013(3), M E 030(3), MATH 230(4), 251(4)[1], PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 305(3), E MCH 215(2), 216(1), ENGL 202C GWS(3), M E 033(3), 412(3), NUC E 301(4)[1], 302(4)[1], 309(3), 450(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
NUC E 310W(2), 403(3), 430(3)[1], 431W(4), 451(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), 004 GS(3), or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 6 credits, of which 3 credits must be designated as design, from E SC 400H(3), NUC E 296(1-18), 297(1-9), 408(3), 420(3), 428(3), 444(1), 445(3), 460(3), 490(3), 496(1-18), 497(1-9), 500-level courses with special permission (Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
(These courses may have to be chosen so that the engineering design or engineering science requirements for the major are met.)
Select 3 credits in technical courses from department list (Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

28-04-110A Change. Under GENERAL EDUCATION, delete note regarding ABET. Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, change PHYS 201 GN(4) and 202 GN(4) to PHYS 211 GN(4) and 212 GN(4); change PHYS 204 GN(4) to PHYS 213 GN(2) and 214 GN(2). Under ADDITIONAL COURSES, add "Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar." Update General Education information.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

Surveying (SUR)

PROFESSOR WAYNE HAGER, Head, School of Engineering Technology and Commonwealth Engineering

PROFESSOR CHARLES D. GHILANI, Program Chair, Wilkes-Barre Campus

This major provides the basic undergraduate education required for private and public service in the surveying profession. Particular emphasis is placed on fundamental surveying principles required in all areas of surveying. A basic introduction is provided in the main subdivisions of surveying, including cadastral surveying, geodesy, photogrammetry, adjustments, remote sensing, geographic information systems, and land development.

For the B. S. degree in Surveying, a minimum of 130 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 106 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (62 credits)
EG T 101(1), 102(1), GEOG 010 GN(3), M I S 103(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], 141 GQ(4), SUR 111(3)[1], 112(3), 162(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), SUR 242(3)[1], 251(3), 272(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
SUR 321(3), 351(3), 362(3)[1], 372W(3) (Sem: 5-6)
SUR 313(4) (Sem: 7-8)
SUR 441(3), 471(3), 482(3) (Sem: 9-10)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (32 credits)
PHYS 211 GN(4), 212 GN(4), 213 GN(2), 214 GN(2); or PHYS 150 GN(3), 151(3), CHEM 012 GN(3), 3 credits in natural sciences (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2), 231(2); or MATH 230(4) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3), 201C GQ(3) or 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
STAT 401(3) or 451(3) (Sem: 5-6)
ECON 002 GS(3) or 014 GS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits, from C E 261(3), CE T 261(3), GEOG 352(3), SUR 325(3), 345(3), 365(3), 375(2), 385(3), 455(3), 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-6, 9-10)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from department list of technical electives (Sem: 5-6, 9-10)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-111 BIOE 201
Analysis of Molecules and Cells
MOLECULES & CELLS (3)
An analytical study of molecular and cellular phenomena including functional and metabolic interactions.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 141, CHEM 013, MATH 141
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-112 BIOE 301
Analysis of Physiological Systems
PHYSIOL SYSTEMS (3)
Linear systems analysis applied to electrical networks and lumped parameter models of physiological control systems.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 141, MATH 251
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-113 BIOE 302
Physiological Simulation Laboratory
PHYSIOL SIM LAB (1)
Computer laboratory designed to illustrate applications of control systems theory to physiological systems.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: BIOE 301
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-114 BIOE 303
Bio-continuum Mechanics
BIOMECHANICS (3)
Mechanical properties of fluids and solids with applications to tissue mechanics and vascular system.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 141, E MCH 210, MATH 251
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-115 BIOE 313
Bioengineering Transport Phenomena I
BIOTRANSPORT I (3)
A mathematical presentation of the fundamentals of chemical processes, with emphasis on physiological applications.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 141, CHEM 013, MATH 251
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-116 BIOE 406
Medical Imaging
MEDICAL IMAGING (3)
Physical principles and clinical applications of medical imaging methods.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 212
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-117 BIOE 413
Bioengineering Transport Phenomena II
BIOTRANSPORT II (3)
An integrated study of the fundamentals of mass and heat transport processes with emphasis on the analysis of physiological systems.
PREREQUISITE: BIOE 303, MATH 251
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-118 BIOE 423
Bioengineering Transport Phenomena III
BIOTRANSPORT II8 (3)
Chemical kinetics and reaction equilibria with applications to the analysis of physiological function and the design of synthetic organs.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 141, BIOE 313 or CH E 301
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: BIOE 413 or CH E 302 and 413
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-119 BIOE 433
Biotransport--Problem Based Learning
BIOTRANSPORT PROB (3)
Application of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer to problems in medicine and biology using a problem-based learning approach.
PREREQUISITE: BIOE 313, 413
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-120 BIOE 440
Clinical Corelations
CLINICAL CORELATN (1)
Engineering analysis applied to common disease states and therapies.
PREREQUISITE: BIOE 402
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-120A BIOE 450W
Bioengineering Senior Design
SENIOR DESIGN (3)
Application of engineering and physiological principles to design of artificial organs and life supportive devices.
PREREQUISITE: BIOE 440, ENGL 202C, senior standing
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-121 BIOE 490
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1)
Technical presentations related to research and industry concerns, and by students doing senior projects.
PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT: BIOE 450W
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-122 E MCH 120S
Adventures in Mechanics--First-Year Seminar
ADV IN MECHANICS (1)
First-year seminar that introduces students to basic concepts in engineering mechanics.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-123 E SC 120S
Design for Failure--First-Year Seminar
DESIGN FOR FAILURE (1)
This seminar, through the utilization of commonly used examples, discusses the engineering principles which are exploited by such designs.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-124 E SC 121S
Science/Engineering Fiction and the Engineering Sciences--First-Year Seminar
FICTION & ENGR SCI (1)
Examines the technology predictions of authors in view of the engineering sciences on which the underlying devices of their stories are based.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-125 E SC 122S
Weird, Wild, and Wonderful Materials and Devices--First-Year Seminar
WEIRD DEVICES (1)
First-year seminar that surveys the use of novel materials and material systems to create practical devices.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-126 E SC 123S
Catastrophic Failures--First-Year Seminar
CATASTROPHIC FAIL (1)
First-year seminar that explores design deficiencies through the study of cash histories of a number of famous failures.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-40-127 I E 101S
Build Your Own Robot--First-Year Seminar
BUILD YOUR ROBOT (1)
The objective of this first-year seminar course is to provide students hands-on experience with robotics and automation devices.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-40-128 I E 102S
Human-Centered Engineering--First-Year Seminar
HUMAN CENTRED ENGR (1)
This first-year seminar considers what makes products and processes usable by people, through both design principles and student projects.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-40-129 I E 103S
Management Science and the Modern Engineer--First-Year Seminar
MGMT SCI&MDRN ENGR (1)
This first-year seminar will introduce students to quantitative methods for decision making through a number of hands-on learning exercises.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-40-130 I E 104S
Managing the Real (Unpredictable) World--First-Year Seminar
MANGAGNG REAL WRLD (1)
Informational first-year seminar on decision making under uncertainty in engineering and everyday life.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-40-131 I E 105S
Manufacturing Science and Technology--First-Year Seminar
MFG SCI & TECH (1)
This first-year seminar will explore some aspects of manufacturing science and technology associated with the manufacturing of electronic products.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-132 S T S 299 (GI)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-133 S T S 499 (GI)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12000

COURSE DROPS

28-04-134 CSE 231
Introduction to Computer Organization
INTRO COMP ORG (3:3:0)
Introduction to computer machine organization, system design, and assembler programming.
PREREQUISITE: CSE 120
PROPOSED START: S12000

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Health and Human Development

28-04-135 Change Teacher Preparation Option: Under PRESCRIBED COURSES, drop KINES 389(2), 491(2), and LLED 450(3); replace KINES 060 GHS (3) with KINES 165 (3); increase number of credits required for KINES 495A from 13 to 14 credits. Drop REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR from 84-117 credits to 84-111 credits. Update General Education information.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2000

Kinesiology (KINES)

PROFESSOR KARL M. NEWELL, Head

Kinesiology offers a comprehensive program of study in the science of human movement and is designed for students who want to prepare for professions involving physical activity and for graduate study in related areas. Three options are offered: (1) Athletic Training; (2) Movement Science; and (3) Teacher Preparation.

All options require a culminating practicum or research experience. Eligibility requirements for this are completion of prerequisites, seventh-semester standing with a minimum of 100 credits, demonstrated computer competency, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average. First aid and CPR certification are highly recommended for the Teacher Preparation option and the Applied Fitness emphasis in the Movement Science option. (See additional requirements for student teaching under General Information, Special Academic Programs.) Relocation away from the University Park Campus is generally necessary for student teaching and may be necessary for practicums in other options.

Students who have completed a minimum of 28 credits with passing grades and have attained third-semester classification with a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average are eligible for entrance into the major after (1) filing a written application; (2) participating in an entrance conference; and (3) meeting the following requirements: Complete, with a grade of C or higher, two of the following three courses: KINES 141(3), 150(3), and 171(3).

For the B.S. degree in Kinesiology with an option in Athletic Training, a minimum of 130 credits is required; with an option in Movement Science, a minimum of 130 credits is required; with an option in Teacher Preparation, a minimum of 144 credits is required; with an option in Wellness Devlepment Specialization, a minimum of 131 credits is required. (To satisfy graduation requirements, students must have completed 6 credits from courses offered in the College of Health and Human Development but outside of Kinesiology.)

ATHLETIC TRAINING OPTION: This option provides a concentrated program of courses designed to prepare students for a career in the profession of athletic training. The courses have been designed to meet the minimum standards necessary for certification by the National Athletic Trainers Association and licensure by the Pennsylvania Physical Therapy Board as an athletic trainer. It is possible to combine either the Teacher Preparation or Movement Science option with the Athletic Training option. It should be noted, however, that such a program may require additional time.

The following requirements for admission to the Athletic Training option are in addition to those for entrance to the Kinesiology major:

1. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.50
2. A 3.00 grade-point average in BIOL 129(4), KINES 303 GHS(3), 135(3), 295F(2)
3. A written application
4. Participate in an entrance interview with the Athletic Training program director or designee
5. A minimum of 100 clock hours of clinical experience in one or more of the training rooms under supervision of a certified athletic trainer. This opportunity is part of KINES 295F(3)

It is recommended that students apply for admission prior to the fourth semester in order to meet the sequence of course requirements, as there is often a waiting list.

MOVEMENT SCIENCE OPTION: This option consists of three areas that provide an opportunity for the concentrated study of physical activity in relation to science and medical emphasis; human behavior and humanities emphasis; and applied fitness emphasis. Upon graduation, students enter a variety of careers in relation to physical activity, be they professional, business oriented, or private agencies, and also may enter graduate school.

TEACHER PREPARATION OPTION: This option helps prepare teachers for K-12 Health and Physical Education. It includes all the academic requirements for the Instructional I Certificate in these fields issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. There are entrance requirements for all University teacher preparation programs:

1. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.50
2. An assessment of reading, writing, and computation skills
3. Completion of an Education Core: EDPSY 014(3) and EDTHP 115(3)
4. An early field experience, preferably in a diverse setting (one with at least 25 percent minority students): for KINES majors, KINES 295A(1)
5. Nine credits of required course work in the teaching field: for KINES majors, KINES 154(3) and two of the following: KINES 141(3), 150(3), 171(3)
6. Documented evidence showing completion of at least 80 hours of paid or volunteer work in a setting with an age-appropriate population, including a minimum of 40 hours of work in each of two settings, one of which should involve students from an underrepresented group, or who are from rural or urban areas, but different from the candidate's own background
7. Approval by the Teacher Preparation option coordinator

WELLNESS DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIZATION OPTION: (offered only at the Berks-Lehigh Valley College): This option is a program of study in the science of human movement. This program offers Kinesiology background and applied experience in health assessment, exercise physiology, motor skill development, stress management, nutrition and healthy living skills. The program also has an emphasis in basic business skills of accounting, marketing, management, and entrepreneurship.

This program will prepare students with a knowledge base, practical experience, and entrepreneurial business skills for careers in human wellness. This combination will enable graduates in this field to compete for employment in the corporate fitness arena, private fitness clubs, community-based fitness organizations, hospital and university settings or possibly to operate their own wellness consulting company.

Graduates will be able to scientifically assess fitness levels of people. Analyzing those assessments, graduates will then be capable of designing and implementing appropriate exercise programs. The program is designed to prepare graduates for advanced study in related fields, if they so choose.

MOVEMENT SCIENCE MINOR: Students must take two of the following: KINES 141(3), 150(3), and 171(3); and select additional courses (at least 6 credits at the 400 level) in Kinesiology for a total of 18 credits. Only courses in which the students earns a grade of C or better may be counted toward the fulfillment of the requirements for the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(7-13 of these credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

INTERCULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMPETENCE:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-8 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 84-111 credits
(This includes 7-13 credits of General Education courses: Athletic Training Option--7 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credit of GHA courses. Movement Science Option--3 credits of GN courses; 4 credits of GQ courses. Teacher Preparation Option--3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 3 credit of GHA courses. Wellness Development Specialization Option--8 credits of GN courses; 4 credits of GQ courses.

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 30 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30 credits)[1]
BIOL 141 GN(3), KINES 141(3), 150(3), 171(3) (Sem: 1-4)
KINES 202(3) (Sem: 3-4)
KINES 321(3), 345(3), 350(3), 360(3), 384(3) (Sem: 3-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 54-81 credits

ATHLETIC TRAINING OPTION: 62 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (59 credits)
BIOL 129(4)[1], KINES 060 GHS(3), 135(3), 303 GHS(3)[1], PSY 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 215 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
KINES 295F(2)[1], NUTR 251 GHS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
KINES 235(3), 395F(3)[1], 395G(3)[1], 436(3), 437(2) (Sem: 5-6)
KINES 335(3), 431(3), 434(3), 435(2), 438(3) (Sem: 5-8)
KINES 395I(3)[1], 495F(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from University list in consultation with adviser (Sem: 3-8)

MOVEMENT SCIENCE OPTION: 54 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12-18 credits)[39]
KINES 295B(1) (Sem: 1-4)
STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-6)
KINES 395B(1) (Sem: 5-8)
KINES 495B(12) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30-31 credits)
Select one course from categories a, b, and c; select 6-7 credits from category d (Sem: 5-8)
a. KINES 400(3), 456(4), 481W(3), or 484(3)
b. KINES 420(3), 436(3), or 483(3)
c. KINES 439W(3), 440(3), 441(3), 442(3), 443(3), or 444(3)
d. KINES 400(3), 420(3), 439W(3), 440(3), 441(3), 442(3), 443(3), 444(3), 456(4), 457(2), 458(1), 481W(3), 483(3), 484(3), 492W(3)

Choose one of the following emphasis area groups and select 15 credits from that emphasis of which at least 6 credits must be at the 400 level:

a. Physical Activity/Science and Medical Emphasis (15 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), 013 GN(3), 014 GN(1), 015 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
B M B 101(3), 121(2), BB H 101 GHS(3), BIOL 110 GN(4), 129(4), 142(1), 240W GN(4), CHEM 034(3), 035(3), 038(4), 039(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), 141 GQ(4), NUTR 251 GHS(3), PHYS 201 GN(4), 202 GN(4), 215 GN(4), 265 GN(4) (Sem: 3-6)
BB H 310W(3), 315 DF(3), 411(3), 432(3), BIOL 409(3), 421(4), 472(3), 473(2), KINES 310(3), 409(3), 456(4), 457(2), 458(1), 481W(3), 484(3), 485(3), 492W(3), PHIL 432(3) (Sem: 5-8)

b. Physical Activity/Human Behavior and Humanities Emphasis (15 credits)
HIST 020 GH(3), 021 GH(3), 100 GH(3), 107 GH(3), PHIL 100 GH(3), 103 GH(3) (Sem: 1-4)
EDPSY 010(3), EDTHP 115(3) (Sem: 3-4)
PSY 202 GS(3), 203(3) (Sem: 3-6)
EDTHP 440(3), KINES 310(3), 420(3), 439W(3), 440(3), 441(3), 442(3), 443(3), 444(3), PHIL 425(3), 427(3), 432(3), PSY 402(3) (Sem: 5-8)

c. Physical Activity/Applied Fitness Emphasis (15 credits)
KINES 060 GHS(3), SOC 023 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
KINES/ESACT activity GHS (2) (Sem: 1-6)
BB H 101 GHS(3), BIOL 055 GN(3), HD FS 129 GS(3), 249 GS(3), NUTR 251 GHS(3), 358(1), PSY 174(3), 213 GS(3), 231 GS(3), 243 GS(3), R P M 277 DF(3) (Sem: 3-6)
BB H 315 DF(3), 415(3), 420(3), 432(3), BIOL 409(3), CN ED 415(3), H P A 457(3), HD FS 411(3), 413(3), 434(3), 445(3), 446(3), 447(3), KINES 445(3), 456(4), 457(2), 458(1), 481W(3), 492W(3), PSY 445(3), R P M 462(3), SOC 423(3), 435(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from courses in the college that are not in the student's major

TEACHER PREPARATION OPTION: 71.5-81 credits[18]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (71.5 credits)
EDPSY 010(3), 014(3), 101 GQ(3), EDTHP 115(3), KINES 051(1.5), 126(3), 154(3), 165(3), 215(3), 295A(1), NUTR 251 GHS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
BB H 446(3), INSYS 400(2), KINES 382(3), 390(4), 395A(1), 445(3), 456(4), 490W(2), 493(3), SPLED 400(3) (Sem: 5-8)
KINES 495A(14) (Sem: 8-9)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (0-9.5 credits)(competency in each activity must be demonstrated through testing or by taking course)
KINES 030(0.5), 031(0.5), 032(0.5), 033(0.5), 034(0.5), 035(0.5), 036(0.5), 037(0.5), 038(0.5), 039(0.5), 040(0.5), 050(1), 052(1.5), 055(1.5) (Sem: 1-4)

WELLNESS DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIZATION OPTION: 68 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (62 credits)
BIOL 129(4), CHEM 12 GN(3), CHEM 14 GN (1), STAT 200 GQ (4), PHYS 215 GN (4) (Sem: 1-2)
ACCT 211(4), KINES 200(3),295 B (1), MIS 103(3), NUTR 251(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BA 243(4), KINES 356(3), KINES 358(l)(Sem: 5-6)
KINES 420 (3), 456(4), 457(3), 46 1W (2), 462W (2), 495C(10) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from BA 321(3),322(3), MKTG 301(3), MGMT 301(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from courses in the college that are not in the student's major (Sem: 5-8)

____________

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[18] A grade of C or better per course is required for teacher certification.
[39] Students interested in research/writing should consult with adviser relative to possible substitutions in this area.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-135A HD FS 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2000

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
School of Information Sciences and Technology

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-136 IST 240
Introduction to computer Languages
INTRO COMP LANG (3:3:0)
Introduction to the specification and application of languages and language paradigms which interact with computers.
PREREQUISITE: IST 230
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE CONCURRENT TO: IST 230
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-137 IST 295A
Distributed Team Project
DISTR TEAM PROJ (3:3:0)
Supervised experience where teams of students work on information system design projects gathered from industry or units within the university.
PREREQUISITE: IST 260
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: IST 110
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of the Liberal Arts

COURSE ADDS

28-04-138 ANTH 445W
Ethnographic Film
ETHNO FILM (3:3:0)
Comparisons of written and visual ethnography; critical assessment of ethnographic film; cross-cultural variation.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 001 or 045
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-139 ANTH 448
Ethnography of the United States
ENTHOGRAPHY OF US (3:3:0)
Ethnographic descriptions of various dimensions of life in the United States.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 045
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-139A ANTH 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PROPOSED START: SP2000

28-04-140 HIST 431 (GI)
Black Liberation and American Foreign Policy
BLK LIB&AM FOR POL (3:3:0)
This course deals with American foreign policy and Black liberation in Africa since 1945.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in African history; 3 credits in African political science; or 3 credits in American political science
CROSS LIST: AAA S 431
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-141 HIST 465 (GI)
Civil Rights and American Politics 1933-1968
CIV RTS & AMER POL (3:3:0)
The civil rights struggle and its impact upon American politics.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, HIST 021, 152, PL SC 001, or 002
CROSS LIST: AAA S 465
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-141A SOC 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PROPOSED START: SP2000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-142 AAA S 430 (DF)
Civil Rights and American Politics 1933-1968
CIV RTS & AMER POL (3:3:0)
The civil rights struggle and its impact upon American politics.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, HIST 021, 152, PL SC 001, or 002
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
RECERTIFICATION OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY CODE: GI
ADD CROSS LIST: HIST 465
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-143 AAA S 431 (DF)
Black Liberation and American Foreign Policy in Africa since 1945
BLK LIB & FOR POL (3:3:0)
Advanced research on American foreign policy and African politics.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 191, HIST 191, PL SC 137, or 150
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
RECERTIFICATION OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY CODE: GI
CHANGE TITLE TO: Black Liberation and American Foreign Policy (BLK LIB & FOR POL)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: This course deals with American foreign policy and Black liberation in Africa since 1945.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE TO: 3 credits in African history; 3 credits in African political science; or 3 credits in American political science
ADD CROSS LIST: HIST 431
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-144 ANTH 476
Anthropology of Gender
ANTH OF GENDER (3:3:0)
Cross-cultural construction of gender and sex roles; theories of gender construction; case studies and practical effects.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in women's studies or anthropology
CROSS LIST: WMNST 476
APPROVED START: S11990

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: ANTH 476W
ADD CROSS LIST: WMNST 476W
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-145 CAMS 411
Classical Drama
CLASS DRAMA (3:3:0)
Masterpieces of Greek tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and comedy (Aristophanes, Menander); their influence on Roman writers.
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: CAMS 411W
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-146 PL SC 134 (GN)
Agroecosystem Science and Policy
AGROECO SCI&POLICY (3)
The science, economics, and politics of managing food production systems; current practices and options for the future.
CROSS LIST: AGESS 134
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Sustainable Agriculture Science and Policy (SUSTAINAG SCI&POLI)
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-147 SPAN 253W
Introduction to Hispanic Literature
INTRO TO HISP LIT (3:3:0)
Introduction to generic distinctions, critical methods, and approaches to Hispanic literature.
PREREQUISITE: SPAN 200
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: SPAN 253
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-148 SPAN 400
Advanced Stylistics
ADV STYLISTICS (3:3:0)
Study of idiomatic constructions, word formation, and principal techniques of style through intensive writing and translation.
PREREQUISITE: SPAN 200
APPROVED START: FA1980

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: SPAN 300W
CHANGE TITLE TO: Advanced Grammar and Composition Through Reading (ADV GRAM & COMP)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: Development of advanced grammar and composition skills through reading texts by native speakers and adapting their techniques for original compositions.
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-149 WMNST 476
Anthropology of Gender
ANTH OF GENDER (3:3:0)
Cross-cultural construction of gender and sex roles; theories of gender construction; case studies and practical effects.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in women's studies or anthropology
CROSS LIST: ANTH 476
APPROVED START: S11990

NEW
CHANGE NUMBER TO: WMNST 476W
ADD CROSS LIST: ANTH 476W
PROPOSED START: SP2001

COURSE DROPS

28-04-150 ANTH 311
Pre-Industrial Human Population Ecology
HUMAN ECOLOGY (3)
Survey of biological and ecological context of pre-industrial cultures, including patterns of fertility and mortality, nutrition, energetics, and disease.
PREREQUISITE: one course in anthropology or familiarity with non-western culture
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-151 ANTH 313
Anthropoligical Genetics
ANTH GENET (3)
Survey of basic molecular, population, and evolutionary genetics, applied to human and primate variation and evolution.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 021 or BIOL 033
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-152 ANTH 457
Language in Culture
LANG IN CULTURE (3:3:0)
The study of language within the context of anthropology, with emphasis on structural analysis.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in linguistics or 3 credits in anthropology
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-153 ANTH 471
Human Evolutionary Biology I
HUMAN EVOL BIOL I (3:3:0)
Human genetic variation and change, evolutionary biology and ecology, the life cycle, and the genetics of human population structure.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 021 or course in genetics of evolutionary biology
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-154 ANTH 472
Human Evolutionary Biology II
HUMAN BIOL II (3:3:0)
Means of assessing human genetic variation and the fossil records of human evolution in light of evolutionary and population genetics.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 471 or course in genetics or evolutionary biology
PROPOSED START: S12000

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

28-04-155 Add. New option to Forest Resources.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

WATERSHED STEWARDSHIP OPTION

The Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship is a graduate option intended to provide enhanced educational opportunities for students with an interest in water resources management who are enrolled in a graduate degree program within Forest Resources. The objective of the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship is to educate students to facilitate team-oriented, community-based watershed management planning directed at water resources problems encountered in Pennsylvania communities, especially non-point source water pollution. The Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship requires 22 credits, of graduate coursework: 12 credits of breadth courses, 2 credits of special watershed stewardship seminar course (FOR 597), 8 credits of new Watershed Stewardship Practicum I and II courses (FOR 570 and FOR 571). One credit of FOR 591 would count as a colloquium course towards degree requirements, but at least one additional credit of FOR 590 is required. Breadth courses will consist of three graduate credits of coursework from each of four subject matter areas: 1) water resources science, 2) social science, public policy and economics, 3) humanities, and 4) communications and design. In the watershed stewardship practicum course students' work in teams with community, government and business leaders to analyze and understand natural resources problems and creatively synthesize appropriate solutions in the form of a written watershed management plan.

A representative pattern of scheduling for the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship in addition to a student's other degree requirements is:

First Year:
Fall Semester
Breadth electives - 6 credits
FOR 591 - Watershed Stewardship Colloquium 1 credit

Spring Semester
Breadth electives - 6 credits
FOR 591 - Watershed Stewardship Colloquium 1 credit

Second Year:
Fall Semester
FOR 570 - 3 credits

Spring Semester
FOR 571 - 5 credits

A list of acceptable breadth courses is provided in the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship Handbook. Students are allowed to petition to the Center for Watershed Stewardship to substitute higher level or equivalent courses in a major field to suit their specific backgrounds and goals. Courses take for the Graduation Option in Watershed Stewardship may be used to satisfy other equivalent (400- or 500-level) degree requirements with concurrence of their advisor and graduate committee. The graduate committee for a student enrolled in the Option in Watershed Stewardship must include a faculty representative from the Center for Watershed Stewardship.

Students enrolled in M.F.R., M. Agr., M.S. or Ph.D. degree programs within the School of Forest Resources and other participating programs may apply to participate in the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship. Watershed Stewardship Option students enrolled in an M.F.R. or M. Agr. degree program, which requires a professional paper rather than a thesis, could write their professional paper on a topic which directly contributes to their overall watershed management plan prepared as part of FOR 570 and FOR 571 classes.

28-04-156 Add. New option to Wildlife and Fisheries Science.

Proposed Effective Date: Summer Session 2000

WATERSHED STEWARDSHIP OPTION

The Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship is a graduate option intended to provide enhanced educational opportunities for students with an interest in water resources management who are enrolled in a graduate degree program within Wildlife and Fisheries Science. The objective of the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship is to educate students to facilitate team-oriented, community-based watershed management planning directed at water resources problems encountered in Pennsylvania communities, especially non-point source water pollution. The Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship requires 22 credits of graduate coursework: 12 credits of breadth courses, 2 credits of Watershed Stewardship Seminar (FOR 591), and 8 credits of new Watershed Stewardship Practicum I and II courses (FOR 570 and FOR 571). One credit of FOR 591 would count as colloquium credit towards degree requirements, but one additional credit of WFS 590 is also required. Breadth courses consists of three graduate credits of coursework from each of four subject matter areas: 1) water resources science, 2) social science, public policy and economics, 3) humanities, and 4) communications and design. In the watershed stewardship practicum courses students' work in teams with community, government and business leaders to analyze and understand natural resources problems and creatively synthesize appropriate solutions in the form of a written watershed management plan.

A representative pattern of scheduling for the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship in addition to a student's other degree requirements is:

First Year:
Fall Semester
Breadth electives - 6 credits
FOR 591 - Watershed Stewardship Colloquium 1 credit

Spring Semester
Breadth electives - 6 credits
FOR 591 - Watershed Stewardship Colloquium 1 credit

Second Year:
Fall Semester

FOR 570 - 3 credits

Spring Semester
FOR 571 - 5 credits

A list of acceptable breadth courses from each discipline is provided in the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship Handbook. Students will be allowed to petition to the Center for Watershed Stewardship to substitute higher level or equivalent courses in a major field to suit their specific backgrounds and goals. Courses take for the Graduation Option in Watershed Stewardship may be used to satisfy other equivalent (400- or 500-level) degree requirements with concurrence of their advisor and graduate committee. The graduate committee for a student enrolled in the Option in Watershed Stewardship must include a faculty representative from the Center for Watershed Stewardship.

Students enrolled in M.F.R., M. Agr., M.S. or Ph.D. degree programs within Wildlife and Fisheries Science may apply to participate in the Graduate Option in Watershed Stewardship. Watershed Stewardship Option students enrolled in an M.F.R. or M. Agr. degree program, which requires a professional paper rather than a thesis, could write their professional paper on a topic which directly contributes to their overall watershed management plan prepared as part of FOR 570 and FOR 571 classes.

COURSE ADDS

28-04-157 AERSP 560
Finite Element Method in Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer
FIN EL THER/FLUID (3)
Application of finite element techniques to viscous/unsteady fluid flow/heat transfer problems.
PREREQUISITE: AERSP 312, 313
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-158 CN ED 525
Applied Testing in Counseling
TESTS IN COUNSELNG (3)
Using counseling assessments effectively and ethically in applied settings, ith an emphasis on test analysis and evaluation of psychometric properties.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of upper-level statistics
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-159 CSE 587
Interfaces to Virtual Environments
INTR VIRTUAL ENVIR (3)
Principles and techniques for sensing and interpretation of human input to computer; virtual reality; augmented reality; issues in multimodality, learning.
PREREQUISITE: graduate standing
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-160 I E 582
Information Technology for Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
IT FOR IE & MFG (3)
Students will learn advanced information technology concepts, tools, and techniques for designing and implementing manufacturing systems.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 201C, CSE 103, or M I S 432
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-160A IST 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or semester.
PROPOSED START: S12000

28-04-061 MATSC 598
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently.
PROPOSED START: SP2000

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
28-04-162 AN SC 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3)
Continuing seminars which consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
APPROVED START: SP1987

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 1-9 (1:1:0 per semester)
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-163 B A 511
Accounting for Managerial Decision Making
AMDM (2)
An integrative approach to the role of accounting information in the investment decision process and implementation of a firm's strategy.
APPROVED START: S11993

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: An integrative approach to the role of accounting information in managerial decision making with a focus on its uses in the implementation of a firm's strategy and on its uses in equity and credit analyses and decisions.
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-164 CHEM 500
Seminar in Chemistry
SEMINAR IN CHEM (1 per semester)
No description.
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 1-2 per semester
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-165 I ENG 520
Topics in Law and Technology
TOPICS LAW & TECH (3)
A seminar course on one area of law relevant to technology, such as intellectual property or products liability.
APPROVED START: SP1998

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Law and Technology: Products Liability (PRODUCTS LIABILITY)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: A seminar course on one area of law and technology, products liability.
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-165A SPAN 544
Spanish Romanticism
SPAN ROMANTICISM (3)
The major authors and works of peninsular romanticism, including poetry, drama, and prose.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3 per semester, maximum of 9
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-166 SPAN 550
Spanish Realism
SPANISH REALISM (3)
The major figures of the period with special emphasis on Perez Galdos.
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE TITLE TO: Spanish Realism (SPANISH REALISM)
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3 per semester, maximum of 9
CHANGE DESCRIPTION TO: The major figures of the period.
PROPOSED START: SP2001

OLD
28-04-167 SPAN 560
The Contemporary Novel in Spain
CONTEMP NOVEL (3)
The novel since 1941: Cela, Laforet, Zunzunegui, Suarez Carreno, Matute, and others.
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS TO: 3 per semester, maximum of 9
PROPOSED START: SP2001

APPENDIX C
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

COURSE ADDS

28-04-168 ANSTH 797
Anesthesia Acting Internship
ANESTHESIA A.I. (5)
The acting internship in anesthesia is designed to expand on the experiences obtained in courses ANSTH 700 and 770.
PREREQUISITE: ANSTH 700, 770, and third-year core clerkships
PROPOSED START: S12000