APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Agricultural Sciences

35-04-001 Add new Bachelor of Science degree in Community, Environment and Development with three options: Community and Economic Development, Environmental Economics and Policy, and International Development. Add CED 152, 230, 309, 409, 410, 425, 475 (new).

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Community, Environment and Development

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (CED)

The principal goal of the Community, Environment and Development (CED) major is to develop the knowledge and skills of undergraduate students to enable them to assist local people, their communities, and institutions effectively understand, respond to and ultimately shape economic and social changes, including those that pose risks to the environment. The CED major focuses on the fields of community and economic development, environment and natural resources, and the critically important interactions between these fields, both locally and globally. Building skills and knowledge to tackle important environment and development issues facing communities today requires a multi-disciplinary or trans-disciplinary program; the major bridges the disciplines of agricultural, environmental and regional economics on the one hand and rural sociology on the other. Foundation (Level I) courses introduce students to key concepts in economics and sociology, and examine how these disciplines contribute to the basic content knowledge encompassing community and economic development and environmental economics and sociology. Level II courses build on the Foundation courses by extending the content knowledge to address the interrelationship between environment and natural resources and community and economic development. Coursework in Methods, Quantification and Communication is also required, including methods and techniques such as Geographical Information Systems and Geographical Information Analysis, statistics and survey research methods. Finally, students select among three Options: 1) Community and Economic Development, 2) Environmental Economics and Policy, and 3) International Development. Students specialize in an option that further allows them to develop skills and competencies matching their specific education and career goals. It is expected that some students completing the program will choose to attend graduate school or law school, while others will choose employment after graduation.

For the B.S. degree in Community, Environment and Development, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 5-7 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 89-91 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GS courses, 9 credits of GWS.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 59-60 61credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (41 credits)
CED 152(3)[1], CED 230(3)[1], E RRE 201(3)[1], ENGL 015 GWS(3) (Sem: 2)
ECON 004 GS(3), GEOG 160 GS(3) (Sem: 3)
CAS 100 GWS(3), CED 309(3)[1], R SOC 327(3)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 4)
R SOC 417(3) (Sem: 5)
E RRE 404(3) (Sem: 6)
CED 475(4) (Sem: 8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-20 credits)
AG BM 101 GS(3) or ECON 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1)
R SOC 011 GS;US(3) or SOC 0010 GS(3) (Sem: 1)
MATH 022 GQ(3) or MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 3)
PL SC 001 GS(3) or PL SC 003 GS(3) or PL SC 014 GS(3) (Sem: 3)
ENGL 202A GWS(3), ENGL 202B GWS(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3), or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 5)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30 credits

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPTION: (30 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
SOC 023 GS(3), CEDEV 430(3) (Sem: 5)
CEDEV 452(3) (Sem: 6)
AEE 460(3) (Sem: 7)
CED 409(3) (Sem: 8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
E R M 411(3) or B LAW 425(3) (Sem: 7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in specialization (Sem: 5-8)

ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND POLICY: (30 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
ECON 302 GS(3) (Sem:5)
E RRE 431W(3), ECON 428(3) (Sem:7)
E RRE 429(3) (Sem: 8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
E R M 411(3) or B LAW 425(3) (Sem:7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 3 credits of Environmental Science from approved department list.
Select 12 credits in specialization (Sem: 5-8)

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTION: (30 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 credits)
SOC 023 GS(3), R SOC 470(3) (Sem: 5)
CED 410(3) (Sem: 6)
CED 425(3), AG EC 450 IL(3) (Sem: 7)
R SOC 420 US;IL(3) (Sem: 8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credit in specialization (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

35-04-002 PHOTO 210
Introduction to Architectural Photography
ARCH PHOTO (2)
Exploration of approaches to photographing architectural interiors, exteriors, and architectural models.
PREREQUISITE: Students in Architecture or by permission of the program.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-003 PHOTO 410
Photographing Motion and Athletic Events
ATHLETIC PHOTO (2)
A practicum course in photographing sports and athletic events.
PREREQUISITE: PHOTO 200
PROPOSED START: S12007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-004 THEA 120
Acting I
ACTING I (3:1:4)
Fundamental skills and training in acting. Emphasis on physical/vocal awareness and the nature of dramatic communication. Theatre majors only.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 101S
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-005 THEA 200
Script Analysis
SCRIPT ANALYSIS (2)
An introduction to script analysis for theatre majors, which focus on full text analysis as a foundation for area specific analysis. Two styles of analysis (contextual and structural) are studied.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100, enrollment as Theatre Major or Minor
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-006 THEA 221
Acting III
ACTING III (3)
A continuation of Thea. 220. For Theatre majors only.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 160, THEA 170, or THEA 180; THEA 220, approval by department
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 130 or THEA 131 and School of Theatre approval
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-007 THEA 326
Music Theatre Performance Workshop
MUTHR PERF WKSHP (1 per semester/maximum of 3)
Performance studies in cabaret, revue, and club environments.
PREREQUISITE: DANCE 234, THEA 224, enrollment in Musical Theatre Option
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: DANCE 234, THEA 224, audition, enrollment in Musical Theatre Option
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-008 THEA 401Y (IL)
Theatre History I: Ancient to 1700
THEATRE HISTORY I (3:3:0)
Survey of drama and theatre from primitive rites through the Renaissance.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-009 THEA 402W
Theatre History II: From 1700 to Present
THEATRE HISTORY II (3:3:0)
Survey of European drama and theatre from the eighteenth century through the modern period.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-010 THEA 405 (US)
Theatre History: American Theatre
AMER THEA HIST (3:3:0)
Survey of American drama and theatre from the colonial period to the present.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-011 THEA 406 (IL)
Theatre in Asia
THEATRE IN ASIA (3:3:0)
A survey of major theatre forms and traditions in Asia.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-012 THEA 407 (US)
Women and Theatre
WOMEN & THEATRE (3:3:0)
A study of theatre practice and dramatic literature as informed by issues of gender, race, and ethnic background.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
CROSS LIST: WMNST 407
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-013 THEA 408 (US)
History of American Musical Theatre
HIST AMER MUS THEA (3:3:0)
A survey of the history of American musical theatre presented in a social, cultural, and aesthetic prospective.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-014 THEA 410
Play Analysis
PLAY ANALYSIS (3:3:0)
Advanced skills in textual analysis of plays and screenplays.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-015 THEA 412 (USI)
African American Theatre
AFR AMER THEATRE (3)
Exploration of the development of African American theatre from its roots in Africa through the diaspora, to the present time.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
CROSS LIST: AAA S 412
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-016 THEA 440
Principles of Playwriting
PLAYWRITING PRINC (3:2:2)
Structure, dramatic effect, characterization, and dialogue; the writing, reading, and criticism of original one-act plays.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: F21982

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-017 THEA 464
History of Fashion
HISTORY OF FASHION (3:3:0)
Survey of dress from Egyptian period to contemporary fashion.
PREREQUISITE: THEA 100
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: THEA 100 or THEA 105
PROPOSED START: SP2008

COURSE DROPS

35-04-018 THEA 101S
The Theatrical Imagination
THEA IMAGINATION (3)
An exploration of the creative processes and skills necessary for theatrical expression. Team taught by technical/design and performance faculty members. Theatre majors only.
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: THEA 100
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend College

COURSE ADDS

35-04-019 MET 457
Lean Manufacturing
LEAN MFG (3)
Principles and methods of Lean Manufacturing currently used in modern industries.
PREREQUISITE: 7th semester standing; and IE T 215 or M E 468 or permission of program
PROPOSED START: S12007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-020 COMMU 001
Newspaper Practicum
NEWSPAPER PRAC (1:0:2 per semester/maximum of 8)
A practicum in news writing, editing, and production of the Behrend College student newspaper.
APPROVED START: FA1984

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: A newspaper/print media practicum. Credits do not fulfill Communication major credits in all programs.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-021 COMMU 002
Newspaper Editorial Staff
NEWSPAPER EDITORS (2-3 per semester, maximum of 12)
A practicum in serving as section editor or editor-in-chief of the Behrend College student newspaper.
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 001
APPROVED START: S11997

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: A newspaper/print media practicum. Credits do not fulfill Communication major credits in all programs.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-022 COMMU 003
Radio Practicum
RADIO PRAC (1:0:2 per semester/maximum of 8)
A practicum in radio production and broadcasting on WPSE, the Behrend College student radio station.
APPROVED START: FA1984

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: A broadcast media practicum. Credits do not fulfill Communication major credits in all programs.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-023 COMMU 301
Introduction to Media Writing
MEDIA WRITING (3)
Tutorial and practice in various kinds or journalistic and commercial writing, emphasizing basic skills.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202A, ENGL 202B, ENGL 202C, or ENGL 202D; and COMM 160
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 315
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Applications for Media Writing
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202A, ENGL 202B, ENGL 202C or ENGL 202D
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-024 COMMU 312
Professional Public Speaking
PROFESSNAL SPEAKNG (3)
Organizing, adapting and presenting ideas in public informative, persuasive, technical and ceremonial speeches.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: CAS
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 212
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CAS 100
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-025 COMMU 317
Communication for Teachers
COMM FOR TEACHERS (3:3:0)
Analysis of dynamics of instructor-student communication implemented through structured exercises in instructor listening, verbal and nonverbal message-making.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 100
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: CAS
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 360
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CAS 100
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-026 COMMU 319
Communication and Civility
COMM AND CIVILITY (3)
Communication behaviors contributing to civil and uncivil discourse; their implications in business, public life, across cultures and in interpersonal relationships.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: CAS
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 340
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-027 COMMU 403
Electronic News Gathering and Editing
ELECTRONIC NEWS (3:3:0)
Intermediate level skills in creating and editing television news packages.
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 301, COMMU 383
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 406
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 315 or COMM 283W
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-028 COMMS 483
Advanced Communication Workshop
ADV COMM WORKSHOP (4)
Conceptualization, planning, and execution of a visual product on a selected topic utilizing an intensive group project-oriented laboratory approach.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251 and COMMS 371
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 482
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 371
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-029 FNC 330
Personal Financial Planning
PERSONAL FIN PLAN (3)
Developing financial plans including cash budgets, credit purchases, investments, and insurance.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing or permission of instructor
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-030 FNC 340
Insurance Planning
INSURANCE PLANNING (3)
Introduction to personal insurance including homeowner's, auto, life, disability, health, and Social Security.
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-031 FNC 430
Estate Planning
ESTATE PLANNING (3)
Liquidity planning, titling and transfer of property, trusts, federal unified tax system, gifting, incapacity planning, legal documents.
PREREQUISITE: ACNTG 320 and FNC 340
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-032 FNC 450
Retirement Planning
RETIREMENT PLAN (3)
Retirement planning: qualified and non-qualified plans, characteristics, provisions, regulations administration, application approach with case studies.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 300
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-033 INT B 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparativey narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: I B
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-034 INT B 411
International Business
INTERNAT'L BUS (3:3:0)
Analysis of business firms in international environments; effect of international economic, political, and sociocultural factors on multinational business operations.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 300, MANGT 300, SCM 310, MRKTG 300
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: I B
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-035 INTST 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written or oral critique of activity required.
APPROVED START: FA1994

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Approval by International Studies or Global Studies Advisor
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-036 MANGT 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-037 MANGT 294
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECTS (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small group basis.
APPROVED START: SP1990

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-038 MANGT 350
Problem Solving and Models for Management
MODELS FOR MANGT (3:3:0)
A hands-on introduction to modeling and solving typical business problems using commonly used techniques and software tools.
PREREQUISITE: SCM 200 or STAT 200; fifth-semester standing
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: SCM 200 or STAT 200; fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-039 MANGT 409
Project Management for Engineers
PROJECT MGMT ENG (3)
The course provides a real-time experience to students in engineering and engineering technology in project management with a focus on leadership behavior and decision making.
PREREQUISITE: 7th semester standing
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 7th semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-040 MANGT 410
Project Management
PROJECT MGMT (3)
A problem-based, interdisciplinary course in project management skills and techniques needed to manage projects in a modern business environment.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 300, SCM 310
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301, SCM 310
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-041 MANGT 420
Conflict Management
CONFLICT MGMT (3:3:0)
An exploration of the sources of interpersonal conflict and strategies of resolution in the managerial context.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 300
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-042 MANGT 440
Advanced Human Resource Management
ADVANCED HRM (3:3:0)
In depth study of human resource management and personnel administration functions and processes.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 340
APPROVED START: S11998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 431
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-043 MANGT 470W
Strategic Management and Business Policy
STRATEGIC PLANNING (3:3:0)
Study of strategic management and business policy formulation and implementation processes.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 300, MANGT 300, SCM 310, MRKTG 300, and seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 471W
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301, MKTG 301, FIN 301, SCM 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-044 MANGT 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: PRIOR APPROVAL OF PROPOSED ASSIGNMENT BY INSTRUCTOR
APPROVED START: SP1990

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
PROPOSED START: SP2008

COURSE DROPS

35-04-045 COMMU 300
Introduction to Communication and Media Technologies
INTRO TO COMM TECH (3)
Introduction to existing and emerging communication technology and examination of its impact on the communication process.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-046 COMMU 305
Introduction to Public Relations Strategies and Campaigns
INTRO TO PR (3)
Analyze public relations campaigns and introduction to their strategies and methods.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202A, ENGL 202B, ENGL 202C, or ENGL 202D; COMMU 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-047 COMMU 310
Introduction to Communication Research
COMM RESEARCH (3)
An introduction accessing, gathering, analyzing and interpreting communication research, and designing and conducting basic communication research studies.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202, CMPSC 203
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-048 COMMU 315
Survey of Interpersonal Communication Theory and Practice
INTERPERSONAL COMM (3:3:0)
Introduction to the field of interpersonal communication through an examination of major theories and their implications for skill development.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-049 COMMU 325
Speech Communication in Organizations
SPCOM IN ORGS (3:3:0)
Introduction to interviewing, briefing, conferring, and decision making: analyzing and evaluating formal and informal patterns of communication in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100, fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-050 COMMU 383
Introduction to Audio/Video Production
A/V PRODUCTION (3)
Introduction to the basic formal and technical elements of audio and video production.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-051 COMMU 400 (IL)
Global Media
GLOBAL MEDIA (3:3:0)
The globalization of the mass media, its impact on mass audiences, and development of strategies to evaluate economic, social, and political forces shaping it.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 100 or COMM 100; and fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-052 COMMU 401W
Advanced Writing and Editing for the Business and Technical Journalist
ADV WRIT & EDIT (3:2:4)
Advanced course in writing and editing for the trade press (business/technical/industrial journalism).
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-053 COMMU 402 (IL)
Intercultural Communication
INTRCULTURAL COMM (3)
Analysis of communication processes as affected by national cultures; effects of differences in language, values, meaning, perception, and thought.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100, fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-054 COMMU 404
Media Ethics
MEDIA ETHICS (3)
Examination of rights and consequent responsibilities inherent in the "free press" guarantees of the First Amendment of the "Constitution."
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-055 COMMU 405
Advanced Public Relations Campaigns and Strategies
ADV PR (3)
Examination and application of strategies for public relations campaigns.
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 305
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-056 COMMU 416
Rhetorical Criticism in Public Affairs
RHET CRIT PUB AFFR (3)
Examination of methods of rhetorical criticism and application of its theories to contemporary socio-political organizations.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 100 or CAS 201
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-057 COMMU 425
Organizational Communication Analysis and Improvement
ORG COM IMPROVEMNT (3)
An examination of communication in organizations emphasizing the types, contexts, effects, problems, and improvement of communication in organizations through consulting.
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 325
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-058 COMMU 430
Small Groups and Leadership in Organizations
GROUPS & LEADERS (3)
Examination and development of communication skills required for effective participation in and leadership of groups in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: COMMU 325
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-059 COMMU 494
Senior Project in Communication
COMMU PROJ (3)
An opportunity for Communication and Media Studies majors to apply communication skills in an extended research project.
PREREQUISITE: seventh-semester standing, completion of all prescribed course work, and an approved proposal
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-060 COMMU 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, internships. Written and oral critiaue of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-061 FNC 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-062 FNC 400
Problems in Financial Management
PRBLMS IN FIN MGMT (3)
Case studies are used to develop skills in solving a variety of financial management problems.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-063 FNC 410
Introduction to Investments
INTRO INVESTMENTS (3)
Global markets and instruments, portfolio management and asset allocation, asset pricing models, case studies.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-064 FNC 460
Investment Analysis
INVESTMENT ANLY (3)
Analysis and valuation of equity, debt, and alternative investments.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 410
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-065 FNC 470
International Financial Management
INTL FIN MANGT (3:3:0)
Financial decision making in an international environment; emphasis on topics relevant to small businesses and entrepreneurs.
PREREQUISITE: FNC 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-066 FNC 480
Advanced Financial Analysis
ADV FIN ANALYSIS (3)
Capstone course integrating financial analysis coursework; advanced financial analysis topics: international investments, derivative securities, hedging, and financial engineering.
PREREQUISITE: ACNTG 426, FNC 460
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-067 FNC 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-068 FNC 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-069 FNC 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-070 FNC 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-071 INT B 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparativey narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-072 INT B 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparativey narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-073 INT B 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparativey narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-074 MANGT 296
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-075 MANGT 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-076 MANGT 300
Behavioral Concepts for Management
BEHAVIORAL CONCEPT (3:3:0)
Introduction to behavioral concepts and theories relevant to problems and issues facing managers.
PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-077 MANGT 300W
Behavioral Concepts for Management
BEHAVIORAL CONCEPT (3)
Introduction to behavioral concepts and theories relevant to problems and issues facing managers.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, B A 243, ECON 002, ECON 004, MIS 204, SCM 200
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-078 MANGT 320
Organization and People
ORG AND PEOPLE (3:3:0)
Study of theories and their applications relevant to individual and group behavior in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-079 MANGT 330
Organizational Processes and Structure
ORG PROCESS/STRUCT (3:3:0)
The analysis of organizational processes and structures focusing on the organization and its environment as the fundamental units of analysis.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-080 MANGT 340 (US)
Introduction to Human Resource Management
INTRO TO HRM (3:3:0)
Analyzes strategic human resource issues and personnel administration practices and procedures within the broader context of effectively managing cultural diversity.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-081 MANGT 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-082 MANGT 442 (US)
Managing Diversity
MANAGING DIVERSITY (3)
Historical and economic review of women's and minorities' participation in United States workforce and analysis of contemporary organizational diversity cases.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100; MANGT 300, PSYCH 100, or WMNST 001; sixth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-083 MANGT 480 (IL)
International Management
INT'L MANGT (3:3:0)
Explores international and multi-cultural work environments, examining cultural assumptions and universal applicability of management theories and practices.
PREREQUISITE: MANGT 300
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-084 MANGT 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-085 MANGT 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-086 MANGT 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Smeal College of Business

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-087 B A 250
Problems of Small Business
SMALL BUSINESSES (3:3:0)
Analysis of problems of the small firm, particularly for the student who wishes to venture into business.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in economics
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Small Business Management (SMALL BUS MGMT)
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-088 B A 422W
Contemporary Business Seminar
CNTP BUS SMNR (3)
Presentations and discussion of contemporary business issues by students and visiting professionals; emphasis on effective business communications.
PREREQUISITE: B A 421, MGMT 301, MKTG 301, FIN 301. Prerequisite or concurrent: B A 495A, B A 495B or B A 495C
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Strategic Business Planning (STRAT BUS PLANNING)
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-089 B A 450
Optimization for Business Decisions
OPTIMIZATION BUS (3)
Optimization models quickly and efficiently analyze a large number of scenarios to find the best course of action for business applications.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 110 or MATH 140 and either SCM 200 or STAT 200
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: INS
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 427
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-090 B A 494
Research Project Courses
RESEARCH PROJECTS (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Research Project
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-091 FIN 301
Corporation Finance
CORPORATION FIN (3:3:0)
The acquisition and management of corporate capital; analysis of operations, forecasting capital requirements, raising capital, and planning profits. May not be used to satisfy Smeal College baccalaureate degree requirements. A student may not receive credit toward graduation for both FIN 100 and 301, or for both B A 301 and FIN 301.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211 or ACCTG 201, ACCTG 202; ECON 004; SCM 200 or STAT 200; CMPSC 203, MIS 103 or equivalent
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Nature of finance function; risk and return concepts; working capital; dividend policies; mergers; security markets; acquisition and management of corporate capital; analysis of operations, forecasting capital requirements; raising capital; and planning profits. May not be used to satisfy Smeal College baccalaureate degree requirements. A student may not receive credit toward graduation at Smeal College for both FIN 100 and FIN 301, or for BA 301 and FIN 301.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211; ECON 004; MGMT 301; SCM 200 or STAT 200; CMPSC 203 or MIS 103
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-092 I B 403
International Business and National Policies
I B & NATL POLCIES (3:3:0)
Evaluation of national economic policies in the light of international economic theory; their impacts on operations of the international business firm.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, B A 301
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, B A 301 or FIN 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-093 I B 404
Contemporary Issues in International Business
CONTEMP ISSUES I B (3)
Investigation of issues in international business practice interpreted from the foundations of the social sciences. Topics will be chosen from contemporary issues in global business and economics.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, B A 301
APPROVED START: S12003

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, B A 301 or FIN 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-094 MGMT 326
Organizational Behavior and Design
ORG BEH & DESIGN (3)
Concepts, theories, and methods of managing people and designing organizations.
PREREQUISITE: B A 304
APPROVED START: S12003

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B A 304 or MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-095 MGMT 401
Contemporary Issues in Management
CONTEMP ISS MGMT (3:3:0)
Advanced treatment of topics of current managerial significance. Issues examined will differ by instructor, section, and semester. Consult departmental office.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 321, MGMT 331
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 321, MGMT 331; or MGMT 326
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-096 MGMT 424
Interpersonal Relationships in Organizations
INTERPR REL IN ORG (3:3:0)
Developing individual skills in interpersonal and group settings and experience-based and conceptual training in relating effectively to other people.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 321
APPROVED START: FA1989

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 321 or MGMT 326
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-097 MGMT 445 (US)
Managing Differences in Organizations
MGN DIFF IN ORGS (3)
This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills for dealing with demographic, functional, occupational and identity-based differences within and among organizations.
PREREQUISITE: B A 304, MGMT 341
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B A 304 or MGMT 301; MGMT 341
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-098 MGMT 461
International Management
INTNL MGMT (3:3:0)
Examines issues of nations and cultures including motivation, communication, negotiation, leadership, ethics and social responsibility, and women in management.
PREREQUISITE: B A 301, B A 302, B A 303, B A 304
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B A 304 or MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

COURSE DROPS

35-04-099 B A 100W
Introduction to Business
INTRO TO BUS (3:3:0)
A comprehensive view of the contemporary environment of business.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-100 B A 198
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interst.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-101 B A 298
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-102 MGMT 442
HRM Practicum (Part One): Staffing and Development
HRM PRAC 1 (1.5)
This course focuses on students applying the skills and techniques of staffing and development in an applied setting.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 341
CONCURRENT: MGMT 441
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-103 MGMT 444
HRM Practicum (Part Two): Performance Management
HRM PRAC 2 (1.5)
This course focuses on students applying the skills and techniques of performance management in an applied setting.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 341
CONCURRENT: MGMT 443
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital College

35-04-104 Change. Add CRIMJ 012, STAT 200; move CRIMJ/PUBPL 320; remove BE SC 408, 461, CRIMJ 305, PL SC 002, 456, PSYCH 412, PUBPL 304W, 401, 420, 480, SOCIO 372, 463, 484, 486. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Criminal Justice

Capital College (CRIMJ): Penn State Harrisburg (offered via Resident Instruction and Penn State Online), Penn State Schuylkill

PROFESSOR BARBARA A. SIMS, Program Coordinator, School of Public Affairs

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Criminal Justice helps provide its graduates with the communications and analytical skills critical to succeed in criminal justice and related careers. Through an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of crime and society, the program also equips students to pursue graduate study in criminal justice or related disciplines, and educates students to become effective problem-solvers as professionals in the field of criminal justice.

The study of criminal justice is approached as an applied interdisciplinary science, teaching students both the theoretical and the practical aspects of crime control and the administration of justice. The Criminal Justice curriculum provides students with the opportunity and assistance to acquire knowledge of the roles of policing, courts, laws, and corrections as they relate to both the adult and juvenile justice system. Students also gain knowledge of the history, concepts, and critical issues related to the role of gender and race/ethnicity in the criminal justice system, victimology, and ethics in criminal justice. The curriculum further provides a theoretical foundation of the discipline, combined with a thorough understanding of the scientific method as it applies to criminal justice. This combination is expected to sharpen the students' talents of reasoning and judgment, qualities imperative to rational functioning in criminal justice and related professions.

For a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Admission Requirements for Transfer Students:
Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average (4.0 scale). The evaluation of prior college work is conducted on an individual basis by the Office of Enrollment Services at both campuses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
The student must have a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average and an average of C (2.00) or better in any course already taken in the major.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-4 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 64 credits
(This includes 0-4 credits of General Education courses: 0-4 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (27 credits)[1]
CRIMJ 200 GS(3), CRIMJ 201 US(3), CRIMJ 202(3), CRIMJ 203(3), CRIMJ 241(3); CRIMJ 012(3); CRIMJ 388(3), CRIMJ 450W(3), CRIMJ 490W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

At least 6 credits in Additional Courses and/or Supporting Courses must be at the 400 level.

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
Select 4 credits from CRIMJ 320(4)/PUBPL 320(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from the following: CRIMJ 303(3), CRIMJ 304(3), CRIMJ 389(3), CRIMJ 401(3), CRIMJ 403 US(3), CRIMJ 404(3), CRIMJ 406(3), CRIMJ 407 US(3), CRIMJ 408(3), CRIMJ 410(3), CRIMJ 411(3), CRIMJ 430(3), CRIMJ 436 US(3), CRIMJ 489W(3), CRIMJ 495(3-12), CRIMJ 496(1-18), CRIMJ 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from the following: PL SC 001 GS(3), PL SC 003 GS(3), PL SC 014 GS(3), PL SC 403(3), PL SC 408(3), PL SC 409(3), PL SC 456(3), PL SC 496(1-18), PL SC 497(1-9), PUBPL 397(1-9), PUBPL 400(3), PUBPL 410 US(3), PUBPL 411(3), PUBPL 412 IL(3), PUBPL 413 IL(3), PUBPL 421(3), PUBPL 485(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (18 credits)
Select 6 credits at the 300 and 400 level from the following: AFRAS, BE SC, PSYCH, SOCIO (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. For information about specific courses in this area, contact the School of Public Affairs. (Sem: 5-8)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-105 AFRAS 310 (US)
Black History to the Twentieth Century
BLACK HIST TO 20C (3)
An examination of Black political, economic, social, and cultural life in America from the era of colonization to 1905.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: AAA S
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 212
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-106 AM ST 476
American Women Writers
AMER WOMEN WRITERS (3)
A study of selected American women writers.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL, ENLSH, or LIT
CROSS LIST: ENGL 492 WOMST 492
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL
CHANGE CROSS LIST: ENGL 492 WMNST 491
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-107 BUS 335
Real Estate Fundamentals
REAL ESTATE FUND (3)
Examination of real estate and market forces affecting it; finance, sales, and brokerage operations.
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-108 BUS 336
Real Estate Practice
REAL ESTATE PRACT (3)
Examination of real estate practice; listing agreements; appraisal; financing; property management and insurance; investment; fair housing laws and ethical practices.
PREREQUISITE: BUS 335
APPROVED START: S11990

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B A 335
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-109 BUS 340
Business Law
BUS LAW (3)
Course examines topics such as commercial paper, secured transactions, bankruptcy, suretyship, professionals' libility, malpractice, and related topics.
APPROVED START: FA1999

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B LAW
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-110 BUS 364Y (US;IL)
Business and Society
BUSINESS AND SOC (3)
Business organizations and the sociocultural environment; current issues; corporate responsibility; international and multinational business environments.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202D, MNGMT 310
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
CHANGE TITLES: International Business and Society (INTL BUS & SOCIETY)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ENGL 202D, MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-111 BUS 395
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-112 BUS 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-113 BUS 454H
Business Honors Thesis/Project
BUS HON THES/PROJ (3)
An opportunity to pursue an advanced research thesis or project to integrate studies within Business Administration.
PREREQUISITE: HONOR 301, senior standing, and permission of the program
APPROVED START: FA1996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-114 BUS 462
Business Strategy
BUS STRAT (3)
Interpretation of business concept in the analysis of problems related to the successful management of a company, institution, or organization.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320, MNGMT 310, MRKT 370, and at least senior status
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B A
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: FIN 301, MGMT 301, MKTG 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-115 COMMS 221
Basic Photography
BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
An introduction to photography, emphasizing both technical skills and aesthetics with both the camera and in the darkroom.
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 215
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-116 COMMS 225
Graphic Design
GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)
Introduction to basic design principles, critical analysis of visual material, and solving graphics problems utilizing traditional and digital production tools.
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 241
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-117 COMMS 230W
Writing for Media
WRITING FOR MEDIA (3)
The application of creativity to the practical concerns of narrative script and radio/television spot writing.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 and ENGL 202
APPROVED START: FA2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-118 COMMS 251
The Nature of Media
NATURE OF MEDIA (3)
A theoretical, cultural, and philosophical study of print and non-print media, including their histories, possibilities, limitations, and interrelationships.
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-119 COMMS 325
Desktop Publishing
DESKTOP PUBLISHING (3)
Practical and theoretical approach to visual communication production in newspaper journalism, advertising, public relations, and other communication industries.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 221 or COMMS 225
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 363
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 215 or COMM 241
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-120 COMMS 332
Reporting
REPORTING (3)
Practice in researching and gathering material for and preparation of news stories for print media.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 231W
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 260W
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-121 COMMS 350 (IL)
Comparative Media Cultures
MEDIA CULTURES (3)
Intercultural examination of economic, political, philosophical, and historical forces that shape various societies' newsgathering routines and content.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-122 COMMS 371
Visual and Video Communication
VISUAL & VIDEO COM (4)
A study of the technical and aesthetic factors in visual production, including visualization, composition, lighting, sound, performance, and project management.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-123 COMMS 374
Audio Communication
AUDIO COMM (3)
Theory and practice in studio recording and broadcasting techniques, including continuity/news writing, control room operation and audio production.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-124 COMMS 410
Mass Media and Politics
MEDIA & POLITICS (3)
Study of mass media as institutions and the effects of the mass media on politics, public policy, and citizens.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 430
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 100 or COMM 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-125 COMMS 416
Media Management
MEDIA MANAGEMENT (3)
Theoretical bases and practical approaches for management and administration of communications projects, organizations, and resources.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 414
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 100 or COMM 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-126 COMMS 421
Advanced Photography
ADV PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
Advanced applications in documentary photography emphasizing the narrative qualities of imagery, and utilizing digital technologies.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 221 or permission of the program
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 415
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 215
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-127 COMMS 425
Advanced Graphic Design
ADV GRAPHIC DSGN (3)
Theory and practice designing graphic visual communication in commercial, non-commercial, and fine art formats for print and on-line media.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 225 and COMMS 371
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 441
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 241 or COMM 371
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-128 COMMS 451
Media Audiences and Contexts
MEDIA AUDIENCES (3)
Survey of the ways media attempt to influence audience reception and how audiences hold sway over media content.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 457
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 100 or COMM 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-129 COMMS 453
Media Criticism and Theory
MEDIA CRIT&THEORY (3)
Critical and theoretical approaches to the analysis of media and communication.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 371
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 456
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 371
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-130 COMMS 454
Media Law and Ethics
MEDIA LAW & ETHICS (3)
The study and practice of key issues in media law and ethics, including libel law, conflict of interest, truth in advertising.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 458
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 100 or COMM 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-131 COMMS 459
Cultural Effects of Interactive and Online Media
CYBERCULTURE (3)
Study of the global social impact and rhetorical limitations of converging media, emphasizing cross-cultural media influences.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-132 COMMS 491
Writers' Seminar
WRITERS' SEMINAR (3)
Workshop designed for advanced students interested in professional writing, involving extensive mutual and self-criticism.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 230W or COMMS 231W
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: COMM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 488
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: COMM 230W or COMM 260W
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-133 ENGL 489
British Women Writers
BRIT WOMEN WRITERS (3)
A study of selected British women writers.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL, ENLSH, or LIT
CROSS LIST: WOMST 489
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL
CHANGE CROSS LIST: WMNST 489
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-134 ENGL 492
American Women Writers
AMER WOMEN WRITERS (3)
A study of selected American women writers.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL, ENLSH, or LIT
CROSS LIST: AM ST 476 WOMST 492
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AM ST 476 WMNST 491
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-135 FINAN 410
Investment and Portfolio Analysis
INVST PORT ANLY (3)
Investment and risk, types of security investments, sources of investment information, the broker, the stock market, portfolio management.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 420
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-136 FINAN 421
Problems in Finance
PROB IN FIN (3)
Case studies are used to develop professional skills in statistical and qualitative analysis of a wide variety of financial problems.
PREREQUISITE: ECNMS 313, FINAN 320
APPROVED START: FA1988

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 480
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-137 FINAN 427
Derivative Securities
DERIV SECURITIES (3)
Introduction to futures contracts and options, leading to a working understanding of their importance in financial management applications.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 410 or approval of program
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-138 FINAN 430
Computer Applications and Financial Modeling
COMP APP FIN MODEL (3)
Computer based financial modeling and applications in finance and financial analysis.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320 or permission of program head
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 440
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-139 FINAN 456 (IL)
International Capital Markets
INTRNL CAPITAL MKT (3)
This course develops understanding of international capital markets by striking a balance between institutional details, theoretical foundation and practical application.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-140 FINAN 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
APPROVED START: S11990

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: FIN
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-141 I ENG 302
Engineering Economy
ENG ECONOMY (2)
Economic analysis of engineering alternatives.
APPROVED START: S12003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: I E
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 303
CHANGE TITLES: Engineering Economic Analysis (ENGR ECON ANALYSIS)
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-142 MNGMT 441
Organization Development
ORG DEVELOPMENT (3)
A study of organizational change and methodologies related with change and improvement. Examination of planned change on processes, strategies, people and culture in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310
APPROVED START: SP1990

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 400
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-143 MNGMT 442
Experiences in Organizational Relations
EXPR ORG REL (3)
An experiential approach to study of behavior in organizations, applying concepts and theories of management to interpersonal situations.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310
APPROVED START: SP1990

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 402
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-144 MNGMT 450
Labor Management Relations
LBR MNGMT RELATION (3)
Study of the key concepts and processes involved in current American labor/management relations.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-145 MNGMT 451
Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
ENTREP SM BUS MGMT (3)
Entrepreneurship, new ventures, and management of small firms.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, MNGMT 310, MRKT 370
APPROVED START: S12001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 431
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, MGMT 301, MKTG 301
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-146 MNGMT 452
Small Business Field Study
SML BUS FLD STUDY (3)
Supervised field study with a small firm.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 451 and permission of program
APPROVED START: FA1985

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 432
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 431
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-147 MNGMT 489
Seminar in Management
SEMINAR IN MNGMT (3)
A capstone course in management for students of high academic achievement. Emphasis on in-depth research of current interest.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310 and at least senior status
APPROVED START: SP1991

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: MGMT
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MGMT 301 and at least senior status
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-148 SCLSC 480W
Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences
QUANT RES METHODS (4)
Students will learn to conduct, analyze and write up quantitative social scientific research according to appropriate professional standards.
PREREQUISITE: permission of program
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SO SC
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-149 SCLSC 481
Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
QUAL RES METHODS (4)
Students will learn how to conduct, analyze and write up qualitative social research according to appropriate professional standards.
PREREQUISITE: permission of program
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SO SC
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-150 SCLSC 492
Current Topics in the Social Sciences
CUR TPCS IN SOC SC (3)
This course allows for various current topics to be offered as suitable to the needs of the program.
PREREQUISITE: permission of program
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SO SC
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-151 SCLSC 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SO SC
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-152 SCLSC 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SO SC
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-153 WOMST 410 (US)
Women in Politics in the U.S.
WOMEN IN POLITICS (3)
Course examines the U.S. women's movements, the participation of women in politics, and selected areas of public policy.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in political science or women's studies
CROSS LIST: PL SC 428
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: WMNST
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 432
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-154 WOMST 430 (US)
Women in American Society
WMN IN AM SOCIETY (3)
A historical study of women's roles and experiences in the United States.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of American Studies, Sociology, or Women's Studies
CROSS LIST: AMSTD 430
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: WMNST
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-155 WOMST 464 (US)
Feminine/Masculine
FEM/MASC (3)
Study of sex role learning; investigating feminine/masculine labeling; implications for contemporary society.
PREREQUISITE: general psychology or general sociology
CROSS LIST: BE SC 464
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: WMNST
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-156 WOMST 489
British Women Writers
BRIT WOMEN WRITERS (3)
A study of selected British women writers.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL, ENLSH, or LIT
CROSS LIST: ENGL 489
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: WMNST
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-157 WOMST 492
American Women Writers
AMER WOMEN WRITERS (3)
A study of selected American women writers.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL, ENLSH, or LIT
CROSS LIST: AMSTD 476 ENGL 492
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: WMNST
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 491
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 6 credits of ENGL
PROPOSED START: SP2008

COURSE DROPS

35-04-158 AFRAS 301 (IL)
Contemporary Africa
CONTEMP AFRICA (3)
Study of Africa from the nineteenth century to the present in its own context including the rise and fall of European colonialism.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-159 AFRAS 412 (US)
Race and Ethnicity
RACE/ETHNICITY (3)
An examination of race and ethnic relations, with an emphasis on interactions between Blacks and various racial and ethnic groups in America.
PREREQUISITE: general sociology
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-160 AFRAS 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-161 BUS 305
Foundations of Business
FOUNDATION BUS (3)
Comprehensive review of all important facets of business enterprise.
PREREQUISITE: may be taken for credit only by non-business or general business majors
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-162 BUS 330
Insurance I
INSURANCE 1 (3)
Insurance principles and coverages available for protection of property and liability losses, fidelity and surety bonding.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-163 BUS 331
Insurance II
INSURANCE 2 (3)
Introduction to principles and methods of handling business and personal risks with emphasis on life, health, and social insurance techniques.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-164 BUS 341
Legal Environment of Business
LEGAL ENVIR OF BUS (3)
The general legal process and its application in the areas of antitrust, employment, labor, environmental, and product liability law.
PREREQUISITE: BUS 340
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-165 BUS 360
Elements of Management Science
ELEM/MNGMT SCI (3)
Decision making under uncertainty, linear programming, waiting line models, game theory, and simulation.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 110; SCM 200 or STAT 200
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-166 BUS 430
Insurance and Estate Planning
INS ESTATE PLNG (3)
Guides to the organization and distribution of an estate by its owner.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, BUS 340
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-167 BUS 432
Risk Management
RISK MANAGEMENT (3)
In-depth study of risk as it relates to property and liability losses affecting individuals and businesses.
PREREQUISITE: BUS 330, BUS 331
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-168 BUS 485
American Business Overseas
AM BUS OVERSEAS (3)
Within the fundamentals of international businss, special attention will be given to the impact of American business activities overseas.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-169 BUS 491
Managerial Statistics
MNGRL STATISTICS (3)
An accelerated course applying statistical techniques to management and economic problems.
PREREQUISITE: admission to Master of Administration program
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-170 BUS 492
Management Science
MGMT SCIENCE (3)
An exposure to calculus and to standard deterministic and probabilistic operations research models.
PREREQUISITE: BUS 491, admission to M.B.A. program
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-171 BUS 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-172 BUS 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-173 BUS 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-174 BUS 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-175 COMMS 231W
Journalistic Writing
JOURNALISM WRITING (3)
The analysis and practice of news, feature, and editorial writing for print, radio, and television.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 and ENGL 202
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-176 COMMS 352
Film and Cultural Values
FILM & CULTURE (3)
Study of cinematic techniques and the evolution of the grammar of the film medium in different cultural contexts.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-177 COMMS 433
Feature Writing
FEATURE WRITING (3)
The study and practice of feature writing for newspapers and magazines.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 230W or COMMS 231W
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-178 COMMS 435
Advanced Reporting
ADVANCED REPORTING (3)
Advanced study of the tools, techniques, and responsibilities of public affairs reporting with special emphases on writing and research.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 332
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-179 COMMS 437
Writing for the Performer
WRITNG FOR PERFORM (3)
Practical seminar in writing for the screen and stage.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 230W or COMMS 231W or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-180 COMMS 446
Performance Studies
PERFORM STUDIES (3)
Study of and experimentation with a selected concept of theatre, such as children's theatre, foreign language plays, or presentational theatre.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
CROSS LIST: THTRE 446
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-181 COMMS 456
Drama as Communication
DRAMA AS COMM (3)
Seminar on the interrelationship between dramatic form, myth, ritual, and technology in Western culture.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251 or COMMS 446
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-182 COMMS 460
Public Relations and Information
PUB REL & INF (3)
Study of the techniques, methods, and skills required of a public relations specialist.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 230W or COMMS 231W
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-183 COMMS 462
Advertising as Communication
ADVERTISING (3)
Study of verbal and graphic communications skills employed in advertising, including copywriting, concept development, layout, and graphic design for various media.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 230W or COMMS 231W and COMMS 225
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-184 FINAN 320
Financial Management
FIN MGMT (3)
Nature of finance function; working capital and fixed-asset management; capital budgeting; sources of funds; dividend policies; mergers; securities markets.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, ECON 002; MATH 110 or MATH 140; SCM 200 or STAT 200
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-185 FINAN 422
Portfolio Analysis and Management
PORTFOLIO ANALYSIS (3)
Provides the necessary tools to perform the optimal portfolio selection for the individual investor.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 410
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-186 FINAN 424
Financial Institutions
FINANCIAL INST (3)
The operations of financial institutions and the relationship with economic activity.
PREREQUISITE: ECNMS 313, FINAN 320
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-187 FINAN 426 (IL)
International Business Finance
INTRNTL BUS FIN (3)
Designed to develop the tools necessary to analyze the multinational business finance problem.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-188 FINAN 428
Real Estate Finance
REAL EST FINANCE (3)
Real estate institutions and markets, real estate mathematics, mortgage instruments, investments, underwriting, and valuation.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-189 FINAN 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-190 FINAN 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-191 FINAN 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-192 HCOMM 495A
Communications Internship
COMM INTERNSHIP (1-9)
A supervised internship at a television or radio station or in a magazine or newspaper office.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-193 HCOMM 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-194 HCOMM 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-195 HCOMM 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-196 MNGMT 310
Organizations: Structure and Process
ORG STRUC PROC (3)
Concepts and applications of organizational theory, behavior, and interpersonal communications.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-197 MNGMT 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-198 MNGMT 461 (IL)
International and Comparative Management
INTL COMP MNGMT (3)
Management practices and corporate strategy in the international context: trade, foreign direct investment and comparisons with American practices.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-199 MNGMT 463 (US)
Human Resources Mangement
HUMAN RESRCE MNGMT (3)
Examination of management practices, selection and placement, training and development, compensation and benefits, labor relations, and employee health and safety.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-200 MNGMT 480
Organizational Theory
ORGAN THEORY (3)
Analysis of the structure and function of complex organizations as they impact members and organization effectiveness.
PREREQUISITE: MNGMT 310
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-201 MNGMT 491
Management Information Systems
MNGMT INFO SYS (3)
Design and implementation of information systems directed at aiding decision making in organizations.
PREREQUISITE: admission to MBA program
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-202 MNGMT 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-203 MNGMT 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-204 MNGMT 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-205 MNGMT 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-206 SCLSC 470
Advanced Statistical and Design Methods
AD STAT-DES METH (3)
Advanced techniques such as complex analyses of variance, orthogonal comparisons, trend analysis, etc., will be presented and studied.
PREREQUISITE: PUBPL 320
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-207 THTRE 446
Performance Studies
PERFORM STUDIES (3)
Study of and experimentation with a selected concept of theatre, such as children's theatre, foreign language plays, or presentational theatre.
PREREQUISITE: COMMS 251
CROSS LIST: COMMS 446
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-208 THTRE 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-209 WOMST 315
Issues in Women's Studies
ISS IN WMN STDIES (3)
An interdisciplinary examination of historical and contemporary women's studies issues.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-210 WOMST 325
Women in Modern History
WOMEN IN MOD HIST (3)
Status, roles, and activities of women since 1700; focus on Europe and selected non-Western areas.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-211 WOMST 365 (US)
Psychology of Women
PSYCH OF WOMEN (3)
Explores topics pertaining to women including sex role socialization and developmental stages.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 100
CROSS LIST: PSYC 365
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-212 WOMST 415
Feminist Thought
FEMINIST THOUGHT (3)
An examination of feminist thought in such disciplines as sociology, psychology, education, literature, philosophy, history, political science, and the sciences.
PREREQUISITE: WMNST 001 or WOMST 315
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-213 WOMST 436 (US)
Women in the Criminal Justice System
WMN IN CRIM J SYS (3)
This culturally diverse course will analyze the status of women in all aspects of the criminal justice system.
PREREQUISITE: fifth semester standing
CROSS LIST: CRIMJ 436
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-214 WOMST 491
Seminar in Women's Studies
SMNR: WOMST STDIES (3)
A seminar in one or more areas of women's studies. (May be repeated for credit.)
PREREQUISITE: WOMST 315 or permission of program
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-215 WOMST 494
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an indivdual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-216 WOMST 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-217 WOMST 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Communications

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-218 COMM 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-3 per semester/maximum of 3)
Supervised practicum with newspapers, broadcasting stations, public relations, and advertising agencies.
PREREQUISITE: continuing student majors in the College of Communications; departmental approval
APPROVED START: FA2006

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-3 per semester/maximum of 6
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

35-04-219 Change. Add B A 302, GEOG 444, 493; P N G 489; change the abbreviation of ECEEM 100 GS to ENNEC 100 GS.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Global Business Strategies for the Earth, Energy, and Material Industries Minor

University Park: College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and The Smeal College of Business (G B S)

PROFESSOR ANDREW N. KLEIT, in charge

The minor in Global Business Strategies for the Earth, Energy, and Materials Industries is a joint offering of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and the Smeal College of Business. The minor introduces students to financial, investment, and management concepts applied to private sector organizations whose operation emphasizes the Earth and its environment, the energy and mineral industries, or the development of new and enhanced materials. The minor focuses on the leadership and information strategies characteristic of enterprises that are succeeding in a rapidly integrating global economy.

The minor provides science and engineering students an introduction to basic entrepreneurial and business concepts to help prepare them for success in a changing professional environment. It provides students in the Smeal College an opportunity to focus on business strategies in the Earth resources, environmental, and materials industries. A minimum of 18 credits is required for the minor. A student enrolled in this minor must receive a grade C or better in all courses in the minor. Advising is available through the EMS Student Center (25 Deike Building).

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
ENNEC 100 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
EM SC 401(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from category a or b:
a. B A 301(2) and B A 302(2) and B A 304(2) (Sem: 3-8)
b. FIN 100(3) or EM SC 301(3); and MGMT 100(3) or EM SC 304(3) (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the approved list of EMS courses. Approved courses are: EM SC 420(3), ENNEC 473(3), ENNEC 484W(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOG 444(3), GEOG 493(3), GEOSC 402Y IL(3), GEOSC 454(3), and METEO 473(3), and P N G 489(3) (Sem: 5-8).


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Education

COURSE ADDS

35-04-220 C I 200
Peer Tutoring
PEER TUTORING (1)
Prepares students to develop successful practices as a peer tutor.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-221 ED EDUC 199 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Study of educational topics in a country other than the United States.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-222 ED EDUC 499 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Study of educational topics in a country other than the United States.
PREREQUISITE: permission of instructor
PROPOSED START: S12007


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Engineering

35-04-223 Add new Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Mechanical Engineering.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Integrated B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

A limited number of undergraduate students in the B.S.M.E. program will be considered for admission to the integrated undergraduate/graduate program leading to the B.S.M.E. and the M.S.M.E. degrees.  Students with a junior standing in the B.S.M.E. degree program may be admitted to the integrated B.S.M.E./M.S.M.E. program, following a positive review of an application specific to this program by the faculty committee on graduate admissions.  Students must have attained a GPA of at least 3.0.  Students admitted to the integrated program must maintain a GPA in all classes used toward the M.S.M.E. degree of at least 3.0.

COURSE ADDS

35-04-224 CH E 100S
Exploring Chemical Engineering First-Year Seminar
EXPLORE CH E FYS (1)
The exploration of Chemical Engineering and available career opportunities.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-225 CH E 330H
Process Fluid Mechanics (Honors)
PROC FLUID MCH HON (3)
An integrated study of the fundamentals and the quantitative design techniques involving flow of fluids in chemical processes.
PREREQUISITE: CH E 210, CH E 220, MATH 230
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-226 SUR 285
Drainage Design
DRAINAGE DESIGN (2)
Fluid properties, continuity, energy, pressure and gravity flow; watersheds, timing, rainfall, and runoff; basic channel, culvert, and sewer design.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 026 or higher and 3rd semester standing
PROPOSED START: S12007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-227 I E 306
Machining Process Design & Analysis
MACH PROC DSGN ANA (3)
Application of Engineering Principles for the Design and Implementation of Economic and Effective Machining Processes.
PREREQUISITE: I E 305
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: I E 322
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-228 I E 310
Principles of Deformation Processing
PRIN DEF PROC (3:2:2)
Discussion, laboratory practices, and laboratory experiments covering principles of metal removal and forming, nonmetallic processing, and metrology.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 011, E MCH 210, or E MCH 110H. Prerequisite or concurrent: E MCH 013, E SC 414M, or MATSE 259
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: I E 305
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-229 I E 463
Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing
CAD/CAM (3:2:2)
Three dimensional modeling and manufacture of parts and assemblies using Computer Aided Design and manufacturing software, and numerically controlled machines.
PREREQUISITE: I E 312 or I E 328
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Any IE Manufacturing Process elective
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-230 I E 464
Assembly of Printed Circuit Boards
ASSEMB PCB (3)
Manufacturing processes and principles for assembly of printed circuit boards with surface mount and through-hole technology.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 110, PHYS 212
APPROVED START: S12007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PHYS 212, I E 305
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Health and Human Development

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-231 NURS 200W
Introduction to Nursing Research
INTRO NURS RES (3)
Introduction to methods and philosophy of empirical inquiry as applied to research in nursing.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 215, NURS 225, NURS 230, NURS 351; or NURS 390 and STAT 200 for RN to BS majors
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: STAT 200, NURS 215, NURS 225, NURS 230, NURS 351; or STAT 200 and NURS 390 for NURN major
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-232 NURS 457
Introduction to Computing and Nursing Informatics
INTR CMPT NSG INFR (3:2:3)
An introduction to computers and nursing informatics focusing on applications to the nursing profession.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 215, NURS 230, STAT 200; or RN license
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: NURS 225, NURS 310, NURS 315, NURS 320, and NURS 331; or eligibility for NURN major NURS 225, NURS 301, NURS 302, NURS 310, AND NURS 320; or eligibility for NURN major
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Intercollege Programs

35-04-233 Change program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Civic and Community Engagement Minor

Intercollege Program (CIVCM)

PROFESSOR CONSTANCE A. FLANAGAN and PROFESSOR LAURA GUERTIN, Co-chairs, Civic and Community Engagement Committee

Administered by a program faculty drawn from across the University, the Intercollege Minor in Civic and Community Engagement is appropriate to undergraduate students seeking to apply domains of knowledge from their majors or General Education programs to issues of consequence beyond the classroom. In the minor students integrate democratic, professional, and creative development. In particular, the minor serves to encourage, recognize, and systematize student participation in public service or problem-based fieldwork and research that:

Specifically, the minor consists of a balanced program of fieldwork experience and supporting coursework that is selected with the advice and consent of a minor adviser and approved on behalf of the minor by a program faculty. Fieldwork experiences are selected from a list of eligible courses (or approved comparable alternatives), and supporting coursework includes a conceptual foundations course that provides students with a critical orientation to contemporary issues and themes in public scholarship. The minor culminates with an approved capstone project, which may be a significant paper, or annotated portfolio, or other demonstration of substantial assessment and integration of the minor experience and the broader issue of application of academic theory and practice in the civic community.

The Civic and Community Engagement Minor Committee is authorized to award a minor certificate to any undergraduate who, in addition to satisfying the degree requirements of his or her baccalaureate major, satisfies the requirements for the Civic and Community Engagement Minor. The completion of the minor is reflected by a formal notation of the student's official record at the time of graduation. To enter the program, a student must submit an application to the committee. Applicants to the minor in Civic and Community Engagement:

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
YFE 211(3) (Sem: 5)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
At least 6 credits must be taken at the 400 level
Select 6-9 credits from Program List of public scholarship courses, of which at least 3 credits involve supervised field experience and of which 3-6 credits are public issues and democracy courses, or equivalents chosen in consultation with minor adviser (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3-6 credits in related areas in consultation with minor adviser (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits of public scholarship capstone work at the 400 level in consultation with minor adviser (Sem: 7-8)


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of the Liberal Arts

35-04-234 Change. Add ENGL 201 GH; Remove ENGL 240, 261, 262 GH, 263 GH, 265, 268. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

English

Abington College (ENGAB)
Altoona College (ENGAL)
University College (ENGCC): Penn State Delaware County, Penn State Fayette, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State York
University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (ENGL)

PROFESSOR ROBERT L. CASERIO, Head

Majors explore the imaginative and practical uses of English through courses in literature, writing, rhetoric, and language. They develop perspectives on human nature and cultural values through American, British, and other English literatures; they learn how to gather, analyze, synthesize, and communicate information; they gain mastery over their language. These skills help English majors find careers in such fields as publishing, business, industry, government, and teaching. English majors often go on to postgraduate study not only in English but in such areas as law, business, education, or other liberal disciplines.

Majors can emphasize writing, literature, or rhetoric, or a mix of literature, writing, and rhetoric. All provide a liberal education and all develop analytic and writing skills. Qualified students may participate in the career internship and in the English honors program.

Students interested in earning certification in secondary education should contact the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. (See also Teacher Education Programs.)

For the B.A. degree in English, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
ENGL 200(3), ENGL 201 GH(3) (Sem: 1-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from ENGL 221(3) or ENGL 221W(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits from ENGL 222(3), ENGL 222W(3), ENGL 231(3), ENGL 231W(3), ENGL 232(3), ENGL 232W(3), ENGL 235 US(3), or ENGL 240(3) (Sem: 1-6)
Select 3 credits from ENGL 310H(3) or ENGL 487W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 6 credits in literature, writing, or rhetoric (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3 credits at the 300 or 400 level in literature primarily before 1800 from department list (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits at the 300 or 400 level in post-1800 multicultural/minority subject matter or in post-1800 sex and gender studies or in post-1800 postcolonial studies (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits at the 300 or 400 level in literature, writing, or rhetoric (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

35-04-235 ANTH 427W
Forensic Archaeology
FORENSIC ARCH (3)
Application of archaeological techniques to crime scene investigations, with practical experience in field and laboratory contexts.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 002
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-236 ENGL 245 (GH;US)
Introduction to LGBTQ Studies Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Studies
INTRO SEX STUDIESINTRO LGBT STUDIES (3)
An introduction to the study of sex and (homo)sexual identity across a wide range of disciplines and methodoligies.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-237 HIST 470
Slavery in the Americas, 1492-1888 Modern Bondage: Slavery in the Americas, 1492-1888
SLAV THE AMERICAS MOD BOND SLAV AMER (3)
The work, culture, ideology, and political economy of slavery in the Americas between 1500 and 1888.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 011, HIST 020, HIST 152, HIST 178 or HIST 192
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-238 PHIL 119 (GH)
Ethical Leadership
ETHICAL LEADERSHIP (3)
Introduction to philosophical theories of ethics and leadership. Uses literary and biographical texts in developing skills of application.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-239 PHIL 469 (US;IL)
African American Philosophy
AFRICAN AMER PHIL (3)
Major works by African American Philosophers, on topics of race, freedom, citizenship, nationhood, law and society.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 or PHIL 009 and 5th semester standing
PROPOSED START: S12007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-240 ANTH 241 (IL)
Peoples and Cultures of Highland New Guinea
HIGHLND NEW GUINEA (3:3:0)
History, ecology, social, economic, religious, and political systems of the aboriginal peoples and cultures of highland New Guinea.
PREREQUISITE: ANTH 001 or ANTH 045
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Cannibals to Christians: Change in Highland New Guinea (CANN TO CHRIS: NEW)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Subsistence farming to cash cropping, involvement in global economy, increasing stratification, tribal war and civil war, demise of traditional religion.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-241 INLST 493
International Studies
INTL STUDIES (3)
Selected topics in International Studies.
PREREQUISITE: prior participation in an Education Abroad program or international work experience, and enrollment in the International Studies major
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: INTST
PROPOSED START: SP2008

COURSE DROPS

35-04-242 INLST 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-12)
Internship in International Studies.
PREREQUISITE: enrollment in the International Studies major or minor and approval by the International Studies adviser
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-243 INT U 187
International Understanding Freshman Seminar
INT U FRESHMAN SEM (3:3:0)
The meaning and advantages of a Liberal Arts education in context of a specific discipline.
PREREQUISITE: first-semester standing and enrollment in the College of the Liberal Arts
PROPOSED START: SP2008

35-04-244 INT U 200 (GS)
International Understanding and World Affairs
INT U & WLD AFFRS (3:3:0)
Interdisciplinary consideration of international problems, conflict and accommodation; impact of various cultures and ideologies on world affairs and foreign policy. Credit will not be given for both this course and PL SC 014.
PREREQUISITE: third-semester standing
PROPOSED START: SP2008


APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Eberly College of Science

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-245 MATH 450
Mathematical Modeling
MATH MODELING (3)
Constructing mathematical models of physical phenomena; topics include pendulum motion, polymer fluids, chemical reactions, waves, flight, and chaos.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 405 or MATH 412
APPROVED START: S12000

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 315 and MATH 430 or MATH 405 or MATH 412
PROPOSED START: SP2007


APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

35-04-246 Drop the D.Ed. degree in Agricultural and Extension Education.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Agricultural and Extension Education (AEE)

TRACY S. HOOVER, Head of the Department
323 Agricultural Administration Building
814-865-1688

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed.

Graduate programs emphasize agricultural or extension education (including preparation for employment in college or university programs), youth and family programming, state-level administration, local-level administration, private industry and international education. A minor may be taken in an area of the student's choice or in general studies. Programs may include courses needed for certification in other fields of education.

Admission Requirements

All applicants must submit a letter of application, two or three typewritten pages in length, describing their professional experience, education, career goals, and reasons for pursuing the degree. Applicants must ensure that three departmental recommendation and evaluation forms from individuals knowledgeable about the applicant are forwarded to the department. Only the most qualified applicants will be admitted to the graduate program. The graduate program may provisionally admit selected applicants pending resolution of the requirements listed here or applicants with special skills and experiences. Requirements listed here are in addition to the general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Master's Degrees

Prerequisite for admission to a master's program is a demonstrated professional interest in agricultural and extension education and/or applied youth and family education. Applicants whose junior-senior grade-point average (GPA) is under 3.00 on a 4.00 scale for their baccalaureate degree are required to submit Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores.

Master of science: This program is intended for those who are interested in defining, developing, or evaluating educational programs, both formal or nonformal, through public and private agencies and organizations serving youth, families or the agriculture community.

Master of education: Prerequisite for admission to this program is a minimum of 18 credits in professional education courses (including educational psychology and teaching and/or professional internship) or certification as a teacher of agriculture, or equivalent professional experience, including extension.

Doctoral Degree

An applicant should have a minimum average of 3.40 on a 4.00 scale on all previous graduate work or a minimum combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE. Two years of appropriate professional experience is required either prior to admission or before the degree is awarded. An interview with the graduate faculty is recommended of all applicants prior to admission into a doctoral program. Applicants to the doctoral program must submit evidence of ability to write a scholarly paper or thesis and demonstrate a teaching-level competence of English.

Master's Degree Requirements

A program of study agreement between adviser and student, including planned course work (approved by the student's committee) and time frame, should be completed before beginning the second semester of study. Successful performance on a four-hour written essay exam, plus a one-hour oral exam, is required of all M.S. and M.Ed. candidates near the completion of their course work for the degree. The master's candidate is required to successfully complete an oral defense of a paper or thesis.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Two years of appropriate professional experience is required either prior to admission or before the doctoral degree is completed.

Other Relevant Information

Selection and appointment of a thesis adviser and doctoral committee follows admission to candidacy. The candidate consults the department head or graduate officer in selecting an adviser. The candidate, in cooperation with an adviser, selects the doctoral committee. The chair of the committee is not necessarily the thesis adviser, but the thesis adviser is a member of the committee.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION (AEE) course list

35-04-247 Add new Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Cell and Developmental Biology.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Cell and Developmental Biology (CDB)

Current (Co-)Chair(s):
Hong Ma, PhD, Department of Biology, University Park
To be appointed, College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (when CoM faculty reaches 10)

Degrees Conferred: Ph. D., M.S.

The Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Cell and Developmental Biology (IGDP in CDB) prepares graduates for diverse opportunities in academic institutions, pharmaceutical companies, private research foundations, governmental research and regulatory programs. The program includes faculty from 10 departments in the College of Agricultural Sciences, Engineering, Liberal Arts, and Eberly College of Science at the University Park campus and the College of Medicine at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. The IGDP in CDB is also supported by the Huck Institutes of Life Sciences which provides modern telecommunications facilities and sophisticated equipment for state-of-the-art research applications. Doctoral students not only receive education and training new principles and experimental approaches, but also practice communication skills in group discussions and informal seminars and explore various potential career opportunities before graduation. Two unique aspects are (1) optional dual mentors will provide students with a interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training, stimulate scientific thinking using different perspectives, and prepare for a wide range of future career options; and (2) an optional internship will provide a mechanism for students to obtain practical experience in future professional settings or gain specialized training off campus.

General Admission Requirements

M.S. or Ph.D. degrees

Application deadline is January 10 for priority consideration.

  1. Completed official Penn State Graduate School application
  2. Paid nonrefundable application fee
  3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended
  4. Completed Integrative Biosciences Graduate Degree Program application
  5. Application for a U.S. visa (International applicants only)
  6. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores
  7. Three letters of recommendation
  8. Statement of goals that pertains to the life sciences
  9. All international applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or masters degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) and submit the results of that test with the application for admission. A TOEFL score of 550 on the paper test, a score of 213 on the computer-based test, or 80 points on the new Internet-based test with a minimum of 23 points on the new speaking portion is required for admission. The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) module provides an exam to test four mandatory skill areas: listening, reading, writing and speaking.  All four modules are equally weighted in the evaluation process.  The International English Language Testing System has been approved by the Graduate Council as an alternative exam to the TOEFL for international students applying to Penn State.  A minimum composite score of 6.5 on the IELTS test is required for admission.
  10. Students must have completed a bachelor’s degree at an accredited college or university and have a minimum of a 3.0/4.0 junior/senior undergraduate grade-point average.

Program Requirements

M.S. or Ph.D. degrees

  1. Foundation of basic knowledge in cell biology, developmental biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. The IGDP in CDB requires at least 9 credits in one or more of these disciplines, taken either as an undergraduate or as a part of the graduate curriculum. The following courses serve to fulfill this requirement.

    BIOCHEMISTRY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BMMB)
    501. Core Concepts in Biomolecular Sciences (5)
    541. Molecular Biology of Animal Development (3)

    INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    572. Benchmark Papers (2)
    590. Colloquium (2)
    592. Current Research Seminars (2)

    * The paperwork has been filed to seek approval of each of these as a standing course.

  2. INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    596. Independent Studies: Laboratory Rotations (1-3 per semester)

  3. INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    595. Internship (1) optional

  4. INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    591. Ethics in the Life Sciences (1)

  5. INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    600. Thesis Research (variable)

  6. INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    601. Ph.D. Dissertation Full-Time (0)

  7. INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
    602. Supervised Experience in College Teaching (1) optional
    OR
    VETERINARY SCIENCE (V SC)
    602. Supervised Experience in College Teaching (1) optional

  8. The Graduate School requires all graduate students to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average.

English Requirement for International Students

The English Requirement for International students in IBIOS is that prescribed by the Graduate School. All entering international students, whose first language is not English, will be required to take a Test of Spoken English (TSE) which is administered by the University's Center for English as a Second Language (ESL). Exceptions may be made if the entering applicant received a baccalaureate or Master’s from an institution which instructs in English.

Students with teaching responsibilities are required to take the American English Oral Communicative Proficiency Test (AEOCPT) prior to entering the classroom. The AEOCPT is given at the beginning of fall and spring semesters. All international students are required to pre-register for this test. The test scores from the AEOCPT (American English Oral Communicative Proficiency Test) are posted on the University's Administrative Information System (AIS) computer. Below is the course of action or the various TSE (Test of Spoken English) score ranges.

250 approved for teaching and the ESL (English as a Second Language) requirement will be satisfied.

230-249 required to schedule and pass ESL 118G.

200-229 required to pass ESL 117G*. These students will not be permitted to teach in a classroom situation, and may instead be assigned to grading and/or proctoring duties.

200 required to schedule and pass with the grade of A in ESL 115G, before ESL 117G*. These students will not be permitted to teach in a classroom situation, and may instead be assigned to grading and/or proctoring duties.

* At the end of this course, students are re-tested. Based upon these test results, students are either approved for teaching, placed in a subsequent ESL course, or asked to retake the course.

For students who enroll at the Hershey Medical School who need to take one or more of the above English courses can fulfill the requirements on one of the following ways. First, take the course at UP. If the student needs to commute between the two campuses but does not have a car, the UP-HY shuttle service can potentially be used. Secondly, a student may take a similar course at Hershey or an area college, approved by the CDB program curriculum committee.

Students, who are required to enroll in ESL courses, must complete the ESL requirement by the end of the second semester of residency. Students who fail to satisfy this requirement may be terminated from the IBIOS program, at the discretion of the Co-Chairs.

M.S. Degree Requirements

For all master’s degrees, a minimum of 30 graduate credits and a 3.0 overall GPA are required. At least 18 credits at the 500-level or above, combined, (with at least 6 credits of 500-level in professional master’s programs) must be included in the program. If pursuing a Masters thesis option, up to 6 IBIOS 600 credits may be A-F graded and 12 credits need to be in the major at the 500 level (excluding IBIOS 600). IBIOS 595 (Internship) and 596 (Rotations) credits all count toward the 30 credits. All CDB graduate students must successfully complete required courses and/or electives (see below) during the first two years of their graduate education. If all course credits and requirements are met, students do not have to be registered for classes while writing and/or defending his/her work. The student selects a thesis committee (upon consultation with faculty advisor), writes a thesis, and defends his/her work. If pursuing a Masters non-thesis option, the student must have a first authored manuscript (based on his/her research) that has been either accepted and/or published in a peer reviewed journal. The manuscript is given to at least the faculty advisor and the IGDP Chair for evaluation.

Students must present their thesis in accordance with the Penn State guidelines as described in the THESIS GUIDE Requirements for the Preparation of Master's and Doctoral Theses. Current copies may be obtained from website: http://www.gradsch.psu.edu/current/thesis/guide.html, or from the Thesis Office, 115 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802; 814-865-5448.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Ph.D. students must have a minimum of 30 credits and a 3.0 overall GPA through out the program. The course requirements are essentially the same as that required for the M.S. degree listed above, with some discretion left to the student and advisor.

Grade Point Average/Unsatisfactory Scholarship: Students are required to have a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 through out the course of their training. Furthermore, the student must have a 3.0 to take the doctoral candidacy, the comprehensive and final oral examinations. One or more failing grades or a cumulative grade-point average below 3.0 may be considered evidence of unsatisfactory scholarship and be grounds for dismissal from the program.

English Competence: A candidate for Ph.D. in the CDB program is required to demonstrate high-level competence in the use of the English language, including reading, writing, and speaking, as part of the language and communication requirements. The CDB program has several required courses, all of which train students to develop and improve skills in reading, writing, and speaking in English. Students are required to make oral presentations and complete written assignments. The instructors of these courses will assist in evaluating the competence in using English and those students identified as being deficient in English will be required to take remedial activities, such as additional courses, writing assignments, and tutorials. International students are advised that the submission of minimum requirements for TOEFL does not constitute the fulfillment of the English competence requirement. English competence must be demonstrated before or at the candidacy exam.

Besides coursework, research, and teaching, IGDP in CDB doctoral students participate in the following:

Candidacy Exam: This exam should be taken by the end or during the student's third semester in the CDB Program. The student will be assigned one scientific paper from the primary literature to read and analyze for approximately one week. The papers will be selected based upon the students’ background and coursework. The analysis should involve exploring the relevant literature as well as the fundamental issues in Cell and Developmental Biology. Following this independent research the student will take an oral exam. The oral exam will be administered by at least three members of the graduate program. The overall goal of the exam is to assure that the student has an intellectual foundation in Cell and Developmental Biology. The exam is designed to evaluate basic knowledge in Cell and Developmental Biology and related disciplines as well as the students’ ability to integrate this understanding to effectively evaluate experimental design, results, and the conclusions drawn. In the event that the student does not pass this exam, the student's committee will make a recommendation as to whether to offer another opportunity or to terminate the student's enrollment in the program.

Comprehensive Examination: Evaluation via the Doctoral Committee to determine the feasibility of proposed research and the preparedness of the student. Students must be registered for classes (typically IBIOS 600) the semester they take this exam.

Doctoral Committee: Upon successful completion of the Candidacy Examination, the student in consultation with the mentors will, as soon as possible, select a doctoral committee. The committee will consist of three members of the IGDP in CDB and one faculty member who is not a member of the IGDP in CDB. One member of the committee must be from a different department from the home department(s) of the mentor(s). This committee is responsible for supervising the academic program and monitoring the progress of the student towards his/her degree. Doctoral Thesis Committee Composition is based on the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin (http://www.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/$gradreqs.htm) published by the Graduate School regarding Doctoral Committees and requires:

• 4 person minimum of approved PSU Graduate Faculty.
• 2 members must be inside the major and 1 member must be outside the major. Note - the outside member must be member of the approved PSU Graduate Faculty. The outside member for intercollege graduate programs may be inside the major but committee membership must have representation from more than one department.
• For students with dual mentors, both mentors may serve on the committee. One of the mentors should be designated as the primary mentor. The outside member must not be in the same department as the primary mentor.
• A person not affiliated with PSU may be added as a special member (beyond the 4 members of the approved PSU Graduate Faculty) upon recommendation of the head of the program and approval of the graduate dean.
• Have committee chair or one of the co-chairs be a member of the approved PSU Graduate Faculty. Typically it's the faculty advisor.
• The doctoral candidate and three committee members must be physically present for the comprehensive exam and defense. No more than one person may be present via telephone. Telephone or video conference arrangements must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.
• Need approval of 2/3 of the committee members for passing comprehensive exam and defense dissertation.

Ph.D. Defense: Evaluation via the Doctoral Committee of the thesis research.

Students must present their thesis in accordance with the Penn State guidelines as described in the THESIS GUIDE Requirements for the Preparation of Master's and Doctoral Theses. Current copies may be obtained from website: http://www.gradsch.psu.edu/current/thesis/guide.html, or from the Thesis Office, 115 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802; 814-865-5448.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

BIOCHEMISTRY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BMMB) course list

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS) course list

VETERINARY SCIENCE (V SC) course list

35-04-248 Add new Master of Professional Studies in Forensic Science.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2006

Master of Professional Studies in Forensic Science

ROBERT C. SHALER, Chair
MITCHELL M. HOLLAND, Co-Chair
DANIEL G. SYKES, Co-Chair

Program Office:
107 Whitmore Laboratory
814-863-6758

Degree Conferred: Master of Professional Studies in Forensic Science

The Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Forensic Science is an inter-college degree program housed in the Eberly College of Science and is offered through a collaboration of the Departments of Anthropology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biology, Chemistry, Entomology, Psychology, and Sociology. The program is offered by Penn State graduate faculty members, with enrichment by mentors from the academic faculty, public crime laboratories, and private forensic laboratories. The curriculum is designed to provide students with innovative, hands-on, and multidisciplinary learning approaches to educate and train them in crime scene investigation, the science behind forensics, courtroom proceedings, and the ethical and social issues that they will be exposed to when they join the forensic community. In addition, the program will develop teamwork and communication skills, which will be important when working actual cases in a crime laboratory.

Admission Requirements and the Application Process

Applications will be considered in accordance with the requirements of the Graduate School as described in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. The MPS in Forensic Science program is appropriate for students with a baccalaureate degree in the biological sciences, chemistry, or a related field of study. Applicants for the MPS program are required to have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in their undergraduate degree. In addition, each applicant is asked to provide a personal statement of interests and objectives, as well as two letters of reference. Letters of reference can be submitted by the student’s undergraduate advisor, research advisor, and/or an instructor for an upper level course taken as part of their major. An applicant may be asked to go through an interview process conducted by members of the forensic science faculty. Admission to the program is based upon a thorough review of all applicant qualifications, and the best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces available for new students.

Applicants are referred to the program web site for guidance on how to submit their applications, the deadline for submitting applications, and when decisions on acceptance into the program will be announced: www.forensics.psu.edu.

Degree Requirements

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required for completion of the program, at least 18 credits from courses at the 500 and 800 level. Students are required to take 16 credits from the core courses listed below. Additional credits are from elective courses (which are determined based on interest and career track). FRNSC 801 will serve as the capstone experience for completion of the MPS degree in Forensic Science.

Core Courses (16 credits)

FORENSIC SCIENCE (FRNSC)
500. Principles of CSI and Criminalistics I (6)
501. Criminalistics II (4)
541. Forensic Seminar Series (1)
561. Ethics in Forensic Science (1)
801. Criminalistics III (4)

Electives (Select at least 14 credits)

A minimum of 30 graduate credits will be required for completion of the program, with at least 18 credits from courses at the 500 and 800-level. The elective courses are chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor from offerings in various academic departments based on the student's interest and career objectives to provide interdisciplinary breadth and perspective. Some examples are;

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
411. Skeletal Forensic Anthropology (3)
413. Molecular Forensic Anthropology (3)

BIOLOGY (BIOL)
422W. Advanced Genetics (3)
505. Statistical Methods in Evolutionary Genetics (3)
514. Topics in Systematics and Evolution (2)

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (B M B)
400. Molecular Biology of the Gene (3)
401. General Biochemistry (2)

BIOCHEMISTRY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BMMB)
597A. Concepts in Biomedical Sciences (5)

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)
427. Forensic Chemistry (4)
525. Analytical Separations (3)
526. Spectroscopic Analysis (3)

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE (CLJ)
501. Criminal Justice Organizations and Institutions (3)
585. Law Enforcement Process and Policy (3)

ENTOMOLOGY (ENT)
412. Insect Taxonomy (3)

FORENSIC SCIENCE (FRNSC)
421. Forensic Molecular Biology (3)
821. Forensic Molecular Biology II (4)
831. Forensic Chemistry II (3)
832. Forensic Drug Chemistry (3)
833. Forensic Toxicology (3)
894. Research Projects in Forensic Science (1-12)
895. Internship (1-6)

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
593. Molecular Biology Laboratory (3)

NURSING (NURS)
409. Introduction to Forensic Nursing (3)

PHARMACOLOGY (PHARM)
501. Pharmacology (4)

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYCH)
464. Behavior Genetics (3)
470. Abnormal Psychology (3)
445. Forensic Psychology (3)

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)
413. Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
512. Criminological Theories (3)
515. Research Methods in Criminology and Deviance (3)

Advanced undergraduate courses (400 level) may be used to meet graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students and with the permission of the graduate faculty in forensic science. Courses below the 400 level may not be counted towards the MPS degree. However, a graduate student may register for or audit courses below the 400 level in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) course list

BIOLOGY (BIOL) course list

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (B M B) course list

BIOCHEMISTRY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BMMB) course list

CHEMISTRY (CHEM) course list

CRIME, LAW AND JUSTICE (CLJ) course list

ENTOMOLOGY (ENT) course list

FORENSIC SCIENCE (FRNSC) course list

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS) course list

NURSING (NURS) course list

PHARMACOLOGY (PHARM) course list

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYCH) course list

SOCIOLOGY (SOC) course list

35-04-249 Change. Revise degree requirements.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Health Evaluation Sciences (HES)

VERNON M. CHINCHILLI , Chair of the Department of Health Evaluation Sciences
College of Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Hershey, PA 17033
717-531-7178
masters-info@hes.hmc.psu.edu

Degree Conferred: M.S.

The Master's Program in Health Evaluation Sciences includes graduate-level course work in biostatistics, epidemiology, and health services research, and provides knowledge and insight required in health related research. Students learn population-based methods for planning, executing, analyzing, and disseminating research results, and methods for evaluating and improving health care practices.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Prospective applicants for this program should have at least a bachelor's degree in a biological, physical, or behavioral science. Please see the program Web page for specific program application requirements.

Master's Degree Requirements

Each student in Health Evaluation Sciences is expected to acquire breadth of knowledge in the disciplines of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Health Services Research, and skills in the areas of experimental design, data collection and quantitative analysis. The HES Master of Science degree can lead to careers in a wide variety of fields and settings, including academic health centers; the health insurance industry; health services networks; local, state, and federal government agencies; and the pharmaceutical industry. Each student must complete at least 30 credits at the 500 level, including 3 research credits and 27 credits of formal course work. Each student must carry out a research project concluding with a manuscript suitable for publication.

Prescribed Courses: 16 credits

HES 520(3), HES 521(3), HES 536(3), HES 550(3), HES 551(3), IBIOS 591(1)

Additional Courses: 11 credits

HES 510(3), HES 511(1), HES 518(1), HES 519(1), HES 522(3), HES 529(1), HES 535(3), HES 540(1), HES 541(1), HES 552(3), HES 560(1), HES 561(1), HES 570(3), HES 580(3), HES 581(1)

Courses in Health Policy and Administration (HPA) and Statistics (STAT) may be taken as elective courses and will be considered on an individual basis in consultation with the student's academic adviser.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (H ADM) course list

HEALTH EVALUATION SCIENCES (HES) course list

STATISTICS (STAT) course list

35-04-250 Change. Drop the option in Biomolecular Science and Engineering.

35-04-251 Change. Drop the option in Nutrition Sciences.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Integrative Biosciences Graduate Program (IBIOS)

RICHARD J. FRISQUE, Co-Director, IBIOS Graduate Education
Life Sciences Building
University Park, PA 16802
1-866-PS-IBIOS; 1-866-77-42467 (toll-free in USA)
huckgradadm@mailbiotech.psu.edu

ANITA K. HOPPER, Co-Director, IBIOS Graduate Education
Room C5716, Mail Code H171
College of Medicine
Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
500 University Drive
Hershey, PA 17033
717-531-8982

Degree Conferred: Ph. D.

Calling upon the expertise of more than 200 faculty members representing 38 different departments among 7 different colleges between 2 different campuses, the Integrative Biosciences (IBIOS) Graduate Program offers a unique opportunity to learn about and work in multiple disciplines. This graduate education component of the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences is supported by modern telecommunications facilities and equipment. Doctoral students not only explore new conceptual connections, but also engage in active group learning experiences and explore a variety of potential career opportunities before graduation. Two unique aspects are (1) dual mentors who will expose students to complementary viewpoints and encourage students to pursue problems at the interface between traditional disciplines, and (2) an optional internship that provides a mechanism for students to obtain “real world” experience in future professional settings.

The program offers the following areas of research emphasis (called options): Cell and Developmental Biology; Chemical Biology; Ecological and Molecular Plant Physiology; Immunobiology; Molecular Medicine; Molecular Toxicology; Neuroscience; and Bioinformatics and Genomics.

General Admission Requirements

Application deadline is January 10 for priority consideration.

1. Completed official Penn State Graduate School application
2. Paid nonrefundable application fee ($45 U.S.)
3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended
4. Completed Integrative Biosciences Graduate Degree Program application
5. Application for a U.S. visa (International applicants only)
6. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test
7. Three letters of recommendation
8. Statement of goals that pertains to the life sciences
9. All international applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or master’s degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) examination. A minimum TOEFL score of 600 on the paper test or a score of 250 on the computer-based test is required.
10. Students must have completed a bachelor’s degree at an accredited college or university and have a minimum of a 3.0/4.0 junior/senior undergraduate grade-point average.

Prescribed (Required) Courses:

  1. Foundation of basic knowledge in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, and computational methods in the life sciences. The IBIOS Graduate Program expects at least 6 credits (or the equivalent) in one or more of these disciplines, taken either as an undergraduate or as a part of the graduate curriculum. The specific courses are left to the discretion of each option.
  2. IBIOS 590 COLLOQUIUM (4 credits, 2 per semester during any of the first four semesters in residence), a monthly colloquium that will present life science topics of general interest to all faculty and graduate students in the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences.
  3. IBIOS 591 ETHICS IN LIFE SCIENCES (1 credit), an examination of integrity and misconduct in life sciences research, including issues of data collection, publication, authorship, and peer review.
  4. IBIOS 595 INTERNSHIP (optional, 1 credit), an external work assignment relevant to individual research or career goals. (Register for IBIOS 595 in 520 Thomas Building)
  5. IBIOS 596 INDIVIDUAL STUDIES: Laboratory Rotations (1-3 credits per semester, depending upon option)
  6. IBIOS 600 THESIS RESEARCH (variable credits)
  7. IBIOS 601 Ph.D. DISSERTATION FULL-TIME (0 credits)
  8. IBIOS 602 SUPERVISED EXPERIENCE IN COLLEGE TEACHING (1 credit each semester), two semesters or the equivalent is required after the first year in residence. International Fellows must pass an English proficiency exam before teaching.

The Graduate School requires all graduate students to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average. Individual options may require a higher GPA.

Students must present their thesis in accordance with the Penn State guidelines as described in the THESIS GUIDE Requirements for the Preparation of Master's and Doctoral Theses. Current copies may be obtained from the web site www.gradsch.psu.edu/current/thesisguide or the Thesis Office, 115 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802; 814-865-5448.

Elective courses. Student may select any 400-500 level courses pending approval by the Faculty Mentor and the Option Director - available elective courses vary from year to year.

CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (CDB) OPTION
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

CHEMICAL BIOLOGY (CB) OPTION
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

ECOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (EMPP) OPTION
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

IMMUNOBIOLOGY (IM) OPTION
College of Medicine (Hershey)
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

Electives

University Park
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

Electives

MOLECULAR MEDICINE (MM) OPTION
College of Medicine (Hershey)
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

University Park
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY (MT) OPTION
College of Medicine (Hershey)
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

University Park
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

NEUROSCIENCE (NEURO) OPTION
College of Medicine (Hershey)
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

Electives

University Park
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

BIOINFORMATICS AND GENOMICS (BG) OPTION

College of Medicine (Hershey)
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

University Park
Prescribed (Required) Courses:

See also BIOTECHNOLOGY.

35-04-252 Add new Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Mechanical Engineering.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Mechanical Engineering (M E)

KAREN A. THOLE, Head of the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering
137 Reber Building
814-865-2519

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

Graduate programs and research facilities are available in combustion, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, dynamic system analysis, robotics, mechanical design, and energy systems. Air pollution control, automotive safety, tribology, designing for noise control and for reliability also provide many research and design opportunities.

 

Admission Requirements

Admission to the program is quite competitive. Entering students must hold a B.S. degree in engineering or physical science. Students with 3.0 or better (out of 4.0) junior/senior cumulative grade-point averages and appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. The best-qualified applicants will be admitted. In addition, scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are required. To qualify for admission, an international student must achieve a minimum score of 550 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or a minimum score of 213 on the computer-based test. Letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose written by the applicant are also required to complete the application pacakge.

Degree Requirements

The M.S. degree program is designed for students to gain advanced knowledge for research, analysis, and design in mechanical engineering. Students pursuing an M.S. degree may choose one of two options: completion of 24 course credits and the submission of a thesis (6 credits) to the Graduate School, or 30 course credits and the submission of a scholarly paper to the department. A Ph.D. thesis proposal may serve as the paper, provided the student has passed the Ph.D. candidacy examination.

Continuous registration is required of all Ph.D. graduate students until the thesis is approved.

The Ph.D. program emphasizes scholarly research and helps students prepare for research and related careers in industry, government, and academe. Students are admitted to candidacy after passing written and oral examinations. The Ph.D. program is quite flexible, with minimal formal requirements. The Ph.D. is awarded upon completion of a program of advanced study that includes a minimum period of residence, a satisfactory thesis, and the passing of comprehensive and final oral examinations as determined by the student's doctoral committee.

Generally, a Ph.D. student must have 30 credits above a master's degree before taking the comprehensive examination.

Integrated B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

A limited number of undergraduate students in the B.S.M.E. program will be considered for admission to the integrated undergraduate/graduate program leading to the B.S.M.E. and the M.S.M.E. degrees.  Students with a junior standing in the B.S.M.E. degree program may be admitted to the integrated B.S.M.E./M.S.M.E. program, following a positive review of an application specific to this program by the faculty committee on graduate admissions.  Students must have attained a GPA of at least 3.0.  Students admitted to the integrated program must maintain a GPA in all classes used toward the M.S.M.E. degree of at least 3.0.

Student Aid

Graduate students are supported by a variety of government and industry fellowships, traineeships, and research and teaching assistantships. Stipends vary depending on the source. Competition for support is extremely keen; however, outstanding students are considered for attractive offers of support, including various fellowships specifically for new students in the College of Engineering. By completing the department's application for financial assistance, you will automatically be considered for a graduate assistantship. To receive full consideration for financial aid, all application materials should be submitted by January 15.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (M E) course list

 

35-04-253 Change name of graduate program from Leisure Studies (LE ST) to Recreation, Park and Tourism Management (RPTM); Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed. and change course abbreviation.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Recreation, Park and Tourism Management (RPTM)

JOHN P. DATTILO, Department Head, Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management

LINDA L. CALDWELL, Professor in Charge
201C Mateer Building
814-863-8983
llc7@psu.edu

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed.

The graduate program is designed to prepare students for administrative, supervisory, research, and teaching positions in public and private recreation and park systems, in colleges and universities, in voluntary agencies and institutions, and in commercial ventures.

The program is oriented to meet the specific needs and research interests of the candidate. Students may pursue interests in the community, including public park and recreation systems, voluntary agencies, and private commercial enterprises; tourism; institution and community-oriented therapeutic settings concerned with many different disabilities and utilizing a variety of activity modalities; park planning, resource management, interpretive services, outdoor education, and outdoor recreation services.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required for admission to the master's and doctoral programs. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

For admission to the graduate program, a bachelor's or master's degree is required. Candidates from majors other than recreation and parks are welcome to apply; however, additional course work is required. Students with a 3.00 junior/senior average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. All students must write a thesis.

There are no additional requirements beyond the general Graduate School requirements for the master's degree. Doctoral degree requirements include a 3.20 average for the master's degree work; understanding of a foreign culture; computer competency; and at least one year's experience in the recreation and parks field before completion of the degree.

Student Aid

Fellowships, traineeships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

RECREATION, PARK AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT (RPTM) course list

 

COURSE ADDS

35-04-254 A E 564
Lighting Design for Visual Appearance
LTG DES VIS APPEAR (3)
Color; the impact of light on materials, architectural spaces, and human perception.
PREREQUISITE: A E 461
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-255 A E 602
Supervised Experience in College Teaching
SUPV EXP/COLL TCHG (1-3 per semester, maximum of 6)
Supervised experience in teaching and orientation to other selected aspects of the professional at the Pennsylvania State University.
PROPOSED START: S12006

35-04-256 AEE 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-04-257 AMSTD 510
U.S. Literature and Culture
US LIT & CULT (3)
Studies exploring the relationship between literature and culture in American Studies.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-258 AMSTD 520
Topics in Popular Culture
TOPICS POP CULT (3)
A detailed exploration of aspects of American popular culture, including popular culture's relationship to society and scholarship.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-259 AMSTD 531
Material Culture and Folklife
MATER CULT & FKL (3)
Investigation of American material culture and folklife, including topics such as traditional design, cultural landscape, architecture, art, craft and food.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-260 AMSTD 536
American Civilization in the Twenty-first Century
AM CIV 21 C (3)
Detailed investigation of specific topics in twenty-first century American civilization.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-261 AMSTD 540
Ethnography and Society
ETHNO SOC (3)
An advanced course on ethnographic theories, methods, and case studies, emphasizing current controversies and new strategies in field work.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-262 AMSTD 550
Seminar in Public Heritage
SEM PUBL HERIT (3)
A study of the ways Americans use and understand heritage in public settings.
PREREQUISITE: AMSTD 482
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-263 AMSTD 551
Seminar in Local and Regional Studies
SEM LOCAL REGION (3)
Detailed investigation of local and regional historical themes and topics, emphasizing research methods.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-264 AMSTD 560
Seminar in Race and Ethnicity
SEM RACE ETHNIC (3)
Studies exploring issues of race and ethnicity in America that can be addressed with theories and methods of American Studies.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-265 AMSTD 561
Seminar in Gender and Culture
SEM GENDER & CULT (3)
Thematic study of gender issues in American history and culture.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-266 AMSTD 592
Field Experience in American Studies
FIELD EXP AMSTD (3)
Field projects and study tours to off-campus sites using American Studies methodologies.
PREREQUISITE: AMSTD 500
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-267 AMSTD 600
Thesis in American Studies
THESIS RES (6)
A thesis supervised by the American Studies Program.
PREREQUISITE: AMSTD 500
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-268 CLJ 558
Victimization
VICTIMIZATION (3)
This course discusses the individual- and community-level correlates, causes, consequences, and policy implications of criminal victimization.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-269 HES 551
Advanced Epidemiological Methods
ADVANCED EPI (3)
Advanced methodological course providing in-depth discussions on applications of advanced methods to design, execution, data analysis, and epidemiological studies reporting.
PREREQUISITE: HES 520 and HES 550 or HES 510
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-270 MATSE 580
Computational Thermodynamics
COMP THERMO (3)
The integration of fundamental principles and advanced computational approaches in the thermodynamics of materials, including hands-on computation, theory and application.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 501 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-271 SPLED 503A
Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Education: Basic Principles I
ABA I (4)
Topics include a history of applied behavior analysis; underlying assumptions; dimensions and characteristics of ABA; ethics; basic terminology and principles.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-272 SPLED 503B
Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Education: Basic Principles II
ABA II (4)
Topics include functional assessment of behavior, ethics, methods to increase and decrease behavior, and generalization.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 503A
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-273 SPLED 503C
Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Education: Extended Applications I
ABA III (4)
Topics include assessment and intervention for challenging behavior, systems support, classroom applications of ABA, and review of ABA Certification Exam.
PREREQUISITE: SPLED 503A, SPLED 503B
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-274 SYSEN 531
Probability Models and Simulation
PROB MDLS AND SIM (3)
Provides background in modeling problems containing random components that must be accounted for in a reasonable solution.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-275 SYSEN 533
Deterministic Models and Simulation
DET MDLG AND SIM (3)
Provides a background in simulation and the modeling of problems that contain differential equations as part of the system.
PROPOSED START: S12007

35-04-276 YFE 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-277 B ADM 514
Strategic Planning and Business Policy
STRAT PLNG (3)
Formulation of objectives and the implementation of programs to promote long-range success of the organization in a changing environment.
PREREQUISITE: B ADM 510 and B ADM 513
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B ADM 510, B ADM 513, and B ADM 532
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-278 LE ST 501
Leisure Studies Foundations
LEIS STDIES FOUND (3)
This course provides general background knowledge about the literature and research methods central to the field of leisure studies.
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-279 LE ST 510
Tourism Behavior: An interdisciplinary Approach
TOURISM BEHAVIOR (3)
An exploration of the various approaches that have been taken in the social sciences to understand tourism behavior.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in statistics; 3 credits in behavioral science
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-280 LE ST 515
Program Development and Evaluation
PROGRM DEV EVAL (3)
Critical analysis of political and social determinants of recreation program development; research and evaluation procedures.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-281 LE ST 525
Behavioral Patterns of the Outdoor Recreationist
BEH PAT OUT REC (3)
Patterns of time and space use; user characteristics; meaning of participation; facilitation of environment-use enhancement.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-282 LE ST 527
Social Psychology of Leisure
SOC PSY LEISURE (3)
Application of the methods, constructs, and theory of social psychology to the study of leisure, outdoor recreation, and therapeutic recreation.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 420, SOC 403
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-283 LE ST 530
Research Methods in Leisure Studies
RESEARCH METHODS (3)
Research techniques, including methods, research design, techniques for data collection, as applied to relevant problems in the leisure studies field.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-284 LE ST 533
Leisure Studies, Surveys, and Appraisals
LEI STDYS APRSLS (3)
Advanced procedures related to leisure, recreation, and park research.
PREREQUISITE: LE ST 530; 3 credits in statistics
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-285 LE ST 540
Public and Private Recreation Lands and Waters
PUB/PVT REC LD/WTR (3)
Public and private roles and interactions, allocation of resources, use policies, open space concepts, private enterprise developments, legal controls.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-286 LE ST 545
Philosophical and Social Bases of Leisure
PHIL SOC BASES LEI (3)
Philosophical and social bases of leisure; analysis of critical issues of leisure for philosophical and social implications.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-287 LE ST 550
Seminar in Leisure Studies
SEMINAR (1-6)
No description.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-288 LE ST 560
Administrative Problems of Leisure Service Organizations
ADM PROB LE ST (3)
Special problems of recreation and park departments; legal powers and liability; departmental organization, financing, personnel policies, and staff development.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-289 LE ST 570
Conceptual Bases for Therapeutic Recreation
CONCPT BASES TH RC (3)
Issues in the application of concepts in therapeutic recreation from a multidisciplinary perspective; evaluation and research.
PREREQUISITE: R P M 477
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-290 LE ST 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3)
Continuing seminars which consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-291 LE ST 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-292 LE ST 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or term.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-293 LE ST 600
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-15)
No description.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-294 LE ST 601
Ph.D. Dissertation Full-Time
PH D DIS FULL-TIME (0)
No description.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-295 LE ST 610
Thesis Research Off Campus
THES RES OFF CMPUS (1-15)
No description.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM
PROPOSED START: SP2008

OLD
35-04-296 LE ST 611
Ph.D. Dissertation Part-Time
PH D DIS PART-TIME (0)
No description.
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: RPTM 611
PROPOSED START: SP2008

APPENDIX D
Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

35-04-297 FPEXT 997
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-10) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or term.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-04-298 FPWDC 997
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (9-10) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or term.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-04-299 COCUR 995B
Penn State International Law Review
PENN STATE INT LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
See Handbook for description.
PREREQUISITE: INTER 971
APPROVED START: FA2000

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-04-300 FMEST 964
Estate Planning and Wealth Transfer Transactions I
ESTATE PLANNING I (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
An introduction to the estate planning process, including an overview of the various relevant federal and state taxes on donative transfers.
PREREQUISITE: FMEST 960 and TAX 950
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: FMEST 960
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-04-301 RP&EL 980
Construction and Surety Law
CONSTRUCTION LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
The course covers law relating to construction contracts, construction surety bonds, and the construction process.
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 2-3
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-04-302 SKILS 954
Advanced Pretrial Advocacy
ADV PRETRIAL ADVOC (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
Students work with case files through written exercises and classroom simulations to gain a thorough understanding of the procedural rules and advocacy tools used in the pretrial stages of litigation. The course grade is based upon class participation and the written exercises.
PREREQUISITE: SKILS 950
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-04-303 SKILS 960
Negotiation
NEGOTIATION (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
An introducation to conflict resolution theory and training in skills employed in negotiation, including contract drafting.
PREREQUISITE: SKILS 959 and SKILS 961
APPROVED START: FA2004

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-04-304 SKILS 987
Writing Workshop
WRITING WORKSHOP (2) CRDT ONLY: Y ANON GR: N
This course is designed to offer an intensive writing experience. In order to clarify the distinction between objective and persuasive writing, students are given two fact patterns and are required to write a legal memorandum and an appellate brief on the basis of each fact pattern. Students are taught to edit their own writing by rewriting the memorandum and brief after they have been critiqued.
PREREQUISITE: CORE 930
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: SP2007