APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Agricultural Sciences

36-04-001 Change. Revise program description. Remove CMPSC 203. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Agribusiness Management

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (AG BM)
University Park, The Smeal College of Business

PROFESSOR JAMES W. DUNN, Program Coordinator

Graduates can be found working in the food production, processing, financial services, wholesaling and retailing industries, both in the United States and abroad. A substantial number are employed by agricultural supply firms. Typically, B.S. degree holders begin their careers in sales or as management trainees, and then progress to management as they develop higher levels of expertise and experience. Penn State Agribusiness Management graduates chose careers in many other places. They also are employed in banking and the investment and mutual funds industries, and others have gone to law school, graduate school, or into rural development. The quality and diversity of the program enables Agribusiness majors to undertake a variety of jobs.

This major, which is offered jointly with The Mary Jean and Frank P. Smeal College of Business, includes a core of courses required of all business students. Combining the required specialization area with a minor or electives also allows a student to focus on a particular area of interest.

For the B.S. degree in Agribusiness Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 78 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (43 credits)
AG BM 102(3)[1], AG BM 106(3)[1], ECON 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
ACCTG 211(4), AG BM 302(3)[1], AG BM 308W(3)[1], AG BM 320(3)[1], AG BM 338 IL(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), MIS 204(3), SCM 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
B A 301(2), B A 302(2), B A 303(2), B A 304(2) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (23 credits)
AG BM 101 GS(3)[1] or ECON 002 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)[77]
B A 243(4) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 2-6)
MATH 110 GQ(4) or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
R SOC 011 GS(3) or SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)[78]
AG BM 407(3) or AG BM 408(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of AG BM 440(3), AG BM 420(3), AG BM 460(3), or AG BM 438(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in a specialty area, in consultation with an adviser (at least 6 of these credits must be at the 300 or 400 level) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[77] AG BM 101 required unless ECON 002 was taken before entering the AG BM major.
[78] R SOC 011 required unless SOC 001 was taken before entering the AG BM major.

36-04-002 Change. Decrease minimum number of credits required for the major: the Forest Biology Option; the Forest Management Option; and the Urban Forestry Option changed from 129 credits to 127 credits. The Watershed Management Option changed from 121 credits to 120 credits. Add ENGL 202D; remove CMPSC 100, 101, 203; change FOR 203 from 2 to 3 credits. Change other credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Forest Science

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (FORSC)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR JAMIE MURPHY, Program Coordinator

The mission of the B.S. program in Forest Science is to help students develop the knowledge, skills, and professional ethics for understanding and managing forest ecosystems and living as responsible members of society.

The Forest Science major provides for the education necessary for students to pursue professional careers in one of the following options: (1) Forest Biology, (2) Forest Management, (3) Urban Forestry, and (4) Watershed Management. These options also will help prepare students for graduate studies in continuing professional education.

FOREST BIOLOGY OPTION: This option provides a strong background in the biological and ecological aspects of contemporary forestry and establishes a sound foundation for professional employment and graduate-level study in forest and environmental sciences.

FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option provides professional training in the management of forest lands consistent with the needs of ownership objectives. Employment opportunities include forest management positions with public agencies, industry, and private consulting.

URBAN FORESTRY OPTION: This option helps prepare students to manage community trees and green spaces. It emphasizes technical expertise, communication abilities, and skills for working with diverse people. Employment opportunities include municipalities, arboricultural companies, utilities, and government agencies.

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option focuses on water resources and the integrated management of natural resources with emphasis on water. Graduates qualify for federal employment as hydrologists and for water-related careers in municipal watershed management, state and local government, and environmental/engineering consulting.

For the B.S. degree in Forest Science, a minimum of 127 credits is required for the Forest Biology, Forest Management, and Urban Forestry options, and a minimum of 120 credits for the Watershed Management option. Students should be aware that completion of the Forest Science degree in four years requires enrollment at the University Park Campus beginning the fall semester of the sophomore year.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21-24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 3 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 96-100 credits
(This includes 21-24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3-6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 40 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (27 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), ECON 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
FOR 200W(3), FOR 203(3)[1], SOILS 101 GN(3), STAT 240 GQ(3), W P 203(1)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 308(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (13 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4), MATH 140 GQ(4), or MATH 140B GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
AEE 440(3), CAS 211(3), CAS 213(3), CAS 250(3), CAS 252(3), or CAS 352(3) (Sem: 5-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
AEE 440(3), ENGL 215(3), ENGL 416(3-6), ENGL 418(3-6), or ENGL 419(3) (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 56-60 credits

FOREST BIOLOGY OPTION: (60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (45 credits)
BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 202(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 204(2), FOR 320(2), FOR 350(3), FOR 366(4)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ENT 313(2), PPATH 318(2), W F S 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 409(2), FOR 410(3), FOR 421(3)[1], FOR 430(3), FOR 475(3)[1], FOR 480(3), FOR 494(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
AG BM 200(3) or MGMT 100(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 455(3) or GEOG 362(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)

FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: (60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (39 credits)
FOR 204(2), FOR 320(2), FOR 350(3), FOR 366(4)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ENT 313(2), PPATH 318(2), W F S 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 421(3)[1], FOR 440(3), FOR 455(3), FOR 466W(3)[1], FOR 470(3), FOR 475(3), FOR 480(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select a minimum of 3 credits from GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3), GEOSC 002 GN(3), METEO 003 GN(3), PHYS 150 GN(3), PHYS 250 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 200(3) or MGMT 100(3) (Sem: 7-8)
FOR 401(3) or FOR 416(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 12 credits from department list approved for the option (Sem: 5-8)

URBAN FORESTRY OPTION: (60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)
BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENT 313(2), FOR 204(2), FOR 350(3), FOR 366(4)[1], FOR 421(3), FOR 480(3), PPATH 318(2) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 401(3)[1], HORT 138(3), HORT 408(4) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
FOR 495(1-6)[1] or FOR 496(1-18)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 24 credits from the following:
a. Select 3-6 credits from ENT 319(1), FOR 410(3), FOR 416(3), FOR 466W(3), FOR 470(3), and W F S 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-8)
b. Select 2-3 credits from E R M 430(3), FOR 409(2), and FOR 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)
c. Select 3 credits from A S M 217(3) and FOR 475(3) (Sem: 5-8)
d. Select 3-6 credits from GEOG 122 GH(3), LARCH 003 GA(3), LARCH 060 GA(3), and LARCH 241(3) (Sem: 5-8)
e. Select 3-6 credits from MGMT 100(3) or MGMT 341(3) and R SOC 305W(3) or R SOC 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)
f. Select 3-6 credits from B A 250(3), B LAW 243(3), and E R M 411(3) (Sem: 5-8)

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTION: (56 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (47 credits)
CHEM 202(3), MATH 111 GQ(2), METEO 003 GN(3), PL SC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
GEOSC 001(3), PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
BIOL 220W(3) (Sem: 4-6)
A S M 327(3), W F S 435(3)[1]/ E R M 435(3)[1], GEOSC 452(3)[1], MICRB 201(3), SOILS 422(3) (Sem: 5-8)
FOR 410(3), FOR 470(3)[1], FOR 471(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
B LAW 243(3), E R M 411(3), PL SC 125(3), PL SC 417(3), or PL SC 419(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E RRE 201(3)/AG EC 201(3), E RRE 431W(3)/AG EC 431W(3), E RRE 429(3)/AG EC 429(3), ECON 302 GS(3), or ECON 428(3) (Sem: 7-8)
FOR 455(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 364(3), or SOILS 450(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-003 Change. Add VB SC 330. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Toxicology

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (TOX)

PROFESSOR JAMES ENDRES HOWELL, Program Coordinator

Toxicology addresses adverse effects of chemicals on animals and humans and includes exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose-response analysis, and risk characterization. This discipline relies on cutting-edge biotechnological approaches to gain insight into drug and toxicant action at the molecular level. Students enrolled in the Toxicology program will develop an understanding of the principles by which chemicals affect the health of humans and animals either adversely, as toxic agents, or beneficially, as therapeutic agents. Students will learn about: 1) mechanisms of action of drugs and toxicants on organ systems of the body; 2) general principles for assessing the safety of chemicals and therapeutic efficacy of drugs; and 3) state-of-the-art molecular, biological, and genetic approaches to understanding drugs, toxicants, and disease through a combination of laboratory and lecture experiences. The B.S. degree in Toxicology provides a strong foundation for graduate work leading to a Ph.D. in most biomedical fields. Students may choose to pursue a Ph.D. degree in Pharmacology, Toxicology, Biochemistry, Physiology, Pathobiology, Oncology, or Molecular Biology. Alternatively, students prepare for employment as research technicians, drug/toxicant specialists, or pharmaceutical sales representatives.

For the B.S. degree in Toxicology, a minimum of 124 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(15 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 12-15 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 79-83 credits
(This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (52 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 3-6)
BIOL 220W GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4), BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 3-6)
VB SC 330(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
E R M 431(3)[1], VB SC 430(3)[1], VB SC 433(3)[1] (Sem 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-21 credits)
Select 6-8 credits from CHEM 202(3), CHEM 203(3); or CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3-4 credits from STAT 200 GQ(4) or STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from AN SC 423(3) or BIOL 472(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits from B M B 211(3), B M B 212(1), B M B 221(2); or B M B 401(3), B M B 402(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of 400-level courses from department list (must include 6 credits of a grade of C or better[1]) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-004 Change FOR 203 from 2 to 3 credits. Change other credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Wildlife and Fisheries Science

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (W F S)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR JAMIE MURPHY, Program Coordinator

The purpose of the Wildlife and Fisheries Science major is to develop the knowledge, skills, and professional ethics of undergraduates interested in the conservation and management of fish and wildlife and their environments. The curriculum is designed to provide a broad-based science background that incorporates natural resource management principles that prepare our students for a diverse array of opportunities such as graduate school, natural resource management agencies, consulting firms, non-profits, etc. Students can choose from two options: Wildlife option and Fisheries option. Each option enables students to gain greater depth of knowledge in one area of the discipline. Coursework required for the Wildlife option meets The Wildlife Society's requirements for professional certification, and coursework required for the Fisheries option meets the American Fisheries Society's requirements for professional certification.

For the B.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Science, a minimum of 120 credits is required for the Wildlife option and a minimum of 122 credits is required for the Fisheries option.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 3-9 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87-95 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 69-72 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (45 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 220W GN(4)[1], CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1) (Sem: 1-4)
BIOL 240W GN(4), CHEM 202(3), PHYS 250 GN(4), SOILS 101 GN(3), W F S 209 GN(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 004 GS(3), W F S 300(2)[1], W F S 301(2)[1], W F S 310(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
W F S 446(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-21 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4)[1] or MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; MATH 111 GQ(2) or MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
AN SC 322(3), BIOL 133 GN(3), BIOL 222(3), or BIOL 230W GN(4); STAT 240 GQ(3) or STAT 301 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 350(3) or STAT 460(3) (Sem: 5-6)
AEE 440(3), CAS 211(3), ENGL 416(3), or ENGL 418(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits in natural resource economics, policy, planning, law, administration, or human dimensions from departmental list (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIRMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 18-23 credits

FISHERIES OPTION: (22-23 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10 credits)
W F S 452(2), W F S 453(2) (Sem: 5-6)
W F S 410(3), W F S 463W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12-13 credits)
BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 142(1); or BIOL 446(3), or AN SC 001(4) (Sem: 5-6)
W F S 407(3), W F S 408(3), or W F S 447W(3) (Sem: 5-8)
ENT 425(3), FOR 470(3), W F S 422(3);W F S 435(3)/E R M 435(3) (Sem: 5-8)
GEOG 160 GS(3), GEOG 363(3), GEOSC 303(3), GEOSC 340(3), GEOSC 412(3), GEOSC 440(3), or GEOSC 452(3) (Sem: 7-8)

WILDLIFE OPTION: (18-19 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
FOR 203(3) (Sem: 3-4)
W F S 407(3), W F S 408(3) (Sem: 5-6)
W F S 447W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
W F S 406(1) or W F S 409(1) (Sem: 5-6)
W F S 410(3), W F S 422(3), W F S 452(2), W F S 453(2), or W F S 463W(3) (Sem: 5-8)
BIOL 414(3), FOR 308(3), HORT 101 GN(3), HORT 138(3), or HORT 445(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-005 Change FOR 203 from 2 to 3 credits. Change other credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Wood Products

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (W P)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR JAMIE MURPHY, Program Coordinator

The primary purpose of this major is to help prepare students for careers in wood products industry. Students can choose from two options: Wood Products Business and Marketing and Wood Products Processing and Manufacturing. The options are designed to give the student flexibility for a science or business/marketing emphasis supported by a general education in communication, natural science, social science and humanities, and quantification.

Proper selection in elective courses enables the student to be prepared for employment in various aspects of wood products business management or marketing, process and product quality control, or research and development. The wide scope of the wood industry--from harvesting to the use of wood, fiber, and chemical products--presents a broad spectrum of employment opportunities. Within the employment spectrum are jobs related to roundwood processing to lumber and plywood, drying and protection of wood and fiber products, adhesives and coatings, reconstituted wood composites, paper manufacture, board products, and construction and housing.

For the B.S. degree in Wood Products, a minimum of 125 credits is required. Students should be aware that completion of the Wood Products degree in four years is difficult if they are not at the University Park campus beginning the fall semester of the sophomore year.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12-19 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 2-6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 86-97 credits
(For the Business and Marketing option this includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses. For the Processing and Manufacturing option this includes 19 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses, 3 credits of GS courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, and 7 credits of GN courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 41-43 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26 credits)
MATH 110 GQ(4), MATH 111 GQ(2) (Sem: 1-4)
FOR 203(3)[1], W P 200W(3)[1], W P 411(4) (Sem: 3-4)
W P 203(1)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
W P 417(4)[1], W P 437W(4)[1], W P 490(1)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-17 credits)
Select 3-4 credits from CMPSC 101 GQ(3), CMPSC 103 GQ(4), CMPSC 201 GQ(3), CMPSC 202 GQ(3), or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits of STAT 200 GQ(4), STAT 240 GQ(3), STAT 250 GQ(3), or STAT 301 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
CAS 211(3) or ENGL 215(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 45-54 credits

WOOD PRODUCTS BUSINESS AND MARKETING OPTION: (45-47 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (8 credits)
W P 400(2), W P 416(3), W P 435(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 24 credits from ACCTG 211(4); AG BM 101 GS(3) or ECON 002 GS(3); AG EC 350(3), B A 250(3), B LAW 243(3), ECON 004 GS(3); ECON 315 GS(3) or LER 100 GS(3); FIN 100(3), I B 303 IL(3) or ECON 333 GS(3); I E 302(3), MGMT 100(3), MKTG 221(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3), SCM 301(3), any GQ B A course or CMPSC 203 GQ(4), or any additional W P course (2-3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (13-15 credits)
Select 13-15 credits in consultation with adviser from department list.
(Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.)

WOOD PRODUCTS PROCESSING AND MANUFACTURING OPTION: (52-54 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)
W P 337(2), W P 412(3), W P 413(3), W P 418(4), W P 423(2) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (17-19 credits)
Select 17-19 credits from BIOL, BI SC (GN), PHYS (GN) biochemistry or organic chemistry, and any additional W P courses (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14 credits)
Select 14 credits in consultation with adviser from department list.
(Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

 

COURSE ADDS

36-04-006 E R M 447
Stream Restoration
STREAM RESTORATION (3)
Stream restoration including fluvial geomorphology, stream classification, impairment, sediment transport, stable stream design, and watershed assessment.
PREREQUISITE: A S M 327 or A B E 307 or C E 361
PROPOSED START: S12008

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-007 FOR 203
Field Dendrology
FIELD DENDROLOGY (2)
Field and laboratory identification of native and introduced trees and shrubs by leaf, fruit bud, twig, and bark.
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Field identification of native and introduced trees and shrubs by leaf, fruit, twig, and bark.
ADD CONCURRENT: FOR 200W or W P 200W and W P 203
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-008 SOILS 402
Chemistry of Soils and Fertilizers
CHEM SOILS FERTLZR (3)
Chemical properties of soils; reactions of chemical and organic fertilizers as they affect ion availability. Laboratory emphasizes soil-plant relationships.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 112, SOILS 101
APPROVED START: S12007

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Soil Nutrient Behavior and Management (SOIL NUTR BEHAV)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Chemical and biological behavior of soil nutrients; management for plant availability and fate in the environment. Laboratory emphasizes soil testing and soil-plant relationships.
PROPOSED START: SP2009

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Behrend College

36-04-009 Change. Add ENGL 434, 439; remove ENGL 262, 263, 265. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2008

Creative Writing

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (CWRIT)

The major will allow students to develop their writing skills through craft classes, literature classes, and writing workshops, in preparation for a variety of post-graduation options, from continuing on to M.F.A. degree programs to various positions in the publishing or editing fields. The program recognizes students must understand the relationship between tradition and individual talent, and provides a required sequence of literature courses designed to give students an overview of the historical literary traditions as well as the traditions of both modern and contemporary prose and poetry, options for additional literature courses (to broaden and/or deepen the nature of that relationship), and a course in creative writing theory. The program also includes a course which has students attending readings by Visiting Writers, and provides further professional development in a variety of ways. The program culminates in a capstone experience, the senior thesis, a collection of poetry or prose of publishable quality, with a critical preface to the collection demonstrating the students' ability to discuss the nature of their own writing and to place it in a literary context.

For the B.F.A. degree in Creative Writing, a minimum of 125 credits is required. A student enrolled in this major must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 80 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (52 credits)
ENGL 006(1-8)*, ENGL 200(3)[1], ENGL 212(3)[1], ENGL 213(3)[1], ENGL 215(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 311(3)[1], ENGL 312(3)[1], ENGL 433(3)[1], ENGL 434(3)[1] (Sem: 4-6)
ENGL 436(3)[1], ENGL 437(3)[1] , ENGL 439(3), ENGL 444(3)[1], ENGL 458(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
ENGL 401W(3)[1], ENGL 494(6)[1] (Sem: 7-8)
*Students planning to major in creative writing should enroll in this course every semester (typically 8 semesters). A student is required to take this course a minimum of four times.

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
Foreign Language Requirement (proficiency of 12 credits of coursework or equivalent)
Students must complete one of the following genre sequences (6 credits):

ENGL 412(3)[1] and ENGL 422(3)[1] (Sem: 4-8)
ENGL 413(3)[1] and ENGL 423(3)[1] (Sem: 4-8)
ENGL 415(3)[1] and ENGL 425(3)[1] (Sem: 4-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from The Canon and Its Critics (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from Globality and Literature (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from Cultural Studies (Sem: 3-6)

In addition to the requirements above, for enrichment, students in the B.F.A. degree program have the opportunity of taking ENGL 209, Literary Magazine Practicum, and serving as genre editors or assistant editors on the staff of Lake Effect, the national literary journal published by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College. This is a 1-credit course in which students may enroll for up to 8 credits over their time in the degree program.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-010 Change. Add program description. Decrease credits required for the minor from 19 credits to 18 credits; remove CMPSC 203. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Management Information Systems Minor

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (MISBD)

PROFESSOR JOHN M. MAGENAU III, Director

The Management Information Systems Minor can open new career options for the student, increase the student's market value, and improve the student's chances for advancement.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (9 credits)
MIS 204(3) (Sem: 3-4)
MIS 336(3), MIS 430(3) (Sem: 5-7)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED: (9 credits)
Select 6 credits from CMPSC or MIS courses (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from 400-level CMPSC or MIS (Sem: 7-8)

36-04-011 Change. Decrease number of credits required for the major from 132 credits to 131 credits. Add BIOL 141, CHEM 112, EDSGN 100S, M E 365 (new), MATSE 259; remove BDENG 100S, M E 368, PHYS 213; move CHEM 111 from Prescribed to Additional Courses and M E 308, 408 to a Supporting Course list. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Mechanical Engineering

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (ME BD)

Built upon a broad foundation in physics, chemistry, and mathematics, this major has the objective of educating graduates to be problem solvers. Graduates of this program will have had opportunities to learn about applying scientific principles, engineering analysis, and engineering design to solve unstructured problems that are typical of those found in mechanical engineering. The major helps prepare graduates for a lifelong productive career, whether they choose professional practice, graduate school, or some other career path. Graduates will have had opportunities to learn how to work with others toward a common goal, to clearly express their ideas in written and verbal form, and to be independent and capable of adapting to the continuously changing technology of the work environment.

After completing the fundamental science core, students may pursue their interest in mechanical engineering by studying fluid and solid mechanics, engineering materials and their properties, thermodynamics and heat transfer, computer-aided design, kinematics and dynamics of machine elements, machine design, finite elements, control systems, electricity, and electronic instrumentation and machinery. The students will be required to analyze and solve a significant mechanical engineering design problem during their senior year.

Entrance Requirement: In addition to the Carnegie unit and minimum GPA requirements described by University policies, all students applying for entrance to any of the engineering majors at Behrend college must have at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA by the end of the semester prior to applying for entrance to the major and have completed, with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 GN(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), and PHYS 211 GN(4). These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering, a minimum of 131 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (85 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], EDSGN 100S(3) (Sem: 1-2)
E E 211(3), E MCH 211(3)[1], E MCH 212(3)[1], E MCH 213(3)[1], M E 300(3)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], MATH 220(2), MATH 230(4), MATH 251(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
M E 320(3)[1], M E 345W(4)[1], M E 347(3)[1], M E 357(3)[1], M E 365(1)[1], M E 367(3)[1], M E 380(3)[1], M E 410(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
M E 448(3)[1], M E 449(3)[1], M E 468(3)[1], MATSE 259(3)[1] (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-6)
ECON 002 GS(3) or ECON 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-6)
CHEM 111 GN(1) and PHYS 214(2); or CHEM 112 GN(3), or BIOL 141 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (13 credits)
Select 13 credits of technical courses from school-approved list. (These credits must be selected to fulfill the thematic requirements of the major.) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-012 Change. Decrease minimum number of credits required for the major from 127 credits to 126 credits. Add the grade of C or better requirement to CHEM 110 GN, CMPSC 360, PHYS 211 GN. Add SWENG 352W, 421; remove CMPEN 352W, CMPSC 479, MIS 204; change SWENG 480 from 1 to 3 credits. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2008

Software Engineering

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (SE BD)

This major provides students with a strong foundation in software engineering through combination of classroom study, software development experience, and design projects. Design, analysis, verification, and maintenance of software systems are stressed. Built upon a core of science and mathematics courses, this major has the objective of educating graduates to be problem solvers. Students acquire the ability to work as members of a team toward successful attainment of a common goal, preparing them for work in industry or further study in graduate school. In addition, written and oral communication skills are developed from an early stage, culminating in a senior design project that stresses communication as well as engineering content.

In addition to completing a broad-based science core in mathematics, chemistry, and physics, students pursue their interest in software engineering by studying principles in computer programming, object-oriented design, software design, software verification, information systems, operating systems, and data communications. The program has a capstone software design project that requires students to work together on teams to design, plan, manage, and implement a software design project.

Entrance Requirement: In addition to the Carnegie unit and minimum GPA requirements described by University policies, all students applying for entrance to any of the engineering majors at The Behrend College must have at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA by the end of the semester prior to applying for entrance to the major and have completed, with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 GN(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), and PHYS 211 GN(4). These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Software Engineering, a minimum of 126 credits is required. A student enrolled in this major must earn a grade of C or better in each 300- and 400-level course in the major.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of the 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 101-102 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (86 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CMPSC 121 GQ(3), CMPSC 122(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 250(3), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
CMPEN 271(3)[1], CMPEN 275(1), CMPSC 360(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3), MIS 336(3), SWENG 311(3)[1] (Sem: (3-4)
CMPEN 441(3)[1], CMPSC 461(3)[1], CMPSC 465(3)[1], STAT 301 GQ(3)[1], SWENG 352W(3)[1], SWENG 411(3)[1], SWENG 421(3)[1], SWENG 431(3)[1] Sem: (5-6)
CMPEN 351(3)[1], CMPEN 461(3)[1], SWENG 480(3)[1], SWENG 481(3)[1], MGMT 301(3) (Sem: (7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
ECON 002 GS(3) or ECON 004 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 210(4) or E E 211(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits of technical elective courses from school-approved list. (Sem: 6-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-013 Change. Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Technical Sales Minor

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (TCHSL)

PROFESSOR JOHN M. MAGENAU III, Director, School of Business

This minor is designed to accommodate undergraduates enrolled in engineering and engineering technology who wish to augment their majors with further studies in industrial or technical sales. This minor is designed for non-business majors. The objective of the minor is to acquaint the technical students of these majors with the issues and methods associated with industrial or technical sales. Relevant studies include principles of management, operations management, supply chain management, marketing, logistics systems, procurement, personal selling or business-to-business marketing, and project management. Students who complete the minor will be positioned for career opportunities as direct sales engineers who play a key role in selection, purchase, installation and maintenance of technical products by selling technology and engineering solutions, or as manufacturing representatives who independently form contracts in exclusive marketing territories for multiple small manufacturers of compatible but not competing technical products.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits
Students are required to have a technically-oriented major (i.e. engineering, engineering technology, physical sciences, or other major as approved).

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (9 credits)
MGMT 301(3) (Sem: 5)
MKTG 301(3), SCM 310(3) (Sem: 6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (10 credits)
SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 5)
MKTG 410(3) or marketing elective as approved (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits from the following list: MGMT 409(3), MGMT 410(3), SCM 455(3), SCM 460(3) (Sem: 7-8)

COURSE ADDS

36-04-014 M E 365
Materials Testing Laboratory
MATERIALS LAB (1)
Laboratory for materials testing, property identification and modification, failure analysis, and metallurgical testing.
CONCURRENT: MATSE 259
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-015 M E 465
Introduction to Manufacturing Laboratory
MANUFACTURING LAB (1)
A laboratory-based introduction to manufacturing processes including material removal, forming, casting and joining for metals and non-metals.
CONCURRENT: M E 468
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-016 M E 469
Metallic Manufacturing Processes
METAL MANUF PROC (3)
Principles of metal working and introduction to current theories; analysis of deformation, joining, and metal removal processes.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: M E 468
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-017 SWENG 421
Software Architecture
SW ARCHITECTURE (3)
The analysis and design of software systems using canonical design patterns.
PREREQUISITE: SWENG 411
PROPOSED START: S12008

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-018 M E 367
Machine Design
MACHINE DESIGN (3:2:3)
Design of machine elements and connections, stress analysis, and modes of failure. Selection of materials for mechanical design.
PREREQUISITE: M E 380. Prerequisite or concurrent: M E 368
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Design and selection of machine components and connections. Stress analysis and modes of failure of materials used in machine components.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: M E 347
ADD CONCURRENT: MATSE 259
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-019 M E 380
Machine Dynamics
MACHINE DYNAMICS (3:3:0)
Kinematic and dynamic analysis and design of linkages, cams and gears. Dynamics of machines including static and dynamic forces and balancing.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 212. Prerequisite or concurrent: M E 347
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Kinematic analysis of mechanisms such as linkages, flywheels, cams and gears. Dynamic forces and vibrations of mechanisms.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: E MCH 212, MATH 251
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-020 M E 448
Engineering Design Concepts
ENGR DES CONCEPTS (3:2:2)
Engineering design and modelling, engineering economic analysis techniques, technical communication skills, project planning and design.
PREREQUISITE: M E 410, M E 367, seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: M E 380, seventh-semester standing
ADD CONCURRENT: M E 367, M E 410
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-021 M E 468
Engineering for Manufacturing
ENGR FOR MFG (4:3:2)
Manufacturability, the selection of the most effective materials and processes, and quality assurance.
PREREQUISITE: M E 368
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATSE 259
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-022 SWENG 480
Software Engineering Design
SFTWARE ENGR DSGN (1:1:0)
Concepts of engineering ethics, economy, and project management, senior capstone project selection, and technical communication skills.
PREREQUISITE: SWENG 431
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2009

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Smeal College of Business

COURSE ADDS

36-04-023 B A 303H
Honors Core Marketing
MARKETING (2)
Junior Core Marketing - Honors Section.
PREREQUISITE: ACCTG 211, B A 243 or B A 241 and B A 242, ECON 002, ECON 004, ENGL 015, MATH 110 or MATH 140, MIS 204, SCM 200 or STAT 200
PROPOSED START: S12008

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital College

36-04-024 Change. Add CRIMJ 201, 220, 221, 234, 300H, 301H, 406, 413, 414, 415, 421, 423, 425, 426, 441, 460, 462; remove PL SC 001, 003, 014, 403, 408, 409, 423, 424, 428, 453, 456, 474, 489, 496, 497, PUBPL 485; move CRIMJ 241 from Prescribed to Additional Courses. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Criminal Justice

Capital College (CRIMJ): Penn State Harrisburg
World Campus

PROFESSOR BARBARA A. SIMS, Program Coordinator, School of Public Affairs

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Criminal Justice helps provide its graduates with the communications and analytical skills critical to succeed in criminal justice and related careers. Through an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of crime and society, the program also equips students to pursue graduate study in criminal justice or related disciplines, and educates students to become effective problem-solvers as professionals in the field of criminal justice.

The study of criminal justice is approached as an applied interdisciplinary science, teaching students both the theoretical and the practical aspects of crime control and the administration of justice. The Criminal Justice curriculum provides students with the opportunity and assistance to acquire knowledge of the roles of policing, courts, laws, and corrections as they relate to both the adult and juvenile justice system. Students also gain knowledge of the history, concepts, and critical issues related to the role of gender and race/ethnicity in the criminal justice system, victimology, and ethics in criminal justice. The curriculum further provides a theoretical foundation of the discipline, combined with a thorough understanding of the scientific method as it applies to criminal justice. This combination is expected to sharpen the students' talents of reasoning and judgment, qualities imperative to rational functioning in criminal justice and related professions.

For a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Admission Requirements for Transfer Students:
Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average (4.0 scale). The evaluation of prior college work is conducted on an individual basis by the Office of Enrollment Services at both campuses.

Entry to Major Requirements:
The student must have a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average and an average of C (2.00) or better in any course already taken in the major.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-4 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 13-17 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 62 credits
(This includes 0-4 credits of General Education courses: 0-4 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES
(25 credits)[1]
CRIMJ 012 GS(3), CRIMJ 100 GS(3), CRIMJ 113 US(3), CRIMJ 210(3), CRIMJ 230(3), CRIMJ 250W(4), CRIMJ 450W(3), CRIMJ 465(3) (Sem: 5-8)

(At least 9 credits in Additional Courses and/or Supporting Courses must be at the 400 level.)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16 credits)
Select 4 credits from CRIMJ 320(4)/PUBPL 320(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from the following: CRIMJ 201(3), CRIMJ 220(3), CRIMJ 221(3), CRIMJ 234(3), CRIMJ 241(3) (Sem 5-8)
Select 6 credits from the following: CRIMJ 300H(3-6), CRIMJ 301H(3-6), CRIMJ 304(3), CRIMJ 389(3), CRIMJ 406(3), CRIMJ 407 US(3), CRIMJ 408(3), CRIMJ 410(3), CRIMJ 413(3), CRIMJ 414(3), CRIMJ 415(3), CRIMJ 421(3), CRIMJ 423 US(3), CRIMJ 425(3), CRIMJ 426(3-6), CRIMJ 430(3), CRIMJ 431(3), CRIMJ 441 US(3), CRIMJ 453 US(3), CRIMJ 460(3), CRIMJ 462(3), CRIMJ 489W(3), CRIMJ 495(3-12), CRIMJ 496(1-18), CRIMJ 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)
Or Select 12 credits from the following: CRIMJ 300H(3-6), CRIMJ 301H(3-6), CRIMJ 304(3), CRIMJ 389(3), CRIMJ 406(3), CRIMJ 407 US(3), CRIMJ 408(3), CRIMJ 410(3), CRIMJ 413(3), CRIMJ 414(3), CRIMJ 415(3), CRIMJ 421(3), CRIMJ 423 US(3), CRIMJ 425(3), CRIMJ 426(3-6), CRIMJ 430(3), CRIMJ 431(3), CRIMJ 441 US(3), CRIMJ 453 US(3), CRIMJ 460(3), CRIMJ 462(3), CRIMJ 489W(3), CRIMJ 495(3-12), CRIMJ 496(1-18), CRIMJ 497(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS
(21 credits)
Select 6 credits: 3 credits at the 200 level and 3 credits at the 300 and 400 level or 6 credits at the 300 and 400 level from the following: AFRAS, BE SC, PL SC, PUBPL, PSYCH, SOC (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits in consultation with an academic adviser and in support of the student's interests. For information about specific courses in this area, contact the School of Public Affairs. (Sem: 5-8)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

36-04-025 AM ST 103 (GH;US)
American Masculinities
AM MASC (3)
Introduction to aspects of masculinities and manhood in America.
PROPOSED START: S12008

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

36-04-026 Change. Add E R M 433, 450, GEOEE 408, GEOSC 413W, 483; remove GEOSC 412, 457, 484.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Geosciences

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (GSCBS)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR DAVID M. BICE, Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs

The geosciences are concerned with understanding earth processes and the evolutionary history of the Earth. Geoscientists work to discover and develop natural resources such as groundwater, metals, and energy sources; to solve technology-generated environmental problems such as acid mine drainage and waste disposal; to predict geological events, such as the occurrence of earthquakes and volcanism; and to solve fundamental questions concerning the origin and evolution of Earth and life. Our degree programs stress data collection; investigation, analysis and synthesis of information related to complex natural problems; and rigor of thought and clarity of oral and written expression. The B.S. provides a broad foundation in the physical and natural sciences for students who seek immediate employment or post-graduate education in several areas of the geosciences. Examples of careers include the petroleum and mining industries; local or federal resource management; water resources, treatment and management; energy and environmental industries; and academia. A senior thesis involving independent research is required of all students.

GENERAL OPTION: This option is designed to provide sufficient flexibility so that the student has the opportunity to prepare for graduate school by focusing on specialized areas in the geosciences. The option's flexibility also permits students to develop a broad background in the geosciences in preparation for post-graduate majors that require breadth, such as environmental law.

HYDROGEOLOGY OPTION: This option helps prepare the student for entry-level positions in environmental agencies and firms where a specialized knowledge of groundwater and related areas is required. The option is also appropriate for students wishing to pursue an advanced degree in the area of hydrogeology.

For the B.S. degree in Geosciences, a minimum of 121 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 97 credits
(This includes 21 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses, 6 credits of GQ courses, 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 69 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (66 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), EM SC 100S GWS(3)[71], MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOSC 001(3) [if GEOSC 001 is not available, GEOSC 020 GN(3) may be substituted] (Sem: 1-6)
GEOSC 201(4)[1], GEOSC 202(4)[1], GEOSC 204(4) (Sem: 3-6)
GEOSC 203(4)[1], GEOSC 310(4)[1], GEOSC 465(4)[1], GEOSC 472A(3), GEOSC 472B(3) (Sem: 5-6)
GEOSC 494W(3), GEOSC 496(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 28 credits

GENERAL OPTION: (28 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (14 credits)
Select 14 credits from 300- and 400-level GEOSC courses: GEOSC 303(3), GEOSC 340(3), GEOSC 402(3), GEOSC 416(3), GEOSC 421(3), GEOSC 422(3), GEOSC 423(4), GEOSC 424(3), GEOSC 426(3), GEOSC 434(3), GEOSC 439(3), GEOSC 440(3), GEOSC 451(3), GEOSC 452(3), GEOSC 454(3), GEOSC 461(3), GEOSC 470W(3), GEOSC 471(3), GEOSC 489(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14 credits)
Select at least 2 credits in physics from approved departmental list (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits of computer science, mathematics [above the level of MATH 141 GQ(4)], or statistics (Sem: 3-6)
Select 9 credits, in consultation with adviser, supportive of the student's interest (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 3-8)

HYDROGEOLOGY OPTION: (28 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSE (3 credits)
GEOSC 452(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from CMPSC 201 GQ(3), CMPSC 202 GQ(3), CMPSC 203 GQ(4), STAT 250 GQ(3) [if STAT 250 is not available, STAT 200 GQ(4) may be substituted] (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from A S M 327(3), E R M 450(3), SOILS 101 GN(3), SOILS 415(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits from A and B. Students must select at least 3 credits from A and 3 credits from B.
A. CHEM 202(3), CHEM 450(3), E R M 433(3), GEOSC 413W(3), GEOSC 419(3) (Sem: 3-8)
B. GEOEE 408(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOSC 340(3), GEOSC 439(3), GEOSC 454(3), GEOSC 483(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (10 credits)
Select at least 2 credits in Physics from approved departmental list (Sem: 1-4)
Select 8 credits, in consultation with advisor, supportive of the student's interest. (Students may apply 6 credits of ROTC) (Sem: 3-8)

Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Geosciences

The Department of Geosciences offers an integrated B.S./MS. Program that is designed to allow academically superior students to obtain both the B.S. and the M.S. degree in Geosciences within 5 years of study. Students who wish to complete the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Geosciences must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S/M.S program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student follows the course scheduling of one of the options in Geosciences; however, if a student intends to enter the Integrated B.S./M.S. program, he/she would be encouraged to take, wherever appropriate, upper level classes. By the end of the junior year,the student normally would apply for admission to the program. A decision of acceptance would be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and a M.S. Advising Committee appointed. During the senior year, the student would follow the scheduling of the B.S. Geosciences option he/she has selected, with an emphasis on completing 500-level coursework wherever appropriate. In place of the Senior Thesis, the student will complete a M.S. Thesis

During the fifth year the student will take courses fulfilling the departmental M.S. degree requirements and complete the M.S. Thesis.

Admissions Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Geosciences must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S program by the end of their junior year. Typical tests scores of students admitted to the Geosciences Graduate Program are: GPA 3.5, and GRE's Verbal 570 and Quantitative 700. Three letters of recommendation by faculty members for admission to graduate studies are required. The applications are reviewed by the Admissions Committee of the Geosciences Graduate Program and acted upon by the Associate Head for Graduate Programs.

The details of the program requirements can be found in the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

36-04-027 Change. Add A B E 307, 467, A S M 217, CHEM 402, C E 361, 370, 371, 473, ENVE 411, 415, E R M 432, 435, 450, GEOSC 419, 445, METEO 448, SOILS 405, 418, W F S 422; Remove BIOL 435, C E 270, E R M 200, 424, GEOSC 457, 462, 483, W F S 309.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Watersheds & Water Resources Minor

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (W W R)

PROFESSOR C. GREGORY KNIGHT, Department of Geography, in charge

Watersheds are important landscape features that control the biogeochemistry of natural waters. This interdisciplinary minor enables students to learn the fundamental processes governing the transport and chemical evolution of surface and subsurface waters. It provides a complement to elective and required coursework in earth sciences, resource management, wastewater treatment, and/or environmental planning. Students in this program will learn to apply fundamental concepts of chemistry, biology, geoscience, and landscape evolution to processes operating at the watershed scale. Learning objectives for the minor include excellence in written and oral expression, the ability to collect and interpret data from dynamic natural systems, and rigor in scientific thought.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the WWR committee's approved list of courses, which includes but is not limited to courses listed below (at least 6 credits must be taken at the 400 level):
B E 307(2), B E 467(4), A S M 217(3), A S M 327(3), C E 361(3), C E 370(3), C E 371(3), C E 473(3), C E 475(3), CHEM 202(3), CHEM 402(3), E R M 411(3), E R M 432(3), E R M 435(3), E R M 450(3), ENVE 411(3), ENVE 415(3), FOR 470(3), FOR 471(1), GEOEE 408(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOSC 201(4), GEOSC 340(3), GEOSC 412(3), GEOSC 413W(3), GEOSC 419(3), GEOSC 445(4), GEOSC 452(3), METEO 417(3), METEO 448(3), SOILS 405(3), SOILS 415(3), SOILS 418(3), W F S 410(3), W F S 422(3) (Sem: 5-8)

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-028 MATSE 468
Ceramics Laboratory III
CERAMICS LAB III (0.5-1)
Cermaic processing and powder characteristics.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 462
APPROVED START: FA2005

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1
PROPOSED START: SP2009

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Engineering

36-04-029 Change. Add CMPSC 121. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2008

Electrical Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (E E)

PROFESSOR W. KENNETH JENKINS, Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering is the application of electronics, electrical science and technology, and computer systems to the needs of society. The Electrical Engineering faculty is committed to providing a curriculum that educates students for both professional careers in electrical engineering and advanced study at the graduate level in electrical engineering or a related field. A combination of required and elective courses ensures that students acquire a broad knowledge base in electrical circuits, digital systems, electronic devices, electromagnetics, and linear systems, as well as expertise in one or more areas of specialization, such as communications, computer hardware, control systems, digital signal and image processing, electromagnetics, electro-optics, electronic material and device processing, electronic design, power systems, and remote sensing and space systems. Students learn electrical engineering theoretical, analytical, and design concepts through lecture-based courses. Additional problem-solving skills and practical experience are developed through design projects and laboratory assignments, which also provide opportunities for learning team-building, teamwork, and technical communication skills.

The BSEE Program prepares students to achieve the following career and professional goals:

  1. Practice electrical engineering through technical assignments such as design, product development, research, manufacturing, consulting, testing, sales, and management.
  2. Be proficient in the use of modern design tools.
  3. Participate and provide leadership on teams comprised of individuals with diverse professional and cultural backgrounds.
  4. Have effective written and oral communication skills to convey information and ideas.
  5. Continue professional development through activities such as graduate school, continuing and distance education, professional training, and membership in professional societies.
  6. Conduct themselves in a professional and ethical manner.

For the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, a minimum of 129 credits is required. This baccalaureate program in Electrical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone 410-347-7700; or www.abet.org (Opens New Window).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 111-112 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (65 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), EDSGN 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPEN 271(3)[1], CMPEN 275(1), E E 210(4)[1], E E 310(4)[1], E SC 314(3)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2-3), MATH 230(4), MATH 250(3), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 316(3)[1], E E 330(4)[1], E E 350(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19-20 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 002 GS(3) or ECON 004 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from I E 424(3), PHYS 410(3-4), STAT 401(3), STAT 414(3), or STAT 418(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E E 402W(3) or E E 403W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (27 credits)
Select 6 credits from program-approved list of 300-level courses (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits from program-approved lists of 300-level or 400-level courses (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits from program-approved list of 400-level courses (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits of engineering /science courses from a program-approved list (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 additional credits, which may include up to 6 credits of ROTC, up to 6 co-op credits, and others from a program-approved list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

36-04-030 Change. Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2008

Industrial Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (I E)

PROFESSOR RICHARD J. KOUBEK, Head, Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

The undergraduate program in industrial engineering, being the first established in the world, has a long tradition of providing a strong, technical, hands-on education in design, control, and operation of manufacturing processes and systems. The curriculum provides a broad-based education in manufacturing, operations research and ergonomics through a base of mathematics, physical and engineering sciences, and laboratory and industrial experiences. It builds a strong foundation for the development of a professionally competent and versatile industrial engineer, able to function in a traditional manufacturing environment as well as in a much broader economy, including careers in financial services, communication, information technology, transportation, health care, consulting, or academia.

We expect our graduates to:

  1. Use their industrial engineering knowledge to understand, analyze and design manufacturing and service processes, systems, and work environments.
  2. Collect, analyze, and interpret data to make sound managerial decisions through modeling and quantitative analysis, as well as the use of information systems.
  3. Present work and ideas effectively through oral and written communications and demonstrate independent learning.
  4. Perform in a professional and ethical manner as part of a diverse team in a global society.

The following outcomes are included in the courses taught in the program:

  1. Management and Information Systems for Industrial Engineering; apply time value of money to make financial decisions and understand cost-accounting principles; understand probability concepts applicable to solve engineering problems; including reliability issues; conduct tests of hypotheses, create regression models and understand and apply statistical quality control methods such as process capability and control charts; formulate, solve and analyze real problems using Markov chains, network models, dynamic programming, queuing theory and inventory models; create simulation models of manufacturing and service systems and analyze simulation output; and gain an in-depth knowledge of implementation-related issues and theoretical aspects of database and Web-based operations related to industrial engineering.
  2. Manufacturing Engineering: understand information contained in typical specifications and methods of product verification and conformance to specifications; and program flexible manufacturing equipment and system controllers; design logical manufacturing layouts and implement contemporary systems issues.
  3. Human Factors: analyze and design both the job and the work site in a cost-effective manner, as well as measure the resulting output; understand and apply cognitive systems engineering: identify visual, auditory, cognitive, perceptual and environmental aspects of human performance, perform task analysis and evaluate human-computer interfaces; and perform work measurement, develop an MTM analysis and carry out a work sampling study.
  4. General: present engineering study results in technical reports and in oral presentations, demonstrate life-long learning by synthesizing information from several sources, work effectively in groups on case studies and projects, demonstrate knowledge of contemporary issues, understand professional and ethical responsibility and the impact of engineering decisions in a global and societal context; and design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability.

After completing courses required for the core and fundamental competencies in the major, students can choose one of the following three tracks for specialization:

Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Service Systems Engineering, and Engineering Information Systems.

A total of 9 course credits in each of the three tracks from the approved list is required, in addition to the three-credit capstone design course.

For the B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering, a minimum of 129 credits is required. This baccalaureate program in Industrial Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone 410-347-7700; or www.abet.org (Opens New Window).

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 111 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (74 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), EDSGN 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 210(5)[1], ENGL 202C GWS(3), MATH 220 GQ(2-3), MATH 231(2), MATH 250(3), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
I E 302(3)[1], I E 305(3)[1], I E 322(3)[1], I E 323(3)[1], I E 327(3)[1], I E 330(3)[1], I E 405(3)[1], MATSE 259(3) (Sem: 5-6)
I E 425(3), I E 453(3), I E 470(3), I E 480W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (16 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3) or ECON 004 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
I E 408(3) or I E 419(3) (Sem: 7-8) (The course not taken to satisfy this requirement can be taken as a track elective. Please see the list in (iv) of section C.)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 3 credits as a science selection from department list (Sem: 3-4)
Select 6 credits as non-major electives from department list (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits in manufacturing processes from department list. (Sem: 5-6) (The courses not taken to satisfy this requirement can be taken as track electives. Please see the lists in (iii) and (iv) of Section C.)
Select 9 credits for the track selected from department list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

36-04-031 M E 199 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-032 M E 299 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-033 M E 399 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-034 M E 499 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-035 NUC E 199 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-036 NUC E 299 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-037 NUC E 399 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-038 NUC E 499 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-039 S T S 124 (GH;US;IL)
History of Western Medicine
HIST WEST MED (3)
This course explores the history of health, illness, and medicine in western society.
CROSS LIST: HIST 124
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-040 S T S 416 (US;IL)
Race, Gender and Science
RACE GENCER & SCI (3)
The class will focus on race and gender as products of science, and how societal values shape scientific activity.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in S T S, WMNST or AAA S
CROSS LIST: AAA S 416 WMNST 416
PROPOSED START: S12008

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Health and Human Development

36-04-041 Change. Revise program description. Add HRIM 385, NUTR 380; remove H P A 332, 460, HRIM 365, MGMT 100, 321, PSYCH 281. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2008

Nutritional Sciences

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (NUTR)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR GORDON JENSEN, Head of the Department

The study of nutrition is a dynamic science that incorporates knowledge of human biology and biochemistry to understand how the body utilizes nutrients and related substances for optimal health throughout the lifecycle. In addition, students gain an understanding of how the interplay of nutrition and lifestyle relate to current public health issues and development of chronic and acute diseases.

The student may select the Applied Sciences option and apply knowledge of nutrition and human behavior to improve the nutritional status of individuals and communities or apply nutrition principles and counseling skills to medical problems in clinical dietetics. Other emphases in nutrition education and communications, nutrition and food science, or nutrition and exercise science are possible within the Applied Sciences option. All graduates with the Applied Sciences option satisfy the current Didactic Program in Dietetics requirement for application to a dietetic internship accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Dietetics Education (CADE). Upon satisfactory completion of an accredited dietetic internship, graduates are eligible to take the registration examination to earn the credential Registered Dietitian. This option also prepares students for graduate study and employment in areas of applied nutrition.

The Basic Sciences option emphasizes the laboratory aspects of nutrition and is recommended for students preparing for careers in medicine and other health related fields such as dentistry, optometry, physician assistant, physical therapy, and chiropractic. This option also prepares students for graduate study and for employment in laboratory-based research. Students enrolled in the Basic Sciences option who want to become a Registered Dietitian should select all of the additional courses in the Didactic Program in Dietetics. A list of courses recommended for developing a specific competence within each option or to meet the academic requirements for a dietetic internship is available from the department office.

APPLIED SCIENCES OPTION: This option integrates knowledge of behavioral sciences and human physiology with nutrition. The option includes practical experience in food service management. Graduates of this option usually work in hospitals, clinics, community agencies, schools, the food industry, wellness centers, private practice, or continue to graduate study in nutrition, public health, business, or related fields.

BASIC SCIENCES OPTION: This option incorporates knowledge from biology, chemistry, physiology, and physics with nutrition. This option specifically prepares students for entry into medical school and other health related professional schools. This option also prepares students for careers in laboratory research in the pharmaceutical or food industries, government, or academia.

For the B.S. degree in Nutritional Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18-22 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 6-7 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 87-90 credits
(This includes 18-22 credits of General Education courses: Applied Sciences Option: 9 credits of GN courses; 4 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GHA courses; or Basic Sciences Option: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GHA courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 36 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)
BIOL 141 GN(3), CHEM 110 GN(3), NUTR 251 GHA(3)[1], NUTR 358(2)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-3)
B M B 211(3)[1], NUTR 445(3)[1], NUTR 446(3)[1], NUTR 451(3)[1] (Sem: 5-7)
NUTR 452(3), NUTR 490W(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
CHEM 202(3) or CHEM 210(3) (Sem: 2-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 51-54 credits

APPLIED SCIENCES OPTION: (54 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), NUTR 120(3), NUTR 360(3) (Sem: 4-6)
HRIM 329(3), HRIM 330(2), NUTR 456(2) (Sem: 5-6)
NUTR 370(1), NUTR 400(1), NUTR 453(3) (Sem: 7-8)
NUTR 380(3) (Sem: 3-5)
HRIM 385(3) (Sem: 5-7)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
AG BM 101GS(3), ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
H D FS 129GS(3) or PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (20 credits)
Select 20 credits, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. See program list of recommended courses. (At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level and, of those, no more than 3 credits may be NUTR 496.) (Sem: 3-8)

BASIC SCIENCES OPTION: (51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (32 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 142(1), BIOL 230W GN(4), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-3)
B M B 212(1), MICRB 201(3), MICRB 202(2), PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
CHEM 203(3) or CHEM 212(3) (Sem: 4-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (16 credits)
Select 16 credits, in consultation with an adviser, from University-wide offerings that provide relevance to this option. See program list of recommended courses. (At least 9 credits must be at the 400 level and, of those, no more than 6 credits may be NUTR 496.) (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of the Liberal Arts

36-04-042 Change. Drop the six program options: Arts; Humanities; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Science and Mathematics; Science, Technology, and Society; and Liberal Studies. Decrease the minimum number of credits required for the major from 123 credits to 120 credits. Revise program description. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Letters, Arts, and Sciences

Abington College (LASAB)
Altoona College (LASAL)
University College (LASCC): Penn State Beaver, Penn State Brandywine, Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette,
Penn State Greater Allegheny, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Mont Alto, Penn State Shenango, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Penn State York
University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (LAS)
World Campus

Letters, Arts, and Sciences is a multi-disciplinary, theme-oriented, and student-designed major leading to a bachelor of arts degree. The major consists of 36 credits, divided into two sections. The core (12 credits) consists of 3 credits each in the following: research methods/projects; communication skills; theory/application; and critical analysis. The additional courses (24 credits) consist of courses directed toward the student's theme, 15 credits of which must be at the 400 level.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the major, the student must submit a proposal. In consultation with an LAS adviser, the student formulates a proposal designing a program that investigates a theme from the viewpoint of at least three different subject areas. Students may not duplicate existing majors from any academic area. An important standard for entrance to the Letters, Arts, and Sciences major is the student's ability to design a program with academic integrity worthy of a bachelor of arts degree.

For the B.A. degree in Letters, Arts, and Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Early Admission Program for Professional Schools: If a student is accepted and enrolled as a degree candidate in a professional postgraduate degree program requiring three years or more to complete (such as medical school, dental school, law school, theological seminary, etc.) and if that student completes 94 undergraduate credits at Penn State including General Education, B.A. requirements, and the LAS 12-credit core requirements, that student may use up to 30 credits from the professional school to complete the B.A. in LAS.

It must be emphasized that only top students are accepted into professional school programs on such an early admission basis and that not every professional school has such a policy. Students must have enrolled in LAS prior to attending the professional school to request graduation in LAS.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 36 credits[1]

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 24 credits from University-wide offerings to include:
a) 12 credits at the 400 level representing at least three different subject areas;
b) a 3 credit 400-level capstone course (to be selected in consultation wtih adviser);
c) at least 9 credits (of the 24 total) from the humanities and social sciences.
(Sem: 1-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 3 credits in research methods/projects from courses that involve research methodology or that focus on a research project; select 3 credits in communication skills from courses that focus on expression including those in verbal, symbolic, and written skills; select 3 credits in theory/application from courses that focus on theory, principle, central concepts, or fundamental issues; select 3 credits in critical analysis from courses that focus on evaluation, synthesis, and analysis. (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

36-04-043 AAA S 416 (US;IL)
Race, Gender and Science
RACE GENDER & SCI (3)
The class will focus on race and gender as products of science, and how societal values shape scientific activity.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in S T S, WMNST, or AAA S
CROSS LIST: S T S 416 WMNST 416
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-044 AAA S 464 (IL)
Globalization, Extractive Industries, and Conflict in Africa
RES WARS AFRICA (3)
Socioeconomic and environmental impacts of extractive industries in Africa.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 110 or at least one of the following: PL SC 003 or PL SC 014 or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: PL SC 464
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-045 CHNS 120 (GH;IL)
Introduction to Chinese Literature and Culture
CHNS LIT & CULTURE (3)
Chinese cultural productions, classical through contemporary; literature and film; changing cultural settings in multiple Chinese-speaking locations. Taught in English.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-046 HIST 124 (GH;US;IL)
History of Western Medicine
HIST WEST MED (3)
This course explores the history of health, illness, and medicine in western society.
CROSS LIST: S T S 124
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-047 PL SC 464 (IL)
Globalization, Extractive Industries, and Conflict in Africa
RES WARS AFRICA (3)
Socioeconomic and environmental impacts of extractive industries in Africa.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 110 or at least one of the following: PL SC 003 or PL SC 014 or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: AAA S 464
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-048 S T S 202 (GH;IL)
Introduction to Disability Studies in the Humanities
INTRO DS HUM (3)
Provides a humanities-based interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-049 WMNST 416 (US;IL)
Race, Gender and Science
RACE GENDER & SCI (3)
The class will focus on race and gender as products of science, and how societal values shape scientific activity.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in S T S, WMNST or AAA S
CROSS LIST: AAA S 416 S T S 416
PROPOSED START: S12008

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-050 ARAB 002
Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II
EL MOD STD ARAB II (4:3:2)
Continued audio-lingual practice in class and language laboratory of modern standard Arabic; continuation of grammar and vocabulary building.
PREREQUISITE: ARAB 001
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Continuation of ARAB 001; development of additional skills in conversation, reading, and writing; grammar and vocabulary building; cultural components.
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-051 ARAB 003
Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic
INT MOD STD ARAB (4:3:2)
Continued audio-lingual practice in class and language laboratory of modern standard Arabic; complex grammatical forms; vocabulary building principles.
PREREQUISITE: ARAB 002
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: More complex grammatical forms; vocabulary building principles; continued development of skills in conversation, reading, writing; culturally-oriented readings and films.
PROPOSED START: SP2009

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Eberly College of Science

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-052 ASTRO 451
Astronomical Techniques
ASTRO TECH (2:2:0)
Practical methods of modern observational astronomy, detectors, filters, instrumentation for both ground-based and space observations, and data analysis.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 212, PHYS 213, PHYS 214
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-053 FRNSC 302
Criminalistics IB
CRIM IB (3)
Basic concepts of criminalistics and the role of the criminalist in a forensic investigation.
PREREQUISITE: FRNSC 301; major standing in Forensic Science
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: FRNSC 201 and MICRB 202 or BIOL 230W
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-054 MATH 220 (GQ)
Matrices
MATRICES (2:2:0)
Systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; linear systems of differential equations.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 110 , MATH 140 , or MATH 140H
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 2-3
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-055 MATH 412
Fourier Series and Partial Differential Equations
FOURIER SERIES (3:3:0)
Orthogonal systems and Fourier series; derivation and classification of partial differential equations; eigenvalue function method and its applications; additional topics.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 230 or MATH 231; MATH 250 or MATH 251
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 230; MATH 250 or MATH 251
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-056 MATH 417
Qualitative Theory of Differential Equations
QUAL DIFF EQ (3:3:0)
Linear differential equations, stability of stationary solutions, ordinary bifurcation, exchange of stability, Hopf bifurcation, stability of periodic solutions, applications.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 220, MATH 250
APPROVED START: SP1985

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 220; MATH 250 or MATH 251
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-057 MATH 437
Algebraic Geometry
ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY (3:3:0)
Study of curves in the plane defined by polynomial equations p(x,y)= 0. Projective equivalence, singular points, classification of cubics.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 230 or MATH 231
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 230 or MATH 231; MATH 311W
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-058 MATH 465
Number Theory
NUMBER THEORY (3:3:0)
Elements, divisibility of numbers, congruences, residues, and forms.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 230 or MATH 231
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: MATH 311W
PROPOSED START: SP2009

COURSE DROPS

36-04-059 ASTRO 293
Observational Astronomy Laboratory
OBSERV ASTRO LAB (1:0:2)
Selected experiments in observational astronomy using telescopes and modern instrumentation; emphasizing the process of data acquisition, analysis, and scientific discovery.
CONCURRENT: ASTRO 292
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-060 ASTRO 452
Advanced Astronomy Laboratory
ADV ASTRO LAB (1:0:2)
Selected experiments and instrumentation techniques in various fields of modern astronomy.
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: ASTRO 292, ASTRO 451
PROPOSED START: S12008

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

University College

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-061 B A 100
Introduction to Business
INTRO TO BUS (3:3:0)
A comprehensive view of the contemporary environment of business.
APPROVED START: S11986

NEW
ADDING GENERAL EDUCATION CODE: GS
PROPOSED START: SP2009


APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

36-04-062 Drop the Master of Agriculture (M.Agr.) degree in Agronomy.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Agronomy (AGRO)

Program Home Page

D. M. SYLVIA, Head of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
116 Agricultural Sciences and Industries Building
814-865-2025

D. P. KNIEVEL, Chair of the Graduate Program in Agronomy
254 Agricultural Sciences and Industries Building
814-865-1547

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

Agronomy graduate programs emphasize research that increases the efficiency of production of agronomic crops, improves the quality of food, feed, and fiber available for humans and animals, assists in the use and development of land resources, develops an understanding of the basic soil-plant-animal climate complex of which humans are a part, and improves the overall quality of the human environment. Within this framework, students may specialize in soil science, crop science, or soil and crop management, including turfgrass management. Areas of specialization in soil science include chemistry, fertility, genesis and morphology, microbiology, mineralogy, and physics. Crop science specialties include breeding and genetics, ecology and management, physiology, and weed science.

Research facilities include a 340-acre experimental farm with irrigation facilities, a 22-acre turfgrass research center, and 18-acre landscape management research center, greenhouses, service areas, and a number of well-equipped experimental laboratories. The department enjoys close collaboration with the USDA Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Laboratory, which adds substantial strength to the research and graduate education capabilities of the department.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), or from a comparable substitute examination, are required for admission. At the discretion of the graduate standards committee, a student may be admitted provisionally for graduate study in the program without these scores. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Prerequisites for major work in agronomy vary with the area of specialization and the degree sought, but courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics, geology, basic and applied biological sciences, and English communication skills are required. A baccalaureate degree in basic or applied natural sciences is preferred for M.S. degree applicants.

A minimum junior/senior grade-point average 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) is required in all courses in the biological and physical sciences regardless of when taken. Exceptions to these requirements may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests.

For admission to the Ph.D. program, an M.S. or equivalent degree with an emphasis on basic and applied natural sciences is preferred. Applicants for the Ph.D. program will be evaluated on the quality of work completed in all previous degree programs.

Students who lack some of the prerequisite courses may be admitted but are required to take these courses without degree credit. The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces available for new students.

Master's Degree Requirements

In addition to the general requirements for the M.S. degree as defined by the Graduate School, the department requires 6 credits of 400- or 500-level formal courses in a minor or general studies area. Participation in at least one Agronomy seminar course each semester is required, and students must register for at least 1 credit of AGRO 602 Teaching Experience. An advisory committee will be appointed for each student, and additional courses and requirements may be determined by this advisory committee.

A thesis based on field and/or laboratory research is required for the M.S. degree.

M.S. candidates must pass a final examination.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Beyond the general requirements for the Ph.D. defined by the Graduate School, the department has a number of specific requirements regarding course level and distribution that are defined in the departmental publication "Graduate Degrees in Agronomy." While a minimum number of courses for the degree is not specified, the doctoral advisory committee has the responsibility of specifying courses and credits essential for the education and development of the candidate. Students are expected to be educated in depth in a specific subfield of agronomy and to have a perspective of the general field. Normally, 55 to 60 credits in formal course work beyond the B.S. degree are required. Doctoral candidates are required to participate regularly in a departmental seminar and to register for at least 2 credits of the seminar during the Ph.D. program. A teaching experience, consisting of two separate semesters, is also required of all Ph.D. students.

The communication and foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be met either by demonstrating a knowledge of at least one foreign language or by completing at least 6 credits of course work in an area of English communications approved by the student's advisory committee.

Other Relevant Information

Every student has a close professional relationship with his or her faculty adviser. While research that is done for the thesis will be on subjects that fall within the ongoing research program of the adviser, students are encouraged to propose research projects that are of interest to them. For the most part, all costs relative to the research program will be covered by the department. The department encourages professional development of students through participation in meetings of relevant professional societies and organizations.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

AGRONOMY (AGRO) course list

See also Soil Science.

 

36-04-063 Drop the Master of Agriculture (M.Agr.) degree.

36-04-063A Add the Master of Professional Studies (M.P.S.) degree.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Animal Science (AN SC)

Program Home Page

Terry D. Etherton, Head of the Department of Dairy and Animal Science
tetherton@psu.edu

Daniel R. Hagen, Graduate Officer
drh@psu.edu

324 Henning Building
814-863-3665

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S., M.P.S.

Students may specialize in animal care and management, breeding and genetics, growth and development, lactational biology, nutrition, or reproductive biology. Well-equipped research laboratories and various agricultural animals, as well as small-animal models and wildlife species, are available.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Prerequisite to graduate work is the completion of an undergraduate major in animal science, dairy science, poultry science, or a related biological science.

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are required for admission (average percentile at least 50 percent in verbal, quantitative, and analytical components). The quantitative reasoning component is recommended, but the program will accept scores from the mathematical reasoning component. Students with a 3.00 junior/senior grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission on a competitive basis.

Exceptions to admission requirements may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests.

Degree Requirements

The M.P.S. is a professional program designed to prepare individuals for specialist and management positions in county agricultural extension, government, or industry and does not require a thesis. The academic M.S. and Ph.D. programs require a thesis and are designed for those primarily interested in education and research. The requirements of these programs are detailed in the departmental publication "Graduate Student Handbook in Animal Science." The communication or foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be satisfied by competence in either one foreign language or communication skills.

Student Aid

Fellowships, traineeships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

ANIMAL SCIENCE (AN SC) course list

36-04-064 Change. Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2008

Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASTRO)

Program Home Page

LAWRENCE W. RAMSEY, Head of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
525 Davey Laboratory
814-865-0418

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

The graduate program in Astronomy and Astrophysics prepares students for careers in astronomy, space science and education. Graduate instruction and research opportunities are available in theoretical, observational, and instrumental astronomy and astrophysics. Currently active areas of theoretical research include high-energy astrophysics (including theory of neutron stars, black holes, and gamma ray bursts), relativity and cosmology, stellar dynamics and planet formation, and computational methodology. Observational areas include spectroscopic and photometric observations of high-redshift quasars, galaxies and the intergalactic medium; gamma-ray bursts; X-ray and visible light studies of quasars, starburst and other active galaxies; visible light studies of nearby galaxies and their stellar populations; infrared study of brown dwarfs and protoplanetary disks; spectroscopy and modeling of binary, magnetically active, pre- and post-main sequence stars; spectroscopic searches for planetary systems. Instrumental areas include: development of X-ray telescopes and detectors; and high-precision visible and near-infrared light spectrographs. Department faculty members participate in several university cross-disciplinary organizations: Astrobiology Research Center, Center for Astrostatistics, Center for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, and the Center for Gravitational Wave Physics.

The Department played a seminal role in and leads many science investigations using two NASA-launched satellites, the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Swift panchromatic gamma-ray burst mission, and the innovative 9-meter Hobby-Eberly Telescope located at the McDonald Observatory in Texas. Faculty and students also observe with other space-based observatories (GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, XMM-Newton) and ground-based telescopes (Gemini and other national facilities, Magellan, Keck, South Africa Large Telescope, Very Large Telescopes). Physics faculty members closely associated with the Department are involved in particle and gravitational wave observations using the Auger, AMANDA, Ice Cube, and LIGO instruments. The Department has extensive computing facilities, and research is also conducted with university and national supercomputing resources.

Graduate students also have ample opportunity to acquire experience in undergraduate teaching and public outreach.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), including the Physics test, are required for admission. In addition, students coming from non-English speaking undergraduate institutions must submit scores from the TOEFL (Test of english as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing System) examination. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Normally, students admitted to the program are required to have a bachelor's degree in physics and/or astronomy with a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in their junior/senior courses in physics, astronomy, math, and related subjects. Typical GRE scores for entering students are 720 or more on the general test, and 680 or more on the Physics test. International applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 590 for the paper-based test, 243 for the computer-based test, or a total score of 96 with a 23 on the speaking section for the internet-based test. The minimum composite score for the IELTS is 6.5.

Degree Requirements

Course requirements for the Ph.D. consists of 30 credits of 3-credit courses, 3 credits of ASTRO 596 for directed research in the second year, 3 credits of ASTRO 589 Seminars in current research, 1 credit of ASTRO 590 Colloquium, and 1 credit of ASTRO 602 for supervised teaching. The ten 3-credit courses must include ASTRO 501, ASTRO 502, at least four additional ASTRO 500-level courses, and at least two PHYS 500-level courses. One 400-level class may be substituted. A GPA of 3.2 in these courses is required.

The Candidacy Examination is an oral examination with broad coverage of covering any area of astronomy. Students who fail the Examination may make a second attempt. At the Comprehensive Examination, the student presents a significant body of original research conducted at Penn State. This Examination tests the student's mastery of the chosen field of research. The student prepares an extended written report and oral presentation, and answers questions on the research and closely related areas. The Comprehensive Exam can be passed, failed with option retake, or failed followed by dismissal from the Ph.D. program. Graduation requires the completion of a dissertation of original research and a thesis defense before the Doctoral Committee.

While all students are admitted into the Ph.D. program, occasionally students terminate with a M.S. degree. This requires completion of the Ph.D. course requirements (except the three topical seminars) with 3.00 grade point average, passage of the Candidacy Exam, and submission of a suitable thesis.

Student Aid

Graduate Teaching Assistantships, externally funded graduate Research Assistantships, and/or University fellowships are typically provided to student admitted and continuing in good standing. Many students also apply for externally funded fellowships. University sources of funding are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS (ASTRO) course list

36-04-065 Change name of program from Health Evaluation Sciences (HES) to Public Health Sciences (PHS). Revise program description. Change all HES course abbreviations to PHS.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Public Health Sciences (PHS)

Program Home Page

VERNON M. CHINCHILLI , Chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences
College of Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Hershey, PA 17033
717-531-7178
masters-info@hes.hmc.psu.edu

Degree Conferred: M.S.

The Master's Program in Public Health Sciences includes graduate-level course work in biostatistics, epidemiology, and health services research, and provides knowledge and insight required in health related research. Students learn population-based methods for planning, executing, analyzing, and disseminating research results, and methods for evaluating and improving health care practices.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Prospective applicants for this program should have at least a bachelor's degree in a biological, physical, or behavioral science. Please see the program Web page for specific program application requirements.

Master's Degree Requirements

Each student in Public Health Sciences is expected to acquire breadth of knowledge in the disciplines of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Health Services Research, and skills in the areas of experimental design, data collection and quantitative analysis. The PHS Master of Science degree can lead to careers in a wide variety of fields and settings, including academic health centers; the health insurance industry; health services networks; local, state, and federal government agencies; and the pharmaceutical industry. Each student must complete at least 30 credits at the 500 level, including 3 research credits and 27 credits of formal course work. Each student must carry out a research project concluding with a manuscript suitable for publication.

Prescribed Courses: 16 credits

PHS 520(3), PHS 521(3), PHS 536(3), PHS 550(3), PHS 551(3), IBIOS 591(1)

Additional Courses: 11 credits

PHS 510(3), PHS 511(1), PHS 518(1), PHS 519(1), PHS 522(3), PHS 529(1), PHS 535(3), PHS 540(1), PHS 541(1), PHS 552(3), PHS 560(1), PHS 561(1), PHS 570(3), PHS 580(3), PHS 581(1)

Courses in Health Policy and Administration (HPA) and Statistics (STAT) may be taken as elective courses and will be considered on an individual basis in consultation with the student's academic adviser.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (H ADM) course list

PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES (PHS) course list

STATISTICS (STAT) course list

36-04-066 Add. New Master of International Affairs in International Affairs.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2008

International Affairs (IA)

Tiyanjana Maluwa, Director, School of International Affairs
203A Beam Building
814-865-8971; www.sia.psu.edu

Degree Conferred: M.I.A.

The School of International Affairs (SIA) is designed to prepare students for occupations involving public service, private enterprise, nonprofit organizations, and international organizations worldwide. The Master’s in International Affairs (MIA) degree program will provide students with a substantial knowledge base in international systems, institutions, issues and history and the advanced analytical tools and cross-cultural skills and competencies necessary for these occupations. Students will work closely with faculty to design a curriculum around their core coursework which incorporates a functional or regional theme and provides the opportunity to apply and enhance the core knowledge component with a thematically-based set of graduate courses from across Penn State’s existing graduate and professional curriculum.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the MIA degree program will require: (i) a bachelor's degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution or (ii) a postsecondary degree that is equivalent to a U.S. baccalaureate degree earned from an officially recognized degree-granting international institution. All applicants will submit GRE scores, two letters of recommendation and a personal statement addressing their reasons for pursuing a graduate degree in international affairs and discussing their plans and goals.

International applicants whose native language is not English will submit a satisfactory TOEFL or IELTS score from a test taken within two years of application. A satisfactory TOEFL score is 550 or above on the paper test, 213 or above on the computer-based test or 80 or above on the new internet-based test (with a minimum of 23 points on the new speaking portion). A satisfactory IELTS score is a minimum composite score of 6.5. If the applicant’s qualifying degree is from a country where English is the native language and the degree is from an institution where English is the language of instruction, the applicant may apply for an exemption from these requirements.

Admissions will be based on a review of all submitted materials and spaces will be offered to the best qualified applicants, taking into account academic achievement, relevant work experience and other indices of aptitude for advanced study in international affairs.

Master’s Degree Requirements

MIA degree candidates must take a total of 30 units of graduate credit, including 18 credits of required core courses. MIA degree candidates must take the six core courses described below plus an additional 12 credits or more of graduate level coursework with a faculty-approved theme and content. The six new courses which will comprise the core curriculum of the M.I.A. are: (i) INTAF 801, (ii) INTAF 802, (iii) INTAF 803, (iv) INTAF 804, (v) INTAF 805, and (vi) INTAF 590.

Students will choose their elective courses, with faculty guidance, from a substantial list of graduate courses. The advanced coursework usually will be clustered around areas of concentration designated by the SIA’s Faculty Governing Council, but students also will be permitted to design an independent interdisciplinary curriculum with faculty approval. The areas of concentration will take advantage of Penn State’s rich graduate curriculum by aggregating in appropriate thematic clusters pre-existing and specially-created graduate-level classes.

In addition to the core curriculum and elective courses, degree candidates must complete either: (i) a master’s paper; or (ii) a supervised internship placement. If the first option is chosen and the candidate opts to complete a paper, they must enroll in 3 credits of INTAF 594. The master’s paper will involve integrating and showing mastery of the subject matter of the student’s curricular emphasis, and may also involve original research. If the second option is chosen, the candidate will enroll in 3 credits of INTAF 595. The student will participate in a supervised internship placement of sufficient depth and professionalism that would allow the student to experience the integration of their curricular studies in an actual professional environment. A reflective paper will be submitted as a part of this credit requirement.

In order to graduate, students also will need to demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English. Proficiency will be defined as follows: (i) four semesters of a Penn State language sequence or its equivalent (15 credits); (ii) native acquisition, as shown by the candidate’s personal history and approved by the SIA faculty; or (iii) performance on a proficiency evaluation sufficient to equal four semesters of language learning: for this purpose, either Penn State’s proficiency certification process (described below) or another pre-approved proficiency assessment may be used.

Penn State’s language proficiency certification process, for students seeking a non-credit evaluation of their proficiency in languages other than English, is established by the School of Languages and Literatures (SLL) and is described briefly as follows. Requests are submitted to the department that offers the language curriculum, on a form available on the SLL website, at least three weeks prior to the time when the certification will be needed. It is not guaranteed that all requests for evaluation will be fulfilled; for example, a tester may not be available. If the language department cannot fulfill the request for an evaluation, the student will be notified and can seek alternative means of documenting proficiency (such as taking an external standardized exam in the language). If the language department can fulfill the request, an evaluation fee (currently $60) must be paid before the evaluation occurs.

36-04-067 Change. Revise program description. Add C MED 501, 503, 507, 515, 530, 531, 535, 590, 600, IBIOS 591.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Laboratory Animal Medicine (L A M)

Program Home Page

RONALD P. WILSON, Chair of the Department of Comparative Medicine

Department of Comparative Medicine, H054
College of Medicine
P.O. Box 850
500 University Drive
Hershey, PA 17033-0850
717-531-8462

Degree Conferred: M.S.

All students entering the program much have completed a professional degree program in veterinary medicine and must hold the degree of D.V.M., V.M.D., or equivalent.

The Department of Comparative Medicine is a basic science, academic department of the College of Medicine. It is concerned with the range of variation of normal and abnormal structure, function, and behavior in a variety of species of animals used for teaching, testing, and research. Its faculty, staff, and students work in a multidisciplinary and collaborative fashion with all other departments in the college to advance the research mission.

Graduate study in a laboratory animal medicine consists of advanced training in biology, medicine and methodology pertinent to animal-based research, and the development of scholarship and research capabilities within the specialty. The general plan is one that provides a broad, basic foundation upon which the individual can build a career in teaching and research and/or in the professional direction of research animal facilities.

The curriculum of this training program includes:

First Year:

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE (C MED)
501. Biology and Care of Laboratory Animals (3)
503.* Laboratory Animal Genetics (3)
507.* Techniques of Laboratory Animal Experimentation (3)
515. Experimental Surgery of Laboratory Animals (3)
530. Diseases of Laboratory Animals I (3)
531. Diseases of Laboratory Animals II (3)
535.* Comparative Pathology (3)
590. Colloquium (3)
600. (3)

INTEGRATED BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
591. Ethics in the Life Sciences (1)

*Course offered every other year; thus students entering program on even numbered years will take during second year.

Second Year:

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE (C MED)
590. Colloquium (1 credit/semester)
600. (6-9) Research project for M.S. thesis.

This program is offered only at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

36-04-068 Drop the Master of Agriculture (M.Agr.) degree in Soil Science.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2008

Soil Science (SOILS)

Program Home Page

D. M. SYLVIA, Head, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
116 Agricultural Sciences and Industries Building
814-865-2025

R. C. STEHOUWER, Chair of the Graduate Program in Soil Science
417 Agricultural Sciences & Industries Building
814-863-7640

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

The Soil Science program is administered in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, College of Agricultural Sciences. Each student will be associated with an adviser who may provide financial support, research facilities, and/or office space. Applicants are encouraged to explore, study, and research opportunities by contacting faculty who may be prospective advisers.

This program provides opportunities for candidates interested in soil and related water resources to become a professional leader and an independent scholar. Faculty in this program are competent to prepare candidates in the subfields of Soil Science including: soil genesis, soil classification, soil morphology, soil mapping, soil physics, soil chemistry, soil mineralogy, soil microbiology, soil fertility, soil conservation, geographic information systems, computer mapping, watershed analysis, soil hydrology, soil and water management, resource inventory and assessment, remote sensing, land evaluation, land waste disposal, and land management.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), or from a comparable substitute examination, are required for admission. At the discretion of the graduate standards committee, a student may be admitted provisionally for graduate study in the program without these scores. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Prerequisites for major work in Soil Science vary with the area of specialization and the degree sought, but courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics, geology, basic and applied biological sciences, and English communication skills are required. Applicants for the M.S. degree should have a baccalaureate degree including 76 credits of basic and applied natural sciences. Admission to the Ph.D. program usually requires an M.S. or equivalent degree with a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.25 (on a 4.00 scale). Applicants for the Ph.D. program will be evaluated on the quality of work completed in all previous degree programs. Students who lack some of the prerequisite courses may be admitted but are required to take these courses without degree credit. The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces available for new students.

Master's Degree Requirements

In addition to the general requirements for the M.S. degree as defined by the Graduate School, the department requires 12 credits of 400- or 500-level formal courses in the major field of which 6 must be 500-level. Participation in at least one colloquium course each semester is required and students must complete at least 1 credit of colloquium (SOILS 590), as well as 1 credit of Teaching Experience (SOILS 602). An advisory committee will be appointed for each student and additional courses and requirements may be determined by this advisory committee.

A thesis based on field or laboratory research is required for the M.S. degree. M.S. candidates must pass a final examination.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Beyond the general requirements for the Ph.D. defined by the Graduate School, the department has a number of specific requirements regarding course level and distribution that are defined in the departmental publication “Graduate Degrees in Soil Science.” While a minimum number of courses for the degree is not specified, the doctoral advisory committee has the responsibility of specifying courses and credits essential for the education and development of the candidate. Students are expected to be educated in depth in a specific subfield of Soil Science and to have a perspective of the general field. Normally, 55 to 60 credits in formal course work beyond the B.S. degree are required.

Doctoral candidates are required to participate regularly in a departmental colloquium and to register for at least 2 credits of Colloquium (SOILS 590) during the Ph.D. program. A teaching experiecne, consisting of two separate semesters, is also required of all Ph.D. students.

The communication and foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be met either by demonstrating a knowledge of at least one foreign language or by completing at least 6 credits of course work in an area of English communications approved by the student’s advisory committee.

Other Relevant Information

Every student has a close professional relationship with his or her faculty adviser. While research that is done for the thesis will be on subjects that fall within the ongoing research program of the adviser, students are encouraged to propose research projects that are of interest to them. For the most part, all costs relative to the research program will be covered by the department. The department encourages professional development of students through participation in meetings of relevant professional societies and organizations.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

SOIL SCIENCE (SOILS) course list

COURSE ADDS

36-04-069 APLNG 580
Proseminar in Applied Linguistics
PROSEM APLNG (1)
This team-taught seminar introduces Ph.D. students to the scholarly areas and research perspectives in Applied Linguistics represented by department faculty.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-070 BIOE 513
Bioengineering Laboratory Techniques
BIOENGR TECHNIQUES (3)
Laboratory techniques in cell molecular biology, protein biochemistry and cell culture with an emphasis on engineering analysis and quantification.
PREREQUISITE: BIOE 512
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-071 BMS 594
Research Topics
RESEARCH TOPICS (1-15)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

36-04-072 BMS 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-12)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

36-04-073 BMS 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

36-04-074 BMS 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or semester.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

36-04-075 BUSAD 558
Knowledge Management
KNOWLEDGE MGT (3)
This course examines the strategic value of knowledge and how organizations can manage their knowledge assets for competitive advantage.
PREREQUISITE: MGMT 501 and ACCTG 512
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-076 CAMS 592
Proseminar
PROSEMINAR (3)
Introduction to the history, research methods, historiography of modern scholarship on ancient Mediterranean studies.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-077 GEOG 501A
Research Perspectives in Physical Geography
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (1)
This course presents contemporary perspectives on Physical Geography, emphasizing the major issues and integrative themes of the sub-discipline.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-078 GEOG 501C
Research Perspectives in Human-Environment Geography
HUMAN-ENVT GEOG (1)
Contemporary perspectives on Human-Environment Geography, emphasizing major issues and integrative themes of the sub-discipline.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-079 GEOG 501D
Research Perspectives in GIScience
GISCIENCE PERSPECT (1)
This course presents contemporary perspectives on Geographic Information Science, emphasizing the major issues and integrative themes of the sub-discipline.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-080 GEOG 502
Research Scholarship in Geography
RESEARCH IN GEOG (3)
Learning the craft of scholarly research in geography.
PREREQUISITE: GEOG 500
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-081 INTAF 801
Actors, Institutions, and Legal Frameworks in International Affairs
ACT INSTI LEGAL FR (3)
Addresses the principal actors, institutions, and legal frameworks which operate in international relations.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-082 INTAF 802
Foundations of Diplomacy and International Relations Theory
DIPL INTR REL THRY (3)
Addresses the central tenets of diplomacy and international relations and theories and concepts that underpin the study of international relations.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-083 INTAF 803
Multi-sector and Quantitative Analysis
MULTI SEC QNT ANAL (3)
Introduces students to quantitative methods applicable to various issue areas, including international relations, economics, business, law, education, health, and environment.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-084 INTAF 804
Culture, Global Diversity, Civic Responsibilities and Leadership
CUL GLOB CIV LEADR (3)
Introduces students to cultural theories and to an understanding of how socio-cultural beliefs may impede or accelerate social change.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-085 INTAF 805
International Economics: Principles, Policies, and Practices
INTERNATIONAL ECON (3)
Addresses principles, policies, and practices in international trade and finance that are fundamental for understanding international economic relations.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-086 INTAF 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3)
Continuing seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-087 INTAF 594
Research Topics
RESEARCH TOPICS (1-15)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-088 INTAF 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-12)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-089 M E 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3)
Continuing seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-090 MKTG 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3)
Continuing seminars that consist of a series of individual lectures by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: S12008

36-04-091 STAT 897
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given on a topical or special interest subject which may be offered infrequently; several different topics may be taught in one year or term.
PROPOSED START: SP2008

36-04-092 SYSEN 536
Decision and Risk Analysis in Engineering
DEC/RISK ANALYS (3)
Analysis of engineering decisions under uncertainty; problem identification, formulation, judgment, resolution; mitigation, risk analysis, quantification and management.
PROPOSED START: S12008

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
36-04-093 EDUC 562
Diagnostic Evaluation of Reading Problems
DIAG EVAL RDG PROB (3)
Utilization of formal and informal instruments and techniques appropriate in analyzing reading disabilities, grade K through 12; includes practicum.
PREREQUISITE: EDUC 321, EDUC 422, EDUC 425, EDUC 471, EDUC 561, EDUC 563
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EDUC 561
PROPOSED START: SP2009

OLD
36-04-094 EDUC 565
Literacy and Leadership
LITERACY & LEAD (3)
Principles of supervision, organization, management, and evaluation of literacy programs will be presented.
PREREQUISITE: EDUC 425, EDUC 471, EDUC 561, EDUC 562, EDUC 563
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EDUC 466, EDUC 563
PROPOSED START: SP2009

APPENDIX D
Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

36-04-095 LAW 903
Visiting Away Semester
VISITING AWAY SEM (1-17) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
Student approved by the law school to visit away for the semester. Course work successfully completed will transfer as progress toward the law degree.
PROPOSED START: S12008