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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Agricultural Sciences

COURSE ADDS

40-04-001 AG 160S
Introduction to Ethics and Issues in Agriculture
INTRO ETHICS IN AG (3)
Introduce students to the University and College of Ag Sciences preparing them to succeed. Review ethical theories and issues in American agriculture. PREREQUISITE: fifth- or second semester standing
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-002 FOR 228
Chainsaw Safety, Maintenance, and Operation in Forest Management
CHNSAW IN FOR MGMT (1)
Safety, maintenance, skills, and techniques for effective chainsaw operation in forest management.
PREREQUISITE: FOR 203 and W P 203
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-003 INTAG 470 (IL)
Comparing US/French Ag
US/FRENCH AG SYSTS (3)
Ag Systems are explored and compared in the U.S. and France concluding with a two week program in France.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-004 VB SC 230
The Science of Posions
SCIENCE OF POISION (3)
An introduction to toxicology using real world examples of highlight the impact to toxicants on environmental, biochemical and physiological processes.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 110, BIOL 110
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-005 W F S 454
Field Ichthyology
FIELD ICHTHYOLOGY (2)
Introduction to collection and field identification of the fishes of Pennsylvania.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110, BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-006 ENT 313
Introduction to Entomology
INTRO ENT (2)
Introduction to basic entomology, covering insect diversity, identification, structure and function, and principles of management.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits of natural science
CONCURRENT: ENT 315
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
REMOVE CONCURRENT
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Altoona College

40-04-007 Change. Revise program description; Add DANCE 365, 366, 466 to Prescribed Courses; Add DANCE 230, 240, 250 to Additional Courses; Remove DANCE 301; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Dance Studies Minor

Altoona College (DNCAL)

The Dance Studies Minor is designed for students interested in furthering their study and exploration of the many areas of dance. Students will explore the creative process of dance as it relates directly to technique and performance. Students have the opportunity to perform with the Ivyside Dance Ensemble, perform in faculty choreography, choreograph for productions, and attend national festivals. The Dance Studies Minor allows students to further enhance their dance study and prepares them for graduate study and a variety of career options. Twenty-one credits are required for completion of the minor with a minimum of 9 credits at the 400 level.

A grade of C or better is required in all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 21 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18 credits)
DANCE 270 GHA(3)
DANCE 365(3), DANCE 366(3) (Sem: 3-6)
DANCE 466(3), DANCE 482(3), DANCE 484 US;IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
DANCE 230 GA(1.5), DANCE 240 GA(1.5), DANCE 250 GA(1.5), DANCE 261 GA(1.5) (Sem: 1-4)

(All Dance Studies minor students are required to demonstrate proficiency at beginning level technique courses before placement in the intermediate or advanced courses.)

COURSE ADDS

40-04-008 DANCE 230 (GA)
Ballet
BALLET (1.5 per semester/maximum of 6)
An exploration of Ballet technique.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-009 DANCE 240 (GA)
Jazz Dance
JAZZ (1.5 per semester/maximum of 6)
An exploration of jazz dance technique throughout history.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-010 DANCE 250 (GA)
Tap Dance
TAP DANCE (1.5 per semester/maximum of 6)
An exploration of tap dance technique throughout history.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-011 DANCE 285
Contemporary Dance Performance
CONTEMP DANCE PERF (1-2 per semester/maximum of 8)
Contemporary Dance Performance is designed to introduce the beginning performer to the choreographic and rehearsal process as preparation for performance.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-012 DANCE 365
Contemporary Movement Lab I
CONT MVMT LAB I (3)
An intermediate level modern dance technique utilizing improvisation to enhance technical and performance issues: alignment, connection, balance, transition, expression, discovery.
PREREQUISITE: any 200 level technique course, or program permission
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-013 DANCE 366
Contemporary Movement Lab II
CONT MVMT LAB II (3)
An intermediate level modern dance technique utilizing composition to enhance technical and performance issues: alignment, connection, balance, transition, expression, discovery.
PREREQUISITE: any 200 level technique class or program permission
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-014 DANCE 466
Contemporary Movement Lab III
CONT MVMT LAB III (3 per semester/maximum of 6)
An advanced exploration of modern dance techniques supported by the choreographic process.
PREREQUISITE: DANCE 365, DANCE 366
PROPOSED START: S12012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

40-04-015 A&A 105
Interdisciplinary Digital Studio (IDS) Seminar I
IDS SEMINAR I (3)
This first year seminar will consist of 5 modules that will introduce students to emerging technologies that are applicable to interdisciplinary electronic design study.
PREREQUISITE: School of Visual Arts Admissions Portfoloio
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-016 A&A 106
Interdisciplinary Digital Studio (IDS) Seminar II
IDS SEMINAR II (3)
This first year seminar will consist of 5 modules that will introduce students to emerging technologies that are applicable to interdisciplinary electronic design study.
PREREQUISITE: School of Visual Arts Admissions Portfolio and completion of A&A 105
PROPOSED START: S12012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend College

40-04-017 Change. Drop Computer Science Option; Increase number of credits for Requirements for the Major from 91-100 to 92-102; Reduce number of electives from 3-6 to 0-6; Increase number of credits for Requirements for the Option from 34 to 38-48 credits; Revise Program Description; Add CHEM 316, 431W, 441, 443, 472 to Prescribed Courses; Add B M B 465, MATH 230, 250, STAT 401 to options; Move CHEM 441, 443 from Additional to Prescribed for the Major; Move CHEM 450 from Prescribed Courses to Option requirements; Move MATH 250 from Additional Courses to Option; Remove CHEM 450, PHYS 213, 214 from Prescribed Courses; Remove CHEM 445, MATH 220, 231 from Additional Courses; Remove BIOL 410, 430, 465, CHEM 472 from options; Change credits as indicated underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Chemistry

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College (CHMBD)

This major provides a strong foundation in chemistry and prepares students for graduate or professional programs and for careers with companies and agencies requiring chemistry or related areas. The major has four options that allow students to choose an area of specialization to meet their career goals. These options are: general chemistry, biochemistry, business, and chemistry education pre-certification. Students have the opportunity to participate in research with faculty members.

Entrance Requirement: In order to be eligible for entrance to the CHMBD major (all options), a student must have: (1) attained more than 27 credits (2) completed CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 210(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

For the B.S. degree in Chemistry, a minimum of 124 credits is required. Each student must earn at least a grade of C in each 300- and 400-level course in the major field and must have earned a minimum 2.00 grade-point average.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18-21 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-6 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 92-102 credits
(This includes 18-24 credits of General Education courses. For the General Chemistry Option, and Biochemistry Option, 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses. For the Business Option, 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses. For the Chemistry Education Pre-Certification Option, 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 54 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (54 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1)[1], CHEM 112 GN(3)[1], CHEM 113 GN(1)[1], MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
CHEM 210(3)[1], CHEM 212(3)[1], CHEM 213(2)[1], CHEM 221(4)[1], CHEM 316(1) (Sem: 3-6)
CHEM 400(1), CHEM 413(4), CHEM 431W(3), CHEM 440(3), CHEM 441(1), CHEM 443(1), CHEM 457(2), and CHEM 472(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 38-48 credits

GENERAL CHEMISTRY OPTION:(38 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (14 credits)
CHEM 450(3), CHEM 452(3) and CHEM 457(1), ENGL 202C GWS(3)[1], MATH 230(4)[1] (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from MATH 250(3)[1] or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6 credits of 400-level CHEM courses (excluding CHEM 494, CHEM 495, and CHEM 496) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from CHEM 494(1-12) or CHEM 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from school-approved list. (Students may apply up to 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 1-8)

BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION: (44-45 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26 credits)
B M B 402(3), BIOL 110S GN(4)[1], BIOL 230W GN(4)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
ENGL 202C GWS(3)[1], MATH 230(4)[1](Sem: 3-8)
B M B 403(1), CHEM 450(3), CHEM 452(3) and CHEM 457(1) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3 credits from B M B 406(3), B M B 465(3), BIOL 322(3), MICRB 201(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from MATH 250(3)[1] or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits of 400-level CHEM courses (excluding CHEM 494, CHEM 495, and CHEM 496) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from CHEM 494(1-12) or CHEM 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from school-approved list. (Students may apply up to 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 1-8)

BUSINESS OPTION: (46-47 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (22 credits)
ECON 102 GS(3)[1], ENGL 202D GWS(3)[1], MGMT 301(3), MKTG 301(3) (Sem: 3-8)
CHEM 496(3) (Sem: 5-8)
SCM 200 GQ(4)[1], STAT 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-19 credits)
CHEM 450(3) or CHEM 452(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits of 400-level CHEM courses (excluding CHEM 494, CHEM 495, and CHEM 496) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9-10 credits in one of the following sequences:
a) SCM 310(3), MGMT 331(3), MGMT 410(3), MGMT 420(3) (Sem: 5-8)
b) MKTG 342(3), MKTG 330(3), MKTG 327(3), MKTG 410(3), MKTG 428(3) (Sem: 5-8)
c) CMPSC 203 GQ(4), MIS 204(3), MIS 336(3), MIS 430(3), MIS 445(4) (Sem: 5-8)
d) One selection each from a), b), and c) above (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from school-approved list. (Students may apply up to 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 1-8)

CHEMISTRY EDUCATION PRE-CERTIFICATION OPTION: (47-48 credits)
This option helps prepare students for chemistry education teaching positions in secondary schools. It includes the academic requirements for the Chemistry Education Instructional I certificate issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (26-27 credits)
CHEM 450(3), CHEM 452(3) and CHEM 457(1), ENGL 202C GWS(3)[1], MATH 230(4)[1], PSYCH 100 GS(3)[1] (Sem: 3-8)
EDPSY 014(3) taken concurrent with C I 295(1), EDTHP 115 US(3) taken concurrently with C I 295(1) (Sem:3-8)
CHEM 395(1-2) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 3 credits from MATH 250(3)[1] or STAT 401(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 6 credits of 400-level CHEM courses (excluding CHEM 494, CHEM 495, and CHEM 496) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from CHEM 494(1-12) or CHEM 496(1-18) (Sem: 5-8)
HD FS 129 GS(3)[84] or PSYCH 212 GS(3)[84] (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from school-approved list. (Students may apply up to 6 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.


COURSE ADDS

40-04-018 FIN 491
Financial Planning Capstone
FIN PLNG CAPSTONE (3)
Critical thinking and decision-making about personal financial planning topics in the context of the financial planning process.
PREREQUISITE: FIN 330, FIN 420, FIN 430, FIN 450
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-019 CHEM 457
Experimental Physical Chemistry
EXP PH CHEMISTRY (2)
Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the principles of physical chemistry and teach techniques of error analysis and the presentation of quantitative data. (Graduate credit not allowed for students majoring in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chemistry, or Chemical Engineering.)
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: CHEM 450 or CH E 320
APPROVED START: S12007

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-2 per semester/maximum of 2
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Berks College

40-04-020 Change. Move PL SC 440 from Additional to Prescribed Courses; Move CAS 471 from Prescribed to Option Requirements.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Global Studies

Berks College (GLBST)

PROFESSOR KIRWIN SHAFFER, Program Coordinator

This major is designed for students who are interested in a liberal arts degree with a concentration in global studies. Featuring both active and collaborative classroom experiences in addition to intensive study abroad/internship experiences, the program is designed for students who wish to develop a set of analytical and interpersonal skills that will prepare them for entry-level employment in a wide range of government and non-profit organizations and agencies and in businesses and industry. Because of the flexible and broad nature of the degree, students might also use this major as preparation for graduate or professional school in business, law, or the social sciences. This program differs most notably from traditional majors in international/global studies by requiring core courses in world literature and intercultural communication, while retaining the traditional foreign language, history, and political science emphasis of most other programs. Study abroad and an internship with an international organization are also important features of this degree.

For the B.A. degree in Global Studies, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 39 credits[1]
Including 24 credits at the 400 level (9-15 credits of which are included in the prescribed courses, the other 9-15 must be chosen from the option tracks below). A minimum of 3 credits of study abroad (meeting any requirement) and 3 credits of INTST 495 are required for the completion of this degree.

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 18-24 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (18-24 credits)
PL SC 014 GS;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
HIST 320W(3) (Sem: 1-6)
CAS 271 US;IL(3) (Sem:3-4)
ENGL 403(3) (Sem: 3-6)
INTST 495 (3-9), PL SC 440(3) (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 15-21 credits

LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE OPTION: (15-21 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-21 credits)
Select 15-21 credits from the following list of courses:
CAS 471 US;IL(3), CEDEV 430(3), CMLIT 153 GH;IL(3), ECON 333 GS(3), HIST 179 GH;IL(3), HIST 432 IL(3), HIST 467 US;IL(3), HIST 468 IL(3), I B 303(3), INTAG 100 GS;IL(3), SPAN 100(3)[83], SPAN 131 GH;IL(3) or SPAN 131Y GH;US;IL(3), SPAN 200(3)[83], SPAN 220(3)[83], SPAN 253W(3)[83], SPAN 300(3)[83], SPAN 420(3)[83], SPAN 476(3)[83], SPAN 497(1-9)[83] (Sem: 1-8)

CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND POLITICS OPTION: (15-21 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-21 credits)
Select 15-21 credits from the following list of courses:
CAS 471 US;IL(3), CEDEV 430(3), CMLIT 153 GH;IL(3), ECON 333 GS(3), ENGL 182A GH;US;IL(3), FR 139 GH;IL(3), GER 100 GH;IL(3), HIST 120 GS;IL(3), HIST 175 GH;IL(3), HIST 179 GH;IL(3), HIST 181 GH;IL(3), HIST 192 GH;IL(3), HIST 435(3), HIST 467 US;IL(3), HIST 468 IL(3), HIST 488(3), I B 303(3), INTAG 100 GS;IL(3), PL SC 412(3), PL SC 413(3), PL SC 424(3), PL SC 443(3), PL SC 454 IL(3), PL SC 487(3), RUS 100 GH;IL(3), SPAN 131 GH;IL(3), UKR 100 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must maintain a grade-point average of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[83] These courses also constitute the projected Spanish minor.

40-04-021 Change. Add ENGL 211W to Prescribed Courses; Remove ENGL 210 from Prescribed Courses; Add COMM 320, 370, ENGL 212, 213, 474, 480, 491, 495, 497 to Additional Courses.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Professional Writing Minor

Berks College (PWRIT)
University College, Penn State Hazleton

The minor in Professional Writing is intended to prepare students from all degree programs within the Berks College (with the exception of the major in Professional Writing) to write effectively in a variety of workplace and academic settings. Theory courses provide the necessary background to help students understand and appreciate the larger issues surrounding the writing and reading of texts. At the same time, practice-oriented courses draw upon the strategies and techniques of practicing writers outside and inside of the University, including workshops, peer conferencing, collaborative writing, portfolio preparation, and internships.

Students may not count courses used to satisfy General Education Writing/Speaking Skills.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
ENGL 211W(3) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following:
CAS 214W(3), COMM 260W(3), COMM 320(3), COMM 370(3), ENGL 110(2-6), ENGL 212(3), ENGL 213(3),ENGL 215(3), ENGL 250(3), ENGL 415(3), ENGL 416(3), ENGL 417(3), ENGL 418(3), ENGL 419(3), ENGL 420(3), ENGL 421(3), ENGL 471(3), ENGL 472(3), ENGL 473(3), ENGL 474(3), ENGL 480(3), ENGL 491(3), ENGL 495(3), ENGL 497(3) (Sem: 3-8)

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Capital College

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-022 EDUC 406
Human Sexuality
HUMAN SEXUALITY (3)
Examination of physiology, diseases, attitudes, morality, and controversial topics related to sexuality. Consideration of sex eduction in the school curriculum.
APPROVED START: F21982

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: HLHED
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Examination of physiology, diseases, attitudes, morality, and controversial topics related to human sexuality.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-023 PUBPL 495
Internship
PUB POL INTERN (3-12)
Experience in a public service agency related to knowledge gained through academic course work, reading, and discussion.
PREREQUISITE: seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START: FA1983

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: fifth-semester standing
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-024 MNG 023
Mineral Land and Mine Surveying
LAND & MINE SURVEY (2)
Surveying theory and practice applied to mineral lands and mines, traversing, leveling, mapping, underground surveying, microcomputer drafting and graphics.
PREREQUISITE: ED&G 100, EG T 101, or E G 010; 1/2 unit of secondary school trigonometry
APPROVED START: FA2006

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 223
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-025 MNG 431
Rock Mechanics
ROCK MECHANICS (3)
Ground stresses, laboratory rock properties, laboratory and field instrumentation, rock mass characteristics, subsidence, slope stability, design of mine
workings.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 210
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 331
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Engineering

40-04-026 Change. Decrease number of credits requried for the major from 71 to 70 credits; Change number of credits required for the major from 62 to 62-63 credits; Revise program description; Add BE T 206 to Additional Courses; Move BE T 202, MATH 022, 026 from Prescribed to Additional Courses; Remove BE T 203 from Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Biomedical Engineering Technology

University College: Penn State New Kensington (2 BET)

PROFESSOR MYRON HARTMAN, Program Coordinator, Penn State New Kensington
PROFESSOR THOMAS A. SEYBERT, Director of Engineering Technology and Commonwealth Engineering, Penn State Wilkes-Barre
PROFESSOR SVEN BILEN, Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, Penn State University Park

The medical community has grown to depend on medical devices and systems to diagnose, treat and monitor patients in health care. These medical devices have become very complex systems, as they are becoming microprocessor controlled, PC based, and networked to share information. Biomedical Equipment Technicians (BETs) are specialized individuals who are educated and trained on the methods of: physiological measurement; equipment application and operation; safety, performance and preventive maintenance testing; calibration; problem solving; and troubleshooting. In addition, BETs may be involved in equipment and technology management programs, selection and installation of medical equipment, manufacturer and FDA recalls of medical devices, quality improvement programs, and training programs for hospital personnel in the safe and proper use of medical equipment. The classroom and laboratory portions of this major focus on electronically and PC based medical devices for patient monitoring and life-support equipment. The student is exposed to a much broader spectrum of medical equipment through a 400-hour (ten-week) practical internship in an approved health care facility.

The major prepares graduates who, during the first few years of professional practice, will be able to:

This program articulates with Pennsylvania Department of Education approved Tech Prep programs. Secondary school Tech Prep students who have graduated from a program covered by a signed Penn State Tech Prep Articulation Agreement may be eligible for special admission procedures and/or advanced placement. Students completing the 2 BET degree need only complete several additional courses to obtain the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Electrical Engineering Technology. Graduates of the program may qualify for admission to the baccalaureate degree major in Electrical Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Harrisburg, Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Erie, and Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Altoona, Berks, New Kensington and York.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Biomedical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 71 credits is required. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR) (See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 62-63 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (47 credits)
BE T 101(1), CHEM 101 GN(3), EET 105(3), CMPET 117(3), CMPET 120(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), IST 110 GS(3)[1], IST 220(3) (Sem: 1-2)
BE T 201(5)[1], BE T 204W(5)[1], BE T 205(4)[1], CAS 100 GWS(3), PHYS 150 GN(3), RADSC 230(3) (Sem: 3-4)
BE T 203 (4)[1][2] (Sem: 5)

ADDITIONAL COURSE (15-16 credits)
MATH 022 GQ(3) and MATH 026 GQ(3) or MATH 040 GQ(5) (Sem: 1-2)
BE T 202(4)[1] or BE T 206(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
BI SC 004 GN(3) or BIOL 141 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits from the following technical courses: BE T 210(3), BE T 296(1-18), BE T 297(1-9), BIOL 129 GN(4), CMPET 211(3), CMPSC 101 GQ(3), EDSGN 100(3), EET 213W(5), EET 297(1-3), EG T 201(2) or MCH T 111(3) (Sem: 3-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[2] BE T 203(4) Internship must be the last course taken for the degree.

40-04-027 Change. Increase number of credits required for degree from 129 to 130 credits; Change credits for Requirements for the Major from 111-112 to 112-113; Add E E 200, 300W, 340 to Prescribed Courses; Move E E 403W from Additional to Prescribed Courses; Remove E E 316, E SC 314 from Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2012

Electrical Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (E E)

PROFESSOR KULTEGIN AYDIN, Interim Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering (E E) is one of the broadest of all engineering majors and is much more than just building electrical circuits. Electrical engineering is the application of electronics, electrical science and technology, and computer systems to the needs of society. An electrical engineer is responsible for designing and integrating electronic/electrical systems in diverse industries such as defense, communications, transportation, manufacturing, health care, construction, and entertainment.

The mission of our undergraduate program is to provide a high-quality education in electrical engineering for our students and to instill in them the attitudes, values, and vision that will prepare them for lifetimes of success, continued learning, and leadership in their chosen careers. A combination of required and elective courses ensures that students acquire a broad knowledge base in electrical circuits, digital systems, electronic devices, electromagnetics, and linear systems, as well as expertise in one or more areas of specialization. Additional problem-solving skills and practical experience are developed through design projects and laboratory assignments, which also provide opportunities for developing team-building and technical communication skills.

The BSEE Program provides undergraduates with the broad technical education necessary for productive employment in the public or private sector, and it develops in them an understanding of fundamentals and current issues important for future years of learning. Our program prepares students following graduation for:

  1. Electrical engineering practice in technical assignments such as design, product development, research, manufacturing, consulting, testing, sales, and management;
  2. Proficiency in the use of modern design tools;
  3. Participation and leadership on teams comprised of individuals with diverse professional and cultural backgrounds;
  4. Effective written and oral communication skills;
  5. Appreciation of the implications of design in a global, societal, and ethical context;
  6. Continued learning through such activities as graduate school, distance education, professional training, and membership in professional societies.
ENTRANCE TO MAJOR -- In addition to the minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements* described in the University Policies, all College of Engineering entrance to major course requirements must also be completed with a minimum grade of C: CHEM 110 (GN), MATH 140 (GQ), MATH 141 (GQ) and PHYS 211 (GN). All of these courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the admission to major process is carried out.

*In the event that the major is under enrollment control, a higher minimum cumulative grade-point average is likely to be needed and students must be enrolled in the College of Engineering or Division of Undergraduate Studies at the time of confirming their major choice.

For the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, a minimum of 130 credits is required. This baccalaureate program in Electrical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 112-113 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (68 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), EDSGN 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E E 200(3), E E 210(4)[1], E E 310(4)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 230(4), MATH 250(3), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 300W(3), E E 330(4)[1], E E 340(4)[1], E E 350(4)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
E E 403W(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (20-21 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CMPEN 270(4)[1]; or CMPEN 271(3)[1] and CMPEN 275(1) (Sem: 3-4)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3-4 credits from I E 424(3), PHYS 410(3-4), STAT 401(3), STAT 414(3), or STAT 418(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
Select 6 credits from program-approved list of 300-level courses (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from program-approved lists of 300-level or 400-level courses (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits from program-approved list of 400-level courses (Sem: 7-8)
Select 3 credits of engineering /science courses from a program-approved list (Sem: 7-8)
Select 6 additional credits, which may include up to 6 credits of ROTC, up to 6 co-op credits, and others from a program-approved list (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

40-04-028 E E 200
Design Tools
DESIGN TOOLS (3)
A working knowledge of electrical engineering design tools and hardware realization of electrical engineering systems.
PREREQUISITE: E E 210, CMPEN 270 or CMPEN 271 or CMPEN 275, CMPSC 201 or CMPSC 121; Prerequisite or concurrent E E 310
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-029 E E 340
Introduction to Nanoelectronics
INTRO NANO ELEC (4)
Introduction to the physics and technology of nanoelectronic devices.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 214, E E 210
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-030 CMPET 117
Digital Electronics
DIGITAL ELECT (3:3:0)
Fundamentals of digital circuits, including logic circuits, boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, counters, and registers.
PREREQUISITE: EET 105
APPROVED START: FA2008

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite and/or concurrent: EET 105
PROPOSED START: FA2012

COURSE DROPS

40-04-031 CMPSC 468
Theory of Automata, Languages, and Computability
AUTOMATA,LANG,COMP (3:3:0)
Language theory: regular and context-free languages; computability: Turing machines, halting problem, undecidable language problems; complexity theory:
NP-complete problems.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 122; MATH 315, MATH 311W or CMPSC 360
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-032 E E 402W
Senior Project Design in Electromagnetics
SR PROJ DSGN E/M (3:2:3)
Project designs of antenna and microwave systems, with an emphasis on technical communications skills. Lab.
PREREQUISITE: E E 330 . Prerequisite or concurrent: ENGL 202C
PROPOSED START: S12012

gold line

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Health and Human Development

COURSE ADDS

40-04-033 RPTM 299 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12 per semester/maximum of 12)
Foreign Studies in RPTM.
PREREQUISITE: RPTM 199
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-034 RPTM 370
Introduction to Arena Management
INTRO ARENA MGMT (3)
Introduction to Arena Management provides students in the Recreation, Park and Tourism Management field with the opportunity to experience first-hand the many facets of managing a sports or entertainment arena. Students are introduced to a variety of departments and service areas within the facility as well as to operational considerations such as design, safety, ticketing, access and technology. Arena marketing, public relations and the impact on the entertainment industry is noted.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-035 RPTM 399 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12 per semester/maximum of 12)
Foreign Studies in RPTM.
PREREQUISITE: RPTM 199
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-036 RPTM 499 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12 per semester/maximum of 12)
Foreign Studies in RPTM.
PREREQUISITE: RPTM 199
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE DROPS

40-04-037 CSD 245
Professional Programs and Relationships
PROGRAMS & RLTSP (2)
Organization and administration of speech pathology and audiology programs in various professional settings; personal, professional, and community relationships and responsibilities.
PROPOSED START: S12012

gold line

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of the Liberal Arts

40-04-038 Change. Reduce credits for minor from 25-26 to 24-25 credits; Revise program description; Remove L A 200 from Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Business and the Liberal Arts Minor

Abington College (BSLAB)
University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (BUSLA)

This minor offers fundamental courses in business, the opportunity for more advanced business courses, and Liberal Arts coursework emphasizing various perspectives on business.

Only courses in which the student earns a grade of C or better may be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the minor.

Students pursuing the Minor in Business and the Liberal Arts are encouraged to use ENGL 202D to satisfy their English 202 requirement.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 24-25 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (4 credits)
ACCTG 211(4) (Sem: 3-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (20-21 credits)
At least 6 credits in additional courses must be at the 400 level.
ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 3-8)
FIN 100(3) or FIN 301(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 2-3 credits from PHIL 119 GH(3) or B E 392 GWS(2); COMM 427(3), COMM 475(3), COMM 487(3), ENGR 407(3), RPTM 230(3) (Sem: 3-8)

Select 6 credits from the following course list:
B A 250(3), B A 321(1-3), COMM 385(3), COMM 424(3), COMM 473(3), COMM 493(3), ECON 390(3), ECON 490(3), LER 100 GS(3); MGMT 100(3) or MGMT 301(3); MGMT 425(3), MGMT 426(3); MKTG 221(3) or MKTG 301(3); MKTG 302(3), MKTG 310(3), MKTG 327(3), MKTG 330(3), MKTG 342(3), SCM 301(3), STAT 220(3), or 3 credits of appropriate internship selected in consultation with adviser.

Select 6 credits from the following course list:
AAA S 445Y US(3), AG EC 430(3), CED 450 IL(3), ANTH 451(3), ANTH 455(3), CAS 352(3), CAS 426W(3), CAS 450W(3), CAS 452(3), CAS 452W(3), CAS 471 US;IL(3), COMM 405(3), COMM 410 IL(3), COMM 419 US;IL(3), COMM 489W(3), COMM 490(3), COMM 491(3), COMM 492(3), CRIM 467(3), CRIMJ 460(3), CRIMJ 467(3), ECON 315 GS(3), ECON 333 GS(3), ECON 342 GS(3), ECON 402(3), ECON 412(3), ECON 428(3), ECON 432(3), ECON 433(3), ECON 434(3), ECON 436W US(3), ECON 443(3), ECON 444(3), ECON 445(3), ECON 447W(3), ECON 463 IL(3), ECON 471(3), ECON 472(3), ENGL 419(3), E B F 473(3), ENNEC 482(3), ENNEC 483(3), FR 407 IL(3), FR 408 IL(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 439(3), GEOG 475H(3), GER 308Y IL(3), GER 408 IL(3), H P A 420(3), H P A 445(3), HD FS 424 US(3), HD FS 425 US(3), HIST 423 IL(3), HIST 425 IL(3), HIST 430 IL(3), HIST 445 US(3), HIST 446 US(3), HIST 447 US(3), HIST 451 US(3), HIST 458Y US(3), HIST 468 IL(3), HIST 475Y IL(3), HIST 481 IL(3), IST 431(3), IST 432(3), IST 445H(3), IST 452(3), JAPNS 403Y IL(4), JAPNS 404 IL(3), LER 400 IL(3), LER 401(3), LER 411(3), LER 414W(3), LER 425(3), LER 434(3), LER 437(3), LER 444(3), LER 445Y US(3), LER 458Y US(3), LER 460(3), LER 464(3), LER 465(3), LER 470(3), PHIL 406(3), PHIL 407(3), PHIL 418(3), PHIL 418W(3), PHIL 420(3), PHIL 431(3), PHIL 432(3), PL SC 412(3), PL SC 419(3), PL SC 490(3), PL SC 426(3), PL SC 440 US;IL(3), PL SC 441(3), PL SC 444(3), PL SC 445Y US(3), PL SC 474(3), PL SC 481(3), PL SC 487(3), PL SC 490(3), PSYCH 482(3), PSYCH 484(3), PSYCH 485(3), SOC 420(3), SOC 422(3), SOC 444(3), SOC 447(3), SOC 455(3), SOC 456(3), SPAN 420(3), STAT 470W(3), WMNST 426Y US;IL(3), WMNST 420 US;IL(3), WMNST 456(3), WMNST 472(3) (Sem: 3-8)

COURSE ADDS

40-04-039 AAA S 209 (GS;IL)
Poverty in Africa
AFRICAN POVERTY (3)
The course examines the causes, consequences, and dynamics of poverty in African countries.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-040 ANTH 220 (GA;GH;IL)
Anthropology and Art/ifacts
ANTH AND ART/IFACT (3)
This coure examines anthropological approaches to the study of art works, their production, and function in diverse human societies, both past and present.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-041 CAMS 481 (IL)
Introduction to Middle Egyptian & Hieroglyphics
EGYPTIAN LANGUAGE (3)
An introduction to the language and script of Ancient Egypt, familiarizing the student with grammar, syntax and lexicon.
PREREQUISITE: LATIN 202 or GREEK 102; 6 credits of any CAMS course, esp, CAMS 020: Egyptian Civ. and 104: Anicent Egypt.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-042 CAS 138T (GWS)
Rhetoric and Civic Life II
RCL II (3)
This course builds rehtorical skills in oral, written, visual, and digital contexts and introduces deliberation and advocacy in civic and disciplinary spheres.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 137H or CAS 137H
CROSS LIST: ENGL 138T
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-043 CMLIT 191 (GH;US;IL)
Introduction to Video Game Studies
INTRO VIDEO GAMES (3)
A comparative, international look at the nature and history of video games as cultural artifacts, from Pong to online role-playing.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-044 ENGL 137H (GWS)
Rhetoric and Civic Life I
RCL I (3)
Within a liberal arts framework and with attention to public discourse--speaking, writing, online communication, and visual presentation--this course instructs students in the arts, practices, and principles of rhetoric.
CROSS LIST: CAS 137H
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-045 KOR 110
Level Two Korean B
LEVEL 2 B (3)
This is the fourth semester course of sequenced Korean study at Penn State. It is the Advanced-Intermediate course.
PREREQUISITE: KOR 001, KOR 002, and KOR 003 (or equivalent cumulative knowledge of Korean)
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-046 AAA S 101 (GH;US)
The African American Woman
AFR AMER WMN (3:3:0)
The sociological, historical, and political experiences of African American women, their roles and contributions to society.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 101
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-047 AAA S 102 (GH;IL)
Women of Color: Cross-Cultural Perspective
WMN CL:CR CUL PERS (3:3:0)
Global examination of value systems of women of color; attention to minority ethnic groups in the United States and developing countries.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 102
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-048 AAA S 103 (US)
Racism and Sexism
RACISM & SEXISM (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of the structure of race and gender in the contemporary United States.
CROSS LIST: SOC 103 WMNST 103
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-049 AAA S 145 (GH;US;IL)
African American Religion
AFRO-AM RELIGION (3:3:0)
History and significance of the religious dimension of the Black American struggle for equality from enslavement to the contemporary period.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 145
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-050 AAA S 146 (GH;US)
The Life and Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.
LIFE OF M L KING (3:3:0)
A survey of the civil rights leader including his religious beliefs, intellectual development, and philosophy for social change.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 146
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-051 AAA S 210 (GH;US)
Between Accommodation and Alienation: African Americans in a Jim Crow Nation, 1896-1932
AFR-AMER 1896-1932 (3:3:0)
The course will explore the context and events that shaped African American life over the period 1896-1932.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, HIST 021
CROSS LIST: HIST 210
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-052 AAA S 211 (GH;US;IL)
The Emergence and Evolution of the Black Diaspora in the Atlantic World
BLACK DIASPORA (3:3:0)
The course will explore the history and role of African and African-descent people in Africa, the Americas, and Europe.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 or HIST 003 or HIST 020 or HIST 021 or HIST 152
CROSS LIST: HIST 211
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-053 AAA S 212 (US)
Black History to the Twentieth Century
BLACK HIST TO 20C (3)
An examination of Black political, economic, social, and cultural life in America from the era of colonization to 1905.
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-054 AAA S 235 (US)
African-American Oral Folk Tradition
AFR-AM FOLK TRAD (3:3:0)
The origins, forms, and function of the oral folk tradition of African Americans.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
CROSS LIST: ENGL 235
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-055 AAA S 250 (GH;IL)
Introduction to the Modern Caribbean
INTRO TO CARIBBEAN (3:3:0)
A survey course which, explores the historical evolution and emergency of the modern Caribbean.
CROSS LIST: HIST 250
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-056 AAA S 364 (GS;US)
Black & White Sexuality
BLK & WHT SEX (3)
This course explains how narrow ways of thinking limit our understanding of the diverse expressions of human sexuality.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 364
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-057 AAA S 401
Afro-American Studies Seminar
AF AM STUDIES SEM (3:3:0)
A seminar examining theoretical and methodological issues in Afro-American Studies.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, AAA S 101
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-058 AAA S 409 (US)
Racial and Ethnic Inequality in America
INEQUALITY IN AMER (3:3:0)
The impact of inequality and discrimination on individual and group identity among various racial and ethnic groups.
PREREQUISITE: SOC 001
CROSS LIST: SOC 409
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-059 AAA S 410
Spirit, Space, Survival: Contemporary Black Women
CONTEMP BLK WMN (3:3:0)
How recent Black women have used spirit and space to survive.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 101
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-060 AAA S 422 (US)
Contemporary African American Communication
CONT AF AM COMM (3:3:0)
A focused study on the continuities between African and African American culture and communication.
PREREQUISITE: SPCOM 100
CROSS LIST: CAS 422
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-061 AAA S 431 (USI)
Black Liberation and American Foreign Policy
BLK LIB & FOR POL (3:3:0)
This course deals with American foreign policy and Black liberation in Africa since 1945.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, AAA S 192; PL SC 001 or PL SC 014
CROSS LIST: HIST 431
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-062 AAA S 432 (IL)
Between Nation and Empire: The Caribbean in the 20th Century
20TH C CARIBBEAN (3:3:0)
An exploration of the political evolution of the Caribbean Region over the course of the 20th Century.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 250
CROSS LIST: HIST 432
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-063 AAA S 445Y (US)
Politics of Affirmative Action
POL OF AFFIRM ACT (3:2:0)
Examines history, politics, and economics of the use of special programs to advance racial interests in the U.S.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 level course and PL SC 001 or PL SC 007
CROSS LIST: LER 445Y PL SC 445Y
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-064 AAA S 460 (USI)
African American Philosophy
AFRICAN AMER PHIL (3)
Major works by African American Philosophers, on topics of race, freedom, citizenship, nationhood, law and society.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 or PHIL 009 and 5th semester standing
CROSS LIST: PHIL 460
APPROVED START: FA2009

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-065 AAA S 465 (US)
Civil Rights and American Politics 1933-1968
CIV RTS & AMER POL (3:3:0)
The civil rights struggle and its impact upon American politics.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, HIST 021, HIST 152, PL SC 001, or PL SC 002
CROSS LIST: HIST 465
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-066 AAA S 469 (US)
Slavery and the Literary Imagination
SLAVERY & LIT IMAG (3:3:0)
The impact of slavery on the petitions, poetry, slave narratives, autobiographies, and novels of African Americans.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
CROSS LIST: ENGL 469
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AF AM
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-067 CAMS 002 (GH;IL)
Literature of the Ancient Near East
ANC NEAR EAST LIT (3:3:0)
Reading and study of literary works from the Ancient Near East, especially from Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 115
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: 3 credits from the following list: CAMS 005, CAMS 010, CAMS 020, CAMS 105
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-068 CAS 422 (US)
Contemporary African American Communication
CONT AF AM COMM (3:3:0)
A focused study on the continuities between African and African American culture and communication.
PREREQUISITE: CAS 100
CROSS LIST: AAA S 422
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 422
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-069 ENGL 235 (US)
African-American Oral Folk Tradition
AFR-AM FOLK TRAD (3:3:0)
The origins, forms, and function of the oral folk tradition of African Americans.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
CROSS LIST: AAA S 235
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 235
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-070 ENGL 469 (US)
Slavery and the Literary Imagination
SLAVERY & LIT IMAG (3:3:0)
The impact of slavery on the petitions, poetry, slave narratives, autobiographies, and novels of African Americans.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030
CROSS LIST: AAA S 469
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 469
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-071 HIST 210 (GH;US)
Between Accommodation and Alienation: African Americans in a Jim Crow Nation, 1896-1932
AFR-AMER 1896-1932 (3:3:0)
The course will explore the context and events that shaped African American life over the period 1896-1932.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, three credits of American history, or permission of the instructor
CROSS LIST: AAA S 210
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 210
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-072 HIST 211 (GH;US;IL)
The Emergence and Evolution of the Black Diaspora in the Atlantic World
BLACK DIASPORA (3)
The course will explore the history and role of African and African-descent people in Africa, the Americas, and Europe.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 or HIST 003 or HIST 020 or HIST 021 or HIST 152
CROSS LIST: AAA S 211
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 211
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-073 HIST 250 (GH;IL)
Introduction to the Modern Caribbean
INTRO TO CARIBBEAN (3:3:0)
A survey course which explores the historical evolution and emergence of the modern Caribbean.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 250
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 250
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-074 HIST 424H
Monotheism and the Birth of the West
MONOTHEISM (3:2:0)
The birth of monotheism and its relation to social organization, the idea of individuality, and science.
PREREQUISITE: CAMS 004, CAMS 110, CAMS 120, or HIST 102
CROSS LIST: J ST 424H RL ST 424H PHIL 434H
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: J ST 424H; RL ST 424H
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-075 HIST 431 (US;IL)
Black Liberation and American Foreign Policy
BLK LIB&AM FOR POL (3:3:0)
This course deals with American foreign policy and Black liberation in Africa since 1945.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in African history; 3 credits in African political science; or 3 credits in American political science
CROSS LIST: AAA S 431
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 431
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-076 HIST 432 (IL)
Between Nation and Empire: The Caribbean in the 20th Century
20TH C CARIBBEAN (3:3:0)
An exploration of the political evolution of the Caribbean Region over the course of the 20th Century.
PREREQUISITE: HIST 250
CROSS LIST: AAA S 432
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 432
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-077 HIST 465 (US)
Civil Rights and American Politics 1933-1968
CIV RTS & AMER POL (3:3:0)
The civil rights struggle and its impact upon American politics.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, HIST 021, HIST 152, PL SC 001, or PL SC 002
CROSS LIST: AAA S 465
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 465
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-078 J ST 424H
Monotheism and the Birth of the West
MONOTHEISM (3:2:0)
The birth of monotheism and its relation to social organization, the idea of individuality, and science.
PREREQUISITE: J ST 004, J ST 102, J ST 110, or J ST 120
CROSS LIST: HIST 424H PHIL 434H RL ST 424H
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: HIST 424H; RL ST 424H
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-079 LER 445Y (US)
Politics of Affirmative Action
POL OF AFFIRM ACT (3:2:0)
Examines history, politics, and economics of the use of special programs to advance racial interests in the U.S.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 level course and PL SC 001 or PL SC 007
CROSS LIST: AAA S 445Y PL SC 445Y
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 445Y; PL SC 445Y
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-080 PHIL 460 (US;IL)
African American Philosophy
AFRICAN AMER PHIL (3)
Major works by African American Philosophers, on topics of race, freedom, citizenship, nationhood, law and society.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 or PHIL 009 and 5th semester standing
CROSS LIST: AAA S 460
APPROVED START: FA2009

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 460
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-081 PL SC 445Y (US)
Politics of Affirmative Action
POL OF AFFIRM ACT (3:2:0)
Examines history, politics, and economics of the use of special programs to advance racial interests in the U.S.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100 level course and PL SC 001 or PL SC 007
CROSS LIST: AAA S 445Y LER 445Y
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 445Y; LER 445Y
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-082 PSYCH 230 (GS)
Introduction to Psychologies of Religion
INTRO PSY RELIG (3:3:0)
Introduction to major Western psychologies of religion (James, Freud, Jung) and to subsequent extensions of and departures from them.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 236
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LISTING
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-083 PSYCH 436
Humanistic, Existential, and Religious Approaches to Psychology
HUMANISTIC PSYCH (3)
Existential, humanistic, and religious approaches to the psychology of experience, consciousness and will.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 100 or RL ST 001
CROSS LIST: RL ST 414
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
REMOVE CROSS LISTING
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-084 RL ST 145 (GH;US;IL)
African American Religion
AFRO-AM RELIGION (3:3:0)
History and significance of the religious dimension of the Black American struggle for equality from enslavement to the contemporary period.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 145
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 145
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-085 RL ST 146 (GH;US)
The Life and Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.
LIFE OF M L KING (3:3:0)
A survey of the civil rights leader including his religious beliefs, intellectual development, and philosophy for social change.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 146
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 146
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-086 RL ST 424H
Monotheism and the Birth of the West
MONOTHEISM (3:2:0)
The birth of monotheism and its relation to social organization, the idea of individuality, and science.
PREREQUISITE: RL ST 004, RL ST 102, RL ST 110, or RL ST 120
CROSS LIST: HIST 424H J ST 424H PHIL 434H
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: HIST 424H; J ST 424H
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-087 SOC 103 (US)
Racism and Sexism
RACISM & SEXISM (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of the structure of race and gender inequality in the contemporary United States.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 103 WMNST 103
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 103; WMNST 103
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-088 SOC 409 (US)
Racial and Ethnic Inequality in America
INEQUALITY IN AMER (3:3:0)
The impact of inequality and discrimination on individual and group identity among various racial and ethnic groups.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in Sociology
CROSS LIST: AAA S 409
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 409
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-089 WMNST 101 (GH;US)
The African American Woman
AFR AMER WMN (3:3:0)
The sociological, historical and political experiences of African American women, their roles and contributions to society.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 101
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 101
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-090 WMNST 102 (GH;IL)
Women of Color: Cross-Cultural Perspective
WMN CL:CR CUL PERS (3:3:0)
Global examination of value systems of women of color; attention to minority ethnic groups in the United States and developing countries.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 102
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 102
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-091 WMNST 103 (US)
Racism and Sexism
RACISM & SEXISM (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of the structure of race and gender inequality in the contemporary United States.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 103 SOC 103
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 103; SOC 103
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-092 WMNST 364 (GS;US)
Black & White Sexuality
BLK & WHT SEX (3)
This course explains how narrow ways of thinking limit our understanding of the diverse expressions of human sexuality.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 364
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AF AM 364
PROPOSED START: FA2012

COURSE DROPS

40-04-093 PHIL 434H
Monotheism and the Birth of the West
MONOTHEISM (3:2:0)
The birth of monotheism and its relation to social organization, the idea of individuality, and science.
PREREQUISITE: CAMS 004, CAMS 110, CAMS 120, or HIST 102
CROSS LIST: HIST 424H J ST 424H RL ST 424H
PROPOSED START: FA2012

40-04-094 PHIL 422
Philosophy of History
PHIL OF HISTORY (3)
Philosophical investigation of history as content and knowledge, objectivity and relativism in historical analysis, historical laws, interpretation, explanation and narrativity.
PREREQUISITE: 9 credits of philosophy, including PHIL 122 or 6 credits of philosophy at the 200 level
PROPOSED START: S12012

FIVE YEAR DROPS

40-04-095 RL ST 236 (GS)
Introduction to Psychologies of Religion
INTRO PSY RELIGION (3:3:0)
Introduction to major Western psychologies of religion (James, Freud, Jung) and to subsequent extensions of and departures from them.
CROSS LIST: PSYCH 230
PROPOSED START: FA2012

40-04-096 RL ST 414
Humanistic, Existential, and Religious Approaches to Psychology
HUMANISTIC PSYCH (3)
Existential, humanistic, and religious approaches to the psychology of experience, consciousness, and will.
PREREQUISITE: PSYCH 100 or RL ST 001
CROSS LIST: PSYCH 436
PROPOSED START: FA2012

gold line

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Eberly College of Science

40-04-096A Change. Increase credits for Requirements for Major from 60 to 63 credits; Revise program description; Add FRNSC 100, 210, 410, 411, 413, 415W to Prescribed Courses; Add BIOL 322 to Additional Courses in Forensic Biology Option; Move CRIM 100, 113 from Prescribed to Additional Courses; Move BIOL 222 from Prescribed to Additional Courses in Forensic Biology Option; Remove FRNSC 201W, 301, 302 from Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Forensic Science

University Park, The Eberly College of Science (FRNSC)

Forensic Science is the application of scientific principles and methods to assist criminal and civil investigations and litigation. This major is an inter-college collaboration among academic units and provides students with a strong foundation in the biological, physical, and mathematical sciences. It introduces them to relevant topics in criminalistics forensic chemistry, forensic biology, crime scene investigation, and appropriate social sciences. Students are educated on the role of forensic scientists in the criminal justice system, the collection and analysis of scientific evidence, and the manner in which evidence is presented in court. Graduates of this major could pursue employment as a scientist in a federal, state, or private forensic laboratory or with insurance companies, homeland security agencies, or the judicial community. Graduates could also choose to pursue advanced degrees, for example, in forensic science, medicine, psychology, anthropology, pathology, odontology, entomology, toxicology, law, or in the general sciences.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Forensic Science major, a student must have: (1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average (2) completed CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), FRNSC 210(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

For the B.S in Forensic Science a minimum of 124-126 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin)

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 97-99 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GH courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 63 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (52 credits)[1]
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), CHEM 210(3), CHEM 212(3), CHEM 213(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
PHIL 132 GH(3) (Sem: 1-8)
FRNSC 100(3) (Sem: 2)
FRNSC 210(3) (Sem; 3)

FRNSC 410(2) (Sem: 4-6)
FRNSC 415W(2) (Sem: 5-6)
FRNSC 411(3), FRNSC 413(3) (Sem: 5-7)
FRNSC 400(1), FRNSC 485W(4) (Sem: 7-8)
STAT 250 GQ(3) (Sem: 5-8)
FRNSC 475(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (11 credits)[1]
CRIM 100 GS(3) or CRIM 113 US(3) (Sem: 1-6)
PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4); or PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 2-6)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 34-36 credits

FORENSIC BIOLOGY OPTION: (36 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (21 credits)[1]
B M B 251(3), MICRB 201(3), MICRB 202(2) (Sem: 1-4)
B M B 400(3) (Sem: 5-7)
B M B 401(3), B M B 442(3) (Sem: 5-7)
FRNSC 421W(4) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (6 credits)[1]
BIOL 222(3) or BIOL 322(3) (Sem: 3-5)
Select 3 credits from B M B 402(3), B M B 428(3), B M B 433(3), BIOL 405(3), BIOL 422(3), BIOL 460(3) (Sem: 6-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Up to 4 credits may be used to achieve the II level of foreign/second language (Spanish is recommended)
Select 9 credits; including at least 3 credits at the 400 level. (Sem: 3-8)

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY OPTION: (34 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (19 credits)[1]
BIOL 110 GN(4), BIOL 230W GN(4) (Sem: 1-4)
CHEM 227(4) (Sem: 3-5)
CHEM 425(3) (Sem: 5-7)
FRNSC 427W(4) (Sem: 6-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (6 credits)[1]
B M B 428(3), CHEM 402(3), CHEM 410(3), CHEM 412(3), CHEM 423W(3), CHEM 430(3), CHEM 431W(3), CHEM 450(3), CHEM 452(3) or 3 credits of 400-level biochemistry (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Up to 4 credits may be used to achieve the II level of foreign/second language (Spanish is recommended)
Select 9 credits; including at least 3 credits at the 300-400 level (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

40-04-097 Change. Revise program description; Add STAT 200 to Prescribed Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Mathematics

Altoona College (MTAAL)
University Park, Eberly College of Science (MTHBA)

PROFESSOR JOHN ROE, Chair, Department of Mathematics

Two degrees are offered in mathematics: the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. Both programs have a common core of mathematics courses; both programs prepare students for graduate work in mathematics. In addition, the Bachelor of Arts degree is oriented toward applications of mathematics in the arts and the humanities. The Bachelor of Science degree has a number of options. These options are oriented toward actuarial science, applied and industrial mathematics, computational mathematics, graduate study and systems analysis.

Many of the options are designed for students who want to use mathematics in industry, commerce, or government. In short, the degree requirements have the flexibility to fit many individual interests. The student, with the assistance of a faculty adviser, should select an option by the end of the sophomore year.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Mathematics major, a student must have: 1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average; and 2) completed MATH 140 GQ(4) and MATH 141 GQ(4) and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

For the B.A. degree in Mathematics, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION or BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS course selections)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-1 credit

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 56 credits
(This includes 6 credits of General Education GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (27-29 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2-3)[1], MATH 230(4)[1], MATH 311W(3-4)[1], MATH 312(3)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 403(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18-19 credits)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) or CMPSC 201 GQ(3) (Sem: 1-2)
MATH 250(3)[1] or MATH 251(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
MATH 435(3)[1] or MATH 436(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits[1] from MATH 411(3), MATH 412(3), MATH 417(3), MATH 419(3), or MATH 421(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits[1] of 400-level MATH courses except MATH 401(3), MATH 405(3), MATH 406(3), MATH 441(3), MATH 470(3), MATH 471(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (8-11 credits)
Select 8-11 credits from department list (Sem: 3-8)

Integrated B.A. in Mathematics and Master of Applied Statistics (M.A.S.)

The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree with B.A. in Mathematics and Master of Applied Statistics (M.A.S.) is designed to be completed in five years. This integrated degree will enable a select number of highly qualified and career oriented students to obtain training in statistics focused on developing data analysis skills, and exploration of core areas of applied statistics at the graduate levels in addition to an undergraduate degree in Mathematics. The M.A.S. degree is a professional masters degree that emphasizes applications. The degree prepares students with interests in mathematics, computation, and the quantitative aspects of science for careers in industry and government as statistical analysts. Research divisions in the pharmaceutical industry, quality control, and quality engineering divisions in manufacturing companies, clinical research units, corporate planning and research units, and other data intensive positions require persons with training in mathematics, computation, database management, and statistical analysis, which this program will provide.

Application Process

The number of openings in the integrated B.A. in Mathematics and M.A.S. program is limited. Admission will be based on specific criteria and the recommendation of faculty. Applicants to the integrated program:

For the IUG B.A. in Mathematics and M.A.S. degree, 120 credits are required for the B.A. and 30 credits for the M.A.S. The following twelve graduate level credits (number of credits in parentheses) can apply to both B.A. and M.A.S. degrees, six of these are at the 500 level: STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3), STAT 502(3).

Assuming all requirements for the B.A. in Mathematics are completed, students in the program can complete the B.A. degree and not advance to the M.A.S. degree if they desire.

Degree Requirements

IUG Math B.A. students must fulfill the Math B.A. requirement while counting these prescribed Statistics courses (15 credits)
STAT 220(3)*, STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3), STAT 502(3)

IUG M.A.S. Requirements (30 credits)
STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3), STAT 502(3), STAT 580(2) and STAT 581(1)**

Electives: (15 credits)
Select from STAT 464(3), STAT 503(3), STAT 504(3), STAT 505(3), STAT 506(3), STAT 507(3), STAT 508(3), STAT 509(3), STAT 510(3) and the departmental list of additional courses for the M.A.S. program with the approval of the adviser.

For the IUG B.A. in Mathematics and M.A.S. degree, the four courses: STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3) and STAT 502(3) can apply to both the B.A. and M.A.S. degrees.

*Can be waived for students with an equivalent course, e.g. STAT 250 GQ(3) or STAT 301 GQ(3).

** For all students in the M.A.S. program, the STAT 581(1) course will have a comprehensive written project report required as part of the course, which serves as the culminating experience.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

40-04-098 Change. Add Applied and Industrial Mathematics Option; Drop Applied Analysis Option and Teacher Certification Option; Change the number of credits required for the major from 80-90 credits to 80-83 credits; Change credits required for the option from 52-62 to 50-51 credits for all options; Revise program description; Add STAT 200 to Prescribed Courses; Add STAT 462, 463 to Actuarial Science Option; Add MATH 415 to General Mathematics Option; Remove MATH 418, 451, STAT 460; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Mathematics

Altoona College (MTSAL)
University Park, Eberly College of Science (MTHBS)

Not all options are available at every campus. Contact the campus you are interested in attending to determine which options are offered.

PROFESSOR JOHN ROE, Chair, Department of Mathematics

Two degrees are offered in mathematics: the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. Both programs have a common core of mathematics courses; both programs prepare students for graduate work in mathematics. In addition, the Bachelor of Arts degree is oriented toward applications of mathematics in the arts and the humanities. The Bachelor of Science degree has a number of options. These options are oriented toward actuarial science, applied and industrial, computational mathematics, graduate study and systems analysis.

Many of the options are designed for students who want to use mathematics in industry, commerce, or government. In short, the degree requirements have the flexibility to fit many individual interests. The student, with the assistance of a faculty adviser, should select an option by the end of the sophomore year.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Mathematics major, a student must have: 1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average; and 2) completed MATH 140 GQ(4) and MATH 141 GQ(4) and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

For the B.S. degree in Mathematics, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(6-12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selections)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-1 credit

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 80-83 credits
(This includes 6 General Education GQ courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 30-32 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24-25 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
MATH 220 GQ(2)[1], MATH 230(4)[1], MATH 311W(3-4)[1], MATH 312(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) or CMPSC 201 GQ(3)(Sem: 1-2)
MATH 250(3)[1] or MATH 251(4)[1] (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 50-51 credits

ACTUARIAL MATHEMATICS OPTION: (50-51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (30 credits)
I E 425(3), MATH 414(3)[1], MATH 415(3)[1], MATH 416(3)[1], MATH 484(3)[1], R M 302(3), R M 410(3), R M 411(3), R M 412(3), STAT 462(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)[1]
MATH 451(3) or MATH 486(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from STAT 463 or 400-level MATH courses except MATH 401(3), MATH 405(3), MATH 406(3), MATH 441(3), MATH 470(3), MATH 471(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (14-15 credits)
Select 14-15 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

APPLIED AND INDUSTRIAL MATHEMATICS OPTION: (50-51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)[1]
MATH 403(3), MATH 412(3), MATH 414(3), MATH 415(3), MATH 436(3), MATH 450(3), MATH 455(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)[1]
Select 12 credits from MATH 411(3), MATH 416(3), MATH 417(3), MATH 419(3), MATH 421(3), MATH 456(3), MATH 461(3), MATH 467(3), MATH 468(3), MATH 479(3), MATH 484(3), MATH 485(3), MATH 486(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (17-18 credits)
Select 17-18 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS OPTION: (50-51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)
CMPSC 122(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 465(3), MATH 414(3)[1], MATH 415(3)[1], MATH 455(3)[1], MATH 456(3)[1], MATH 467(3), MATH 484(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)[1]
Select 3 credits from MATH 411(3), MATH 412(3), or MATH 417(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits from CMPSC 468(3), MATH 310(3), MATH 468(3), or MATH 485(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (17-18 credits)
Select 17-18 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

GENERAL MATHEMATICS OPTION: (50-51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)[1]
MATH 403(3), MATH 414(3), MATH 415(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)[1]
MATH 435(3) or MATH 436(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from MATH 411(3), MATH 412(3), MATH 417(3), MATH 419(3), or MATH 421(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 6 credits of 400-level MATH courses except MATH 401(3), MATH 405(3), MATH 406(3), MATH 441(3), MATH 470(3), MATH 471(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (29-30 credits)
Select an approved sequence of 12 credits in MATH or a related area or an area of application (Sem: 1-8)
Select 17-18 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

GRADUATE STUDY OPTION: (50-51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (24 credits)[1]
MATH 403(3), MATH 404(3), MATH 414(3), MATH 415(3), MATH 421(3), MATH 429(3), MATH 435(3), MATH 436(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)[1]
Select 9 credits of 400-level MATH courses except MATH 401(3), MATH 405(3), MATH 406(3), MATH 441(3), MATH 470(3), MATH 471(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (17-18 credits)
Select 17-18 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OPTION: (50-51 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)[1]
MATH 414(3), MATH 415(3), MATH 436(3), MATH 484(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)[1]
Select 6 credits from MATH 310(3), MATH 451(3), MATH 485(3), or MATH 486(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 3 credits from 400-level MATH courses except MATH 401(3), MATH 405(3), MATH 406(3), MATH 441(3), MATH 470(3), MATH 471(4) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (29-30 credits)
Select an approved sequence of 12 credits in an area of application; possible areas include business, economics, industrial engineering, social sciences (Sem: 1-8)
Select 17-18 credits from department list (Sem: 1-8)

Integrated B.S. in Mathematics and Master of Applied Statistics (M.A.S.)

The Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate (IUG) degree with B.S. in Mathematics and Master of Applied Statistics (M.A.S.) is designed to be completed in five years. This integrated degree will enable a select number of highly qualified and career oriented students to obtain training in statistics focused on developing data analysis skills, and exploration of core areas of applied statistics at the graduate levels in addition to an undergraduate degree in Mathematics. The M.A.S. degree is a professional masters degree that emphasizes applications. The degree prepares students with interests in mathematics, computation, and the quantitative aspects of science for careers in industry and government as statistical analysts. Research divisions in the pharmaceutical industry, quality control, and quality engineering divisions in manufacturing companies, clinical research units, corporate planning and research units, and other data intensive positions require persons with training in mathematics, computation, database management, and statistical analysis, which this program will provide.

Application Process

The number of openings in the integrated B.S. in Mathematics and M.A.S. program is limited. Admission will be based on specific criteria and the recommendation of faculty. Applicants to the integrated program:

For the IUG B.S. in Mathematics and M.A.S. degree, 120 credits are required for the B.S. and 30 credits for the M.A.S. The following twelve graduate level credits (number of credits in parentheses) can apply to both B.S. and M.A.S. degrees, six of these are at the 500 level: STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3), STAT 502(3).

Assuming all requirements for the B.S. in Mathematics are completed, students in the program can complete the B.S. degree and not advance to the M.A.S. degree if they desire.

Degree Requirements

IUG Math B.S. students must fulfill the Math B.S. requirement while counting these prescribed Statistics courses (15 credits)
STAT 220(3)*, STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3), STAT 502(3)

IUG M.A.S. Requirements (30 credits)
STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3), STAT 502(3), STAT 580(2) and STAT 581(1)**

Electives: (15 credits)
Select from STAT 464(3), STAT 503(3), STAT 504(3), STAT 505(3), STAT 506(3), STAT 507(3), STAT 508(3), STAT 509(3), STAT 510(3) and the departmental list of additional courses for the M.A.S. program with the approval of the adviser.

For the IUG B.S. in Mathematics and M.A.S. degree, the four courses: STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3), STAT 501(3) and STAT 502(3) can apply to both the B.S. and M.A.S. degrees.

*Can be waived for students with an equivalent course, e.g. STAT 250 GQ(3)or STAT 301 GQ(3).

** For all students in the M.A.S. program, the STAT 581(1) course will have a comprehensive written project report required as part of the course, which serves as the culminating experience.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

40-04-098A FRNSC 415W
Laboratory in Crime Scene Investigation
CSI LAB (2)
Laboratory course covering crime scene investigation with emphasis on scientific philosophy, concepts, procedures, problem solving and hands-on activities.
PREREQUISITE: FRNSC 410
PROPOSED START: S12012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

University College

40-04-099 Change. Reduce Electives from 14-18 to 11-15 credits; Reduce minimum credits for degree from 123 to 120 credits; Add B A 241, 242, CRIMJ 113, 220, 241, 296, 297, 304, 310, 311, 389, 407, 408, 410, 413, 415, 420, 422, 431, 432, 435, 450W, 465, 469, 497, 497A to Additional Courses.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Administration of Justice

Abington College (AJAAB)
University College (AJACC): Penn State Fayette, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State Wilkes-Barre

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Administration of Justice provides students with a broadly based liberal education focused on the understanding and analysis of justice systems. Having grappled with the many dilemmas and controversies presented by the problems of administering justice in a complex society, graduates of this program are given the background to be educated, thoughtful, and intelligent citizens.

For the B.A. degree in Administration of Justice, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(4-7 credits of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 11-15 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 43-44 credits[1]
(This includes 4-7 credits of General Education courses; 0-3 credits of GH courses; 4 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
CRIM J 012 GS(3), CRIM J 100(3), CRIM J 221(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24-25 credits)
Select 3-4 credits in values and ethics from B A 243(4), or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2), CRIMJ 465(3), PHIL 003 GH(3), PHIL 103 GH(3), PHIL 105 GH(3), PHIL 106 GH(3), or PHIL/S T S 107 GH(3), S T S 100 GH(3), S T S 101 GH(3) or S T S/PHIL 107 GH(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from CRIMJ 451 US(3) or CRIMJ 453 US(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 18 credits in CRIMJ, with at least 12 credits in the 400 level from: CRIMJ 013 GS(3), CRIMJ 083S GS(3), CRIMJ 113 US(3), CRIMJ 200(3), CRIMJ 201(3), CRIMJ 210(3), CRIMJ 220(3), CRIMJ 230(3), CRIMJ 234(3), CRIMJ 241(3), CRIMJ 296(1-18), CRIMJ 297(1-9), CRIMJ 300H(3), CRIMJ 304(3), CRIMJ 310(3), CRIMJ 311(3), CRIMJ 345(3), CRIMJ 389(3), CRIMJ 406(3), CRIMJ 407(3), CRIMJ 408(3), CRIMJ 410(3), CRIMJ 412(3), CRIMJ 413(3), CRIMJ 414(3), CRIMJ 415(3), CRIMJ 420(3), CRIMJ 421(3), CRIMJ 421W(3), CRIMJ 422(3), CRIMJ 423(3), CRIMJ 424(3), CRIMJ 424W(3), CRIMJ 425(3), CRIMJ 426(3), CRIMJ 430(3), CRIMJ 431(3), CRIMJ 432(3), CRIMJ 435(3), CRIMJ 439(3), CRIMJ 441(3), CRIMJ 441W(3), CRIMJ 450W(3), CRIMJ 460(3), CRIMJ 462(3), CRIMJ 467(3), CRIMJ 469(3), CRIMJ 471(3), CRIMJ 473(3), CRIMJ 482(3), CRIMJ 489W(3), CRIMJ 497(3), CRIMJ 497A(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (6 credits)
Select 6 credits, in consultation with adviser, from University-wide offerings according to student's career plan (Sem: 5-8)

[1]A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

40-04-100 Change. Reduce Electives from 17-21 to 14-18 credits; Reduce minimum credits for degree from 123 to 120 credits; Add B A 241, 242, CRIMJ 113, 220, 241, 296, 297, 304, 310, 311, 389, 407, 408, 410, 413, 415, 420, 422, 431, 432, 435, 450W, 465, 469, 497, 497A to Additional Courses; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Administration of Justice

Abington College (AJSAB)
University College (AJSCC)
: Penn State Beaver, Penn State Fayette, Penn State New Kensington, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State Shenango, Penn State Wilkes-Barre

The Bachelor of Science degree is intended to prepare students for careers in the administration of justice. Two emphases are provided: (1) for students interested in entry-level employment in justice agencies; (2) for students interested in academic or research positions and who may seek graduate education before beginning employment.

For the B.S. degree in Administration of Justice, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(4-7 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 14-18 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 64-65 credits[1]
(This includes 4-7 credits of General Education courses; 0-3 credits of GH courses; 4 credits of GQ courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
CRIMJ 012 GS(3), CRIMJ 100(3), CRIMJ 221(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (39-40 credits)
(Some of the courses in this category may have prerequisites that are not included in the major.)
Select 3-4 credits in values and ethics from B A 243(4) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2), CRIMJ 465(3), PHIL 003 GH(3), PHIL 103 GH(3), PHIL 105 GH(3), PHIL 106 GH(3), or PHIL/S T S 107 GH(3), S T S 100 GH(3), S T S 101 GH(3) or S T S/PHIL 107 GH(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 3 credits from CRIMJ 451 US(3) or CRIMJ 453 US(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 18 credits in CRIMJ, with at least 9 credits in the 400 level from: CRIMJ 013 GS(3), CRIMJ 083S GS(3), CRIMJ 113 US(3), CRIMJ 200(3), CRIMJ 201(3), CRIMJ 210(3), CRIMJ 220(3), CRIMJ 230(3), CRIMJ 234(3), CRIMJ 241(3), CRIMJ 296(1-18), CRIMJ 297(1-9), CRIMJ 300H(3), CRIMJ 304(3), CRIMJ 310(3), CRIMJ 311(3), CRIMJ 345(3), CRIMJ 389(3), CRIMJ 406(3), CRIMJ 407(3), CRIMJ 408(3), CRIMJ 410(3), CRIMJ 412(3), CRIMJ 413(3), CRIMJ 414(3), CRIMJ 415(3), CRIMJ 420(3), CRIMJ 421(3), CRIMJ 422(3), CRIMJ 423 US(3), CRIMJ 424(3), CRIMJ 425(3), CRIMJ 426(3), CRIMJ 430(3), CRIMJ 431(3), CRIMJ 432(3), CRIMJ 435(3), CRIMJ 439(3), CRIMJ 441(3), CRIMJ 450W(3), CRIMJ 460(3), CRIMJ 462(3), CRIMJ 467(3), CRIMJ 469(3), CRIMJ 471(3), CRIMJ 473(3), CRIMJ 482(3), CRIMJ 489W(3), CRIMJ 497(3), CRIMJ 497A(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 15 credits -- emphasis a or b:
a. Field Research emphasis: CRIMJ 240W(4), CRIMJ 290(1- 3), CRIMJ 494(5), CRIMJ 495(5) (Sem: 5-8)
b. Research and Policy Analysis emphasis: Select 15 credits, at least 6 at the 400 level from: AM ST 491W(3-6), CRIMJ 424W(3), any CMPSC (3), ECON 104 GS(3), LER 100 GS(3), L ST 370(3), PL SC 002(3), PL SC 419 US(3), PL SC 490(3), SOC 409 US(3), SOC 419(3), SOC 422(3), or SOC 423(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits, in consultation with adviser, from University-wide offerings according to student's career plan (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

gold line


APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

40-04-101 Change. Add new M.D./Ph.D. degree; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Biomedical Sciences (BMS)

Program Home Page

PROFESSOR RALPH KEIL, Chair, Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program
C1712 College of Medicine, Mail Code H170
Hershey, PA 17033
1-717-531-1045
1-717-531-0786 (FAX)
rkeil@psu.edu

Degrees conferred:
Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D., M.S.

The Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Graduate Program with its Options in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Translational Therapeutics, and Virology and Immunology provides predoctoral students curricular training with a unique focus on human health and disease and the opportunity to concentrate in one or more disciplinary approaches including biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, genetics, immunology, pharmacology, physiology, structural biology, and virology.  Students receive rigorous training that provides the skills necessary to be leaders in biomedical research and other endeavors that benefit from a rigorous scientific background, including education, law, journalism, and public policy.

The first-year Fall curriculum provides the student an understanding of basic cellular processes through a common curriculum that includes three parallel and integrated three-credit BMS courses arranged around the theme 'Life Requires': 1) BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, 2) BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, and 3) BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information. The Fall curriculum also includes the one-credit Art of Scientific Communication I course that reinforces the 'Life Requires' components and aids students in the transition from textbooks to primary literature as a source of information.  The first-year Spring curriculum offers an opportunity to explore one or more curricular paths that lead to entry into one of the Options and/or to utilize Integrative Physiology as a stepping-stone to an individualized curricular pathway within the BMS Graduate Program.  The Spring curriculum also includes the one-credit Art of Scientific Communication II course that further develops the student's knowledge acquisition from the primary literature and assists improvement of presentation and writing skills necessary for subsequent journal clubs, literature-based courses, and scientific discourse throughout their career. In addition, during the first year, students complete three research rotations that expose them to the wide range of research interests of The Pennsylvania State University graduate faculty from both basic and clinical science departments at the College of Medicine in Hershey. These rotations serve to inform the students with regard to choosing a dissertation adviser and doctoral committee. 

Curriculum in the second year is determined by the choice to participate in one of the Options, or an individualized curricular pathway designed by the interaction of the student with the dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.

Successful completion of the Program results in conferral of the Ph.D. Degree in Biomedical Sciences.

The BMS Graduate Program is an interdepartmental program that engages faculty from at least seven basic science and eleven clinical science departments. This broad-reaching Program provides students a wide ranging understanding of multiple disciplines with specific expertise in a chosen area, and encourages interdisciplinary research that is the hallmark of biomedical sciences in the 21st century.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Completed official Penn State Graduate School Application for Admission; Master's or Doctoral Degree
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. Statement of goals including a) your reasons for applying to the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, b) particular areas of research interests if known, and c) long-term career goals
  5. All applicants must have received from a regionally accredited institution a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. International applicants must hold the equivalent of an American four-year baccalaureate degree.
  6. Post-secondary course work must include biochemistry and molecular biology or genetics.
  7. English Proficiency-- The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). Applicants with iBT speaking scores between 15 and 18 may be considered for provisional admission, which requires completion of specified remedial English courses ESL114G (American Oral English for Academic Purposes) and/or ESL116G (ESL/Composition for Academic Disciplines) and attainment of a grade of B or higher. The minimum composite score for the IELTS is 6.5. Graduate programs may have more stringent requirements.

Masters Degree Requirements
The Biomedical Sciences Program does not actively recruit students to earn an M.S. degree. To receive an M.S. degree in Biomedical Sciences, at least 36 credits from courses at the 500- or 600-level are required.

  1. Required Core Courses: BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, BMS 591 Ethics in the Life Sciences, BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, and BMS 600 Thesis Research (no more than 6 credits of BMS 600 Thesis Research may be counted toward the 36 credit minimum).
  2. Required Program Courses: BMS 520 Integrative Physiology, BMS 581 Molecular & Translational Approaches to Human Disease, BMS 590 Colloquium and at least 7 credits of elective courses selected in consultation with the student's thesis adviser and thesis committee.

Students must complete original laboratory research that culminates in a thesis. Additionally, all requirements listed in the University Bulletin for the M.S. degree must be fulfilled.

Doctoral Degree Requirements
During the Fall semester of the first year of study, Ph.D. candidates are required to take BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, and BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation. In the Spring semester, students are required to take BMS 520 Integrative Physiology, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, BCHEM 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation and elective courses selected in consultation with the BMS Graduate Program Student Advisory Committee. Each candidate for the Ph.D. degree must fulfill written and spoken English communication requirements that are satisfied by preparing written and oral reports describing the laboratory rotations during the first year.

At the end of the first year, admission to Ph.D. candidacy is determined by performance in course work, laboratory rotations, and the BMS Graduate Program Candidacy examination. Students join their research laboratory by the end of the summer of the first year.

The doctoral committee of a Ph.D. student is formed upon entry into the thesis laboratory. The committee must include at least two faculty members in the major field. In addition, an official "outside member" must be appointed as one of the four members. The outside member may not have a budgetary connection or adjunct appointment or other conflict of interest with the department or academic unit to which the doctoral program belongs, or to the department or academic unit of the chair or dissertation advisor, and cannot serve as either chair or co-chair of the committee.

During the second year, students take BMS 581 Molecular & Translational Approaches to Human Disease, BMS 590 Colloquium, and elective courses that are selected in consultation with the student's dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.
 
Ph.D. candidates prepare a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application prior to the end of the fifth semester of enrollment. As part of this examination, the candidate also gives an oral presentation of this proposal to their doctoral committee.

It is expected that the Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each Ph.D. candidate.

M.D./Ph.D. Admissions Requirements

In addition to the basic college level premedical school requirements for the Penn State College of Medicine (one each year of biology, chemistry, physics, math, and organic chemistry), the M.D./Ph.D. program has the following requirements:

• Academic Achievement
Applicants to our program generally have very strong grades and MCAT scores. In recent years, successful applicants have an average GPA of 3.75 and MCAT scores of 33-34. Applicants are not required to take the GREs.
• Research Experience
We are especially interested in candidates with a strong and sustained background in research. Candidates who have spent 1-2 years after graduation conducting research are strongly encouraged to apply.
• Recommendations
We are especially interested in receiving letters of recommendation from faculty with whom you conducted research and who can comment on your passion and potential for research.
• Goals
Applicants must be able to clearly articulate the reasons for pursuing the joint degree.
• International Students
All qualified candidates are eligible to apply regardless of citizenship. (http://www.pennstatehershey.org/web/md/admissions/overview/requirements)

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION

The BMS Graduate Program Student Advisory Committee, which includes representation from the Program and each Option of the Program, advises students about academic and related matters until the student has a dissertation adviser. First-year students carry out a series of rotation projects in at least three different faculty laboratories before deciding on a research laboratory. If desired, students formally make a decision to join an Option by the end of the Spring semester of their first year and must satisfy all admission requirements of the Option.

Students must have a dissertation adviser by the end of the summer of the first year. The student and dissertation adviser then plan additional course work and develop a research plan in consultation with the doctoral committee.

STUDENT AID

Graduate assistantships available to students in this Program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

COURSES

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 699 and 800 to 899.

Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (BMG) Option

John M. Flanagan, Ph.D., Option Director
The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine
Hershey, PA 17033
cxs8@psu.edu

The objective of the Option in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics is to provide students in the Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Graduate Program the opportunity to specialize their graduate curriculum and laboratory training to focus on the principles and application of biochemical and molecular genetic analysis. These approaches play key roles in identifying and characterizing cellular processes and elucidating the structure and function of key macromolecules including DNA, RNA, protein, lipid, and carbohydrates. The Option also stresses the biological intersections of these classes of macromolecules. The combination of didactic courses, colloquia, seminars, and laboratory research provides students with an integrated approach for applying biochemical and molecular genetic analysis to interrogate and manipulate basic cellular processes and macromolecules of biomedical significance. The training afforded by this Option exposes graduates to the fundamentals needed to experimentally address scientific questions in areas such as epigenetic control of gene expression, structure/function, biomolecular engineering, and systems analysis using genetic and biochemical approaches.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To be admitted to the Option in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Ph.D. candidates must successfully complete 1) the first year of the BMS Graduate Program, 2) three research rotations, at least two with faculty in the Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Option, and 3) the BMS Graduate Program Candidacy examination.
Masters Degree Requirements
The Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Option does not actively recruit students to earn an M.S. degree. To receive an M.S. degree in The Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Option at least 36 credits from courses at the 500- or 600-level are required.

  1. Required Core Courses: BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, BMS 591 Ethics in the Life Sciences, BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, and BMS 600 Thesis Research (no more than 6 credits of BMS 600 Thesis Research may be counted toward the 36 credit limit).
  2. Required Option Courses: BCHEM 521 Structure, Function, and Regulation of Biological Molecules, BCHEM 522 Molecular Genetics: Genes to Genomes, BCHEM 590 Colloquium, BCHEM 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, and at least 7 credits of elective courses selected in consultation with the student's thesis adviser and thesis committee.

Students must complete original laboratory research that culminates in a thesis. Additionally, all requirements listed in the University Bulletin for the M.S. degree must be fulfilled.

Doctoral Degree Requirements
During the Fall semester of the first year of study, Ph.D. candidates take BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, and BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation. In the Spring semester, students considering joining the Option in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics take BCHEM 521 Structure, Function, and Regulation of Biological Molecules, BCHEM 522 Molecular Genetics: Genes to Genomes, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, and BCHEM 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation. Each candidate for the Ph.D. degree must fulfill written and spoken English communication requirements that are satisfied by preparing written and oral reports describing laboratory rotations done during the first year.

At the end of the first year, admission to Ph.D. candidacy and the Option in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics is determined by performance in course work, laboratory rotations, and the BMS Graduate Program Candidacy examination. Students join their research laboratory by the end of the summer of the first year.

During the second year, students take BCHEM 590 Colloquium and at least 7 credits of 500-level didactic elective courses selected in consultation with the student's dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.

Ph.D. candidates prepare a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application prior to the end of the fifth semester of enrollment. As part of this examination, the candidate also gives an oral presentation of this proposal to their doctoral committee.

It is expected that the Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each Ph.D. candidate.

Translational Therapeutics Option

Jong Yun, Ph.D., Option Director
The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine
Hershey, PA 17033
717-531-8285
jky1@psu.edu

The Option in Translational Therapeutics of the Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Graduate Program is designed to give qualified students a combination of didactic instruction, informal interaction, and laboratory experience that enables them to obtain a firm foundation in the principles, methods, and contributions of pharmacology, defined broadly as the science of the interaction of chemical agents with biological systems. Of primary importance, this Option focuses on identification of disease targets, development of therapeutic strategies, and refinement of drug delivery approaches. With this preparation, graduates of the Translational Therapeutics Option will be capable of designing and executing high-quality independent research, and of assuming positions of responsibility within the therapeutic community.

This Option offers studies in the general areas of drug discovery and development, molecular pathophysiology, drug metabolism, molecular pharmacology, endocrine pharmacology, neuropharmacology, cardiovascular-renal pharmacology, pharmacogenetics, and clinical pharmacology. Primary emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanism by which drugs act in the body and by which the body transforms drugs.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To be admitted to the Option in Translational Therapeutics, Ph.D. candidates must successfully complete 1) the first year of the BMS Graduate Program, 2) three research rotations, at least two with faculty in the Translational Therapeutics Option, and 3) the Candidacy exam.

Masters Degree Requirements

The Translational Therapeutics Option does not actively recruit students to earn an M.S. degree. To receive an M.S. degree in The Translational Therapeutics Option at least 36 credits from courses at the 500- or 600-level are required

1. Required Core Courses: BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, BMS 591 Ethics in the Life Sciences, BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, and BMS 600 Thesis Research (no more than 6 credits of BMS 600 Thesis Research may be counted toward the 36 credit minimum).

2. Required Option Courses: PHARM 520 Principles of Drug Action, PHARM 551 Anti-infective Therapeutics, PHARM 552 Integrated Systems Pharmacology, PHARM 553 Gastrointestinal and Immunomodulatory Therapeutics, PHARM 554 Anticancer Therapeutics, PHARM 561 Neuropharmacology, PHARM 562 Endocrine Pharmacology, and at least 7 credits of elective courses selected in consultation with the student's thesis adviser and thesis committee.

Students must complete original laboratory research that culminates in a thesis. Additionally, all requirements listed in the University Bulletin for the M.S. degree must be fulfilled.

Doctoral Degree Requirements
During the Fall semester of the first year of study, Ph.D. candidates take BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, and BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation. In the Spring semester, students considering joining the Option in Translational Therapeutics take PHARM 520 Principles of Drug Action, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, PHARM 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, and elective courses selected in consultation with the BMS Graduate Program Student Advisory Committee. Each candidate for the Ph.D. degree must fulfill written and spoken English communication requirements that are satisfied by preparing written and oral reports describing laboratory rotations done during the first year.

At the end of the first year, admission to Ph.D. candidacy and the Option in Translational Therapeutics is determined by performance in course work, laboratory rotations, and the BMS Graduate Program Candidacy examination. Candidates join their research laboratory by the end of the summer of the first year.

During the second year, students take PHARM 551 Anti-infective Therapeutics, PHARM 552 Integrated Systems Pharmacology, PHARM 553 Gastrointestinal and Immunomodulatory Therapeutics, PHARM 554 Anticancer Therapeutics, PHARM 561 Neuropharmacology, PHARM 562 Endocrine Pharmacology, and elective courses selected in consultation with the candidate's dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.

Ph.D. candidates prepare a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application prior to the end of the fifth semester of enrollment. As part of this examination, the candidate also gives an oral presentation of this proposal to their doctoral committee.

It is expected that the Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each Ph.D. candidate.

Virology and Immunology Option

Richard Courtney, Ph.D., Option Director
The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine
Hershey, PA 17033
rcourtney@psu.edu

The objective of the Option in Virology and Immunology is to provide graduate students in the Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Graduate Program the opportunity to focus their graduate-level coursework and laboratory research in areas related to virology and immunology. The areas of research within virology include viral oncology, virus-cell interactions, the structure and assembly of viruses, functional role of viral gene products, the molecular biology of virus replication, and viral induced latency. The areas of research within immunology include adaptive and innate immunity, cellular and humoral immunity, antigen presentation, tumor immunology, vaccine development, and neuroimmunology. The Option in Virology and Immunology allows students to develop an integrative research approach using aspects of biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and genetics to approach scientific questions associated with areas of virology and immunology.

This Option is offered only through the BMS Graduate Program at the Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

To be admitted to the Option in Virology and Immunology, Ph.D. candidates must successfully complete: (1) the first year of the BMS Graduate Program; (2) three research rotations, at least two with faculty members in the Virology and Immunology Option; and (3) the Candidacy examination.

Masters Degree Requirements

The Virology and Immunology Option does not actively recruit students to earn an M.S. degree. To receive an M.S. degree in The Virology and Immunology Option at least 41 credits from courses at the 500- or 600-level are required.

1. Required Core Courses: BMS 501 Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism, BMS 502 Cell and Systems Biology, BMS 503 Flow of Cellular Information, BMS 504 Art of Scientific Communication I, BMS 505 Art of Scientific Communication II, BMS 591 Ethics in the Life Sciences, BMS 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, and BMS 600 Thesis Research (no more than 6 credits of BMS 600 Thesis Research may be counted toward the 41 credit minimum).
2 Required Option Courses. MICRO 550 Medical Microbiology:Topics in Molecular Pathogenesis, MICRO 553 Science of Virology, MICRO 560 Concepts in Immunology, MICRO 572 Literature Reports, MICRO 581 Immunology A: Basic Concepts in Innate and Adaptive Immunity, MICRO 582 Immunology B: Adaptive Immunity, MICRO 583 Viral Vectors, MICRO 590 Colloquium, MICRO 596 Individual Studies: Research Rotation, MICRO 602 Supervised Experience in College Teaching, GENET 581 Genetics of Model Organisms A: Bacterial and Viral Pathogenesis, and IBIOS 580 Critical Readings in Immunology.

Students must complete original laboratory research that culminates in a thesis. Additionally, all requirements listed in the University Bulletin for the M.S. degree must be fulfilled.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

During the Fall semester of the first year of study, Ph.D. candidates take BMS 501 (Regulation of Cellular and Systemic Energy Metabolism), BMS 502 (Cell and Systems Biology), BMS 503 (Flow of Cellular Information), BMS 504 (Art of Scientific Communication I), and BMS 596 (Individual Studies: Research Rotation).

In the Spring semester, students who are considering joining the Option in Virology and Immunology should take MICRO 550 (Medical Microbiology-Topics in Molecular Pathogenesis), MICRO 581 (Immunology A: Basic Concepts in Innate and Adaptive Immunity), MICRO 582 (Immunology B: Adaptive Immunity), MICRO 596 (Individual Studies: Research Rotation), MICRO 602 (Supervised Experience in College Teaching) and BMS 505 (Art of Scientific Communication II). Each candidate for the Ph.D. degree must fulfill written and spoken English communication requirements that are satisfied by preparing written and oral reports describing the laboratory rotations that were performed during the first year of the program.

At the end of the first year, admission to Ph.D. candidacy and the Option in Virology and Immunology is determined by successful performance in course work, laboratory rotations, and the BMS Graduate Program Candidacy examination. Students join their research laboratory by the end of the summer of the first year.

During the second year, students take MICRO 553 (Science of Virology), MICRO 560 (Concepts in Immunology), MICRO 602 (Supervised Experience in College Teaching), MICRO 572 (Literature Reports), MICRO 583 (Viral Vectors), MICRO 590 (Colloquium), GENET 581 (Genetics of Model Organisms A: Bacterial and Viral Pathogenesis), and IBIOS 580 (Critical Reading in Immunology).
Ph.D. candidates prepare a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application usually prior to the end of the sixth semester of enrollment. As a part of this examination, the candidate also participates in an oral defense of this proposal with the candidate's doctoral committee.

It is expected that the Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended for the successful completion of the Ph.D. degree.

M.D./Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Prospective students interested in simultaneously pursuing an M.D. and Ph.D. degree must apply to the College of Medicine M.D. program using the national American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) application system and indicate their intent to pursue the joint degree program. The College of Medicine M.D./Ph.D. Admissions Committee reviews applications and evaluates candidates for acceptance into both the M.D. and Ph.D. program. Candidates not accepted into the joint degree program can be referred to either the M.D. or Ph.D. program, depending on their qualifications.

During the first two years of medical school, the student conducts at least three research rotations. After successful completion of the first two years of medical school the candidate enters the BMS Graduate Program or one of its three options, each of which may have different credit requirements.

During the summer after the second year of medical school M.D./Ph.D. students take Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), which serves as the Candidacy Examination for the BMS program and its Options.

Biomedical Sciences Program Requirements

The doctoral committee of an MD/PhD student in the BMS program is formed upon entry into the thesis laboratory. The committee must include a minimum of four faculty members, i.e., the chair and at least three additional members, all of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty. The committee must include at least two members of the BMS program graduate faculty. At least one member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate's major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the 'Outside Field Member.'

M.D./Ph.D. students in the BMS program are required to take BMS 581 Molecular & Translational Approaches to Human Disease. Additional courses are selected in consultation with the student’s dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.

The M.D./Ph.D. candidate prepares a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application and gives an oral presentation of this proposal to their doctoral committee.

It is expected that the M.D./Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the final doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each M.D./Ph.D. candidate.

Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Option Requirements

The doctoral committee of a M.D./Ph.D. student in the Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Option is formed upon entry into the thesis laboratory. The committee must include a minimum of four faculty members, i.e., the chair and at least three additional members, all of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty. The committee must include at least two members of the major program graduate faculty and at least two members of the faculty of the Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Option. If the dissertation advisor is not a member of this Option, a co-advisor who is a member of the Option must be appointed to the committee. At least one member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate's major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the 'Outside Field Member.'

M.D./Ph.D. students in the BMG Option are required to take BCHEM 521 Structure, Function, and Regulation of Biological Molecules and BCHEM 522 Molecular Genetics: Genes to Genomes. Additional courses are selected in consultation with the student’s dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.

The M.D./Ph.D. candidate prepares a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application and gives an oral presentation of this proposal to their doctoral committee.

It is expected that the M.D./Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the final doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each M.D./Ph.D. candidate.

Translational Therapeutic Option Requirements

The doctoral committee of a M.D./Ph.D. student in the Translational Therapeutic Option is formed upon entry into the thesis laboratory. The committee must include a minimum of four faculty members, i.e., the chair and at least three additional members, all of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty. The committee must include at least one member of the major program graduate faculty and at least two members who are faculty of the Translational Therapeutics Option. If the dissertation advisor is not a member of this Option, a co-advisor who is a member of the Option must be appointed to the committee. At least one member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate's major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the 'Outside Field Member.'

M.D./Ph.D. students in the Translational Therapeutics Option are required to take PHARM 520 Principles of Drug Action. Additionally, the candidate takes elective courses selected in consultation with the candidate’s dissertation adviser and doctoral committee.

The candidate prepares a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application and gives an oral presentation of this proposal to the doctoral committee.

It is expected that the M.D./Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the final doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each M.D./Ph.D. candidate.

Virology and Immunology Option Requirements

The doctoral committee of a M.D./Ph.D. student in the Virology and Immunology Option is formed upon entry into the thesis laboratory. The committee must include a minimum of four faculty members, i.e., the chair and at least three additional members, all of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty. The committee must include at least two members of the major program graduate faculty. If the dissertation advisor is not a member of this Option, a co-advisor who is a member of the Option must be appointed to the committee. At least one member of the doctoral committee must represent a field outside the candidate's major field of study in order to provide a broader range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise. This committee member is referred to as the 'Outside Field Member.'

M.D./Ph.D. students in the Virology and Immunology Option are required to take MICRO 553 (Science of Virology), MICRO 560 (Concepts in Immunology), IBIOS 580 (Critical Reading in Immunology), MICRO 572 (Literature Reports), MICRO 590 (Colloquium), MICRO 583 (Viral Vectors), GENET 581 (Genetics of Model Organisms A: Bacterial and Viral Pathogenesis), and MICRO 602 (Supervised Experience in College Teaching).

Comprehensive Examination

The M.D./Ph.D. candidate prepares a written comprehensive examination in the format of a grant application and gives an oral presentation of this proposal to their doctoral committee.

Final Doctoral Examination

It is expected that the M.D./Ph.D. candidate will have at least one paper submitted for publication in a major peer-reviewed scientific journal prior to the final doctoral examination. A dissertation must be prepared and defended by each M.D./Ph.D. candidate.

40-04-102 New. Add new Ph.D. in Biostatistics program.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2012

Biostatistics (BIOS)

Program Home Page

VERNON M. CHINCHILLI, Chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences
College of Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Hershey, PA 17033 717-531-7178

Degree Conferred: Ph.D.

Biostatistics is the science that applies statistical theory and mathematical principals to research in medicine, biology, environmental science, public health, and related fields. Biostatisticians working in the area of public health develop and use mathematical and scientific methods to (1) determine risk factors for disease and injuries, and (2) identify health trends within communities. Biostatisticians working in the area of medicine develop and use mathematical and scientific methods to design and analyze (1) clinical trials to investigate new therapies for treating acute and chronic illness, (2) observational studies to understand disease onset and progression, (3) basic science studies to determine the mechanisms of disease, and (4) human genetics studies to investigate the inherited susceptibility to disease. Career opportunities are available in universities, academic medical centers, government, and private industry. The demand for individuals with graduate-level degrees in biostatistics is extremely high.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Applicants must complete prior to admission:

1. A two-semester graduate-level course in applied statistics from a recognized graduate program. The comparable courses offered by the Department of Statistics are Stat 511: Regression Analysis and Modeling (3) and Stat 512: Design and Analysis of Experiments (3).

2. A two-semester graduate-level course in mathematical statistics from a recognized graduate program. The comparable courses offered by the Department of Statistics are Stat 513: Theory of Statistics and Stat 514 (3): Theory of Statistics II (3).

Prospective applicants must demonstrate:

3. For admission to the Graduate School, all applicants must have received from a regionally accredited institution a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. International applicants must hold the equivalent of an American four-year baccalaureate degree.

4. Results from one of the following standardized tests taken within the past five (5) years:

5. Results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) for applicants whose first language is not English.

6. Completion of the Graduate School application, which includes three (3) letters of recommendation and a Curriculum Vitae or resume.

7. Payment of the application fee.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Each student in the Biostatistics Ph.D. program is expected to acquire knowledge in the disciplines of Biostatistics.

Each student must complete a total of 31 credits of graduate level course work, the majority of which are 500 level courses, specifically:

After the completion of the first year of coursework, each candidate is required to take a candidacy examination, based on the coursework in PHS 523, PHS 524, PHS 525, PHS 526 and PHS 527. The decision to admit or not to admit a student to candidacy will be made by a committee of graduate faculty in the Biostatistics program. In addition, a comprehensive examination is administered at the completion of all coursework, followed by the final oral examination in defense of the PhD dissertation.

Courses

Prescribed Courses: 22 credits
PHS 500(1), PHS 523(3), PHS 524(3), PHS 526(3), PHS 527(3), PHS 528(3), PHS 580(3), STAT 553(3)

Additional Courses: 6 credits
PHS 535(3), PHS 536(3), PHS 550(3), PHS 551(3), PHS 552(3), PHS 570(3)

Elective Courses: 3 credits
Select from PHS 516(3), STAT 561(3), STAT 562(3)

Common Courses: Varies
PHS 594(1-9), PHS 596(1-9), PHS 597(1-9), PHS 600(3-6)

PUBLIC HEALTH (PHS) course list

40-04-103 Change. Drop options; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Business Administration (BUSAD)

JAMES A. NEMES, Interim Director of Academic Affairs
School of Graduate Professional Studies
Penn State Great Valley
30 East Swedesford Road
Malvern, PA 19355-1443
610-648-3229
On the Web: www.sgps.psu.edu

Degree Conferred: M.B.A.

The Penn State Great Valley M.B.A. is a general degree program emphasizing development of the planning and problem-solving skills crucial in middle and upper management in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Nearly all students are working professionals who bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the classroom. Required research may be conducted in Penn State Great Valley's Library and Computer Center, which provide local research support as well as access to the library and computer resources of the entire Penn State system.

The M.B.A. program is geared toward the needs of part-time students who are employed full-time. Courses in the program, which are offered at Great Valley, are scheduled for the convenience of adult learners, in the evening or on Saturday. Online and blended formats are also available.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to the Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. Scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) are required for admission. Scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required of international applicants and must be submitted at the time of application. Exception: The TOEFL is not required of natives of an English-speaking country or applicants who hold a baccalaureate or graduate degree from an institution of an English-speaking country. Applicants should have had at least one year of quantitative analysis or statistics.

Admission decisions are based on the quality of the applicant's credentials in relation to those of other applicants. Evaluation criteria include professional and academic accomplishments, GMAT scores, two recommendations, and a personal statement that provides indications of future academic and professional potential. Application filing dates: Penn State Great Valley's M.B.A. program has a rolling admission policy. New students may start classes in fall, spring, or summer sessions.

Degree Requirements

Normally 45 credits will be required to complete the M.B.A. degree.

Prior to enrolling in M.B.A. program requirements, students entering the program are expected to meet preprogram requirements that build a foundation for quantitative analysis as described below.

Quantitative Skills Requirement: Prior to enrolling in their M.B.A. course work, students must demonstrate competence in quantitative skills. This requirement must be satisfied in one of two ways:

  1. Completion of two sequential undergraduate courses in applied statistics or one graduate introductory course in applied statistics at a regionally accredited institution of higher education with a minimum grade of B, within the seven years prior to being enrolled at Penn State Great Valley. Syllabi for such courses must be provided.

OR

  1. Satisfactory completion of BUSAD 501 (formerly MS&IS 510): Statistical Analysis for Managerial Decision Making at Penn State Great Valley. This requirement must be satisfied by the first semester or summer session of the student's matriculation prior to enrolling in M.B.A. degree courses, and completed with a grade of B or higher. Successful completion of this course will result in 3 graduate credits, but will not count toward the completion of program requirements for the M.B.A. degree.

To facilitate successful fulfillment of preprogram requirements, students needing to take BUSAD 501 will be admitted on a one-year provisional basis.

Exemption from up to 15 credits from the foundation courses may be granted in accordance with the course exemption guidelines for the M.B.A. program. Normally students will need to have completed at least two undergraduate courses with a grade of B or higher, no more than seven years prior to admission to the M.B.A. program, to be eligible for exemption from a single foundation course. At the Management Division Head's discretion, a competency exam may be required to receive certain course exemptions. Course work not meeting the tests of relevancy, quality, or currency must be taken at the graduate level prior to starting advanced coursework. Time limits may be waived by the M.B.A. program on the basis of post-graduate training or current and relevant work experience.

All entering students are required to take MGMT 501.

Foundation Courses (18 credits) provide an overview of key business processes and functional areas of organizations. The are: Behavioral Science in Business (MGMT 501), Financial and Managerial Accounting (ACCTG 511), Financial Management (FIN 531), Prices and Markets (BUSAD 523), Marketing Management (MKTG 500), and Operations Management (OPMGT 510).

Essential Courses (15 credits) build necessary competencies for effective managerial practice, knowledge of key elements of contemporary business, and ethical decision making. They include one course in each of the following categories: Ethics, Global, Interpersonal Dynamics, Organizational and Industry Contexts, and Managing Technology.

Elective courses (9 credits) provide an opportunity for students to pursue their interests and develop distinctive competencies by pursuing advanced courses offered or approved by the Management Division.

All students must complete a Capstone course (3 credits) that provides students with an opportunity to strategically integrate and apply what they have learned in their course work. MGMT 571 (Strategic Management) is the capstone course for the MBA.

Student Aid

There are a limited number of scholarships, fellowships, and graduate assistantships available. For more information on these, contact the Financial Aid Office at Penn State Great Valley.

Most students work full-time and take classes part-time. In many cases, employers have a tuition-reimbursement plan paying for partial or full tuition. To find other options that may be available to you, contact the Great Valley Financial Aid Office, 610-648-3311.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

ACCOUNTING (ACCTG) course list

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (B A) course list

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSAD) course list

BUSINESS LAW (B LAW) course list

FINANCE (FIN) course list

HEALTH POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (H P A) course list

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (I B) course list

LEADERSHIP (LEAD) course list

MANAGEMENT (MGMT) course list

MARKETING (MKTG) course list

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (SYSEN) course list

40-04-104 Change. Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Health Policy and Administration (H P A)

Program Home Page

DENNIS G. SHEA, Head
604 Ford Building
814-863-5421

Degrees Conferred:

The graduate degrees in the Department of Health Policy and Administration focus on management, policy, and research in health services, with particular attention to the recurrent problems of cost, quality, and access to health services.

The doctoral program (Ph.D.) is designed to provide advanced knowledge and skills in health services research, with an emphasis track in health policy and economics, health care organizations or population health and demography. The doctorate in H P A prepares students to become independent health services researchers in academic and nonacademic settings.

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Health Policy and Administration provides a solid foundation of knowledge and skills in health services research. The M.S. in H P A prepares students for further graduate study toward a doctorate in health services research or related fields or for research and analytic work in academic and nonacademic health services research settings.

The professional Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) program prepares students for the complexities they will face in managing organizations that plan, finance and deliver health care. The curriculum emphasizes strategic decision-making, financial management, communication and detailed aspects of the U.S. health care system. These include health law, epidemiology, health insurance, government health-financing programs, ethics, managed care, long-term care, health care technology, marketing, and strategic planning for health services.

The integrated B.S. in Health Policy and Administration/Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) program allows qualified undergraduate students to earn both degrees in five calendar years of full time academic study. Students completing an integrated B.S./M.H.A. are prepared to advance quickly to positions of leadership in health care organizations.

The M.B.A. program of the Smeal College of Business and the Department of Health Policy and Administration of the College of Health and Human Development offer a concurrent degree program. The M.B.A./M.H.A. graduate will be well-grounded in both business and health management and prepared for positions in hospitals, nursing homes, managed care and health insurance organizations, health care consulting, and pharmaceutical companies,as well as for helping businesses in all sectors understand the unique features of the health care system.

Doctoral Admission and Degree Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Satisfactory scores from either the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required for admission; the GRE is preferred. A junior/senior grade-point average of 3.00 or better (on a 4.00 scale) and a well-considered statement of experience and career goals are major criteria for admission. Some work experience in health services is preferred, but not required.

The H P A doctoral curriculum includes study in three substantive areas: (1) core courses in health services organization, delivery, finance and policy; (2) core courses in health services research methods and statistics, and (3) courses and a doctoral thesis in an emphasis track approved by the doctoral committee.

M.S. Admission and Degree Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Satisfactory scores from either the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required for admission; the GRE is preferred. A junior/senior grade-point average of 3.00 or better (on a 4.00 scale) and a well-considered statement of experience and career goals are major criteria for admission. Some work experience in health services is preferred, but not required.

The M.S. curriculum in H P A includes study in three substantive areas: (1) a core set of courses in health services organization, delivery, finance, and policy; (2) courses in health services research methods and statistics, and (3) courses and a master's thesis approved by the thesis advisor. At least 15 credits of the program must be completed in H P A departmental course offerings at the 400-and 500-level. At least 18 credits of the degree must be in 500-and 600-level courses. A 6-credits master's thesis must be completed as part of the degree requirement.

M.H.A. Admission and Degree Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Satisfactory scores from either the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required for admission; the GRE is preferred. This requirement will be waived for applicants with five or more years of relevant work experience. A junior/senior grade-point average of 3.00 or better (on a 4.00 scale), a relevant personal statement and three letters of recommendation are necessary. Some work experience in health care is preferred, but not required.

The program can be completed on a full-time basis in 21 months or on a part-time basis or with the aid of technology through the World Campus in 28 months. Requirements for the completion of the M.H.A., include 49 credits with at least 39 credits at the 500-or 800-level. Included in the 49 credits is a residency in a health care setting and a capstone course to demonstrate evidence of analytical ability and synthesis of material.

Integrated B.S. in Health Policy and Administration/Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) Admission and Degree Requirements

The following credentials will be considered for admission:

Students admitted to the B.S. in Health Policy and Administration/M.H.A. are able to earn both the B.S. and M.H.A. in five calendar years of full-time academic study.

M.B.A./M.H.A. Concurrent Degree Program Admission and Degree Requirements

Students may apply to be admitted to either the M.H.A. or the M.B.A. program initially. During the initial year in either graduate program, students may apply to complete the concurrent degree program and must meet admission requirements for the other program. See the M.H.A. and M.B.A. degree program descriptions for further admission requirements of each program.

Students complete 88 credits associated with both the M.H.A. and M.B.A. degrees. Included within the required credits is a 10-week integrated residency during a summer. The time required to complete the M.B.A./M.H.A. can be as much as 34 months.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships available to students in this program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

HEALTH POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (H P A) course list

 

40-04-105 Change. Drop M. Ed. in Human Nutrition; Change name from Nutrition to Nutritional Sciences; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Nutritional Sciences (NUTR)

Program Home Page

GORDON JENSEN, Head of the Department of Nutritional Sciences
SHELLY NICKOLS-RICHARDSON, Professor-in-Charge of Graduate Program in Nutrition
323 Chandlee Laboratory
814-863-2920

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.S.

Graduates are prepared for careers in basic and applied research in nutrition and in college teaching. The course of study is planned to meet the professional objectives of the individual student. Students may emphasize molecular and cellular nutritional sciences, nutritional biochemistry, applied human nutrition, applied animal nutrition, nutrition education, and nutrition in public health. Supporting courses are available in biochemistry, physiology, genetics, microbiology, biophysics, food science, health policy and administration, human development and family studies, anthropology, sociology, psychology and statistics.

Current research emphasizes minerals, vitamin A, lipid metabolism, metabolic disorders, nutrition and behavior, nutrition education strategies, evaluation of dietary intake and nutritional status, nutrition policy and health promotion and disease prevention across the life cycle.

Facilities include well-equipped nutrition science laboratories with animal facilities supervised by a University laboratory animal resource staff. The Diet Assessment Center and the metabolic kitchens serve as a laboratories for students in community nutrition, nutrition education, and metabolic nutrition.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), or from the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), are required for admission. At the discretion of a graduate program, a student may be admitted provisionally for graduate study in a program without these scores. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the General Bulletin.

College graduates with an undergraduate degree in nutrition, animal sciences, food science, dietetics, or a related biological or social science will be considered for admission. Applicants should have a minimum grade-point average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale), an acceptable score on the GRE (an average quantitative and verbal score above the fiftieth percentile), and three supporting recommendations. Exceptions may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests. When openings are limited, the best-qualified candidates are given priority.

The basic expectations for admission from undergraduate studies include 6 credits in chemistry (organic and inorganic); 3 credits each in physiology, biochemistry, and nutrition; and physics, calculus, and analytical chemistry for some research areas in nutrition science and social science for public health and community nutrition. Students with more than 9 credits of deficiency and a superior record may be admitted as provisional students until they qualify for consideration for regular degree status. Deficiencies are expected to be made up with a 3.00 grade-point average or better within the first two semesters.

Master's Degree Requirements

The graduate program in Nutritional Sciences offers the M.S. degree with an emphasis in basic nutritional sciences, applied human nutrition, or nutrition in public health.

The M.S. degree requires 30 credits of course work, including 6 credits in research (NUTR 600). The M.S. degree with an emphasis on nutrition in public health includes a 4-credit field experience (NUTR 555).

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Students are admitted on a provisional basis pending satisfactory completion of the candidacy examination designed to assess the student's potential and academic preparation for doctoral study. Candidacy examinations must be scheduled by students with a master's degree after they have completed 10 credits in doctoral work but before the end of the second semester following admission to the graduate program. The candidacy examination is administered and evaluated by the Graduate Candidacy Committee.

Communication and Language Requirement: Doctoral students must demonstrate competency in spoken English as judged by the program faculty and in technical writing by completion of ENGL 418 with a grade of B or better. Students also must complete satisfactorily 2 to 3 credits at the 400 or 500 level from any one of the following areas: (1) college teaching; (2) logic or philosophy of science; (3) foreign language; or (4) computer science. There are no specific course requirements; however, the academic program is developed by the student in consultation with his or her adviser to develop doctoral-level competence in nutrition and one or more supporting areas. Students are expected to participate in a colloquium each semester and enroll in a seminar on a regular basis.

Nutritional Sciences Option within the IBIOS program: This option in Nutritional Sciences is proposed to promote excellence in graduate education in nutritional sciences by capitalizing on the expertise existing within the biological, biomedical, behavioral, and social sciences at Penn State. Students can choose an area of focus within this option that emphasizes biomolecular nutrition, human nutrient requirements, or ingestive behavior and nutrition intervention. The educational goal of this option is to create a stimulating and diverse environment in which students will develop the critical thinking skills needed to tackle complex issues in nutrition. Students will be expected to develop a foundation of basic knowledge in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry and computational methodology. In addition, students are required to complete 2 credits of IBIOS 590. Students are required to complete a course in professional developmental ethics. All students are required to assist in teaching/resident instruction for at least two semesters during their degree program.

Student Aid

Fellowships, traineeships, graduate assistantships, and other forms of financial aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

FOOD SCIENCE (FD SC) course list

NUTRITION (NUTR) course list

40-04-106 Change. Drop Master of Agriculture degree.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Rural Sociology (R SOC)

Program Home Page

ANN R. TICKAMYER, Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
103 Armsby Building
814-865-5461

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.S.

All degree programs emphasize a comprehensive understanding of the various facets of societal organization pertinent to the rural sector. While breadth is encouraged, areas of special interest and research include rural social change, community structure, population, rural community development, the structure of agriculture, natural resources, and the environment.

Admission Requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), or from a comparable substitute examination accepted by a graduate program and authorized by the dean of the Graduate School, are required for admission. At the discretion of a graduate program, a student may be admitted provisionally for graduate study in a program without these scores. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Prerequisites for the master's program include 3 credits in rural sociology or sociology, and additional credits in either field. If the entering student does not have these prerequisites, they must be made up at the University during the early part of the master's program.

Students with a 3.00 junior/senior average (on a 4.00 scale) and with appropriate course backgrounds will be considered for admission. The best-qualified applicants will be accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students. Exceptions to the minimum 3.00 grade-point average may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests.

Degree Requirements

All students are required to have training in sociological theory, statistics, and research methods.

There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. degree; the student is expected to substitute such courses and instruction necessary to generate superior capabilities of inquiry into an analysis of basic and/or applied rural sociological problems.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships available to students in this program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

RURAL SOCIOLOGY (R SOC) course list

Dual-Title Degree in Rural Sociology (R SOC) and International Agriculture and Development (INTAD)

Graduate students with research and educational experiences in rural sociology may apply to the Rural Sociology/INTAD Dual-Title Master's Degree Program. The goal of the dual-title degree R SOC/INTAD degree program is to enable graduate students from R SOC to acquire the knowledge and skills of their major area of specialization in R SOC, while at the same time gaining the perspective and methods needed to work internationally. Graduate study in this program seeks to prepare students to assume leadership roles in professions in international agriculture and development requiring state-of-the-art methodological training, as well as of conceptual expertise in rural sociology and in one or more of R SOC's four signature areas: (1) agriculture and food systems, (2) community and international development, (3) natural resources and environment, (4) rural social demography.

This dual-title graduate degree program does not duplicate any other degree program at the University.

Degree Requirements

To qualify for a dual-title degree, students must satisfy the requirements of the Rural Sociology program in which they are primarily enrolled. In addition, they must satisfy the requirements described below, determined by the student, their INTAD advisor, and their Rural Sociology program advisor.

Degree Requirements for R SOC/INTAD Dual Title M.S.

The Master's in Rural Sociology and INTAD is a dual-title degree awarded to students who are admitted to the Rural Sociology master's program and admitted to the dual-title degree in INTAD. In addition to the requirements of the Rural Sociology degree, dual-title degree students must:

Courses

Complete a minimum of 12 INTAD course credits (400, 500, or 800 level) as follows:

9 credits from the core curriculum:

• Program Design and Delivery (AEE 450, 3 credits)
• Leadership Development (CEDEV/R SOC/AEE 505, 3 credits, on-line)
• International Agricultural Development Seminar (INTAD 820, 3 credits)

3 credits of internship or applied courses/ independent studies with international development content

Master's Thesis & Final Oral Examination

Write a master's thesis on a topic that reflects both the graduate program in Rural Sociology and the dual-title offering in INTAD.

All members of the student's committee for the dual-title master's degree will be members of the graduate faculty. The committee must include at least one graduate faculty member from INTAD. A Degree Committee form should be filed upon selection of the committee members and should be approved by the INTAD Academic Program Committee Co-chair.

Candidates for the dual-title master's degree in R SOC and INTAD will also be required to pass a masters' thesis defense covering the general field of Rural Sociology and INTAD, with emphasis on the student's area of specialization. The oral exam is to be administered by the student's thesis committee. A favorable vote of a two-thirds majority is necessary for passing.

Some courses may satisfy both the graduate major program requirements and those of the INTAD program. Students and advisors should maintain the INTAD Master's Degree Plan of Study, which must be submitted to the INTAD program office two months before the student files the "Intent to Graduate" via eLion.

Degree Requirements for R SOC/INTAD Dual-Title Ph.D.

The doctoral degree in R SOC and INTAD is a dual-title degree awarded only to students who are admitted to the R SOC doctoral program and admitted to the dual-title degree in INTAD. The minimum course requirements for the dual-title Ph.D. degree in R SOC and INTAD, in addition to the R SOC requirements, are as follows.

Courses

Students must complete a minimum of 18 INTAD course credits with study in the following categories:

9 credits from the core curriculum, which includes:

9 credits from INTAD elective curriculum/courses with international development content/internships/independent study

Courses totaling a minimum of 18 credits must be taken at the 500-level or above; particular courses may satisfy both the R SOC requirements and those in the INTAD program. Final course selection is determined by the student in consultation with their INTAD advisors and their major program advisors. Students who already hold a master's degree from another institution may petition to have equivalent course credits accepted.

Graduates of the dual-title INTAD master's degree program who wish to pursue an INTAD doctoral degree must re-apply to the INTAD program for admission. INTAD master's degree credits may be carried over to the doctoral program. Six additional INTAD credits will be required. INTAD master's degree graduates who pursue an INTAD Ph.D. are required to take the INTAD 820 International Agricultural Development Seminar a second time.

Candidacy

Candidacy procedures will be based on the procedures of the major department and will have an international dimension. Although not encouraged, the dual-title degree student may require an additional semester or more to fulfill requirements for the dual-title degree program. Therefore, under exceptional circumstances, the candidacy exam may be delayed at the discretion of the student advisor in consultation with the INTAD program coordinators.

Committee Composition

The doctoral committee of a Ph.D. dual-title degree student must include a minimum of four faculty members, i.e., the chair and at least three additional members, all of whom must be members of the Graduate Faculty; and the committee must include at least one representative from the INTAD Program faculty. The chair of the committee can be a member of both the Major Program and the INTAD Program faculty. If the chair is not an INTAD Program faculty member, the INTAD representative must be the co-chair of the committee. An official "outside member" also must be appointed to the committee.

Comprehensive Exam

Each Ph.D. candidate must pass a comprehensive (combined written and oral) examination in rural sociology, research methods and statistics, and two or more chosen areas of specialization. It is expected that one of these areas will be INTAD. A separate comprehensive examination is not required by the INTAD program, but the INTAD representative on the student’s doctoral committee must have input into the development of and participate in the evaluation of the comprehensive examination.

Doctoral Thesis & Final Oral Examination

Ph.D. students enrolled in the dual-title degree program are required to write a doctoral thesis on a topic that reflects their original research and education in both Rural Sociology and International Agriculture and Development. The dissertation should contribute to the body of knowledge in international agriculture. Upon completion of the student’s doctoral thesis, a final oral examination is scheduled. The exam is administered by the student’s doctoral committee and focuses on the student’s thesis research. A public oral presentation of the dissertation is also required.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 o 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400-499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students but courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up for deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

40-04-107 Change. Remove Penn State New Kensington as offering location; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Teaching and Curriculum (T & C)

Program Home Page

DENISE G. MEISTER, Coordinator of the Graduate Program in Teaching and Curriculum
Penn State Harrisburg
Middletown, PA 17057
717-948-6213

Degree Conferred:

M.Ed.

The Master of Education in Teaching and Curriculum is designed to enhance the skills of teachers for public and private schools. The program focuses on three essential components--curriculum, instruction, and assessment--that contribute to the organization's philosophy of learning. The Teaching and Curriculum program is unified by its vision of critical thinking, democracy, diversity, lifelong learning, nurturance, and scholarship. Courses are designed to reflect the standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). The program is offered at Penn State Harrisburg and other selected Penn State campuses.

Specifically, the goals of the program are to develop in students (1) the ability to communicate effectively either with school-age students and their parents or with co-workers and/or clients; (2) the ability to conduct an instructional program that provides a sound intellectual and emotional climate for learning; (3) competence in a variety of teaching methods and in the utilization of materials and content appropriate for an effective instructional program; (4) the ability to interpret and to evaluate educational literature and research; and (5) the ability to describe and to evaluate major issues and current trends in instructional curriculum practice and development.

Certification programs are also available in the areas of early childhood education, English as a second language, and principalship.

Admission Requirements

Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

The M.Ed. Program in Teaching and Curriculum has four important admission requirements.

First, candidates must have achieved an overall junior/senior grade point average of 3.00 or higher. For candidates applying for admission who have completed credits beyond the baccalaureate degree, we will evaluate the last (approximately) 60 credits completed.

Second, candidates must submit two letters of recommendation. These letters must be from former professors who can attest to the academic ability and potential of the candidate.

Third, candidates must submit a 200-300 word personal statement that addresses their career goals and reasons for pursuing a graduate degree.

Fourth, candidates must submit test scores from one of the following: Graduate Record Examination, Miller Analogies Test, or Praxis examinations completed for certification. In addition, the language of instruction at Penn State is English. International applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, 213 for the computer-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the internet-based test. The minimum composite score for the IELTS is 6.5. International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a masters degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States and Wales.

Retention

Candidates must maintain a minimum 3.00 grade point average in courses approved by the program, satisfactorily complete all required key assessments, attain a grade "C" or better in all required core courses. Candidates who do not make satisfactory progress will be notified in writing noting the specific deficiencies and requesting that they meet with the program coordinator to develop a remediation plan. Failure to meet or to satisfactorily complete the remediation plan will result in termination from the program.

In compliance with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) requirements, all persons enrolled in Teacher Education Programs at Penn State Harrisburg are expected to demonstrate the professional dispositions that are aligned with the unit's vision statement. The faculty shall evaluate the approved dispositions demonstrated by the candidates in class and during field experiences. Candidates may be rated as exemplary, acceptable, or unacceptable. Candidates are expected to attain acceptable or exemplary ratings in order to graduate.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Education degree in Teaching and Curriculum provides students with two alternatives to meet the required culminating or capstone experience : (1) course work with a master's project (EDUC 587) or (2) course work that includes a capstone course (EDUC 591). Students may complete the degree requirements for either of the two alternatives with the approval of their adviser.

A total of 30 credits must be completed: 18 credits in core courses and 12 credits in electives. At least 18 credits must be at the 500 level or higher. A minimum grade-point average of 3.00 for work done at the University and acceptable or higher ratings on the professional dispositions are required for graduation.

Prescribed Core Course Requirements (18 credits)

Learning Theory: EDUC 520(3)
Curriculum Development and Instructional Design: EDUC 506(3) or EDUC 403(3) (Early Childhood only)
Educational Assessment: EDUC 539(3) or EDUC 404(3) (Early Childhood only)
Educational Foundations: EDUC 505(3)
Educational Research Designs: EDUC 586(3)
Culminating Course: EDUC 587 Master's Project or EDUC 591 Education Seminar

Electives

Students are required to take up to 12-15 credits of elective course work. Students may take all of those credits in education or, with the approval of their adviser, select up to 9 credits of electives in a field other than education.

Options

Language Arts Option: The goal of the language arts option is to provide students an in depth understanding of how research in theory in the language arts are related to language acquisition and growth; the knowledge and skills necessary for conducting informal assessments in the language arts and required to implement a variety of instructional procedures for the language arts; and an awareness of the role that literature can have in an effective language arts program at any level. 

Mathematics Education Option: The objective of the mathematics education option is to provide courses that will emphasize current research and curriculum shifts related to the teaching of mathematics in K - 12 classrooms. This option requires completion of four EDMTH courses (a total of 12 credits): EDMTH 441, 442, 443, 444 in addition to the other program requirements.

Transfer Credits

Subject to the limitations given below, a maximum of 10 credits of high-quality graduate work done at a regionally accredited institution may be applied toward the requirements for the master's degree. However, credits earned to complete a previous master's degree, whether at Penn State or elsewhere, may not be applied to a second master's degree program at Penn State. The student should distinguish carefully between the transferability of credit and its applicability in a particular degree program. Approval to apply any transferred credits toward a degree program must be granted by the student's academic adviser, the program head or graduate officer, and the Graduate School. Transferred academic work must have been completed within five years prior to the date of the first degree registration at the Graduate School of Penn State, must be of at least B quality (grades of B- are not transferable), and must appear on an official graduate transcript of an accredited university. Pass-fail grades can be substantiated by the former institution as having at least B quality.

A maximum of 15 graduate credits taken as a nondegree student prior to admission to a graduate degree program may be applied to a graduate program, with departmental approval. The credits must have been earned within five years preceding entry into the degree program.

Forms for transfer of credit can be obtained from the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services, 114 Kern Building.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit courses below the 400 level in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

EDUCATION (EDUC) course list

40-04-108 Drop. Discontinue Telecommunications Studies program.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Telecommunications Studies (TELEC)

Program Home Page (Opens New Window)

MARIE HARDIN, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research
College of Communications
201 Carnegie Building
814-865-3070; commgpo@psu.edu

Degree Conferred:

M.A.

The M.A. in Telecommunications Studies program offers a systematic approach to understanding the globalization of information technologies and the convergence of electronic media and telecommunications. It includes history, technology, policy, economics, industrial structures, and e-commerce issues. The program is for both recent undergraduates in communications and related fields seeking advanced study, as well as for individuals currently associated with the media information and telecommunications industries wishing to advance themselves professionally. Applicants without an undergraduate degree or professional connection to the field may be required to acquire a basic background as a condition of admission, based on a case-by-case evaluation.

Admission Requirements

Scores for the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are required for admission. All international applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or master's degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit the results of that test with the application for admission. The minimum TOEFL admittance score is 600. Applicants with an undergraduate 3.00 junior/senior grade-point average (on a 4.00 scale) are eligible for admission. Also required are three letters of recommendation and an autobiographical statement of 750 to 1,000 words indicating the nature of the applicant's interest in undertaking graduate study in telecommunications.

Program of Study

The M.A. in Telecommunications Studies program is a one-calendar year, 30-credit program that requires a 3-credit master's paper. A student must enter the program in the fall semester.

Degree Requirements

Candidates must complete a minimum of 30 credits (including master's paper preparation): no more than 9 credits at the 400 level and no more than 6 credits in independent study (in addition to 3 credits researching and writing a master's paper). Candidates must complete a 9-credit core. The remaining credits are selected by the student in consultation with the adviser. Course work offered by departments outside the College of Communications may be scheduled as part of the student's program with prior approval of the student's academic committee. A candidate must maintain 3.00 grade-point average and complete a significant research paper (master's paper) under the direction of a faculty adviser. This paper shall be reviewed and approved by a faculty committee of at least three members. Students are required to schedule three separate, formal meetings with their advisers and academic committees for (1) discussion and approval of the general program plan, (2) the paper proposal, and (3) a formal presentation and defense of the paper at the final meeting of the student's advisory committee.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantship and other forms of student aid available to students in the program are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

COMMUNICATIONS (COMM) course list

40-04-109 Change. Drop D. Ed. degree in Workforce Education and Development; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Workforce Education and Development (WF ED)

Program Home Page

RICHARD A. WALTER, Professor-In-Charge of Graduate Programs in Workforce Education and Development
301 Keller Building
814-865-2133

Degrees Conferred:

Ph.D., M.S., M.Ed.

The general focus of the program is preparation for entry into professional positions within the broadly conceived field of workforce education and development, including human resource development in industry, secondary and postsecondary technical education, and employability programs for special populations. Emphases within the program include: training and development/human resources, leadership/administration, school-to-work, and postsecondary technical and community college leadership.

Admission Requirements

Admission to graduate programs in Workforce Education and Development (WF ED) is based on the faculty's evaluation of a candidate's prior undergraduate and graduate work, relevant prior work experience including military service, and career goals. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.50 is required for admission to the master's degree program. A GPA of 3.00 in prior graduate course work is required for admission to the doctoral program.

Degree Requirements

Master's Degrees Requirements

M.Ed. and M.S. degrees are offered in Workforce Education and Development, both of which require a minimum of 30 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree. M.S. candidates must complete a master's thesis or paper. Candidates for the M.Ed. degree must complete a written comprehensive examination.

Doctoral Degrees Requirements

The Ph.D. degree is offered in Workforce Education and Development. Two or more years of prior full-time work experience that is relevant to WF ED is an important consideration in evaluating applications for the doctoral program. Students are admitted only for the fall semester. Beginning students are not formally granted candidate status for a doctoral degree until successfully completing the candidacy exam given in the spring semester. Please see WF ED Web site for further details.

Student Aid

A limited number of graduate assistantships available to students in this program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Courses

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT (WF ED) course list

COURSE ADDS

40-04-110 BIOET 590
Bioethics Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1-3 per semester/maximum of 36)
Continuing seminars in bioethics that consist of a series of individual presentations by faculty, students, or outside speakers.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-111 BIOET 594
Research Topics
RESEARCH TOPICS (1-12 per semester/maximum of 15)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-112 BIOET 595
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-12 per semester/maximum of 12)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction, including field experiences, practicums, or internships related to bioethics.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-113 BIOET 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Creative projects, including nonthesis research, that are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-114 BIOET 597
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore a topic or topics in bioethics in depth.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-115 BIOET 598
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9 per semester/maximum of 9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore a topic or topics in bioethics in depth.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-116 BIOET 599
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-2 per semester/maximum of 4)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-117 BIOET 600
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-12 per semester/maximum of 99)
Thesis Research in Bioethics.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-118 BIOET 601
Ph.D. Dissertation Full Time
DISS FULL-TIME (0)
Full-time Ph.D. dissertation preparation.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-119 BIOET 602
Supervised Experience in College Teaching
SUPERVISED TEACH (1-3 per semester/maximum of 6)
Students will teach lower-level undergraduate courses in bioethics, including courses on the undergraduate minor in bioethics and medical humanities.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-120 BIOET 603
Foreign Academic Experience
FOREIGN ACAD EXP (1-9 per semester/maximum of 18)
Foreign study and/or research approved by the graduate program for students enrolled in a foreign university constituting progress toward the degree.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-121 BIOET 610
Thesis Research Off-Campus
THES RES OFF-CAMP (1-12 per semester/maximum of 99)
Thesis Research, Off Campus.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-122 BIOET 611
Ph.D. Dissertation Part Time
DISS PART TIME (0)
Part-time Ph.D. dissertation preparation.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-123 BUSAD 802
Cornerstone of Sustainability
SUSTAINABILITY (3)
In-depth exploration of the social, environmental, and organizational sustainability challenges facing business leaders in the 21st Century.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-124 BUSAD 809
Triple Bottom Line Accounting
BOTTOM LINE ACCT (3)
In-depth exploration of the issues related to implementing measurement, reward and reporting systems for economic, social, and environmentl impacts.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-125 BUSAD 824
Finance and Investment for Sustainable Growth
SUSTAINABLE GROWTH (3)
In-depth exploration of the methods of financing available for sustainable growth in developed and emerging markets.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-126 BUSAD 879
Sustainable Products and Service Development
SUSTAINABLE PROD (3)
In-depth exploration of the creation and development of sustainable products and services.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-127 C E 603
Foreign Academic Experience
FOREIGN ACADEM EXP (1-9 per semester/maximum of 18)
Foreign study and/or research contituting progress towards the degree at a foreign university.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

40-04-128 CEDEV 560
Regional Development: Principles, Policy, and Practice
REGIONAL DEVELOP (3)
Regional growth and development, focusing on challenges to theory, policy, and practice, emphasizing change in metropolitan, micropolitan, and rural areas.
PREREQUISITE: CEDEV 430 and CEDEV 500
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-129 E E 550
Foundations of Engineering Systems Analysis
ENGINEERING ANLY (3)
Analytical methods are developed using the vector space approach for solving control and estimation problems; examples from different engineering applications.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 436
CROSS LIST: M E 550
PROPOSED START: FA2012

40-04-130 GEOG 510
Seminar in Physical Geography
PHYS GEOG SEMINAR (3 per semester/maximum of 18)
Analysis of current literature in physical geography focusing on theoretical and methodological debates.
PREREQUISITE: GEOG 454, GEOG 455
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-131 H P A 526
Health Disparities
HEALTH DISPAR (3)
This course provides an overview of social factors that lead to demographic disparities in health.
CROSS LIST: SOC 526
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-132 HIST 514
The Early Modern World: Empires, Trade, and Religion
EMWRLD EMP TRD REL (3)
This course provides an overview of early modern history, with an emphasis on cultural encounters between the different global regions.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-133 HIST 525
Imperial Borderlands in Modern Europe
MODEUR IMP PRDRLND (3)
This course provides students with an overview of the processes of constructing borders in a variety of forms, ethnic, religious, trade, and linguistic, in a European imperial context.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-134 HIST 534
The Catholic World 1540-1770
EMOD CATHOLIC WLD (3)
This course examines the relationship between world history and Catholicism.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-135 HIST 551
The African American Freedom Struggle in the Twentieth Century
AFAM20THC FRMVMT (3)
Theory and history of African American freedom movements for social and political change in the 20th century US.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-136 I I D 600
Thesis Research
I I D THESIS RESEA (1-9 per semester/maximum of 36)
Laboratory work on thesis project.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-137 M M 600
Thesis Research
MM THESIS RESEARCH (1-9 per semester/maximum of 36)
Laboratory work on thesis project.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-138 M T 596
Individual Studies
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (1-3 per semester/maximum of 6)
Laboratory Rotations for first year students.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-139 M T 600
Thesis Research
MT THESIS RESEARCH (1-9 per semester/maximum of 36)
Laboratory work on thesis project.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-140 NURS 860
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Role I
ACNP ROLE I (3)
Acute Care Nurse Practitioner role across the continuum of care with adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions to restore or maximize health.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 502, NURS 503, NURS 504, NURS 865, NURS 866
CONCURRENT: NURS 862
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-141 NURS 861
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Role II
ACNP ROLE II (3)
Continuation of Acute Care Nurse Practitioner role across the continuum of care with adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions to restore or maximize health.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 860, NURS 862
CONCURRENT: NURS 863
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-142 NURS 862
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
ACNP PRACTICUM I (4)
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner practicum with patients across the continuum of care with adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 502, NURS 503, NURS 504, NURS 865, NURS 866
CONCURRENT: NURS 860
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-143 NURS 863
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum II
ACNP PRACTICUM II (4)
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner practicum across the continuum of care with adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 860, NURS 862
CONCURRENT: NURS 861
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-144 NURS 864
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Integrative Practicum
ACNP INTEGRATED (6)
Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner integrative practicum across the continuum of care with adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions.
PREREQUISITE: NURS 862, NURS 863
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-145 NURS 865
Pharmacology for Acute Care Nurse Practitioners
ACNP PHARM (1)
Principles of clinical pharmacology as applied to management of complex acute, critical, and chronically ill adult and older adult patients.
CONCURRENT: NURS 504
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-146 NURS 866
Health Assessment of the Adult Gerontology Population in Acute Care
ACNP ASSESS (1)
Physical assessment and diagnostics for physical and pscyhosocial health of adult and older adult individuals and families with acute and critical illness.
CONCURRENT: NURS 502
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-147 PHIL 539
Critical Philosophy of Race
PHILOSOPHY OF RACE (3 per semester/maximum of 6)
The study of philosophical issues raised by racism and by the concept of race and other related concepts.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-148 PHIL 563
Major Figures in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy
FIGURES: 19TH C (3 per semester/maximum of 12)
Close study of a major figure in nineteenth-century philosophy through one central text or several important texts.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-149 PHIL 564
Major Figures in Twentieth-Century Philosophy
FIGURES: 20THC (3 per semester/maximum of 12)
Close study of a major figure in twentieth-century philosophy by means of one central text or several important texts.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-150 PHS 505
Public Health Program Planning and Evaluation
PH PRGM PLAN EVAL (3)
Foundations in public health program planning and evaluation.
PREREQUISITE: PHS 504 or BB H 504
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-151 SOC 526
Health Disparities
HEALTH DISPAR (3)
This course provides an overview of social factors that lead to demographic disparities in health.
CROSS LIST: H P A 526
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-152 CSE 565
Algorithm Design and Analysis
ALGORITHM ANLY (4)
An introduction to algorithmic design and analysis.
PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 465
CONCURRENT: CSE 468
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CMPSC 465
CHANGE CONCURRENT: CMPSC 464
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-153 ENGR 595I
International Engineering Internship
INTL ENGR INTERN (1 per semester/maximum of 4)
A supervised work experience in a professionally relevant position in research, industry, or government.
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 0.5 per semester/maximum of 4
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: A supervised work experience in a professionally relevant position in research, industry, government or service sector.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-154 H ADM 503
Research Methods
RESEARCH METHODS (3)
Examination of research methodologies relevant to administration, planning, and public policy.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits statistics or permission of program and a demonstrated working knowledge of SPSS
CROSS LIST: P ADM 503
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: demonstrated working knowledge of IBM SPSS Statistics
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-155 IST 871
Enterprise Architecture Foundations I
EA FOUNDATIONS I (3)
Theoretical foundations and practice of enterprise architecture.
APPROVED START: FA2011

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: EA
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-156 IST 872
Enterprise Architecture Foundations II
EA FOUNDATIONS II (3)
Develops additional capabilities for justifying Enterprise Architecture decision making.
PREREQUISITE: IST 871
APPROVED START: FA2011

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: EA
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-157 M E 550
Foundations of Engineering Systems Analysis
ENGINEERING ANLY (3)
Analytical methods are developed using the vector space approach for solving control and estimation problems; examples from different engineering
applications.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 436
APPROVED START: FA1996

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: E E 550
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-158 MUSIC 535
Composition
COMPOSITION (1-4)
Composition of vocal, instrumental, and electronic media and preparation of compositions for performance.
PREREQUISITE: MUSIC 474
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 535J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-159 MUSIC 560
Choral Conducting
CHORAL CONDUCTING (2-4 per semester, maximum of 16)
Study of choral conducting techniques, comprehensive score analysis, and supervised rehearsal and performance practicum.
PREREQUISITE: MUSIC 466 or admission by audition
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 560J
CHANGE CREDITS: 2 per semester/maximum of 16
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-160 MUSIC 583
Studies in Choral Literature
STDY IN CHORAL LIT (2-3 per semester, maximum of 20)
Selected studies in choral literature of all types from the Renaissance to the present.
APPROVED START: SP1992

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 2 per semester, maximum of 8
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-161 MUSIC 591
Graduate Degree Performance
GRAD DEG PERF (1)
A juried recital performance for students majoring in performance, composition, or conducting.
PREREQUISITE: consent of department
APPROVED START: SP1985

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 891J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-162 MUSIC 801
Doctoral Solo Recital (DMA)
DMA SOLO RECITAL (2 per semester/maximum of 4)
Culminating solo recital(s) of artist-level repertoire; may be repeated with different repertoire.
PREREQUISITE: Completion of at least one semester of KEYBD 580J (lessons, doctoral/artist level)
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 801J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-163 MUSIC 802
DMA Lecture-Recital Monograph
DMA LECT-REC MGPH (1)
Preparation of a monograph to be text of the DMA lecture-recital; must be approved prior to performance.
PREREQUISITE: Candidacy for the DMA; previous completion of one MUSIC 801 recital
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 802J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-164 MUSIC 803
Performance of the DMA Lecture-Recital
DMA LECT-RECITAL (2)
Performance of the D.M.A. lecture-recital (the lecture monograph to be pre-approved as MUSIC 802).
PREREQUISITE: Candidacy for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree; MUSIC 802
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 803J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-165 MUSIC 804
Chamber Music Recital (DMA)
CHMBR MUS RECITAL (1 per semester/maximum of 2)
Recital devoted to chamber music (including song groups or cycles for voice and piano). May be repeated.
PREREQUISITE: Candidacy for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 804J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-166 MUSIC 805
DMA Final Recital
DMA FINAL RECITAL (3)
Final, culminating solo recital of artist-level repertoire; independently prepared.
PREREQUISITE: Completion of all other course work; Comprehensive Examination for the degree Doctor of Musical Arts
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 805J
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-167 NUTRN 520
Readings in Nutrition
RDGS IN NUTRN (0.5)
Readings and reports of selected topics in nutrition.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: NUTR
CHANGE CREDITS: 1 per semester/maximum of 2
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Readings and reports of selected topics in nutrition.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-168 P ADM 502
Governmental Fiscal Decision Making
DECISION MAKING (3)
Nature, function, and technique of governmental budgeting viewed as mechanism for allocating resources among alternative public uses.
PREREQUISITE: P ADM 500
APPROVED START: SP2003

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-169 P ADM 503
Research Methods
RESEARCH METHODS (1-3)
Examination of research methodologies relevant to administration, planning, and public policy.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits statistics or permission of program and a demonstrated working knowledge of SPSS
CROSS LIST: H ADM 503
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: demonstrated working knowledge of IBM SPSS Statistics
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-170 P ADM 505
Human Resources in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors
HUMAN RESOURCES (3)
Concepts and approaches contributing to effective use of human resources in public and non-profit organizations; legal issues and requirements.
PREREQUISITE: P ADM 500
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-171 P ADM 570
Scope and Methods of Public Administration
SCOPE & METHODS (3)
Examination of theoretical approaches to public administration and the role of theory in the field.
PREREQUISITE: P ADM 500, P ADM 503, P ADM 507, P ADM 510
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: P ADM 500
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-172 P ADM 571
Seminar in Organizational Theory
SEM ORG THEORY (3)
Selected theories of organizations and their applications to the study of public organizations.
PREREQUISITE: P ADM 570
APPROVED START: SP1988

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: P ADM 510 or P ADM 570
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-173 P ADM 575
Advanced Research Design
ADV RES DSGN (3)
Experimental, quasi-experimental, survey, aggregate, and other research designs applied to organizational, managerial, and policy analysis research problems.
PREREQUISITE: P ADM 570
APPROVED START: SP1988

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: P ADM 503
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-174 P ADM 579
Public Leadership and Ethics
PUB LDRSHP & ETHCS (3)
Examination of theory and research in leadership and public ethics, and their application to the field of Public Management.
PREREQUISITE: P ADM 570 and P ADM 574 or permission of program
APPROVED START: S12004

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: P ADM 570
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-175 P ADM 594
Research Topics
RESEARCH TOPICS (1-18)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual basis.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: P ADM 503
PROPOSED START: FA2012

COURSE DROPS

40-04-176 CEDEV 600
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-15)
No description.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-177 CEDEV 610
Thesis Research
THESIS RESEARCH (1-15)
No description.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-178 KINES 564
Multidisciplinary Approaches in Motor Control
MULTIDISC MTR CNTL (3)
The course introduces major theoretical advances to questions of motor control, both by a general overview and a paper-based discussion.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-179 MUSIC 502
Early Music Ensemble
EARLY MUS ENS (1)
Ensemble for the performance and study of Renaissance and Baroque music on instruments of the era.
PREREQUISITE: placement audition
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-180 MUSIC 506
Symphonic Band
SYMPHONIC BAND (1 per semester, maximum of 4)
Rehearsal and performance of symphonic band literature. A select group using standard instrumentation.
PREREQUISITE: admission by audition
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-181 MUSIC 509
Centre Dimensions
CENTRE DIMENSIONS (1 per semester, maximum of 4)
The rehearsal and performance of large jaza band literature ("charts") along with individualized formal study of jazs improvisation.
PREREQUISITE: admission by audition
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-182 MUSIC 511
Percussion Ensemble
PERCUSSION ENSEMBL (1 per semester, maximum of 4)
Study and performance of percussion chamber music in various instrumental combinations focusing on the classical and contemporary repertoire.
PREREQUISITE: admission by audition
PROPOSED START: S12012

gold line

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

Post-Baccalaureate Credit Certificate Programs

40-04-183 Add. New Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Graduate Credit Certificate.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Patricia Sweeney PhD, CRNP, FNP, BC
203 Health and Human Development East
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: 814-863-2211
Fax: 814-863-2925
E-Mail: pxs29@psu.edu

The purpose of the Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner certificate is to prepare individuals with a Master's degree in nursing seeking additional certification as an Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. The curriculum includes the didactic and clinical courses required for application of the NP role and required for certification. The program of study is variable and may require a total of 29 credits. Some credits may be waived based on evaluation of transcripts and prior course completion.

Admission Requirements:

Applicants are required to have a Master's degree in nursing from a NLNAC or CCNE accredited institution. In addition, undergraduate chemistry and statistics are required. Students need to submit two recommendations and official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate programs.

List of Courses Included in the Certificate:

NURS 502(3), NURS 503(3), NURS 504(3), NURS 870(3), NURS 871(3), NURS 872A(3), NURS 873A(4), NURS 874A(6)

Effective Semester: Spring 2012
Expiration Semester: Spring 2016

40-04-184 Change. Revise program description; Change from Postbaccalaureate to Graduate Credit Certificate; Add STAT 414, 415, 482, 506, 510.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Applied Statistics

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

James L. Rosenberger
326 Thomas Building
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: 814-865-1340
Fax: 814-863-7114
E-mail: jlr@psu.edu

The graduate certificate in Applied Statistics helps quantitative professionals in a variety of fields become knowledgeable and skillful in applied statistics. The certificate was designed specifically for researchers working with statistical data who wish to advance their careers, and for those who seek career changes. The certificate is offered through Penn State's World Campus. Students earn the certificate by completing 12 credits of instructor-led online course work. Two 3-credit courses are required, and the remaining 6 credits are selected from a list of electives. Students who successfully complete the certificate earn 12 academic credits and receive the graduate certificate in Applied Statistics. Students subsequently admitted to the Department of Statistic's professional Master of Applied Statistics degree program may count up to 15 credits of certificate courses toward the M.A.S. degree.

Admission Requirements

An applicant must have received, from a regionally accredited institution, a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. Applicants from countries in which English is not the primary language must earn TOEFL scores of at least 550 for the paper test or 213 for the computer-based test.

Admission Procedures

Students interested in applying for admission to the Graduate Certificate in Applied Statistics program should go to the World Campus web site: http://www.worldcampus.psu.edu/AppliedStatisticsCertificate_Admissions.shtml

PRESCRIBED COURSES

STATISTICS (STAT)

ELECTIVES

Choose at lease 6 credits from:

STATISTICS (STAT)

* Note: credits cannot be taken for both 483 and 480-482.

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Fall Semester 2011
Expiration Date: Fall Semester 2016

40-04-185 Change. Change from Postbaccalaureate to Graduate Credit Certificate Program; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Clinical Research

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Thomas A. Lloyd, Ph.D., Professor and Division Chief, Epidemiology
Mardi Sawyer, BS
Public Health Sciences, A210
Penn State College of Medicine
600 Centerview Drive, PO Box 855
Hershey, PA 17033-0855
Phone: 717-531-1286
Fax: 717-531-3922
E-mail: mds21@psu.edu

In the current medical climate, there is a growing need for academic clinicians and health care professionals who are trained in clinical research. Unfortunately, there are few programs that offer the didactic preparation for the unique requirements of a clinical researcher.

The primary goal of this program is to provide a formal, structured program that will prepare certificate candidates to pursue a successful career in clinical research. The curriculum includes courses in biostatistics, epidemiology, clinical trials, decision and cost-effectiveness analysis, outcomes measurement, quality management, health care economics and policy, scientific communication, and SAS statistical analysis computing. The 15 credit hour program offers courses on weekday evenings, enabling the student to continue clinical or employment activities. Certificate candidates will be able to complete the 15 credit hour requirement in 2 semesters.

Admission Requirements

The successful applicant must have completed a medical, nursing, or baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. Fellows and junior faculty members with current appointments at the Penn State College of Medicine, as well as nursing graduates and public health personnel, are target candidates for the certificate program.

COURSES

Core (6 prescribed credits)

PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES (PHS)

520. Principles of Biostatistics (3)
550. Principles of Epidemiology (3)

In addition to the 6 credits of required core coursework, students must select an additional 9 credits from the following list of electives:

PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES (PHS)

500. Research Ethics (1)
511. Methods in Translational Research (1)
518. Scientific Communications (1)
519. Patient Oriented Research (1)
535. Quality of Care Measurement (3)
536. Health Survey Research Methods (3)
551. Advanced Epidemiological Methods (3)
580. Clinical Trials Design Analysis (3)
581. Clinical Trials Case Studies (1)
801. Data Management (1)

Effective Date: Spring Semester 2010
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2015

40-04-186 Change. Revise Program Description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Community and Economic Development

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Diane McLaughlin
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
110-C Armsby Building
University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814-863-8626
Fax: 814-865-3746
Email: dkk@psu.edu

The Graduate Certificate program in Community and Economic Development helps students prepare to confront the multidimensional challenges faced by community development practitioners. The main objective of the certificate program is to educate professionals who will assume leadership roles in helping establish and maintain viable communities. Recipients of the certificate will become deeply involved in assisting localities with a variety of issues, including: developing new organizations and new industries; growth management; protecting the environment; revitalizing downtown areas; enhancing the local quality of life; assisting educational, social, health, and human service systems; and developing vital infrastructure--in short, working with communities to help them shape their own futures.

The certificate program teaches the theory, skills, and tools that allow practitioners to address the important issues in community and economic development. The certificate program emphasizes topical problems, drawing from the experiences of both students and the faculty. Students in Community and Economic Development gain a broad understanding of the dynamics of communities and their social, economic, and political systems. With this training, graduates have a wide range of career opportunities in an expanding job market. Some work for local or regional governments, industrial development authorities and chambers of commerce, major corporations, nongovernmental organizations, or consulting firms. Others may work for development authorities, housing authorities, planning commissions, or environmental planning and development agencies.

Program Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in Community and Economic Development (CEDEV Certificate) requires 15 credits, consisting of five 3-credit courses. The CEDEV Graduate Certificate is designed to build a basic level of knowledge and skills required for practitioners to address the important issues in community and economic development. Admission to the certificate requires applicants to provide evidence of completion of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.

The certificate program is designed primarily for professionals in the field who wish to expand their existing knowledge and for those who wish to learn about community and economic development, including those working in or interested in dealing with the variety of development issues in America's towns, boroughs, small cities and rural areas. All courses are delivered online through the Penn State World Campus.

The five required courses introduce students to the field and cover the topics of principles of community and economic development, leadership, community structure, capacity and processes, local economic development, planning, population, land use and municipal finance, and the methods and techniques of effective community and economic development. Courses in the certificate program are required courses in the master's degree program in Community and Economic Development and can be transferred into the master's program for qualified applicants.

Admission Requirements

Students with a 3.00 average (on a 4.00 scale) for the most recent two years of college/university education, or with an advanced degree, and with appropriate course or experiential backgrounds will be considered for admission. To complete an application for the graduate certificate in Community and Economic Development, please visit:

http://www.worldcampus.psu.edu/degrees-and-certificates/community-and-economic-development-certificate/apply

COURSES

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (CEDEV)

Program is jointly offered by Penn State's World Campus and the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, College of Agricultural Science.

40-04-187 Drop. Drop Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program in Critical Success Factors for Business Leadership.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2011

Critical Success Factors for Business Leadership

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Ellen Foster Curtis
Penn State Great Valley
School of Graduate Professional Studies
30 E. Swedesford Road
Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 610-648-3229
Fax: 610-725-5224
E-mail: efc5@psu.edu

This 15-credit program was designed to provide today's business leaders with the tools for achieving success in four key performance areas valued by top organizations: long- and short-term financial performance, learning and growth of the organization's human assets, customer knowledge, and internal business processes. This program was created for business professionals wishing to update their knowledge, skills, and abilities; current managers in science, technology, or engineering who seek a business background to help them in their managerial roles; and individuals making a transition into a managerial position, returning to the workforce, considering a career change, or who do not have an undergraduate degree in business and are considering an M.B.A. Students who complete this certificate and decide that they want to pursue an M.B.A. must formally apply to the MBA program. If accepted into the MBA program, all 15 credits in the certificate will be applied to the degree.

Admission Requirements

Applicants should submit an official transcript from their undergraduate institution, a current résumé, a statement of intent or career objective, and at least one letter of recommendation. Admission decisions are based on the quality of the applicant's credentials in relation to those of other applicants. Evaluation criteria include professional and academic accomplishments. Once admitted, these students must complete a nondegree enrollment form in order to register for classes. Application filing dates: Penn State Great Valley's MBA program has a rolling admission policy. New students may start classes in early September, late October, early January, early March, or late April.

Students who complete the certificate and decide that they want to go on to finish an M.B.A. must formally apply to the program by submitting an additional letter of recommendation, a Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score, and statement of intent, in addition to Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. If accepted into the MBA program, all 15 credits in the certificate will be applied to the degree.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

ACCOUNTING (ACCTG)

MANAGEMENT (MGMT)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSAD)

MARKETING (MKTG)

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (OPMGT )

OR

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (M I S)

Note: Some course substitutions may be considered for students with a bachelor's degree in business and outstanding academic performance.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Spring Semester 2004
Expiration Date: Fall Semester 2008

40-04-188 Drop. Drop Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program in Essentials of Entrepreneurship.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2011

Essentials of Entrepreneurship

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Ellen Foster Curtis and Dr. Eric W. Stein
Penn State Great Valley, School of Graduate Professional Studies
30 East Swedesford Road, Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 610-648-3229
Fax: 610-725-5224
E-mail: efc5@psu.edu or ews3@psu.edu

This 15-credit program is designed to provide business leaders with the tools to achieve success in starting new ventures from scratch or setting up new ventures within existing organizational structures. Areas of emphasis include: managing people; financial accounting; the financial, legal, and operational aspects of new ventures; and specialized areas such as marketing, management information systems, or communications.

This program was created for business professional wishing to start a new business or who want to update their knowledge, skills, and abilities; current managers in science and technology who want to start and manage new ventures; and individuals making a transition into a managerial position, returning to the workforce, considering a career change, or who have an undergraduate degree in a nonbusiness field. Students who complete this certificate and want to pursue an M.B.A. must formally apply to the MBA program. If accepted into the MBA program, up to 15 credits in the certificate can be applied with approval of the division head.

Admission Requirements

Applicants should submit an official transcript from their undergraduate institution, a current résumé, a statement of intent or career objective, and at least one letter of recommendation. Admission decisions are based on the quality of the applicant's credentials in relation to other applicants. Evaluation criteria include professional and academic accomplishments. Once admitted, these students must complete a nondegree enrollment form in order to register for classes. Application filing dates: Penn State Great Valley's MBA program has a rolling admission policy. New students may start classes in early September, late October, early January, early March, or late April.

Students who complete the certificate and decide that they want to go on to finish an M.B.A. must formally apply to the program by submitting an additional letter of recommendation, a Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score, and statement of intent, in addition to Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin. If accepted into the MBA program, up to 15 credits in the certificate can be applied to the M.B.A. degree with the approval of the division head.

PRESCRIBED COURSES:

9 credits

MANAGEMENT (MGMT)

ACCOUNTING (ACCTG)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSAD)

ELECTIVES:

6 credits

Choose two courses. May be taken at any time in sequence. No additional pre-requisites. Examples of electives include:

ACCOUNTING (ACCTG)

BUSINESS LAW (B LAW)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (B A)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUSAD)

MARKETING (MKTG)

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (M I S)

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MSIS)

Note: Additional courses may be available. Check with adviser.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Spring Semester 2006
Expiration Date: Fall Semester 2011

40-04-189 Change. Reduce credits for certificate from 15 to 12 credits;Revise Program Description; Remove ADTED 460, 497A, 497B, 497C, E C E 451.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Family Literacy

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Sheila Sherow
405 Keller Building
Phone: 814-861-3954 
Fax: 814-863-6108
E-mail: sms20@psu.edu

The certificate in Family Literacy, based on a multidisciplinary approach to literacy instruction involving both adult educators and early childhood education and family literacy specialists, is intended for location-bound students who work in a variety of literacy-related settings, both formal and informal. These settings include public schools and preschools (teachers, teaching assistants, reading specialists), organizations such as Head Start and grant-funded family literacy programs. The goal of the certificate is to build the capacity of the field to provide high-quality, research-based instruction and program development in family literacy. The certificate consists of a 12-credit program delivered online through the World Campus. The program objectives include strengthening program effectiveness through developing an understanding of staff roles and responsibilities as part of a collaborative family literacy team and supporting a learner-centered approach to delivering program services.

Admission Requirements

Students must have a baccalaureate degree to enroll.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

ADULT EDUCATION (ADTED)

Effective Date: Fall Semester 2010
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2015

40-04-190 Add. New Family Nurse Practitioner Graduate Credit Certificate.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Family Nurse Practitioner

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Patricia Sweeney PhD, CRNP, FNP, BC
203 Health and Human Development East
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: 814-863-2211
Fax: 814-863-2925
E-Mail: pxs29@psu.edu


The purpose of the Family Nurse Practitioner certificate is to prepare individuals with a Master's degree in Nursing seeking additional certification as a Family Nurse Practitioner. The curriculum includes the didactic and clinical courses required for application of the NP role and required for certification. The program of study is variable and may require a total of 33 credits. Some credits may be waived based on evaluation of transcripts and prior course completion.

Admission Requirements:

Applicants are required to have a Master's degree in nursing from a NLNAC or CCNE accredited institution. In addition, undergraduate chemistry and statistics are required. Students need to submit two recommendations and official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate programs.

List of Courses Included in the Certificate:

NURS 502(3), NURS 502A(1), NURS 503(3), NURS 504(3), NURS 870(3), NURS 871(3), NURS 872(3), NURS 873(4), NURS 874(6), NURS 875(2), NURS 876(2)

Effective Semester: Spring 2012
Expiration Semester: Spring 2016

40-04-191 Change. Revise program description; Revise renewal date.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Geographic Information Systems

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Anthony C. Robinson
2217 Earth and Engineering Sciences Building
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: 814-867-4638
Fax: 814-863-1564
E-mail: acr181@psu.edu

The Postbaccalaureate Certificate Program in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) helps professionals in a variety of fields become knowledgeable and skillful users of geographic information systems. The program was designed specifically for experienced GIS practitioners who lack formal education in geography and GIS and wish to advance their careers, and for those who seek to make career changes. The program is offered through Penn State's World Campus. Students earn the certificate by completing four instructor-led online courses -- three required and one elective. Students who successfully complete the program earn 11 academic credits (2 credits for the first course, 3 credits each for the rest). Students subsequently admitted to the Department of Geography's Master of GIS degree program may count up to 15 credits of certificate program courses toward the MGIS degree.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have received, from a regionally accredited institution, a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. Applicants from countries in which English is not the primary language must earn TOEFL scores of at least 550 for the paper test or 213 for the computer-based test.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

ELECTIVES

Choose at least 3 credits from:

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 - 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG) course list

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2016

40-04-192 Add. New Geospatial Intelligence Graduate Credit Certificate Program.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Geospatial Intelligence

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

The Geospatial Intelligence certificate promotes sound theory, methodologies, techniques, ethics, and best practices in the professional application of geospatial intelligence. The program is for working geospatial intelligence professionals with more than two years of experience who are only able to participate part-time and at a distance, while maintaining full-time professional responsibilities. The curriculum integrates the geospatial information science and intelligence disciplines in a synergistic manner. All courses are instructor-led and online. Students devote approximately eight to twelve hours per week to each course. Although assignments are due weekly, students are free to study at their convenience. The program is well suited for the geospatial intelligence professional serving outside the continental US. All candidates are required to take the 3-credit foundations course, 6-credits of geospatial information science and technology courses, a 3-credit course in a geospatial intelligence area of the student's interest, and 1-credit of capstone work. Half of the credits must be at the 500-level or above.

Admission Requirements:

An applicant for the graduate certificate must have received, from an accredited institution, a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. An entering student must have worked, anticipates working, or completed in a satisfactory manner course work in an area related to national security, law enforcement, or business. The student must be admitted to the: (1) Penn State Graduate School, (2) World Campus, and (3) Department of Geography. To apply, the student completes a single online application that provides the necessary information to each organization. In addition to completing the online application, transcripts must be submitted to the program by surface mail. The Geospatial Intelligence Program Admissions Committee reviews and ranks applications as they are received.

Prescribed Courses

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

483. Problem Solving with GIS (3)
882. Geographic Foundations of Geospatial Intelligence (3)

or

883. Remote Sensing for the Geospatial Intelligence Professional (3)
884. Geographic Information Systems for the Geospatial Intelligence Professional (3)

594A. Seminar in Geospatial Intelligence

Electives

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

Choose at least 3 credits from:

485. GIS Programming and Customization
486. Cartography and Visualization
489. GIS Application Development
585. Open Web Mapping
863. GIS Mashups for Geospatial Professionals

Effective Date: Spring Semester 2012
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2016

40-04-193 Change. Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Geriatric Nursing Education

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Ann Kolanowski
School of Nursing
106 Health and Human Development East
Phone: 814-863-9901
Fax: 814-865-6625
E-mail: amk20@psu.edu

In conjunction with the Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, the Penn State School of Nursing offers a Geriatric Nursing Education Graduate Certificate program. The primary goal of the program is to prepare individuals with a current Master's degree in Nursing to teach geriatric nursing education at both the Associate and Baccalaureate degree levels. The curriculum includes 6 credits (two 3 credit courses) of didactic content in geriatric nursing and 6 credits (two 3 credit courses) of didactic content in education. All four courses will be delivered using distance technology. The education courses are currently available through the World Campus.

The Geriatric Nursing Education certificate program consists of four graduate-level courses (12 credits).

Admission Requirements

Applicants must hold either a Master's degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or a Master's degree that is equivalent to a U.S. Master's degree from an officially recognized degree-granting international institution. The credit conditions for the Masters degree must be substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State's Master's degree programs in Nursing or related health disciplines. Copies of all undergraduate and graduate degree transcripts must accompany the application.

Prior to admission, transcripts are evaluated by the Director of the Hartford Center in collaboration with the admissions committee to ascertain successful completion of the core nursing courses. A recommendation regarding admission is discussed with the Associate Dean for Graduate Education prior to making an offer of admission.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

NURSING (NURS)
522. Assessment of the Older Adult (3)
523. Nursing Interventions for Complex Problems of the Older Adult (3)

ADULT EDUCATION (ADTED)
460. Introduction to Adult Education (3)
506. Program Planning in Adult Education (3) OR
507. Research and Evaluation in Adult Education (3)

OR

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (C I)
501. Teaching as Inquiry (3)

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (EDLDR)
551. Curriculum Design: Theory and Practice (3)

To be awarded the Graduate Certificate in Geriatric Nursing Education, students must successfully complete

NURS 522, NURS 523, ADTED 460, and ADTED 506 or ADTED 507

- OR -

NURS 522, NURS 523, C I 501 and EDLDR 551.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2009
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2013

40-04-194 Change. Revise program description; Add I E 479; Remove I E 418, 522, I H S 470.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Andris Freivalds
Harold and Inge Marcus
Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
307 Leonhard Building
University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814-865-7601
Fax: 814-863-4745
E-mail: axr32@psu.edu

Individuals involved in the design and development of products for human use will find the program content immediately applicable to their job. With an emphasis on the application of user engineering design principles, the tools and methods to assess and enhance quality and productivity for both consumers and employees are provided. Applications include medical devices, consumer products, military systems, software design and the workplace. The program is comprised of three courses from the Penn State curriculum. These courses provide students with both a breadth and depth in their exposure to user engineering tools and principles.

Admission Requirements

The successful applicant will possess a baccalaureate degree in a related technical field (with courses in calculus and physics) and is generally expected to have a minimum GPA of 3.0. International students must satisfy the Graduate School's English language requirement. Professional experience will be taken into consideration for admission. Exceptions to the minimum 3.0 grade-point average may be made for students with special backgrounds, abilities, and interests.

GRE scores are not required for nondegree graduate students. Individuals who wish to apply to the graduate degree program in Industrial Engineering must submit an application for admission, along with all of the required supporting documentation, including GRE scores.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (I E)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Spring Semester 2012
Expiration Date: Fall Semester 2014

40-04-195 Add. New Human Resources and Employment Relations Graduate Credit Certificate.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Human Resources and Employment Relations (HRER)

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Paul F Clark
003 Keller Building
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: (814)865-5425
Fax: (814)867-4169
E-Mail: pfc2@psu.edu

 

The program is designed for professionals who desire further education in the specialized field of Human Resources and Employment Relations (HRER) without completing a full master's degree. Many professionals and recent graduates believe they need further education beyond their bachelor's degree for personal and professional development and to compete effectively in the labor market for HRER practitioners. The certificate program provides flexibility for working professionals and advanced knowledge in the rapidly changing field of HRER in many areas, including: dispute management and resolution, workplace diversity, work and family, trends in human resources, and technology and the workplace. Upon successful completion of the certificate program, students may opt to apply for the master's degree in HRER.

Students must complete 9 credits.

Admission Requirements:

Admission to the program does not assume former knowledge of the field of HRER. An applicant must have received a valid bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution and have two years of full-time professional work experience. The following documentation must be submitted for evaluation prior to admission:


List of Courses Included in the Certificate:

HUMAN RESOURCES AND EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS (HRER)

504. Seminar in Employment Relations (3)
505. Seminar in Human Resources (3)

Select One Elective from the Course List below:

500. Topics in Comparative Industrial Relations (3)
501. Labor and Employment Law (3)
502. Organizations in the Workplace (3)
512. Research Methods in Human Resources and Employment Relations I (3)
513. Research Methods in Human Resources and Employment Relations II (3)
516. Labor Market Analysis (3)
536. Diversity in the Workplace (3)

Effective Semester: Summer 2010
Expiration Semester: Summer 2015

40-04-196 Drop. Drop Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program in Industrial Relations and Human Resources.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2011

Industrial Relations and Human Resources

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Paul F. Clark, Department Head and Professor of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations
133 Willard Building
University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814-865-0752
Fax: 814-863-3578
E-mail: pfc2@psu.edu

The program is designed for professionals and new graduates who desire further education in the specialized field of Industrial Relations and Human Resources (IR/HR) without completing a full master's degree. Many professionals and recent graduates believe they need further education beyond their bachelor's degree for personal and professional development and to compete effectively in the labor market for IR/HR practitioners. The certificate program provides flexibility for working professionals and advanced knowledge in the rapidly changing field of IR/HR in many areas, including: dispute management and resolution, workplace diversity, work and family, trends in human resources, and technology and the workplace. Upon successful completion of the certificate program, students may opt to continue for the master's degree in IR/HR.

Students must complete 9 credits.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the program does not assume former knowledge of the field of IR/HR. There are two required courses (IRHR 504 and IRHR 505). The remaining course is an elective.

The following will be required:

PRESCRIBED COURSES

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS AND HUMAN RESOURCES (IRHR)

ELECTIVE COURSES (select one)

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS AND HUMAN RESOURCES (IRHR)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Fall Semester 2003
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2008

40-04-197 Change. Change name from Medical Adult Education to Adult Education in the Health and Medical Professions; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2011

Adult Education in the Health and Medical Professions

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Elizabeth Tisdell
Dr. Edward W. Taylor
W330 Olmsted, Penn State Harrisburg
Phone: 717-948-6640
Fax: 717-948-6064
E-mail: ejt11@psu.edu; ewt1@psu.edu

The primary goal of the Graduate Certificate in Adult Education in the Health and Medical Professions is to assist medical/health professionals in increasing their knowledge and competence in educating adult learners in medical education/health science settings.                  

The objectives are to promote: awareness of how learning theory informs practice; effective methods for teaching adults; development of a reflective practice; understanding of program/instructional design

Candidates are required to take 12 graduate credits, including the 9-credit core of three required classes and one other advisor-approved 3-credit graduate course related to the candidate’s specific area of interest.  The required classes, in which assignments will relate to health/medical education issues, are: 

ADTED 460:  Introduction to Adult Education
ADTED 501:  Foundations of Medical Education
ADTED 505: Teaching of Adults
The 3-credit graduate elective will be related to the candidate’s specific interest in medical/health education.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

U.S. applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. International applicants must have a tertiary (post secondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year U.S. bachelor's degree. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates. Additionally, all international applicants must meet the Graduate School's English proficiency requirements.

Applicants must submit the following materials:
* A one-page resume
* A statement describing professional goals, experience, and responsibilities (2 pages maximum)
* One letter of recommendation
*  Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate programs previously attended.

LIST OF COURSES INCLUDED IN THE CERTIFICATE

The three required classes include the following and assumes that the candidate would relate a part of their papers or assignments to the areas of health or medical education : 
ADTED 460:  Introduction to Adult Education
ADTED 501:  Foundations of Medical Education
ADTED 505: Teaching of Adults
The 3-credit graduate elective will be related to the candidate’s particular interest related to health or medical education, and could include other graduate courses in the Adult Education Program or another related area.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2010
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2015

40-04-198 Change. Change from Postbaccalaureate to Graduate Credit Certificate; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2012

Project Management

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Jeffrey K. Pinto, Professor of Management
Sam and Irene Black School of Business
Penn State Erie, The Behrend College
5091 Station Road
Erie, PA 16563-1400
Fax: 814-898-6223
E-mail: jkp4@psu.edu

Delivering complex projects on time and under budget is a daily challenge for most corporations. More organizations now use project-based methods to accomplish such tasks, resulting in increased demand for project managers. The online Graduate Certificate in Project Management is an interdisciplinary, 12-credit program that uses problem-based learning to provide a strong foundation in project management theory and practice. The program is offered by the AACSB Accredited Sam and Irene Black School of Business and Penn State is a Project Management Institute (PMI)® Registered Education Provider (R.E.P), making this certificate a well-respected credential. In addition to being an excellent stand-alone credential, all of the courses in the Graduate Certificate in Project Management can be applied toward the Master of Project Management degree program also offered through Penn State’s World Campus. Approval to apply nondegree graduate credits toward a degree program must be granted by the student's academic adviser, the program head or graduate officer, and the Graduate School. A maximum of 15 credits earned as a nondegree student may be applied to a degree program.

Admission Requirements

Only candidates who demonstrate high promise of success for graduate work are admitted to the program. All applicants must have received from a regionally accredited institution a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions that are deemed substantially equivalent to those currently required by Penn State. Admission decisions are based on undergraduate grade-point average, Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores, and a personal essay.

Applicants must achieve a minimum GMAT score of 450. When this score is added to the applicant’s undergraduate grade-point average, multiplied by 200, the total must be at least 1,050 in order to meet minimum requirements for admission to the MPM program. Either the applicant's cumulative undergraduate grade-point average or the junior/senior grade-point average can be used for this calculation. Applicants must also demonstrate proficiency in writing by obtaining at least a 4.0 on the analytical writing assessment portion of the GMAT, or by earning a grade of B or higher in a college English composition course. The MPM program emphasizes application of course concepts to actual project management opportunities and problems. Therefore, students who currently are, or previously were, employed as project managers or project team members will derive the greatest benefit from the program. All applicants must provide evidence of sufficient current or previous work experience that will enable them to successfully complete course assignments requiring the application of course concepts to real project management situations. This evidence may be provided in either the form of three letters of recommendation from individuals who know the applicant in a professional capacity or through nomination to participate in the program by an appropriate official within the applicant's employing organization. Those who write letters of recommendation or submit nominations on behalf of the candidate will be asked to attest to the nominee's suitability for the program of study considering factors such as the applicant's length of employment, level and areas of work responsibility, personal qualities, career goals, maturity of purpose, and program requirements to apply course concepts to work-related issues. Applicants are encouraged to consult with the program chair concerning the suitability of their work experiences in relationship to program requirements.

The language of instruction at Penn State is English. All international applicants must take and submit scores for the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), with the exceptions noted below. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL is 550 for the paper-based test, 213 for the computer-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the Internet-based test (iBT). The minimum composite score for the IELTS is 6.5. International applicants are exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement who have received a baccalaureate or a graduate degree from a college/university/institution in any of the following: Australia, Belize, British Caribbean and British West Indies, Canada (except Quebec), England, Guyana, Republic of Ireland, Liberia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, and Wales.

All students must be computer literate and have ready and reliable access to a computer and the Internet to successfully complete the MPM program. They must know how to use word processing software, log on to an Internet provider, and use e-mail. Additionally, MPM students will use Microsoft Office in their coursework that will require they have a working knowledge of Microsoft Office programs such as Word, Excel, Power Point, and Access. Access to fax facilities may be needed as an additional form of communication between student and instructor or between students.

COURSES

Students complete MANGT 510, Project Management (3), in their first semester of study and three additional courses from the following list for a total of 12 credits:

MANAGEMENT (MANGT)

MANGT 515 through 540 may be taken either concurrently or subsequently with MANGT 510.

Effective Date: Fall Semester 2012
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2016

40-04-199 Drop. Drop Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program in Psychology: Clinical Applications in Health Psychology.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2011

Psychology: Clinical Applications in Health Psychology

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Michael A. Becker, Ph.D.
W157 Olmsted Building
Penn State Harrisburg
Middletown, PA 17057
Phone: 717-948-6037
Fax: 717-948-6519
E-mail: dvo@psu.edu

The Penn State Harrisburg Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Psychology: Clinical Applications in Health Psychology is wellness oriented and is intended to prepare counselors to work in either a mental health or a medical setting. This program of study will enhance mental health professionals' skills in developing prevention programs and in providing services for individuals and families coping with death, traumatic injuries, and chronic or terminal illnesses as well as general mental health concerns.

Admission Requirements

Students must have obtained a master's degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education in clinical or counseling psychology, or be concurrently enrolled as a degree student in Penn State Harrisburg's Applied Clinical Psychology master's degree program. For students currently enrolled in the master's program in Applied Clinical Psychology at Penn State Harrisburg, the certificate will be awarded upon successful completion of the master's program as well as completion of the 12 credits required for the certificate. The certificate cannot be awarded prior to completion of the master's degree.

REQUIRED COURSES

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (select one)

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

COUNSELOR EDUCATION (CN ED)


Effective Date: Fall Semester 2003
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2008

40-04-200 Change. Change from Postbaccalaureate to Graduate Credit Certificate Program; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Supply Chain Management

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. John E. Tyworth
454B Business Building
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: 814-865-1866
Fax: 814-863-7067
E-mail: jet@psu.edu

The primary goal of the program is to prepare supply chain professionals to manage value-creating supply chain networks that modern business enterprises employ to acquire, produce, and deliver goods and services on a global scale. Students learn how to analyze and manage core business processes including sourcing and procuring raw materials, supplies and components and planning and fulfilling customer demand. All candidates are required to complete with a passing grade the three prescribed 800-level, 4-credit courses to earn the certificate.

Admission Requirements

The curriculum is designed for working supply chain management professionals. Accordingly, successful applicants will normally have, before the start of their first semester, at least two years' post baccalaureate work experience in supply chain management or a closely allied field.

An applicant must have received, from a regionally accredited institution, a baccalaureate degree under residence with credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. Additionally, the applicant's baccalaureate degree should be in business, engineering, economics, information sciences, or a related field and the applicant should have completed a college-level course in microeconomic principles.

To assure a smooth transition into the curriculum prospective students should have Microsoft Office Excel skills, knowledge of business statistics, and an understanding of basic accounting and microeconomic terms and principles.

Required Courses

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM)

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM) course list

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2016

40-04-201 Add. New Teaching to Speakers of Other Languages Graduate Credit Certificate.

Proposed effective date: Fall Semester 2010

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Karen E. Johnson
234 Sparks Building
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: 814-867-4284
Fax: 814-863-7986
E-Mail: sah4@psu.edu

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is designed for candidates holding a baccalaureate degree with little or no previous experience teaching adult English language learners either in the US or abroad. Candidates are required to take four 3-credit graduate level courses that contain integrated practical field experiences that enable candidates to gain essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching adult English language learners in diverse contexts throughout the world.

Admission Requirements

Candidates must have received either (1) a bachelor's degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution or (2) a postsecondary degree that is equivalent to a U.S. baccalaureate degree earned from an officially recognized degree-granting international institution with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

International candidates must have a minimum TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based), 250 (computer-based), or 100 (internet-based) with a 23 on the oral section.

List of Courses Included in the Certificate:

APPLIED LINGUISTICS (APLNG)

802 FOCUS ON ENGLISH: TEACHING FORM, MEANING & USE (3)
804 FOCUS ON LEARNERS: IDENTITY, COMMUNITY & LANGUAGE LEARNING (3)
806 FOCUS ON CLASSROOMS: PLANNING & SUPPORTING LANGUAGE LEARNING (3)
808 FOCUS ON INSTRUCTION: TEACHING & ASSESSING LANGUAGE LEARNING (3)

Capstone experience: Professional e-portfolio that draws upon aspects of course work that demonstrate achievement of all program goals and can be used when applying for teaching positions around the world.

Effective Semester: Fall 2010
Expiration Semester: Fall 2016

gold line

APPENDIX D
Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

40-04-202 CCLAW 959
Business Reorganizations
BUSINESS REORG (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course is a study of the law governing the reorganization of businesses under chapter 11 and related provisions of the U.S. bankruptcy code. It includes such topics as prepetition planning, the filing of a business reorganization case (either voluntary or involuntary), jurisdiction and venue, the automatic stay and "adequate protection," the bankruptcy estate, "first day" orders, use of cash collateral, postpetition financing, wage payment orders, rights of utilities, reclamation rights, executory contracts, employment and payment of professionals, professional responsibility in the bankruptcy context, creditors' (and other) committees, chapter 11 trustees and examiners, substantive consolidation, chapter 11 plans and disclosure statements, plan confirmation, claims objections, avoidance actions, coordination of international insolvency cases.
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 961 or CCLAW 952
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-203 HLTHL 961
Bioethics and Public Health Law
BIOETH PUB HLTH LW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
The course will focus on the laws governing ethical issues that arise in the course of providing medical care and ensuring public health. Specific topics include treatment at the end of life, reproductive rights, organ transplantation, genetic testing, human experimentation, and infectious disease control and prevention. A central theme is the conflict between patients' interests and the interests of others and/or social interests. This course also explores the intersection of ethics and economics in terms of the social right to care and the rationing of limited medical resources.
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-204 LLMLW 997
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (4) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
Special Topics
PROPOSED START: SP2012

40-04-205 SKILS 968
Written Advocacy and Judicial Opinions
WRIT ADV JUD OPIN (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The bulk of advocacy is in the form of written submissions to the courts, and the vast majority of judicial decisions are written. In order to advocate effectively, lawyers must communicate their arguments clearly and persuasively to the courts. In order to resolve cases and establish useful precedent, judges must communicate their reasoning clearly and authoritatively. This course will explore both forms of written communication and develop the writing skills associated with each.
PREREQUISITE: Legal Analysis, Research and Writing I and II
PROPOSED START: S12012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-04-206 CCLAW 964
Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions I
BUS PLN FOR M&A I (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course first focuses on various topics that are important in M&A transactions involving both closely-held corporations, including directors duties, shareholder voting and dissenters' rights, basic issues under the Federal securities laws, fundamentals of Federal income taxation and accounting, use of modern valuation techniques, including DCF and CAPM, in M&A, and basic issues in antitrust and pre-merger notification. The course then turns to an analysis of various forms of negotiated acquisition, including acquisitions of stock and assets of closely-held corporations and acquisitions of publicly-held corporations in negotiated transactions. The course is based on the first half of Thompson, Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions: Corporate, Securities, Tax, Antitrust, International, and Related Aspects (2008).
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 963 recommended
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 963
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-207 CCLAW 965
Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions II
BUS PLN FOR M&A II (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course builds on the topics covered in Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisition I, and is based on the second half of Thompson, Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions: Corporate, Securities, Tax, Antitrust, International, and Related Aspects (2008). The course starts with an examination of leveraged buyouts, and then focuses on the drafting of various types of acquisition agreements. The course then looks at proxy contests and then turns to hostile takeovers and going private transactions regulated by the Williams Act provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course then looks at special topics in M&A, including spinoffs, international M&A, bank acquisitions, acquisitions of public utilities, bankruptcy acquisitions, joint ventures and ethics issues in M&A.
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 963 and CCLAW 964 recommended
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 964
PROPOSED START: SP2012

OLD
40-04-208 CCLAW 978
Payment Systems
PAYMENT SYSTEMS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
In the modern economy commercial parties use a variety of payment mechanisms. This course provides an overview of different payment systems (including checks, credit and debit cards, wire transfers, and letters of credit), the credit system, and the devices that enhance creditworthiness (including notes, guaranties, and standby letters of credit). Classroom discussion is devoted almost exclusively to developing analyses of written problems contained in the course text. Because this course requires familiarity with the Uniform Commercial Code, students should take another Uniform Commercial Code course prior to or concurrently with this course.
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Payment Systems and Financial Transactions (PAY SYS/FIN TRANS)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Payment Systems and Financial Transactions is a general overview of the law of negotiable instruments (e.g., checks) and other mechanisms for making payments, including credit cards, debit cards, ACH payments, and wire transfers. The course also will cover credit enhancement systems such as guaranties and letters of credit. The course will address both uniform state law (UCC Articles 3, 4, 4A, and 5), and applicable federal statutes and regulations (such as the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Truth-in-Lending Act, and the Electronic Fund Transfer Act).
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-04-209 FMEST 964
Estate Planning and Wealth Transfer Transactions I
ESTATE PLANNING I (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course is open only to third-year law students. This course will acquaint students with federal estate and gift tax laws that must be considered in estate planning, and it will provide a general overview of state systems of wealth transfer taxation. Matters covered include the gross estate, deductions and credits, generation skipping transfer taxes, transactions subject to gift tax, and exclusions and credits available to shelter lifetime wealth transfers. Also covered will be non-tax issues to be considered in estate planning, probate issues and probate avoidance, forms of property ownership, and issues about the attorney-client relationship. Although not required, students are encouraged to take TAX 950 Advanced Federal Income Taxation (which is a prerequisite for Estate Planning and Wealth Transfer Transactions II) or another advanced tax elective in their second year before enrolling.
PREREQUISITE: FMEST 960 PREREQUISITE: FMEST 960
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Estate Planning (ESTATE PLANNING)
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Studies the concepts and techniques required to develop estate plans. Topics include the initial client interview, drafting of wills and trusts, powers of attorney, living wills, disability planning and income taxation of trusts and estates. The psychological and ethical aspects of estate planning will be covered. The course will also survey the federal gift, estate and generation skipping taxes. The course is intended to be an introduction to estate planning, valuable to both the person intending to specialize in the field and the general practitioner.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: FMEST 960, TAX 949
PROPOSED START: FA2012

COURSE DROPS

40-04-210 CCLAW 962
Business Bankruptcy
BUSINESS BNKRPTCY (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course considers the application of the Bankruptcy Code to Business Entities, with a focus on reorganization.
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 961
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-211 CCLAW 953
Bankruptcy Issues Seminar
BANKRUPTCY SEMINAR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar will expose students to advanced topics in commercial law. The exact topic offered each year will vary depending on the professor who is leading the seminar, but topics for examination may include: the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, the Uniform Commercial Code, state and federal consumer credit statutes, or consumer credit lending. In some years students may also be given the opportunity to focus on the intersection of commercial law and another substantive area of law. Students will present analyses of current case and statutory developments and an analytical paper.
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 961
PROPOSED START: S12012

40-04-212 FMEST 965
Estate Planning and Wealth Transfer Transactions II
ESTATE PLANNING II (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course is open only to third-year students. This course will examine particular estate planning techniques, such as appropriate uses of the applicable credit amount and the marital and charitable deductions. Also to be explored are various types of inter vivos trusts and other lifetime wealth transfer devices, valuation issues, estate planning issues confronting owners of closely held businesses, and issues unique to qualified retirement plans. Students are encouraged to take Advanced Federal Income Taxation prior to enrolling, but may take the two courses simultaneously.
PREREQUISITE: FMEST 964, TAX 950
PROPOSED START: S12012