APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Agricultural Sciences

34-03-001 Change Change program description. Decrease minimum number of credits required for associate degree from 68 credits to 63 credits. Add AN SC 001, 207, 208, 301, 305, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 322, 324, 327, AG 301W, AG BM 220, B A 241, 242, 243, ENT 313, 316, HORT 137, 138, M I S 204, MGMT 301; removed A S M 206, AG EC 208, 232, AN SC 007, 201, 202, B A 250, BIOL 110 GN, 220W, 230W, 240W, CHEM 011, ENGL 202A GWS, 202D GWS, ENT 012, HORT 430W, M I S 103, MGMT 100, PTYSC 201. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

Agricultural Business

PROFESSOR JILL L. FINDEIS, in charge, College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State University Park (2 AGB)
PROFESSOR JANELLE B. LARSON, in charge, Berks College

The Agricultural Business major helps prepare students for employment in commercial agriculture and businesses serving agriculture. Five options allow students to specialize in either Crop or Animal Production, Food Technology, Horticulture, or General Agribusiness Management, which provides training in management, business organization, and marketing.

The first two semesters are offered at selected locations, where students fulfill basic course requirements in accounting, business, English, and natural and social sciences. The second year at the University Park campus provides course work in livestock and crop production, food technology, horticulture, management, and agribusiness. Each option allows the student a choice of courses to satisfy special interests and needs. The Food Technology and Horticulture options can be completed at both University Park and at Penn State Berks, although some course substitutions may be necessary, as not all courses listed below are offered at both campuses.

For the Associate in Science degree in Agrcultural Business , a minimum of 63 credits is required depending on the option chosen.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(9 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR. Requirements for certain options also will fulfill other general education requirements.)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

ELECTIVES: 3-5 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 45-48 credits
(This includes 9 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 16 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3), CAS 100 GWS(3), ACCTG 211(4), AG BM 101 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
AG BM 200(3)[1] or MGMT 301(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 29-32 credits

ANIMAL PRODUCTION OPTION: (31-32 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
AGRO 028(3), AN SC 001(4)[1], A S M 101(3), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 102(3) or AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) or MKTG 221(3)
(Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits in animal science from AN SC 100(3), AN SC 207(2), AN SC 208(1), AN SC 301(3), AN SC 305(3), AN SC 306(3), AN SC 308(4), AN SC 309(4), AN SC 310(3), AN SC 311(3), AN SC 322(3), AN SC 324(3), and AN SC 327(3) (Note: some courses may have biology and/or chemistry prerequisites.) (Sem: 3-4)

CROP PRODUCTION OPTION: (30-31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
A S M 101(3), AGRO 028(3)[1], ENT 313(2) and ENT 316(1), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from agronomy, agroecosystems science, horticulture or turfgrass science. (Note: some may have biology and/or chemistry or other prerequisites.) (Sem: 3-4)

FOOD TECHNOLOGY OPTION: (29-30 credits)
(Note: some courses may have biology and/or chemistry prerequisites.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (23 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), FD SC 200(3)[1], FD SC 201(1), FD SC 205(3), FD SC 206(3), M I S 204(2), NUTR 251 GHA(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
AG BM 102(3) or AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) or MKTG 221(3)
(Sem: 3-4)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2)
(Sem: 3-4)

GENERAL OPTION: (30-31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
AG BM 102(3), AG BM 106(3), AGRO 028(3), SOILS 101 GN(3), A S M 101(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6-7 credits)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 220(3)[1]
or MKTG 220(3)[1], or MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 6 credits in agribusiness management or business (Sem: 3-4)
Select 3 credits in agronomy, animal science, agroecosystems science, horticulture, or other courses in agriculture. (Sem: 3-4)

HORTICULTURE OPTION: (30-31 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
HORT 101 GN(3)[1], HORT 202(3), SOILS 101 GN(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9-10 credits)
AG BM 102(3) or AG BM 220(3) or MKTG 220(3) or MKTG 221(3)
(Sem: 3-4)
HORT 137(3) or HORT 138(3)
(Sem: 3-4)
B A 243(4) or B LAW 243(3) or AG 301W(3) or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2)
(Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from horticulture, turfgrass science, agribusiness or business. (Note: some may have prerequisites.)


[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

34-03-002 A S M 491
Contextual Integration of Communication Skills for the Technical Workplace
TECH COMM SKILLS (2)
To develop corporate communication skills in technically focused students in a contextual manner.
PREREQUISITE: Junior level standing in A B E or A S M
CROSS LIST: A B E 491
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-003 A S M 492
Contextual Integration of Leadership Skills for the Technical Workplace
LEADERSHIP SKILLS (2)
To develop corporate leadership skills in technically focused students in a contextual manner.
PREREQUISITE: A S M 491, junior level standing in A B E or A S M
CROSS LIST: A B E 492
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-004 AN SC 215 (GS)
Pets in Society
PETS IN SOCIETY (3)
Introduction to the varied roles that companion animals play in human society and their impacts on human activity and well-being.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-005 PPATH 300 (GN)
Horticultural Crop Diseases
HORT CROP DISEASES (2)
Diseases of horticultural crops are examined stressing their cause, diagnosis, control and national and international importance.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in a biological science
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-006 SOILS 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-007 SOILS 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

34-03-008 GD 100 (GA)
Introduction to Graphic Design
INTRO GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)
A beginning level graphic design course. Instruction touches on the practice, theories, history and processes of the graphic design industry.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Capital College

COURSE ADDS

34-03-009 ACCT 461
Financial Statement Analysis
FIN STMT ANALYSIS (3)
The exploration of conventional and advanced methods of analyzing financial statements, including the assessment of earnings quality.
PREREQUISITE: FINAN 320
PROPOSED START: SP2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Communications

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-010 COMM 409
News Media Ethics
NEWS MEDIA ETHICS (3:3:0)
Ethical problems in the practice of journalism, advertising, and public relations; principal public criticisms of news media; case study approach.
APPROVED START: FA1986

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Ethical problems in the practice of journalism; principal public criticisms of news media; case study approach.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-011 COMM 409H
News Media Ethics
NEWS MEDIA ETHICS (3)
Ethical problems in the practice of journalism, advertising, and public relations; principal public criticisms of news media; case study approach.
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Ethical problems in the practice of journalism; principal public criticisms of news media; case study approach.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-012 ENNEC 100 (GS)
Minerals and Resources and the Global Community
MINERALS&RESOURCES (3:3:0)
Resource use decisions and their affect on the individual development and destinies of nations and groups; minerals in economic development and world history, in the global economy plus area studies.
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Introduction to Energy and Earth Sciences Economics (ENGY & ERH SCI ECO)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Resource use decisions and their effect on local, national, and global development.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-013 MNG 023
Mineral Land and Mine Surveying
LAND & MINE SURVEY (2)
Surveying theory and practice applied to mineral lands and mines, traversing, leveling, mapping, underground surveying, microcomputer drafting and graphics.
PREREQUISITE: E G 010; 1/2 unit of secondary school trigonometry
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: ED&G 100, EG T 101, or E G 010; 1/2 unit of secondary school trigonometry
PROPOSED START: FA2006

COURSE DROPS

34-03-014 MATSE 423
Phase Transformations in Metals and Alloys
PHASE TRANSFORM (4)
An introduction to phase equilibria, phase transformations and microstructural development in materials.
PREREQUISITE: MATSE 401, MATSE 430
PROPOSED START: SP2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Education

COURSE ADDS

34-03-015 INSYS 100 (GS;IL)
World Technologies and Learning
WRLD TECH (3)
This course examines the impact of learning technologies from email to online learning on world cultures from a socio-technical perspective.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-016 WF ED 450
Cultural Diversity in the Workplace
CULT DIV IN WKPLCE (3)
Provides opportunities for students to explore different cultures and mores that are changing the dynamics of the workplace.
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES CODE: USI
PROPOSED START: FA2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Engineering

34-03-017 Change name from Agricultural Architectural Engineering Technology to Building Engineering Technology. Change the name of one option from General to Architectural Engineering Technology. Change program description. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

Building Engineering Technology

PROFESSOR DHUSHY SATHIANATHAN, Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, Penn State University Park (2 BLET)
PROFESSOR TINA MERLI, Program Coordinator, Penn State Worthington Scranton
PROFESSOR DAVID MEREDITH, Program Coordinator, Penn State Fayette

This major is designed to provide technically trained personnel between the level of high school graduate and professional engineer or architect to support the architectural design/construction industry, and technical support firms.

Graduates of the Building Engineering Technology major may qualify for admission to baccalaureate degree majors in Environmental Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Structural Design and Construction Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Harrisburg.

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY OPTION: This option helps prepare students to translate sketches and design concepts into working drawings and specifications, and to work with architects, structural engineers, and all phases of the building/construction industry.

Graduates from the Architectural Engineering Technology option must:
I. Have the technical knowledge and skills to work in the professional sector and building industry.
II. Use critical thinking skills to solve complex and real world challenges and applications.
III. Communicate effectively using information technology when appropriate.
IV. Possess workplace skills needed to function in a business environment.
V. Continue to learn and adopt emerging technology in formal and informal settings.

BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY OPTION: This option helps prepare students for the heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry as system designers, equipment sales representatives, building automation supervisors, and indoor air quality specialists.

Graduates from the Building Environmental Systems Technology option must:
I. Have the technical knowledge and skills to work in the professional sector of the HVAC&R Industry.
II. Use critical thinking skills to solve complex real world problems and applications.
III. Communicate effectively using information technology when appropriate.
IV. Possess the workplace skills needed to function well in a business environment.
V. Continue to learn and adapt emerging technologies in either formal or informal settings.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Building Engineering Technology, a minimum of 72 credits is required. These options are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: 410-347-7700, or www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 63-64 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 42 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (42 credits)
AE T 101(3)[1], AE T 102(3), AE T 103(3), CMPSC 101 GQ(3), EG T 101(1), EG T 102(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), MATH 081 GQ(3), MATH 082 GQ(3), PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
AE T 204(3), AE T 210W(3)[1], CAS 100 GWS(3), MATH 083 GQ(4), PHYS 151 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21-22 credits

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY OPTION: (21-22 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (16 credits)
AE T 113(2), MCH T 111(3) (Sem: 1-2)
AE T 206(2), AE T 207(3), AE T 214(3)[1], AE T 215(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (5-6 credits)
Select 5-6 credits from the following technical courses: AE T 212(3), AE T 297(1-9), CHEM 011(3), CMPSC 102(3), EE T 100(3), EG T 201(2), EG T 297(1-9), IE T 105(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 231(2), MATH 250(3), MCH T 213(3), ME T 207(3), ME T 281(4) (Sem: 3-4)

BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY OPTION: ( 21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES(15 credits)
AE T 121(2), ME T 281(4) (Sem: 1-2)
AE T 227(3), AE T 228(3), AE T 229(3) (Sem: 3-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following technical courses: AE T 212(3), AE T 297(1-9), CHEM 011(3), CMPSC 102(3), EE T 100(3), EG T 201(2), EG T 297(1-9), IE T 105(2), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 231(2), MATH 250(3), MCH T 213(3), ME T 207(3), ME T 281(4) (Sem: 3-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

34-03-018 Change grade of C or better course requirements to apply only to MATH 251, NUC E 301, 302, 309, 430, 450.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

Nuclear Engineering

University Park, College of Engineering (NUC E)

PROFESSOR RICHARD C. BENSON H. Joseph Sommer, Interim Head, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering
PROFESSOR JACK S. BRENIZER, JR., Program Chair, Nuclear Engineering Program

Nuclear engineering is the practical application of nuclear science for the benefit of humankind. In this context, graduates of nuclear-engineering programs are generally qualified to obtain positions primarily in the nuclear-power industry, in civilian and military branches of the government, in the applications of radiation, radioactivity, and nuclear science to other branches of engineering and to enter graduate and professional degree programs in these areas.

The undergraduate nuclear-engineering major represents the first comprehensive component of professional education and development for the students who participate in and complete this baccalaureate-degree program. The overall educational objective of the engineering component of our program is to prepare the students so that following graduation they will function effectively in the marketplace. The first two years of the program stress fundamentals in mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer programming, and engineering sciences such as mechanics, materials, and thermodynamics. The last two years provide the breadth and depth in nuclear science, behavior of heat and fluids, reactor theory and engineering, and radiation measurement. The laboratory work includes experiments using the University's 1,000-kilowatt research reactor. Engineering design is incorporated in many courses from the freshman year to the senior year, but is particularly emphasized in the senior capstone design course, which integrates the critical elements of reactor theory, reactor engineering, safety considerations and economic optimization into a reactor design. In addition to this core technical curriculum we emphasize the broad liberal education the university graduates need, the need for life-long learning, the impact of engineering on society, and the need to communicate technical information to an international and multicultural audience.

In the technical part of the curriculum, we emphasize power engineering, which refers to complex systems used to generate electricity. Because our emphasis in power engineering is strong and because a shortage for expertise in power engineering exists in the industry, generally the industry values our graduates highly. Many graduates are employed by electric power companies that use nuclear power plants, or by companies that help service and maintain those plants. They use their knowledge of engineering principles, radioactive decay, interactions of radiation with matter, and nuclear reactor behavior to help assure that the power plants meet the demand for reliable, economic electricity while ensuring a safe environment. To do this, graduates must be problem solvers who can develop and use complex computer models and sophisticated monitoring systems, design systems to handle radioactive waste, determine if the materials in the plant are becoming brittle or corroded, or manage the fuel in the reactor to get the maximum energy from it.

Other graduates work in industries that use radioactivity or radiation to detect problems or monitor processes. Jobs are also found in branches of the government as designers of the next generation of reactors for submarines, aircraft carriers, or space probes, or to manage and clean up contaminated wastes. They could also be involved with regulation of nuclear power or radiation uses, or in research to develop advanced technologies that will be used in next-generation power plants. Graduates who want to further their education in the fields of health physics, radiation biology, or nuclear medical applications find this degree to be a useful preparation.

Within two to three years of graduation, the majority of our B.S. graduates are expected to be working in the power engineering area or pursuing advanced degrees. Some graduates will be working in nuclear science and other branches of nuclear engineering. Graduates of this program have established strong records of achievement at all technical and managerial levels in industry and government. We expect that other areas besides power engineering may grow in importance, and that, in general, the needs of our constituents may change. Because of this, we constantly assess and review the needs of our undergraduate students and their most frequent employers and use this feedback to consider revisions to our curriculum so that it is responsive to the needs of our constituents.

For the B.S. degree in Nuclear Engineering, a minimum of 129 credits is required. This baccalaureate program in Nuclear Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone 410-347-7700; or www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem:1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(27 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 111 credits
(This includes 27 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 9 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (89 credits)
CHEM 012 GN(3), CHEM 014 GN(1), ED&G 100(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
E MCH 011(3), E MCH 012(3), E MCH 013(3), M E 030(3), MATH 230(4), MATH 251(4)[1], PHYS 214 GN(2) (Sem: 3-4)
E E 305(3), E MCH 215(2), E MCH 216(1), ENGL 202C GWS(3), M E 033(3), M E 412(3), NUC E 301(4)[1], NUC E 302(4)[1], NUC E 309(3)[1], NUC E 310W(2), NUC E 450(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
NUC E 403(3), NUC E 430(3)[1], NUC E 431W(4), NUC E 451(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar (Sem: 1-2)
ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), ECON 014 GS(3) or ENNEC 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100A GWS(3) or CAS 100B GWS(3) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 201C GQ(3) or CMPSC 201F GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)
Select 6 credits in nuclear engineering courses from NUC E 405, NUC E 408, NUC E 409, NUC E 420, NUC E 428, NUC E 444, NUC E 445, NUC E 460, NUC E 470, NUC E 490, or 500-level NUC E courses with approval of adviser (Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Select 3 credits in technical courses from program list of supporting courses and related areas (Students may apply 3 credits of ROTC.) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

34-03-019 Change. Reduce the minimum number of credits required for the major from 130 credits to 128 credits. [Program code was previously changed to SUR E as a result of the earlier name change.] Add SUR 335 and 485; remove EG T 101, 102, GEOG 120 GS, M I S 103, PHYS 150 GN, 151, 214. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

Surveying Engineering

University College
University Park, College of Engineering (SUR E)

PROFESSOR DHUSHY SATHIANATHAN, Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, Penn State University Park
PROFESSOR THOMAS A. SEYBERT, Program Chair, Wilkes-Barre Campus

The Surveying Engineering major provides a basic undergraduate education required for private and public service in the profession of surveying. Particular emphasis is placed on fundamental surveying principles required in all areas of surveying. Instruction is provided in the main divisions of surveying, including land surveying, mapping, photogrammetry, data analysis and adjustment, geodesy and map projection coordinate systems, remote sensing, geographic information systems, and land development. Students study various data collection techniques using surveying tools including total stations, levels, softcopy photogrammetry, satellite imagery, and the global positioning system (GPS). They also study legal principles related to land surveying, professional ethics, applications for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in surveying, and data management techniques. Through the use of elective courses, students can specialize in the areas of GIS, photogrammetry, remote sensing, land surveying, and geodesy. Through the use of projects and capstone courses students will design measurement systems, alignments, land information systems, and land development.

Specific educational objectives of the program are designed so that the graduate will have:

For the B. S. degree a minimum of 128 credits is required. The baccalaureate program in Surveying is accredited by the Applied Science Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: 410-347-7700, or www.abet.org. The Surveying program was renamed to Surveying Engineering effective Fall 2004. Surveying Engineering will be reviewed for accreditation as Surveying Engineering during Fall 2005.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 107 credits
(This includes 24 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (72 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], MATH 220 GQ(2), SUR 111(3)[1], SUR 112(3), SUR 162(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
CAS 100A GWS(3), CMPSC 201C GQ(3), MATH 230(4), MATH 251(4), STAT 401(3), SUR 222(3), SUR 241(3)[1], SUR 262(2) (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), SUR 272(3)[1], SUR 341(3), SUR 351(3), SUR 362(3), SUR 372W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)
SUR 441(3), SUR 471(3), SUR 482(3), SUR 490(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (26 credits)
Select 1 credit of First-Year Seminar
ED&G 100(3) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 012 GN(3) or GEOG 010 GN(3) and PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2) (Sem: 1-4)
ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits, from SUR 313(3), SUR 325(3), SUR 335(3), SUR 375(2), SUR 445(3), SUR 455(3), SUR 465(3), SUR 485(3) (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from department list of technical electives (Sem: 5-6, 9-10)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

34-03-020 A B E 491
Contextual Integration of Communication Skills for the Technical Workplace
TECH COMM SKILLS (2)
To develop corporate communication skills in technically focused students in a contextual manner.
PREREQUISITE: Junior level standing in A B E or A S M
CROSS LIST: A S M 491
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-021 A B E 492
Contextual Integration of Leadership Skills for the Technical Workplace
LEADERSHIP SKILLS (2)
To develop corporate leadership skills in technically focused students in a contextual manner.
PREREQUISITE: A B E 491, junior level standing in A B E or A S M
CROSS LIST: A S M 492
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-022 CSE 121 (GQ)
Introduction to Programming Techniques
INTRO PROGMG TECH (3)
Design and implementation of algorithms. Structured programming. Problem solving techniques. Introduction to a high-level language, including arrays, procedures, and recursion.
PREREQUISITE: 2 entrance units in mathematics
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-023 CSE 122 (GQ)
Intermediate Programming
INTERMED PROGRMG (3)
Object-oriented programming, recursion, fundamental data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, and graphs), the basics of algorithmic analysis, and an introduction to the principles of language translation.
PREREQUISITE: CSE 121
PROPOSED START: SP2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Health and Human Development

COURSE ADDS

34-03-024 CSD 494H
Senior Honors Thesis
HONORS THESIS (1-6)
Independent study related to a student's interests directed by a faculty supervisor and culminating in the production of a thesis.
PREREQUISITE: Approval of honors thesis advisor.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-025 BB H 302 (US)
Diversity and Health
DIVERSITY & HLTH (3)
Examine the relationship of diverse personal and sociocultural factors to health, like socioeconomic class, race-ethnicity, gender, age, and sexual orientation.
PREREQUISITE: PSY 002 or SOC 001
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: AAA S 302
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-026 HD FS 416
Racial and Ethnic Diversity and the American Family
RACE/ETH DIV & FAM (3)
This course will explore the nature and determinants of racial and ethnic variation in family processes in the United States.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in sociology
CROSS LIST: SOC 411
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES CODE: US
PROPOSED START: SP2005

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of the Liberal Arts

34-03-027 Change. Add GER 208Y IL, 344 IL, 412 IL; remove GER 302W. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

German

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GERBA)

PROFESSOR ADRIAN WANNER, Head

For the B.A. degree in German, a minimum of 124 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 15-18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 37-40 credits[1]

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 16 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
GER 301 IL(3), GER 310 IL(3), GER 344 IL(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GER 401Y IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
GER 201 IL(4) or GER 208Y IL(4) (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21-24 credits

GERMAN STUDIES OPTION: (24 credits)
The German Studies option is designed to acquaint the student with the development of the cultures and civilization in the German-speaking countries. The option’s interdisciplinary approach provides a general background and specific language skills that can serve as a basis for careers in business, civil service, journalism, law, and graduate work in many areas.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
GER 200 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GER 440 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
GER 431 IL(3) or GER 432 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select an additional 6 credits in German literature or culture at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 credits related to German Studies at the 400 level, in consultation with the adviser, from history, philosophy, political science, or art history (Sem: 5-8)

GERMAN LITERATURE OPTION: (21 credits)
The German Literature option will serve students interested in the literatures of the German-speaking countries and is recommended for fields such as art, comparative literature, history, philosophy, and the performing arts.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
GER 431 IL(3), GER 432 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
Select an additional 15 credits in German at the 300 or 400 level, including a minimum of 9 credits in German literature (Sem: 5-8)

TEACHING OPTION: (21 credits)
The Teaching option is designed to prepare students for the teaching of German in secondary schools. The number of elective credits enables students to study an additional foreign language, thus enhancing their teaching opportunities.

Students planning to teach in public schools should schedule the appropriate courses leading to certification in consultation with an adviser in the College of Education. For the Pennsylvania teaching certificate, 41 additional credits, which includes including 15 credits of student teaching, are required.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
GER 200 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GER 411(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15 credits)
GER 412 IL(3) or GER 430 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
GER 431 IL(3) or GER 432 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 9 additional credits in German at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

34-03-028 Change. Add GER 208Y IL and 344 IL; remove GER 302W. Change "Note" per underlining. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

German

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GERBS)

PROFESSOR ADRIAN WANNER, Head

The B. S. degree in German is designed to allow students to combine fluency in the German language and culture with other academic disciplines. The German-Business option develops basic German business-communication skills as well as fundamental knowledge of German economics. The German-Engineering option has a required overseas study and internship component.

Courses in German literature and culture are essential to all German B. S. options, and students in the German-Business option are encouraged to participate in the University's study abroad programs in Germany.

For the B. S. degree in German, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(0-13 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 23-25 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 55-66 credits[1]
(This includes 0-13 credits of General Education courses: 0-6 credits of GS courses; 0-3 credits of GWS courses; 0-4 credits of GQ courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 28 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (21 credits)
GER 200 GH;IL(3) (Sem: 1-4)
GER 301 IL(3), GER 310 IL(3), GER 344 IL(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GER 308Y IL(3), GER 401Y IL(3), GER 408(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
GER 201 IL(4) or GER 208Y IL(4) (Sem: 1-4)
GER 431 IL(3) or GER 432 IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 27 or 38 credits

GERMAN BUSINESS OPTION: (38 credits)
This option is designed to introduce German majors to the principles of business administration. The curriculum combines an exposure to managerial processes with foreign language competency in German.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (31 credits)
ACCTG 211(4), ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), I B 303 IL(3), MGMT 100(3) (Sem: 3-4)
ECON 333 GS(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), FIN 100(3), I B 403(3), MKTG 221(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
MS&IS 200(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-8)
Select an additional 3 credits of German courses at the 400 level (Sem: 5-8)

GERMAN ENGINEERING OPTION: (27 credits)
(Open only to students enrolled in an engineering major.)
This option is designed to combine the study of German and Engineering in order to internationalize and enhance the study and practice of the engineering profession.

PRESCRIBED COURSES (6 credits)
GER 399 IL(3), GER 499 IL(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (21 credits)
Select 21 credits of engineering courses in consultation with the engineering adviser (Sem: 3-10)

Note: The German Engineering Option is open only to Engineering majors. A work experience in a German-speaking country may be substituted for GER 399 or GER 499. The work experience may take the form of an internship (ENGR 195I) or part of a cooperative education sequence (ENGR 295I, ENGR 395I, or ENGR 495I). If the number of work-experience credits for which a student registered is less than 6, the difference in the number of credits must be earned by taking additional courses in consultation with the German Department.

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

34-03-029 Change description. Add GER 208Y IL, 308Y IL, 344 IL; remove GER 302W. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

German Minor

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (GER)

PROFESSOR ADRIAN J. WANNER, in charge

The German minor is designed for students who want to study the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking countries in order to broaden their horizons and meet an increasing demand for people with foreign language skills and international expertise. German is one of the most important languages in Western Europe, being the mother tongue of approximately 100 million Europeans, and in the countries of Eastern Europe it is the most important foreign language of business and commerce.

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures offers a wide array of courses in German language, literature and culture as well as in professional and business German, allowing students great independence in shaping their own academic program. Students are encouraged to take advantage of Penn State's study abroad opportunities, which include semester and year programs in Freiburg, Berlin, and Vienna plus summer and year programs in Marburg.

The German minor opens employment opportunities for its graduates in fields and professions where proficiency in one or more foreign languages is desirable or required, i.e., secondary and higher education, government, business, the media, and public relations.

All courses in the minor must be taught in German and the students must receive a grade of C or better.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES: (3 credits)
GER 301 IL(3) (Sem: 3-5)

ADDITIONAL COURSES: (10 credits)
GER 201 IL(4) or GER 208Y IL(4)
(Sem: 3-5)
Select 6 credits from GER 308Y IL(3), GER 310 IL(3) and GER 344 IL(3)
(Sem: 4-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (6 credits)
Select 6 credits of 400-level GER courses (Sem: 5-8)

34-03-030 Change. Add PL SC 410, 434, and 456 as new courses and other courses as listed by underlining; move PL SC 001, 418, 442 from Prescribed Courses to Additional or Supporting Courses. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2006

International Politics

University Park, College of the Liberal Arts (INTPL)

PROFESSOR DONNA BAHRY, Head

This major, administered within the Department of Political Science, is designed to provide students with a broad, comprehensive education in international relations, and foreign policy. While the bulk of the required courses are in the areas of international and comparative politics, the curriculum also comprises courses in international economics, political geography, and history as major requirements. The major provides an opportunity to study in detail a variety of crucial contemporary issues-conflict among and within nations, democratization, economic and political globalization, regional conflicts and the emerging importance of non-state actors--as well as analysis of foreign and economic policy making in the United States and other nations.

The major is intended to help prepare students for career opportunities with the U.S. government executive agencies dealing with foreign affairs, national security, and the international economy; with relevant committees of the U.S. Congress; with multinational corporations, banks, and consulting firms; and with international organizations. The major also provides preparation for law and business schools and for graduate study in political science, and international relations.

For the B. A. degree in International Politics, a minimum of 123 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(3 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

ELECTIVES: 18 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 39 credits[1]
(This includes 3 credits of GS General Education courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
PL SC 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (24 credits)
Select 3 credits from PL SC 001 GS(3) or PL SC 007 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits from PL SC 003 GS(3)
, PL SC 020 GS(3), PL SC 022(3), PL SC 145(3), PL SC 150(3) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 6 credits from PL SC 410(3), PL SC 412(3), PL SC 418(3), PL SC 442(3)
(Sem: 1-4)
Select 3-6 credits (only 3 credits may be below the 400 level) from
HIST 120 GS;IL(3), HIST 142 GS;IL(3), HIST 143 GH;IL(3), HIST 144 GS;US;IL(3), HIST 173 GH;IL(3), HIST 175 GH;IL(3), HIST 179 GH;IL(3), HIST 181 GH;IL(3), HIST 192 GH;IL(3), HIST 420 IL(3), HIST 423 IL(3), HIST 430 IL(3), HIST 452 US;IL(3), HIST 467 US;IL(3), HIST 468 IL(3), HIST 473 IL(3), HIST 479 IL(3), HIST 481 IL(3), HIST 486 IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3-6 credits (only 3 credits may be below the 300 level) from ECON 002 GS(3), ECON 004 GS(3), ECON 333 GS(3) or I B 303 IL(3) (Sem: 1-8)
Select 3-6 credits (only 3 credits may be below the 300 level) from GEOG 103 GS;IL(3), GEOG 124 GS;IL(3),GEOG 128 GS;IL(3), GEOG 402(3), GEOG 406(3), GEOG 408W(3), GEOG 410(3), GEOG 413(3), GEOG 442(3), GEOG 443(3), GEOG 444(3), GEOG 454(3), GEOG 455(3), GEOG 460 US(3), GEOG 470 US;IL(3), GEOG 480(3), GEOG 481(3) (Sem: 1-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
Select 0-12 credits from 400-level political science courses in International Relations or Comparative Politics (excluding courses taken to fulfill other requirements in the major): PL SC 412(3), PL SC 413(3), PL SC 414(3), PL SC 415(3), PL SC 418(3), PL SC 422(3), PL SC 434(3), PL SC 437(3), PL SC 438(3), PL SC 439(3), PL SC 441(3), PL SC 442(3), PL SC 451(3), PL SC 452(3), PL SC 453(3), PL SC 454 IL(3), PL SC 455(3), PL SC 456(3), PL SC 457(3-6), PL SC 458(3-6), PL SC 459(3), PL SC 466(3), PL SC 467(3), PL SC 468(3) (Sem: 3-8) and/or
Select 0-3 credits in Political Methodology PL SC 408(3) or PL SC 409(3) (Sem: 3-8) and/or
Select 0-12 credits of foreign language courses beyond the 12th-credit level (9 of these credits must be at the 400 level. With adviser approval, all 12 credits may be below the 400 level. (Sem: 3-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

34-03-031 AAA S 302 (US)
Diversity and Health
DIVESITY & HLTH (3)
Exam the relationship of diverse personal and sociocultural factors to health, like socioeconomic class, race-ethnicity, gender, age, and sexual orientation.
PREREQUISITE: PSY 002 or SOC 001
CROSS LIST: BB H 302
PROPOSED START: FA2006

34-03-032 ENGL 233 (GN;GH)
Chemistry and Literature
CHEM AND LIT (3)
Exploration of key concepts of chemistry, the reciprocal influence of chemistry and literature through history, and the relationship of science to society, culture, and values.
CROSS LIST: CHEM 233
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-033 ENGL 301M
Honors Seminar in English: Literature Before 1800
HONORS COURSE (3-12)
Reading, group discussions, and oral and written reports on various specific authors and literary works.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030; approval of the departmental Honors Committee
PROPOSED START: FA2005

34-03-034 ENGL 302M
Honors Seminar in English: Literature After 1800
HONORS COURSE (3-12)
Reading, group discussions, and oral and written reports on various specific authors and literary works.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030; approval of the departmental Honors Committee
PROPOSED START: FA2005

34-03-035 ENGL 303M
Honors Seminar in English: American Literature & Culture
HONORS COURSE (3-12)
Reading, group discussions, and oral and written reports on various specific authors and literary works.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030; approval of the departmental Honors Committee
PROPOSED START: FA2005

34-03-036 ENGL 304M
Honors Seminar in English: Creative Writing
HONORS COURSE (3-12)
Reading, group discussions, and oral and written reports on various specific authors and literary works.
PREREQUISITE: ENGL 015 or ENGL 030; approval of the departmental Honors Committee
PROPOSED START: FA2005

34-03-037 RL ST 108
Muhammad and the Qur'an
MUHAMMAD AND QURAN (3)
History of the Qur'an and its interpretation by the early Muslim community; life of Muhammad and his role within Islam
PROPOSED START: SP2006

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-038 GER 201 (IL)
Conversation and Composition
CONVERSA/COMPOSIT (4:4:0)
Continuation of GER 003; emphasis on reading, writing, and conversational skills; course utilizes short literary selections, a concise novel, videos.
PREREQUISITE: GER 003 or GER 012
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: GER 003 or GER 008
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-039 GER 208Y (IL)
Business German
BUSINESS GERMAN (4:4:0)
Intermediate Business German.
PREREQUISITE: GER 008
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: GER 003 or GER 008
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-040 GER 301 (IL)
Intermediate Conversation and Composition
INT CONVERS/COMPOS (3:3:0)
Intensive practice in spoken and written German through readings, discussions, video, and composition.
PREREQUISITE: GER 201
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: GER 201 or GER 208
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-041 GER 308Y (IL)
German Business Communication
GER BUS COMMU (3:3:0)
Development of German commerce and industry; extensive practice in the major forms of business communications such as business correspondence.
PREREQUISITE: GER 201
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: GER 301
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-042 GER 344 (IL)
Intermediate German Culture
INT GER CULTURE (3:3:0)
An overview of German culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Conducted in German.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: GER 301 or GER 308Y
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: GER 301
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-043 SOC 411
Racial and Ethnic Diversity and the American Family
RACE/ETH DIV & FAM (3)
This course will explore the nature and determinants of racial and ethnic variation in family processes in the United States.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in sociology
CROSS LIST: HD FS 416
APPROVED START: SP2005

NEW
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES CODE: US
PROPOSED START: SP2005

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Eberly College of Science

COURSE ADDS

34-03-044 CHEM 233 (GN;GH)
Chemistry and Literature
CHEM AND LIT (3)
Exploration of key concepts of chemistry, the reciprocal influence of chemistry and literature through history, and the relationship of science to society, culture, and values.
CROSS LIST: ENGL 233
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-045 FRNSC 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2005

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
University College

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-046 P T 270A
Pathophysiology
Pathophysiology (3)
Introduction to medical and post-operative conditions and/or disease states most frequently treated by physical therapy modalities.
PREREQUISITE: a grade of C or better in BIO 141, BIOL 142, P T 100, P T 384
APPROVED START: FA2005

NEW
ADD UNITED STATES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES CODE: IL
PROPOSED START: FA2005


APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

COURSE ADDS

34-03-047 EDTHP 520
Perspectives on Contemporary School Reform
PERSP ON SCHL REFM (3)
Examination of contemporary U.S. school reform, with a focus on contrasting theoretical perspectives and the application of policy analysis principles.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-048 EDTHP 525
Alternative Assessment of National Educational and Health Policies
ALT ED POLICY (3)
Overview of alternative research strategies in education, nursing and health education studies used to study impact of national policies.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-049 EDTHP 527
Testing and Educational Equity
TEST & ED EQUITY (3)
This course considers testing, the reasons that policymakers have widely adopted testing, and implications of testing for educational equity.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-050 I E 567
Distributed Systems and Control
DIST SYS CONTROL (3)
Advances in distributed control and decision-making in enterprises and supply chains with emphasis on computing, algorithms, and dynamics.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-051 MATSE 506
Interfacial Electrochemical Processes
INTERFAC ELECTROCHEM (3)
Survey of thermodynamic and kinetic fundamentals of electrochemical processes at interfaces.
PROPOSTED START: SP2006

34-03-052 MATSE 555
Polymer Physics I
POLYMER PHYSICS I (3)
Introduction to the fundamental concepts needed to understand the physics applicable to polymer melts, solutions and gels.
CROSS LIST: PHYS 555
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-053 P M E 520
Multiphase Systems Analysis
MULTIPHASE SYS ANA (3)
Apply principles of thermodynamics of surface and colloid phenomena in multiphase systems to solve industrial problems.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-054 P M E 590
Colloquium
COLLOQUIUM (1)
Course teaches students how to engineer their technical presentations.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-055 PHYS 555
Polymer Physics I
POLYMER PHYSICS I (3)
Introduction to the fundamental concepts needed to understand the physics applicable to polymer melts, solutions and gels.
CROSS LIST: MATSE 555
PROPOSED START: SP2006

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
34-03-056 ADTED 602
College Teaching
COLLEGE TEACHING (3)
Experience in teaching in the Adult Education Program.
PREREQUISITE: Advanced standing in the Adult Education graduate program.
APPROVED START: S12004

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-3
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
34-03-057 HES 570
Health Care Economics and Policy
HEALTH ECON (3)
This is an introductory course that surveys the major United States health policy issues as background for both health services research and clinical investigation.
PREREQUISITE: enrollment in the Master's Program in Health Evaluation Sciences or at the discretion of the instructor
APPROVED START: FA2000

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Health Economics and Economic Evaluation
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: An introductory course on applied economic evaluation, with emphasis on micro-economic theory, cost-effectiveness and economic modeling.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: enrollment in HES graduate program or discretion of the instructor
PROPOSED START: FA2006

COURSE DROPS

34-03-058 KINES 520
Psychology of Sport
PSY OF SPORT (3)
Study of man's psychological behavior in sport and physical activity; development of somatopsychic theory of physical activity.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credits in psychology
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-059 KINES 535
International Sport
INTNL SPORT (3)
An analysis of sport and physical education in other cultures and a comparison with the U.S.A.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-060 KINES 568
Applied Skeletal Muscle Physiology
APPL MUSCLE PHSIO (3)
An in-depth advanced understanding of the structural, morphological, and biochemical functions of muscle and changes with exercise.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 472, BIOL 473
CROSS LIST: PHSIO 568
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-061 KINES 569
Laboratory Procedures in Applied Physiology
LAB PROC APP PHSIO (3)
Laboratory based study of procedures used to measure physiological and metabolic responses and adaptations to exercise, environmental, and dietary
interventions.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 472
CROSS LIST: PHSIO 569
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-062 KINES 576
Internship in Adapted Physical Education
INTERN ADAPT P E (3)
Supervised internship in recreational, educational, or clinical situations; assessment of motor performances, evaluation of activities, and staff conference participation.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-063 KINES 580
Analysis of Body Composition
ANALYSIS BODY COMP (3)
Study of the methods employed in the analysis of body composition.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 472 or 3 credits in physiology at the 400 or 500 level
CROSS LIST: PHSIO 580
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-064 KINES 581
Biomechanics
BIOMECHANICS (3)
Kinetic and kinematic analyses of human motion utilizing electromyography and stroboscopic-photographic techniques.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 480, KINES 484
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-065 KINES 582
Sport Biomechanics
SPORT BIOMECHANICS (3)
Analysis of sports movements utilizing cinematography, electronic devices, and related research instruments.
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-066 KINES 583
Survey of Locomotion Studies
LOCOMOTION STUDIES (3)
Mechanical/physiological factors constraining movement; solutions to overcome these constraints; muscle mechanics. Locomotion studies, neural control, and gait analysis covered.
PREREQUISITE: E MCH 011, E MCH 012, I E 553
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-067 KINES 584
Electromyographic Kinesiology
EMG KINES (3)
The theoretical background and practical application of electromyography in understanding human movement and the function of muscles.
PREREQUISITE: KINES 480, KINES 484
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-068 KINES 585
Environmental Physiology
ENVIRON PHYSIOLOGY (3)
Human physiological response and adaptation to environmental (heat, cold, altitude) extremes.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in physiology at the 400 or 500 level
CROSS LIST: PHSIO 585
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-069 PHSIO 568
Applied Skeletal Muscle Physiology
APPL MUSCLE PHSIO (3)
An in-depth advanced understanding of the structural, morphological, and biochemical functions of muscle and changes with exercise.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 472, BIOL 473
CROSS LIST: KINES 568
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-070 PHSIO 569
Laboratory Procedures in Applied Physiology
LAB PROC APP PHSIO (3)
Laboratory based study of procedures used to measure physiological and metabolic responses and adaptations to exercise, environmental, and dietary
interventions.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 472
CROSS LIST: KINES 569
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-071 PHSIO 580
Analysis of Body Composition
ANALYSIS BODY COMP (3)
Study of the methods employed in the analysis of body composition.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 472 or 3 credits in physiology at the 400 or 500 level
CROSS LIST: KINES 580
PROPOSED START: SP2006

34-03-072 PHSIO 585
Environmental Physiology
ENVIRON PHYSIOLOGY (3)
Human physiological response and adaptation to environmental (heat, cold, altitude) extremes.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in physiology at the 400 or 500 level
CROSS LIST: KINES 585
PROPOSED START: SP2006

APPENDIX B
GRADUATE
Post-Baccalaureate Credit Certificate Programs

34-03-073 Add new postbaccalaureate credit certificate program.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2006

Advanced Graduate Studies in Psychology: Applications in Clinical Psychology

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Barbara A. Bremer, Ph.D.
W157 Olmsted Building
Penn State Harrisburg
Telephone: 717-948-6362
Fax: 717-948-6519
E-mail: bab12@psu.edu

The certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Psychology: Applications in Clinical Psychology is treatment oriented and is intended to prepare mental health counselors to work in community mental health settings. The four courses will provide exposure to major subfields of applied clinical psychology, to enhance training received in a traditional masters program. This program of study will enhance mental health professionals' skills in providing services for individuals and families coping with several psychological issues such as relationship difficulties, depression, decision-making, trauma, anxiety, custody issues, or adjustment.

Admission Requirements (including completion of a baccalaureate degree) as applicable:
Students must have obtained a master's degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education in clinical or counseling psychology, or be concurrently enrolled as a degree student in Penn State Harrisburg's Applied Clinical Psychology master's program. For students currently enrolled in the master's program in Applied Clinical Psychology at Penn State Harrisburg, the certificate will be awarded upon completion of the 12 credits required for the certificate. The certificate cannot be awarded prior to completion of the master's degree. Course work counting for a graduate or undergraduate degree may not also be used to fulfill the requirements for the certificate.

Required Courses

COUNSELOR EDUCATION (CN ED)
505. Foundations of Career Development and Counseling Information(3)

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)
515. Clinical Health Psychology(3)
525. Forensic Psychology(3)
572. Neuropsychological Assessment(3)

If one of the required subdisciplines of applied clinical psychology was included in a student's masters program, the program will permit the student to select a substitute course that would provide the student with exposure to an area to which the student was not exposed in her or his masters program. Students, with program permission may substitute a 500-level psychology course, such as those listed below, for a required course she or he had previously taken in a masters program.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

ADULT EDUCATION (ADTED) course list

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC) course list

Effective Date: Spring Semester 2006
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2011