APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Agricultural Sciences


35-02-001 Change. Increase the minimum number of credits required for the minor from 18 credits to 19 credits. Add COMM 160. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Agricultural Communications Minor

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (AGCOM)

PROFESSOR JOAN S. THOMSON, in charge

Through the Department of Agricultural and Extension Education, this interdisciplinary program of study is designed to introduce majors in the College of Agricultural Sciences to the skills and professional practices in communications and to the interdependence between communications and society. A grade of C or better is required in every course used to satisfy the requirements for the minor.

Students are required to complete a total of 19 credits, including 6 credits at the 400 level.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 19 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (7 credits)
COMM 160(1) (Sem: 1-2)
COMM 260W(3) (Sem: 3-4)
AGCOM 362W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 3-6 credits from AG ED (EXTED) 330W(3), AG ED (EXTED) 440(3), or AGCOM 495(1-3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3-6 credits from COMM 180 GS(3), COMM 283W(3), COMM 401(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 405(3), COMM 409(3), COMM 411(3), COMM 413W(3), or COMM 460W(3) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits from COMM 401(3), COMM 403(3), COMM 405(3), COMM 409(3), or COMM 413W(3) (Sem: 5-8)

35-02-002 Change. Decrease the minimum number of credits required for Watershed Management Option from 130 credits to 121 credits. Add BIOL 220, W F S 435/ERM 435, MICRB 201, SOILS 450; move PL SC 001; remove AG BM 200, BIOL 435, ECON 004, MICRB 400, MGMT 100, R SOC 417, SOC 446. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Forest Science

University Park, College of Agricultural Sciences (FORSC)

PROFESSOR PAUL R. BLANKENHORN, Program Coordinator

The mission of the B.S. program in Forest Science is to help students develop the knowledge, skills, and professional ethics for understanding and managing forest ecosystems and living as responsible members of society.

The Forest Science major provides for the education necessary for students to pursue professional careers in one of the following options: (1) Forest Biology, (2) Forest Management, (3) Urban Forestry, and (4) Watershed Management. These options also will help prepare students for graduate studies in continuing professional education.

FOREST BIOLOGY OPTION: This option provides a strong background in the biological and ecological aspects of contemporary forestry and establishes a sound foundation for professional employment and graduate-level study in forest and environmental sciences.

FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option provides professional training in the management of forest lands consistent with the needs of ownership objectives. Employment opportunities include forest management positions with public agencies, industry, and private consulting.

URBAN FORESTRY OPTION: This option helps prepare students to manage community trees and green spaces. It emphasizes technical expertise, communication abilities, and skills for working with diverse people. Employment opportunities include municipalities, arboricultural companies, utilities, and government agencies.

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option focuses on water resources and the integrated management of natural resources with emphasis on water. Graduates qualify for federal employment as hydrologists and for water-related careers in municipal watershed management, state and local government, and environmental/engineering consulting.

For the B.S. degree in Forest Science, a minimum of 129 credits is required for the Forest Biology, Forest Management, and Urban Forestry options, and a minimum of 121 credits for the Watershed Management option. Students should be aware that completion of the Forest Science degree in four years requires enrollment at the University Park Campus beginning the fall semester of the sophomore year.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(21-24 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 1-4 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 98-103 credits
(This includes 21-24 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3-6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 42-43 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (29 credits)
BIOL 110 GN(4), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), ECON 002 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
FOR 200W(3), FOR 203(2)[1], SOILS 101 GN(3), STAT 240 GQ(3), W P 203(1)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), FOR 308(3)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10 credits)
AEE 440(3), CAS 211(3), CAS 213(3), CAS 250(3), CAS 252(3), or CAS 352(3) (Sem: 5-6)
MATH 110 GQ(4), MATH 140 GQ(4), or MATH 140B GQ(4) (Sem: 1-2)
AEE 440(3), ENGL 215(3), ENGL 416(3-6), ENGL 418(3-6), or ENGL 419(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3-4 credits)
Select a minimum of 3 credits from the following list of courses: CMPSC 100(3), CMPSC 101 GQ(3), or CMPSC 203 GQ(4) (Sem: 3-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 56-60 credits

FOREST BIOLOGY OPTION: (60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (45 credits)
BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
CHEM 202(3) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 204(2), FOR 320(2), FOR 350(3), FOR 366(4)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ENT 313(2), PPATH 318(2), W F S 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 409(2), FOR 410(3), FOR 421(3)[1], FOR 430(3), FOR 475(3)[1], FOR 480(3), FOR 494(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
AG BM 200(3) or MGMT 100(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 455(3) or GEOG 362(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits in consultation with adviser (Sem: 5-8)

FOREST MANAGEMENT OPTION: (60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (39 credits)
FOR 204(2), FOR 320(2), FOR 350(3), FOR 366(4)[1] (Sem: 3-6)
ENT 313(2), PPATH 318(2), W F S 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-6)
FOR 421(3)[1], FOR 440(3), FOR 455(3), FOR 466W(3)[1], FOR 470(3), FOR 475(3), FOR 480(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
Select a minimum of 3 credits from GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3), GEOSC 002 GN(3), METEO 003 GN(3), PHYS 150 GN(3), PHYS 250 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
AG BM 200(3) or MGMT 100(3) (Sem: 7-8)
FOR 401(3) or FOR 416(3) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (12 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 12 credits from department list approved for the option (Sem: 5-8)

URBAN FORESTRY OPTION: (60 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (33 credits)
BIOL 240W GN(4) (Sem: 1-2)
ENT 313(2), FOR 204(2), FOR 350(3), FOR 366(4)[1], FOR 421(3), FOR 480(3), PPATH 318(2) (Sem: 3-4)
FOR 401(3)[1], HORT 138(3), HORT 408(4) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
FOR 495(1-6)[1] or FOR 496(1-18)[1] (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (24 credits)
In consultation with adviser, select 24 credits from the following:
a. Select 3-6 credits from ENT 319(1), FOR 410(3), FOR 416(3), FOR 466W(3), FOR 470(3), and W F S 209 GN(3) (Sem: 5-8)
b. Select 2-3 credits from E R M 430(3), FOR 409(2), and FOR 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)
c. Select 3 credits from A S M 217(3) and FOR 475(3) (Sem: 5-8)
d. Select 3-6 credits from GEOG 122 GH(3), LARCH 003 GA(3), LARCH 060 GA(3), and LARCH 241(3) (Sem: 5-8)
e. Select 3-6 credits from MGMT 100(3) or MGMT 341(3) and R SOC 305W(3) or R SOC 460(3) (Sem: 5-8)
f. Select 3-6 credits from B A 250(3), B LAW 243(3), and E R M 411(3) (Sem: 5-8)

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTION: (56 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (47 credits)
CHEM 202(3), MATH 111 GQ(2), METEO 003 GN(3), PL SC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
GEOSC 001(3), PHYS 250 GN(4), PHYS 251 GN(4) (Sem: 3-4)
BIOL 220W(3) (Sem: 4-6)
A S M 327(3), W F S 435(3)/ E R M 435(3), GEOSC 452(3)[1], MICRB 201(3), SOILS 422(3) (Sem: 5-8)
FOR 410(3), FOR 470(3)[1], FOR 471(1) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 credits)
B LAW 243(3), E R M 411(3), PL SC 125(3), PL SC 417(3), or PL SC 419(3) (Sem: 5-6)
E RRE 201(3)/AG EC 201(3), E RRE 431W(3)/AG EC 431W(3), E RRE 429(3)/AG EC 429(3), ECON 302 GS(3), or ECON 428(3) (Sem: 7-8)
FOR 455(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 364(3), or SOILS 450(3) (Sem: 7-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-003 TURF 434
Turfgrass Edaphology
TURF EDAPHOLOGY (3)
Characterization of soil physical and chemical properties for the establishment and maintenance of sports turf; includes root-zone construction.
PREREQUISITE: SOILS 101, TURF 235
APPROVED START: S12001

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Characterization of soil physical properties for the establishment and maintenance of sports turf; includes root-zone construction.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Arts and Architecture

COURSE ADDS

35-02-004 ART 476
History and Theory of Digital Art
HIST DIGITAL ART (3)
History and theories of contemporary digital art emphasizing humanistic approaches to technology.
PREREQUISITE: ART H 100 or ART H 112 or ART H 307 or ART H 325 or ART H 326 or ART 211
CROSS LIST: ART H 476
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-005 ART H 476
History and Theory of Digital Art
HIST DIGITAL ART (3)
History and theories of contemporary digital art emphasizing humanistic approaches to technology.
PREREQUISITE: ART H 100 or ART H 112 or ART H 307 or ART H 325 or ART H 326 or ART 211
CROSS LIST: ART 476
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-006 MUSIC 441W
Capstone Experience in Elementary General and Choral Music
CAP ELEM GEN CHOR (3)
Selection and application of materials, methods, teaching and assessment strategies for elementary general and choral music settings.
PREREQUISITE: MUSIC 345, MUSIC 395B
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-007 ART 473
Graphic Design Seminar
GRAPH DSGN SEMINAR (3:2:4)
A seminar on subjects which relate to the field of graphic design.
PREREQUISITE: junior standing in graphic design
APPROVED START: F21979

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: GD
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 403W
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: GD 320
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-008 MUSIC 442
General Music Methods and Materials: Emphasis
GEN MUS M&M:EMPH (3:3:0)
Methods, materials, and teaching strategies for general music grades K-12. Intended for those with a general music emphasis.
PREREQUISITE: MUSIC 295A, MUSIC 340, piano proficiency passed
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 442W
CHANGE TITLES: Capstone Experience in Middle School General and Choral Music (CAP EX MS GEN CHOR)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Capstone experience to teaching in general and choral middle school settings.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: Limited to Music Education Majors. MUSIC 345, MUSIC 395B
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Behrend College

COURSE ADDS

35-02-009 CHEM 474
Organic Synthesis
ORG SYN (3)
Theory and methodology of organic synthesis applied to complex organic molecules.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 039
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES



OLD
35-02-010 BIOBD 322
Genetic Analysis
GENETIC ANALYSIS (3)
A discussion of the mechanisms of heredity in prokaryotes and eukaryotes with emphasis on analysis and modes of inference.
PREREQUISITE: at least two of the following courses: BIOL 220W, BIOL 230W, BIOL 240W, or MICRB 201
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: BIOL
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-011 BIOBD 401W
Biological Experimental Design
BIOL EXP DSGN (3:1:4)
Discussion of experimental design, analysis and presentation, with a practicum providing for student design, analysis and presentation of biological experiments. Students may not take this course if they have taken BIOBD 350W.
PREREQUISITE: at least two of the following three courses: BIOL 220W, BIOL 230W, BIOL 240W; STAT 250
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: BIOL
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 402W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-012 BIOBD 419
Population Ecology
POPULATION ECOLOGY (3:2:3)
Theoretical discussions of demographics, population and metapopulation growth models, life histories, and species interactions such as competition, predation, host-parasitoid relationships.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W, MATH 140, STAT 250
APPROVED START: S12000

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: BIOL
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 438
CHANGE TITLES: Theoretical Population Ecology (THEORE POP ECOLOGY)
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-013 BIOBD 453
Biochemistry Laboratory
BIOCHEM LAB (1)
An introduction to techniques of experimental biochemistry, illustrating principles covered in BIOBD/CHMBD 452.
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: BIOBD 452
APPROVED START: S12007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B M B
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 403
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-014 BIOBD 460
Molecular Biology
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3:2:3)
A discussion of current aspects of cell molecular biology with a laboratory emphasizing current biotechnology techniques.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 230W, BIOL 240W
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B M B
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 406
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: BIOL 222 or BIOL 322; BIOL 230W or B M B 251; CHEM 039
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-015 BIOBD 465
Protein Structure and Function
PROTEIN STR & FUNC (3)
A study of the relationship between structure and function of proteins; internet analysis to predict structure and function is included.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 230W
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: B M B
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-016 BIOBD 494A
Senior Seminar in Biology
SR SEM IN BIOBD (1:1:0)
Discussion of selected topics from recent biological literature; reports on current research or internship experiences.
PREREQUISITE: 18 credits in Biology; seventh-semester standing
APPROVED START: S11992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: BIOL
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 492
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-017 BIOBD 495
Internship in Biology
BIOBD INTERNSHIP (3-12)
Practical off-campus experience in Biology under the supervision of a professional and a faculty member.
APPROVED START: S11992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: BIOL
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-018 IETBD 333
Engineering Economics for Technologists
ENGR ECON (2:2:0)
Fundamentals of engineering economics; equivalence and rate of return analysis; replacement models; depreciation and tax considerations; and economic decision making for technologists.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 210 OR MATH 141
APPROVED START: SP2007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-019 IETBD 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: S11992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

COURSE DROPS

35-02-020 BIOBD 097
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-021 BIOBD 125
Introductory Biology Seminar
INTRO BIOL SEMINAR (1)
Current topics in biodiversity and organic evolution.
CONCURRENT: BIOL 110
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-022 BIOBD 150
Health Sciences Seminar
HEALTH SCI SEMINAR (1)
Presentation and exploration of a variety of career choices in the biomedical health sciences.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-023 BIOBD 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-024 BIOBD 199 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-025 BIOBD 225
Molecular and Cell Biology Seminar
MOLECULAR/CELL SEM (1)
Current topics in molecular and cell biological research focusing on techniques.
CONCURRENT: BIOL 230W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-026 BIOBD 296
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-027 BIOBD 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-028 BIOBD 301H
Scholars Seminar in Biology
SCHOLAR BIOL SEMIN (1:1:0)
Schreyers Scholars students doing honors thesis receive instruction on primary literature reviews, experimental design, research grant and thesis proposal preparation.
PREREQUISITE: Junior standing in biology and enrollment in Schreyer's Honors Program
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-029 BIOBD 380
Introduction to Scanning Electron Microscopy
INTRO TO SEM (2:1:2)
Theory of scanning electron microcopy, specimen preparation and basic familiarity with use of scanning electron microscope.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 110; CHEM 113
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-030 BIOBD 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-031 BIOBD 399 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-032 BIOBD 410
Limnology
LIMNOLOGY (3:2:3)
The interrelations of physical, chemical, and biotic factors in fresh-water habitats; intensive studies of local lakes and streams.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-033 BIOBD 412
Behavioral Ecology
BEHAVIORAL ECOL (3)
Theories of behavioral ecology including examples from vertebrate and invertebrate taxa.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W, BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-034 BIOBD 413
Vertebrate Field Biology
VERT FIELD BIOL (3:2:3)
Field observations, collections, identification, and classification of vertebrates from local habitats. Special attention given to life histories and ecology.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-035 BIOBD 415
Current Issues in Wetlands
WETLANDS (3:2:3)
A discussion of wetlands hydrology and biology, emphasizing conservation and mitigation issues, and investigative laboratories involving both plants and animals.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-036 BIOBD 420
Comparative Anatomy
COMPARATIVE ANAT (4:2:4)
Comparative anatomy of selected vertebrate animals, emphasizing structural adaptations.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-037 BIOBD 424
Animal Histology
ANIMAL HISTOLOGY (3:2:3)
Microscopic structure of tissues and organs with emphasis on those of mammals, structure-function relationships, histotechnology, including histochemistry.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-038 BIOBD 425
Medical Genetics
MEDICAL GENETICS (3:3:0)
Recent developments in human heredity, cytogenetics, clinical genetics, prenatal diagnosis, and genetic counseling.
PREREQUISITE: BIOBD 322 or BIOL 222
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-039 BIOBD 426
Evolutionary Genetics
EVOL GENETICS (3)
Current genetic research in evolution, both population and molecular, providing a basis for understanding the mechanisms of evolution.
PREREQUISITE: BIOBD 322 or BIOL 222
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-040 BIOBD 429
Unifying Concepts in Biology
UNIFY CONCEPT BIOL (2)
Selected unifying evolutionary concepts in biology including natural selection, microevolution, adaptation, macroevolution, coevolution, biogeography, and human evolution.
PREREQUISITE: BIOBD 322 or BIOL 222
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-041 BIOBD 430A
Clinical Microbiology
CLIN MICROBIOL (6)
Identification and clinical pathology of bacteria and viruses; techniques to collect, culture, isolate, and determine antimicrobial susceptibility.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-042 BIOBD 430B
Clinical Urinalysis
CLIN URINALYSIS (3)
Principles of urine analysis to include anatomy and physiology of the urinary system, microscopic urinary structures, physical and chemical characteristics of urine, pregnancy tests, clinical correlation, and evaluation procedures.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-043 BIOBD 430C
Clinical Chemistry
CLIN CHEMISTRY (7)
Principles of instrumentation, radioimmunoassay, specimen collection and preservation; enzymology, endocrinology, biochemistry of lipids and proteins, toxicology, clinical correlation, and quality control.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-044 BIOBD 430D
Clinical Hematology and Coagulation
CLIN HEMA & COAG (4)
The composition and functions of blood, diseases related to blood disorders, the role of platelets and coagulation; manual and automated techniques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-045 BIOBD 430E
Clinical Immunology and Serology
CLIN IMMUN & SER (4)
Basic principles of immunology and serology which are involved in the diagnosis of diseases.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-046 BIOBD 430F
Clinical Immunohematology
CLIN IMMUNOHEMAT (4)
Blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, hemoloytic diseases, and related diagnostic tests; immunogenetics and HLA system compatibility testing, and quality control used in blood banking.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-047 BIOBD 430G
Clinical Parasitology
CLIN PARASITOL (1)
Principles of clinical parasitology to include intestinal and urogenital protozoa, amoeba, blood parasites, helminths, and arthropods affecting humans.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-048 BIOBD 430I
Clinical Mycology
CLIN MYCOLOGY (1)
Clinical mycology including dermatophytes, medically important yeasts, and serodiagnosis of fungal diseases.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-049 BIOBD 430K
Clinical Seminar
CLINICAL SEMINAR (1)
Basic principles of education, curriculum development, and management techniques applied to a clinical situation.
PREREQUISITE: SEVENTH-SEMESTER STANDING IN THE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION OF THE BEHREND COLLEGE BIOLOGY MAJOR
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-050 BIOBD 445
Developmental Plant Biology
DEVELOP PLANT BIOL (3)
Developmental mechanisms associated with biological processes of vascular plants.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-051 BIOBD 446
Plant Functions
PLANT FUNCTIONS (4:3:3)
Introduction of the experimental basis for our understanding of higher plant functions, including nutrition, water relations, and development.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 230W, BIOL 240W; CHEM 202 OR CHEM 210
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-052 BIOBD 449
Developmental Animal Biology
DEV ANIMAL BIOLOGY (3)
The problems of differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, and reproduction of animals.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 230W, BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-053 BIOBD 452
Cellular Biochemistry
CELL BIOCHEM (3)
Principles of bioenergetics, metabolic pathways, biosynthesis of biomolecules, hormonal regulation, and information pathways.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 472 or BIOL 230W and CHEM 212
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-054 BIOBD 455
Animal Parasitology
PARASITOLOGY (3:2:3)
Exploration of the taxonomy, life-cycles, and ecology of animal parasites.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-055 BIOBD 459
Freshwater and Terrestrial Invertebrates
FRWTR/TERR INVERT (4)
Examination of structure, function, behavior, and ecology of free-living and symbiotic invertebrates occurring in various freshwater and terrestrial habitats.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W, BIOL 240W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-056 BIOBD 469
Animal Physiology
ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (3:2:3)
Mammalian body functions; emphasis on humans with selected comparisons to other animals.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 240W; CHEM 203 OR CHEM 213
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-057 BIOBD 494B
Junior-Senior Research in Biology
JR/SR RES IN BIOBD (1-12)
An opportunity for Biology majors to apply investigative skills in an extended research project under faculty supervision.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-058 BIOBD 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-059 BIOBD 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-060 BIOBD 498
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-061 IETBD 296
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-062 IETBD 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-063 IETBD 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Capital College

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-064 I E T 308
Statistical Quality Control
STAT QUALITY CNTRL (3)
Fundamentals of probability and statistics, introduction to quality control fundamentals, control charts, acceptance sampling.
APPROVED START: S11987

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-065 I E T 311
Elements of Metallurgy
ELEM OF METALLURGY (3)
Introduction to metallurgical concepts, metallurgical testing, phase diagram studies, heat treating concepts, ferrous and nonferrous systems.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 110, CHEM 111
APPROVED START: S12007

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-066 I E T 321
Manufacturing Processes
MANUFACTURING PROC (3)
Manufacturing processes for producing metal, plastic, and ceramic items. Primary emphasis is placed on machine tool processes.
APPROVED START: SP2001

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-067 I E T 397
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-068 I E T 402
Production Management
PROD MGMT (3)
Principles and practices of managing the manufacturing operations of companies. Topics include management structure, physical plant, quality control, work sampling.
PREREQUISITE: I E T 321
APPROVED START: S11987

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-069 I E T 405
Quality Control and Reliability Engineering
QUAL CONTROL ENGR (3)
Application of statistical methods to the control of quality, sampling inspection, and reliability engineering.
PREREQUISITE: E T 313
APPROVED START: S11985

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-070 I E T 431
An Introduction to Plastics and Ceramics
PLAST & CERAMICS (3)
An introductory study of the properties and processing parameters utilized for plastic and ceramic materials.
PREREQUISITE: I E T 311
APPROVED START: S11987

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-071 I E T 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

35-02-072 Add new Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology

The Department of Meteorology offers an integrated B.S./M.S. (IUG) Program that is designed to allow academically superior students to obtain both the B.S. and the M.S. degree in Meteorology in five years of study. In order to complete the program in five years, students interested in the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student will follow the course scheduling of one of the options in the B.S. degree, normally the Atmospheric Sciences or the General option (see the Undergraduate Bulletin). Students who intend to enter the Integrated B.S./M.S. program are encouraged to take upper level classes during their first three years whenever appropriate. By the end of the junior year, students normally apply for admission to both the IUG program and to the Graduate School. Acceptance decisions will be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and M.S. advising committees appointed for successful applicants. During the senior year, IUG students follow the scheduling of the selected B.S. Meteorology option, with an emphasis on completing 500-level course work as appropriate. During the senior year, IUG students will start work on their theses or papers that are designed to meet the requirements of the M.S. degree in Meteorology. During the fifth year, IUG students take courses fulfilling the departmental M.S. degree requirements and complete their M.S. theses or papers. Typical scheduling plans for students pursuing the General or Atmospheric Sciences options are given on the departmental Web site http://www.met.psu.edu. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student receives financial support, for example, via an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition.

Admission Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology should apply for admission to both the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by no later than the end of their junior year. In this case, successful students will be admitted formally into the graduate program in Meteorology just prior to their senior year, if their progress has been satisfactory. Admission prior to the senior year is also possible in some unusual circumstances. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Officer for the Department of Meteorology, who will determine the necessary criteria for all applicants. These criteria include the setting of the minimum required scores on the GRE and the minimum cumulative GPA for consideration, the receipt of sufficiently strong recommendation letters from three faculty and a strong letter of support from the department head, and the writing of an excellent proposal for a workable research project with a specific adviser; normally, evidence of significant research progress must be provided in the application as well.

The details of the program requirements can be found in the Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin.

COURSE ADDS

35-02-073 GEOG 475H
Labor in the Global Economy: U.S. and South African Perspectives
LBR GLOB ECON (3)
This course focuses on how the nature of work is changing in the global economy, and the implications for economic opportunity and inequality in both.
CROSS LIST: L I R 475H
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-074 MATSE 483
Simulation and Design of Nanostructures
NANOSTRUCT SIM DES (3)
Introduction to computer simulation techniques and their applications at the physical/life sciences interface.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 214 or E SC 312, MATH 230
CROSS LIST: E SC 483
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Education

COURSE ADDS

35-02-075 CI ED 401 (IL)
Introduction to Comparative Education
INTRO TO COMPAR ED (3)
Origins, nature, scope, basic literature, and methodology of comparative education. Study of sample topics.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-076 CI ED 440
Introduction to Philosophy of Education
INTRO PHIL ED (3)
Introduction to the examination of educational theory and practice from philosophical perspectives, classical and contemporary.
PREREQUISITE: EDTHP 115
PROPOSED START: FA2007

35-02-077 CI ED 444
Language, Culture and the Classroom: Issues for Practitioners
LANG/CULT & CLASRM (3)
Critical understanding of cultural linguistic diversity to facilitate the inclusion of English Language Learners in a globalized classroom.
PREREQUISITE: WL ED 300 or WL ED 400
PROPOSED START: FA2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-078 ED 100S
First-Year Seminar in Education
FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR (3)
Learning about a scholarly community through the development of knowledge and skills needed for successful participation in higher education.
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: EDUC
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-079 ED 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: SP1999

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: EDUC
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-080 ED 294
Research Project Courses
RESEARCH PROJECTS (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: EDUC
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-081 EDTHP 401 (IL)
Introduction to Comparative Education
INTRO TO COMPAR ED (3:3:0)
Origins, nature, scope, basic literature, and methodology of comparative education. Study of sample topics.
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CI ED 401
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-082 EDTHP 440
Introduction to Philosophy of Education
INTRO PHIL ED (3:3:0)
Introduction to the examination of educational theory and practice from philosophical perspectives, classical and contemporary.
PREREQUISITE: EDTHP 115
APPROVED START: S11995

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CI ED 440
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-083 WL ED 444
Language, Culture and the Classroom: Issues for Practitioners
LANG/CULT & CLASRM (3)
Critical understanding of cultural linguistic diversity to facilitate the inclusion of English Language Learners in a globalized classroom.
PREREQUISITE: WL ED 300 or WL ED 400
APPROVED START: S12004

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: CI ED 444
PROPOSED START: FA2007

COURSE DROPS

35-02-084 ED 494
Research Project Courses
RESEARCH PROJECTS (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Engineering


35-02-085 Change. Add "grade of C or better requirement" to BE T 201, 202, 203, 204W, 205, IST 110, 220 [as well as EE T 101, 117]. Add BI SC 004, EDSGN 100, IST 110, 220, RADSC 230; move BIOL 141 from Prescribed Courses to Additional Courses; change credits for BE T 204W from 4 credits to 5 credits. Remove EE T 114, 118; EG T 101, 102; E T 002, 005; MATH 083. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Biomedical Engineering Technology

University College: Penn State New Kensington
University Park, College of Engineering (2 BET)

PROFESSOR MYRON HARTMAN, Program Coordinator, Penn State New Kensington
PROFESSOR DHUSHY SATHIANATHAN, Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, Penn State University Park

The medical community has grown to depend on medical devices and systems to diagnose, treat and monitor patients in health care. These medical devices have become very complex systems, as they are becoming microprocessor controlled, PC based, and networked to share information. Biomedical Equipment Technicians (BETs) are specialized individuals who are educated and trained on the methods of: physiological measurement; equipment application and operation; safety, performance and preventive maintenance testing; calibration; problem solving; and troubleshooting. In addition, BETs may be involved in equipment and technology management programs, selection and installation of medical equipment, manufacturer and FDA recalls of medical devices, quality improvement programs, and training programs for hospital personnel in the safe and proper use of medical equipment. The classroom and laboratory portions of this major focus on electronically and PC based medical devices for patient monitoring and life-support equipment. The student is exposed to a much broader spectrum of medical equipment through a 400-hour (ten-week) practical internship in an approved health care facility.

The major prepares graduates who, during the first few years of professional practice, will be able to:

This program also articulates with Pennsylvania Department of Education approved Tech Prep programs. Secondary school Tech Prep students who have graduated from a program covered by a signed Penn State Tech Prep Articulation Agreement may be eligible for special admission procedures and/or advanced placement. Students completing the 2 BET degree need only complete several additional courses to obtain the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Electrical Engineering Technology. Graduates of the program may qualify for admission to the baccalaureate degree major in Electrical Engineering Technology offered at Penn State Harrisburg and at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College and the baccalaureate degree major in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology offered at Penn State New Kensington, Altoona, York, and Berks.

For the Associate in Engineering Technology degree in Biomedical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 71 credits is required. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: 410-347-7700, or www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 21 credits
(12 of these 21 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR) (See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 62 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (56 credits)
BE T 201(5)[1], BE T 202(4)[1], BE T 203(4)[1], BE T 204W(5)[1], BE T 205(3)[1], CAS 100 GWS(3), CHEM 101(3), EE T 101(3)[1], EE T 109(1), EE T 117(3)[1], EE T 120(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), IST 110(3)[1], MATH 081 GQ(3), MATH 082 GQ(3), PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1)
IST 220(3)[1] (Sem: 2)
RADSC 230(3) (Sem: 3)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
BI SC 004 GN(3) or BIOL 141 GN(3) (Sem: 1)
Select 3 credits from the following technical courses: BE T 297(1-9), BIOL 129 GN(4), CE T 261(3), CMPSC 101 GQ(3), EDSGN 100(3), EE T 211(3), EE T 213W(5), EE T 297(1-9), EG T 201(2) or MCH T 111(3) (Sem: 1-2)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

35-02-086 Change. Add "grade of C or better requirement" to the following courses: EE T 114, 205, 210, 220; EMET 322, 330; IE T 101; MATH 022, 026, 140; MCH T 111, 213, 214. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology

Penn State Altoona
Penn State Berks
University College: Penn State New Kensington, Penn State York (EMET)

PROFESSOR IRENE FERRARA, Program Coordinator, Penn State Altoona
PROFESSOR TERRY SPEICHER, Program Coordinator, Penn State Berks
PROFESSOR RONALD LAND, Program Coordinator, Penn State New Kensington
PROFESSOR CHARLES GASTON, Program Coordinator, Penn State York
PROFESSOR DHUSHY SATHIANATHAN, Head, School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs, University Park College of Engineering

The Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (B.S. EMET) degree program provides the basic undergraduate education required for a career as an electro-mechanical engineering technologist. The program emphasizes a breadth of knowledge in all fields of engineering technology related to typical, highly-automated manufacturing, production, or assembly plant processes. Basic coverage is provided in all major areas of technology involved in the operation and control of manufacturing and production processes, including instrumentation and monitoring methods, principles of machine design, automated control techniques, thermal and fluid sciences, computerized manufacturing systems, principles of electrical and electronic circuit operation, computer-aided drafting and design, economics of production, and statistical analysis and quality control.

The primary aim of the EMET program is to provide graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to apply current methods and technology to the development, design, operation, and management of electro-mechanical systems, particularly in those industries where automated systems are prevalent. Specific educational objectives of the program are to:

The major is organized as a four-year baccalaureate program with the corresponding Penn State admission requirements. Graduates of an associate degree in either electrical or mechanical engineering technology from Penn State may re-enroll in the EMET program. The College of Engineering ENGR students may enroll through "Change of Major" procedures. Students from an engineering technology program at another institution or community college accredited by TAC of ABET may transfer into the program with advanced standing.

For the B.S. degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology, a minimum of 130 credits is required. This program is accredited at Penn State Altoona, Penn State Berks, and Penn State New Kensington of the University College by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: 410-347-7700, or www.abet.org.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 103-104 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 9 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (56 credits)
ED&G 100(3), EE T 101(3), EE T 109(1), MATH 022 GQ(3)[1], MATH 026 GQ(3)[1], PHYS 150 GN(3) (Sem: 1-2)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1], PHYS 151 GN(3) (Sem: 3-4)
EMET 330(3)[1], MATH 250(3) (Sem: 5-6)
CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 111 GN(1), EMET 350(3), EMET 405(4), EMET 410(4), EMET 440(3), IE T 105(2) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (47-48 credits)
Select from one of the following tracks a or b:
a. Students following an electrical track must complete the following courses:
EE T 114(4)[1], EE T 117(3)[1], EE T 118(1)[1], EE T 120(1) (Sem: 1-2)
EE T 205(1)[1], EE T 210(2)[1], EE T 213W(5), EE T 216(3), EE T 220(2)[1], EE T 221(1), MCH T 111(3)[1] (Sem: 3-4)
EE T 211(3), EMET 311(3), EMET 322(4)[1], IE T 101(3)[1], IE T 215(2), MET 210W(3) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 4 credits from EMET 420(3), EMET 430(3), or EMET 497(1-9) (Sem: 7)

b. Students following a mechanical track must complete the following courses:
EG T 114(2), IE T 101(3)[1], MCH T 111(3)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
EE T 114(4)[1], EG T 201(2), IE T 215(2), IE T 216(2), MCH T 213(3)[1], MCH T 214(1)[1], MET 206(3)[1], MET 210W(3) (Sem: 3-4)
EE T 220(2)[1], EMET 310(3), EMET 320(4)[1], EMET 321W(4) (Sem: 5-6)
Select 6 credits from EMET 420(3), EMET 430(3), or EMET 497(3) (Sem: 7)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

35-02-087 AERSP 498
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

35-02-088 CH E 452
Chemical Process Safety
CHEM PROC SAFETY (3)
This course provides an overview of Process Safety in the Chemical Industry, focusing on the nature of chemical plant addidents.
PREREQUISITE: Prerequisite or concurrent: CH E 410, CH E 430
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-089 CSE 443
Introduction to Computer and Network Security
INTRO CMP SECURTY (3)
Introduction to theory and practice of computer security with an emphasis on Internet and operating system applications.
PREREQUISITE: CSE 411, CSE 458
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-090 EDSGN 011S
Explorations in Design First-Year Seminar
EXPLORE DESIGN FYS (1)
Students explore topical issues in engineering design.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-091 EDSGN 012S
Solar Racers First-Year Seminar
SOLAR RACERS FYS (1)
Students explore solar energy engineering by designing, building, testing, and racing a model car powered by a photoboltaic panel.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-092 A B E 405
Agricultural Measurements and Control Systems
AGR MEAS & CONTRL (3:2:2)
Principles of measurements, instruments, controls, and data acquisition systems, with emphasis on agricultural applications.
PREREQUISITE: E E 305
APPROVED START: FA1996

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: PHYS 212
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-093 E SC 483
Simulation and Design of Nanostructures
NANOSTRUCT SIM DES (3)
Introduction to computer simulation techniques and their applications at the physical/life sciences interface.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 214 or E SC 312, MATH 230
APPROVED START: S12006

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: MATSE 483
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-094 IE T 101
Manufacturing Materials, Processes, and Laboratory
MFG MTLS & PROC (3:2:3)
Mechanical properties of materials; primary processing methods used in manufacturing; ferrous and nonferrous metals; important plastic plus ceramic materials; dimensional verification and measurements; mechanical properties evaluation; laboratory methods; statistical interpretation of data.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-095 IE T 105
Economics of Industry
ECON OF INDUSTRY (2:2:0)
Internal economics of industrial enterprise, cost factors, and methods of comparing alternate proposals.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-096 IE T 109
Inspection and Quality Control
INSPECT&QUAL CONTR (3)
Inspection methods and procedures and their application to control and acceptance sampling based on statistical methods.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 082
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-097 IE T 215
Production Design
PRODUCTION DESIGN (2:2:0)
Design of tools required for production. Study of advanced technologies in manufacturing systems, including CNC, automation and robotics, CAD-CAM, and CIM.
PREREQUISITE: IE T 101
CONCURRENT: IE T 216
APPROVED START: SP1996

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
REMOVE CONCURRENT
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-098 IE T 216
Production Design Laboratory
PROD DSGN LAB (2:0:6)
Laboratory methods in production design and manufacturing processes of systems including computer applications, automation and robotics, non-destructive testing, material removal and joining.
PREREQUISITE: IE T 101
CONCURRENT: IE T 215; EG T 201 or EMET 311
APPROVED START: FA2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
REMOVE CONCURRENT
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-099 IE T 296
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, that are supervised on an individual basis and that fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: S11997

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-100 IE T 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: FA1992

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: IET
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Health and Human Development

35-02-101 Change. Reduce minimum number of credits required for the Management Dietetics Option from 128 credits to 120 credits. Remove NUTR 358, 360. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2007

Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management

University Park, College of Health and Human Development (HRIM)

PROFESSOR HUBERT B. VAN HOOF, Head of the School

This major helps provide preparation for management positions in hotels, restaurants, institutions, and other hospitality organizations. The program is designed to give the student a broad general education and a strong management and problem-solving orientation balanced with the requisite technical skills, all of them essential for career progression to upper-management positions in the hospitality professions. The program also helps prepare students for graduate study.

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT OPTION: This option helps prepare students for management positions in any segment of the hospitality industry, including hotels, restaurants, institutional or non-commercial operations, clubs, resorts, and casinos. The management focus helps provide students with the analytical, interpersonal, and organizational skills necessary to effectively function as hospitality professionals.

MANAGEMENT DIETETICS OPTION: This option helps prepare graduates for general management positions within the food services operated by or for medical organizations, health and life care facilities, college feeding, governmental agencies, and community feeding programs. The management dietitian is qualified to solve both nutrition and food service problems. Graduates may also choose to work in the management of commercial food service operations. Together with the necessary clinical experience, the option satisfies the eligibility requirements for membership in the American Dietetic Association.

For the B.S. degree in Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management, a minimum of 120 credits is required. The B.S. degree program consists of two options: (1) Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management and (2) Management Dietetics.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(10.5-22 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 0-7 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 78.5-97 credits[1]
(For the HRIM option, this includes 10.5 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 1.5 credits of GHA courses. For the Management Dietetics option, this includes 22 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 7 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GHA courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 56 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (53 credits)
CMPSC 203 GQ(4), MKTG 221(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
HRIM 201(3), HRIM 202(1), HRIM 271(2), HRIM 329(3), HRIM 330(2), HRIM 335(3), HRIM 336(3), HRIM 350(3), HRIM 365 IL(3), HRIM 380(3), HRIM 430(3), HRIM 435(3), HRIM 442(3), HRIM 466 US(3), HRIM 490W(3), HRIM 492(1) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
ECON 002 GS(3) or ECON 014 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 22.5-41 credits

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT OPTION: (22.5 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (10.5 credits)
HRIM 405(3), HRIM 480(3), NUTR 100 GHA(1.5), NUTR 119(3) (Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS: (12 credits)
Select 12 credits of HRIM courses from an approved department list, up to 4 credits of any foreign language, and other courses in consultation with an advisor.

MANAGEMENT DIETETICS OPTION: (41 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (38 credits)
B M B 211(3), BIOL 141 GN(3), CHEM 110 GN(3), CHEM 202(3), MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1) (Sem: 3-4)
NUTR 120(3), NUTR 251 GHA(3), NUTR 370(1), NUTR 400(1), NUTR 445(3), NUTR 446(3), NUTR 452(3), NUTR 453(3), NUTR 456(2) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (3 credits)
PSYCH 100 GS(3) or SOC 001 GS(3) (Sem: 1-4)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

COURSE ADDS

35-02-102 H&HD 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of the Liberal Arts

COURSE ADDS

35-02-103 CAMS 420
Introductory Targumic Aramaic
TARGUMIC ARAMAIC (3)
Fundamentals of Aramaic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-104 CAMS 421
Introductory Syriac
SYRIAC (3)
Fundamentals of Syriac grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-105 CLJ 299 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-106 HEBR 451
Advanced Biblical Hebrew
ADV BIB HEBREW (3)
Translation and analysis of selected readings in Biblical Hebrew texts; attention will be paid to grammatical as well as literary details.
PREREQUISITE: HEBR 152 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-107 HEBR 452
Readings in Biblical Hebrew
BIB HEB READINGS (3)
Translation and analysis of selected readings in Biblical Hebrew texts; attention will be paid to grammatical as well as literary details.
PREREQUISITE: HEBR 451 or equivalent
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-108 L I R 475H
Labor in the Global Economy: U.S. and South African Perspectives
LBR GLOB ECON (3)
This course focuses on how the nature of work is changing in the global economy, and the implications for economic opportunity and inequality in both.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum of 12 credits GEOG or L I R credits before taking the course (or the permission of the program).
CROSS LIST: GEOG 475H
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-109 SOC 299 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-110 ECON 436 (US)
Economics of Discrimination
ECON OF DISCRIM (3:3:0)
Analysis of the economic characteristics of women and minorities, with examination of race and sex discrimination and related government policies.
PREREQUISITE: ECON 302 or ECON 315
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 436W
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-111 GER 430 (IL)
History of the German Language
HIST OF GER LANG (3:3:0)
Development of German as a literary language from its earliest stages, including historical and cultural aspects; conducted in English.
PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: GER 401
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Development of German from its earliest stages, including historical and cultural aspects.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: or concurrent: GER 401Y
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-112 PL SC 495
Political Science Internship
PL SC INTERNSHIP (1-9)
Combining experience in government offices, related agencies, or law firms, with appropriate readings and a research paper/report.
PREREQUISITE: prior consent of supervisor, adviser, or department head; applicable departmental internship requirements such as satisfactory completion of required 300- or 400-level courses appropriate for the internship program selected
APPROVED START: FA1981

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-6
PROPOSED START: FA2007

 

COURSE DROPS

35-02-113 FR ST 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Eberly College of Science

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-114 B M B 402
General Biochemistry
GEN BIOCHEM (3:3:0)
Comprehensive survey of the pathways and regulation of intermediary metabolism.
PREREQUISITE: B M B 401
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: B M B 401 or CHEM 471
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-115 BIOL 444
Field Ecology of the Central Appalachian Highlands
FLD ECOL CEN HIGH (3)
This field course will examine the terrestrial flora and fauna of the central Appalachian highlands.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Field Ecology (FLD ECOL)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This field course will explore the flora and fauna of the mid-Atlantic area.
PROPOSED START: FA2007

OLD
35-02-116 BIOL 450W
Experimental Field Biology
FIELD BIOLOGY (5:2:6)
A practical introduction to modern experimental techniques for ecological study of terrestrial, marine, and fresh water habitats.
PREREQUISITE: BIOL 220W, BIOL 240W
APPROVED START: FA1994

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3-5
PROPOSED START: FA2007


APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

Change. Drop the following three options from the Integrative Biosciences Graduate Program:

35-02-117 Drop the Molecular Toxicology Option.
35-02-118 Drop the Molecular Medicine Option.
35-02-119 Drop the Ecological and Molecular Plant Physiology Option.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Integrative Biosciences Graduate Program (IBIOS)

RICHARD J. FRISQUE, Co-Director, IBIOS Graduate Education
Life Sciences Building
University Park, PA 16802
1-866-PS-IBIOS; 1-866-77-42467 (toll-free in USA)
huckgradadm@mailbiotech.psu.edu

ANITA K. HOPPER, Co-Director, IBIOS Graduate Education
Room C5716, Mail Code H171
College of Medicine
Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
500 University Drive
Hershey, PA 17033
717-531-8982

Degree Conferred: Ph. D.

Calling upon the expertise of more than 200 faculty members representing thirty-eight different departments among seven different colleges between two different campuses, the Integrative Biosciences (IBIOS) Graduate Program offers a unique opportunity to learn about and work in multiple disciplines. This graduate education component of the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences is supported by modern telecommunications facilities and equipment. Doctoral students not only explore new conceptual connections, but also engage in active group learning experiences and explore a variety of potential career opportunities before graduation. Two unique aspects are (1) dual mentors who will expose students to complementary viewpoints and encourage students to pursue problems at the interface between traditional disciplines, and (2) an optional internship that provides a mechanism for students to obtain “real world” experience in future professional settings.

The program offers the following areas of research emphasis (called options): Biomolecular Transport Dynamics; Cell and Developmental Biology; Chemical Biology; Immunobiology; Neuroscience; and Nutrition Sciences.

Program Requirements

1. Foundation of basic knowledge in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, and computational methods in the life sciences. The IBIOS Graduate Program expects at least 6 credits (or the equivalent) in one or more of these disciplines, taken either as an undergraduate or as a part of the graduate curriculum. The specific courses are left to the discretion of each option.
2. IBIOS 590 COLLOQUIUM (2 credits, 1 per semester during any of the first four semesters in residence), a monthly colloquium that will present life science topics of general interest to all faculty and graduate students in the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences.
3. IBIOS 591 ETHICS IN LIFE SCIENCES (1 credit), an examination of integrity and misconduct in life sciences research, including issues of data collection, publication, authorship, and peer review.
4. IBIOS 595 INTERNSHIP (optional, 1 credit), an external work assignment relevant to individual research or career goals. (Register for IBIOS 595 in 520 Thomas Building)
5. IBIOS 596 INDIVIDUAL STUDIES: Laboratory Rotations (1-3 credits per semester, depending upon option)
6. IBIOS 597(optional, variable credits) SPECIAL TOPICS
7. IBIOS 600 THESIS RESEARCH (variable credits)
8. IBIOS 601 Ph.D. DISSERTATION FULL-TIME (0 credits)
9. IBIOS 602 SUPERVISED EXPERIENCE IN COLLEGE TEACHING (1 credit each semester), two semesters or the equivalent is required after the first year in residence. International Fellows must pass an English proficiency exam before teaching.
10. The Graduate School requires all graduate students to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average. Individual options may require a higher GPA.

Students must present their thesis in accordance with the Penn State guidelines as described in the THESIS GUIDE Requirements for the Preparation of Master's and Doctoral Theses. Current copies may be obtained from the Thesis Office, 115 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802; 814-865-5448.

General Admission Requirements

Application deadline is January 10 for priority consideration.

1. Completed official Penn State Graduate School application
2. Paid nonrefundable application fee ($45 U.S.)
3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended
4. Completed Integrative Biosciences Graduate Degree Program application
5. Application for a U.S. visa (International applicants only)
6. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test
7. Three letters of recommendation
8. Statement of goals that pertains to the life sciences
9. All international applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or master’s degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) examination. A minimum TOEFL score of 600 on the paper test or a score of 250 on the computer-based test is required.
10. Students must have completed a bachelor’s degree at an accredited college or university and have a minimum of a 3.0/4.0 junior/senior undergraduate grade-point average.

See also BIOTECHNOLOGY.

35-02-120 Change. Degree requirements for M.S. and Ph.D. Add Astrobiology Dual Title possibility. Revise program description. Change credits as indicated by underlining.

35-02-121 Add. new Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Meteorology (METEO)

WILLIAM H. BRUNE, Head of the Department
503 Walker Building
814-865-3286
meteograd@ems.psu.edu

Degrees Conferred: Ph.D., M.S.

The graduate program embraces topics that span atmospheric processes from those of the planetary boundary layer to those of the upper atmosphere, that encompass phenomena with molecular to planetary dimensions, and that range from practical to theoretical significance. The program develops and integrates approaches based on observational, computational and analytical techniques.
The major interests of the faculty and graduate students center on (1) analysis, modeling, and prediction of the evolution of synoptic-scale, or mesoscale weather systems, particularly those of significant impact on human activities; (2) observation and theoretical study of processes related to transmission of radiation through the atmosphere, including remote sensing through use of electromagnetic or acoustic systems; (3) observations, laboratory, and theoretical study of trace gases, particulates, and clouds and their consequences for air quality and climate; and (4) observation and theoretical study of atmospheric physics on a variety of scales, including phenomena of weather and climate, boundary layer physics, turbulence, convective systems, and severe storms.

The department encourages interdisciplinary studies and is expanding its programs in biometeorology, climate dynamics, atmospheric pollution prediction, atmospheric carbon cycling, forecast reliability and verification, mathematical study of fluid dynamical systems, and integrated atmosphere–ocean studies. The department is affiliated with the Earth and Environmental Sciences Institute, which conducts studies in Earth system science, including climate, large-scale dynamics, oceanography, and regional assessments.

For the M.S. program, a minimum of 30 credits is required. For the Ph.D. program, a minimum of 4 credits is required, plus 6 elective credits per academic year in consultation with the adviser until the comprehensive examination is passed.

Admission Requirements

The Meteorology program is open to all students with a baccalaureate degree and a strong interest in the atmospheric sciences. A degree in meteorology, science, mathematics, or engineering provides a particularly good background, although the department has had some students with arts and humanities degrees (such as Art History) who have done well. The minimum course requirements for admission are mathematics at least through differential equations and at least one year of physics. Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) are required for the evaluation of all applicants. Requirements listed here are in addition to general Graduate School requirements stated in the GENERAL INFORMATION section of the Graduate Bulletin.

For admission to the program, the departmental admission committee considers courses taken, grade-point average, supporting letters, GRE scores, professional experience, and English proficiency. Rather than setting rigid standards in each category, the committee examines the overall record as a whole. The best-qualified applicants are accepted up to the number of spaces that are available for new students.

Generally, additional mathematics and physics beyond the minimum requirements listed above, as well as courses in statistics, chemistry, and computer programming, will strengthen the student’s application. Courses in meteorology are not required for admission. Most students admitted to the graduate program have GPA's of 3.50 or higher; particularly good grades in the sciences are desirable. Two recommendations are solicited from persons familiar with the student’s academic competence, and the student is required to write a letter summarizing interests and goals. The General Test package containing the Mathematical Reasoning Test of the GRE is required of all applicants. A verbal and quantitative combined score of 1200 or greater is typical for the department’s students. All international students whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum TOEFL score of 550 points on the paper test, of 213 points on the computer-based test, or of 80 points on the Internet-based test together with a minimum score of 23 points on the speaking portion, is required for admission.

Master’s Degree Requirements

The degree is offered with both thesis and research paper options. For both options, a core curriculum is required that is composed of METEO 520, 521, 533, 535, and 580 that is supplemented by 5 elective credits from 500-level Meteorology courses, for a total of 18 credits.

All students must take a minimum of 12 additional elective credits for a total of 30 credits, which are distributed as follows. Students in the master’s thesis option must select 6 additional credits from 400- and 500-level course work in Meteorology or related disciplines, and 6 quality-graded credits of METEO 600 (quality-graded credits count toward the grade-point average; see http://www.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/$acadinfo.htm. Students in the master's paper option must select 6 of the additional credits from 400- and 500-level course work in Meteorology, together with 6 additional credits from 400- and 500-level course work in Meteorology or related disciplines if not used as electives above. METEO 600 credits cannot be used to fulfill any portion of these additional credits.

Finally, all M.S. students defend their thesis or paper in a public presentation that is evaluated by, and must be approved by, the students' committee. A minimum of three signatures is required for a master's thesis, including the thesis adviser and the department head or program chair.

For a minor in Meteorology, an M.S. student must select 6 credits of 500-level Meteorology courses in a course plan approved by the department.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Studies for the Ph.D. degree are designed to accommodate the interests and capabilities of the candidate, and they are overseen by a doctoral committee, which also administers comprehensive and final oral examinations. Before being admitted to Ph.D. candidacy, a student must have the academic support of a faculty member and the student must pass each part of the two-part Ph.D. candidacy examination that is typically offered twice each year. In order to assess the student’s progress in assimilating the required material, both sections of the exam must be taken within one year of being admitted to the program and the student must pass the entire exam within two years of admission. Once a student passes a section of the candidacy exam, the student does not take that section again. Before being admitted to the comprehensive exam, a student must have passed the department’s competency exam in written and spoken technical English. Before being admitted to the final oral exam, a student must have completed 4 required credits: METEO 580 (1 credit) and 3 credits from at least two different graduate seminar courses. In addition, 6 credits per academic year from 400- and 500-level course work in Meteorology or related disciplines must be taken until the comprehensive examination is passed (METEO 580 and the elective courses apply to this requirement). One credit of METEO 590 is required each semester until the comprehensive exam is passed. There are no minimal credit requirements for quality-graded METEO 600 (research credits whose grades count toward the grade-point average). Students may earn up to 12 quality-graded credits, including those earned during the pursuit of an M.S. degree in Meteorology from Penn State. The student is expected to master the material in the M.S. core courses (METEO 520, 521, 533, and 535), but need not take those courses for credit.

Students interested in the emerging field of Astrobiology may wish to obtain a dual-title degree in Astrobiology and Meteorology. The pursuit of this dual title entails additional course work beyond the degree requirements set forth here (see the Graduate Bulletin http://www.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/programs/aboil.htm for further details concerning these course and other program requirements), as well as the participation of at least one Astrobiology program faculty member on the dissertation committee. The Astrobiology representative, who assists with the selection of courses, may be the adviser and have an appointment in Meteorology. In addition to passing the departmental Ph.D. Candidacy exam that all Meteorology doctoral students must take, all dual-title students must pass a second Candidacy Examination that assesses their potential in the field of astrobiology. The structure and timing of the second candidacy examination will be determined jointly by the dual-title and major program. The field of Astrobiology should be integrated into the comprehensive examination. A Ph.D. dissertation that contributes fundamentally to the field of Astrobiology is required. A public oral presentation of the dissertation is required.

For a minor in Meteorology, Ph.D. students should select 15 credits of 500-level Meteorology courses in a course plan approved by the department.

Other Relevant Information

The program differentiates between instruction and research topics appropriate for M.S. students seeking positions of advanced responsibility in government or industry, those appropriate for M.S. students anticipating further study, and those appropriate for Ph.D. candidates who will work in advanced research laboratories or academic institutions.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships available through this program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin. Most graduate students are supported with teaching or research assistantships.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

METEOROLOGY (METEO) course list

NOTE: Courses in the use of X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and spectroscopy in meteorological studies are listed under MATERIALS SCIENCE.

Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology

The Department of Meteorology offers an integrated B.S./M.S. Program that is designed to allow academically superior students to obtain both the B.S. and the M.S. degree in Meteorology in five years of study. In order to complete the program in five years, students interested in the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology must apply for admission to the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. program by the end of their junior year.

During the first three years, the student will follow the course scheduling of one of the options in the B.S. degree, normally the Atmospheric Sciences or the General Option (see the Undergraduate Bulletin). Students who intend to enter the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program are encouraged to take upper level classes during their first three years whenever appropriate. By the end of the junior year, students normally apply for admission to both the IUG Program and to the Graduate School. Acceptance decisions will be made prior to the beginning of the senior year and M.S. advising committees appointed for successful applicants. During the senior year, IUG students follow the scheduling of the selected B.S. Meteorology Option, with an emphasis on completing 500-level course work as appropriate. During the senior year, IUG students will start work on their theses or papers that are designed to meet the requirements of the M.S. degree in Meteorology. During the fifth year, IUG students take courses fulfilling the departmental M.S. degree requirements and complete their M.S. theses or papers. Typical scheduling plans for students pursuing the General or Atmospheric Sciences Options are given on the departmental Web site http://www.met.psu.edu. If a plan similar to one of these plans is followed, then the student will have completed all requirements for the B.S. in Meteorology by the end of the fourth year. If, for some reason, a student cannot continue in the integrated program, then this student will be able to receive the undergraduate degree upon completion of all of the B.S. requirements. Undergraduate tuition rates will apply as long as the student is an undergraduate, unless the student receives financial support, for example, via an assistantship requiring the payment of graduate tuition.

Admission Requirements

Students who wish to complete the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program in Meteorology should apply for admission to both the Graduate School and the Integrated B.S./M.S. Program by no later than the end of their junior year. In this case, successful students will be admitted formally into the graduate program in Meteorology just prior to their senior year, if their progress has been satisfactory. Admission prior to the senior year is also possible in some unusual circumstances. In all cases, admission to the program will be at the discretion of the Graduate Admissions Officer for the Department of Meteorology, who will determine the necessary criteria for all applicants. These criteria include the setting of the minimum required scores on the GRE and minimum cumulative GPA for consideration, the receipt of recommendation letters from three faculty and a letter of support from the department head, and the identification of an adviser who is willing to oversee the student's research project; normally, evidence of significant research potential must be provided in the application as well.

Degree Requirements

The total degree requirements are as follows: The new program will fulfill the present rigorous requirements of the existing M.S. Program. In particular, all IUG students must defend their theses or papers, as do all M.S. students, in a public presentation toward the end of their graduate program.

B.S. Degree Portion:

TOTAL B.S. REQUIREMENTS: 121 credits (12 double-counted with the M.S. Requirements)

General Education: 45 credits, 24 of which are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

Requirements for the Major (All Options): 75 credits

Prescribed Courses: 56 credits
Additional Courses: 19 credits

Requirements for the General Option: 18-19 credits

M.S. Degree Portion:

TOTAL M.S. REQUIREMENTS: 30 credits (12 double-counted with the B.S. Requirements)

Prescribed Courses: METEO 520, 521, 533, 535 (12 credits)

Additional Courses: 18 credits

6 credits of 500-level course work
6 credits of 400- or 500-level course work
6 credits of METEO 600 (thesis option)
or 6 credits of 400- or 500-level course work

35-02-122 Add. Add new Intercollege Graduate M.S. Degree Program in Molecular Medicine.

35-02-123 Add. Add new Intercollege Graduate Ph.D. Degree Program in Molecular Medicine.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Molecular Medicine (MM)

Degrees Conferred : Ph. D., M.S.

The Intercollege Graduate Program in Molecular Medicine (IGDP in MM) prepares graduates for diverse opportunities in academic institutions, pharmaceutical companies, private research foundations, governmental research and regulatory programs. The program includes faculty from 14 academic units in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Eberly College of Science at the University Park campus and the College of Medicine at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. The IGDP in MM is also supported by the Huck Institutes of Life Sciences which provides modern telecommunications facilities and sophisticated equipment for state-of-the-art research applications. Doctoral students not only explore new conceptual connections, but also engage in active group learning experiences and explore a variety of potential career opportunities before graduation. Two unique aspects are (1) optional dual mentors will expose students to complementary viewpoints and encourage students to pursue problems at the interface between traditional disciplines, and (2) an optional internship will provide a mechanism for students to obtain practical experience in future professional settings.

General Admission Requirements

Ph.D. degrees

Application deadline is December 1 for priority consideration.

  1. Completed official Penn State Graduate School application for the IGDP in Molecular Medicine
  2. Paid nonrefundable application fee
  3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended
  4. Application for a U.S. visa (International applicants only)
  5. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test
  6. Three letters of recommendation
  7. Statement of goals that pertains to the life sciences
  8. All international applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or master’s degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) examination. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper test, a score of 213 on the computer-based test, or a score of 80 on the internet-based test is required.
  9. Students must have completed a bachelor’s degree at an accredited college or university and have a minimum of a 3.0/4.0 junior/senior undergraduate grade-point average.

Program Requirements

Ph.D. degrees

1. Foundation of basic knowledge in cancer biology, toxicology, immunology, infectious diseases, molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry. The IGDP in MM requires at least 9 credits in one or more of these disciplines. Students may request a waiver of a required if they have taken the specific course as an undergraduate or a similar course at another institution. The request will be made in writing to the campus curriculum committee after consultation with the co-chair. The following courses are to fulfill this requirement.

University Park

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (B M B)
464. Molecular Medicine (3 credits)

BIOCHEMISTRY, MICROBIOLOGY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BMMB)
501. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (5 credits)

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
VBS/IBIOS 511. Molecular Immunology (2 credits)
590. Colloquium(1 credit)
591. Ethics in Life Sciences (1 credit)
596. Independent Studies: 3 Laboratory Rotations (1 credit)

Penn State Hershey

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BCHEM)
502. Core Biochemistry (3 credits)
520. Core Molecular Genetics (3 credits)

CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (CMBIO)
540. Core Cell Biology (3 credits)

INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS)
590. Colloquium (1 credit)
591. Ethics in Life Sciences (1 credit)
596. Independent Studies: 3 Laboratory Rotations (1 credit)

MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (MICRO)
503. Core Molecular Biology (3 credits)

To augment the core sequences of courses, students and their research committees will formulate an individualized advanced curriculum. Additionally, opportunities to participate in an internship (IBIOS 595) or supervised college teaching experiences (IBIOS 602/VBS 602) are available. Interested graduate students are to discuss the opportunity with a MM IGDP Co-Chair and/or their faculty advisor.

IBIOS 595. INTERNSHIP (1 credit). For students interested in exploring academic, government, medical, law, or business corporate approaches to research. This is an external work assignment relevant to individual research or career goals. Interested graduate students are to discuss the opportunity with the IGDP in MM co-chair and/or their faculty advisor.

IBIOS 602/VBS 602. SUPERVISED EXPERIENCE IN COLLEGE TEACHING (1 credit). All students are strongly encouraged to enroll for 1 credit (or the equivalent) of Supervised Experience in College Teaching before the beginning of their third year. International fellows from non-English speaking countries must pass an English proficiency exam before any teaching duties are assigned.

M.S. Degree Requirements

Although the graduate program in Molecular Medicine generally gives admission to students who seek the Ph.D. degree, on occasion, the program may allow candidates to pursue the Master of Science (M.S.) degree. This degree can also serve as an alternative for students who do not proceed to the Ph.D. for any number of reasons. It should be noted that an M.S. degree is not required for entry into the Ph.D. program of the Molecular Medicine IGDP. Masters students must have a minimum of 30 credits and a 3.0 overall GPA. IBIOS 595 (Internship), 596 (Rotations), and 602 (Teaching) credits all count toward the 30 credits. Eighteen credits need to be in the major at the 500-600 level.

Student Aid

Graduate assistantships available in this program and other forms of student aid are described in the STUDENT AID section of the Graduate Bulletin. Under normal circumstances, all students admitted and continuing in good standing are provided with graduate assistantship support from University sources, research grants, or fellowships. Financial support is usually not provided for work toward a M.S. degree.

For course descriptions see the corresponding URLs.

INTEGRATED BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS) course list

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (B M B) course list

BIOCHEMISTRY, MICROBIOLOGY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BMMB) course list

VETERINARY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (VBS) course list

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BCHEM) course list

MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (MICRO) course list

CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (CMBIO) course list

BIOLOGY (BIOL) course list

MICROBIOLOGY (MICRB) course list

STATISTICS (STAT) course list

HEALTH EVALUATION SCIENCES (HES) course list

PHYSIOLOGY (PSIO) course list

PHARMACOLOGY (PHARM) course list

PATHOLOGY (PATH) course list

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500-599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

35-02-124 Add new Intercollege Graduate M.S. Degree Program in Molecular Toxicology.

35-02-125 Add new Intercollege Graduate Ph.D. Degree Program in Molecular Toxicology.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2007

Molecular Toxicology

Degrees Conferred: Ph. D., M.S.

The Intercollege Graduate Program in Molecular Toxicology (IGDP in MT) prepares graduates for diverse opportunities in academic institutions, pharmaceutical companies, private research foundations, governmental research and regulatory programs. The program includes faculty from eight departments in the College of Agricultural Sciences, Health and Human Development and Eberly College of Science at the University Park campus and the College of Medicine at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. The IGDP in MT is also supported by the Huck Institutes of Life Sciences which provides modern telecommunications facilities and sophisticated equipment for state-of-the-art research applications. Doctoral students not only explore new conceptual connections, but also engage in active group learning experiences and explore a variety of potential career opportunities before graduation. Two unique aspects are (1) optional dual mentors will expose students to complementary viewpoints and encourage students to pursue problems at the interface between traditional disciplines, and (2) an optional internship will provide a mechanism for students to obtain “real world” experience in future professional settings.

General Admission Requirements

M.S. or Ph.D. degrees

Application deadline is January 10 for priority consideration.

  1. Completed official Penn State Graduate School application
  2. Paid nonrefundable application fee
  3. Two official transcripts from each institution attended
  4. Completed Integrative Biosciences Graduate Degree Program application
  5. Application for a U.S. visa (International applicants only)
  6. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test
  7. Three letters of recommendation
  8. Statement of goals that pertains to the life sciences
  9. International applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or master's degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English, must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Second Language) and submit the results of that test with the application for admission. A TOEFL score of 550 on the paper test, a score of 213 on the computer-based test, or 80 points on the internet-based test with a minimum of 23 points on the speaking portion is required for admission.
  10. Students must have completed a bachelor’s degree at an accredited college or university and have a minimum of a 3.0/4.0 junior/senior undergraduate grade-point average.

Additional English Requirement for International Students (both M.S. and Ph.D.)

International applicants whose first language is not English or who have not received baccalaureate or master's degrees from an institution in which the language of instruction is English, whether or not they hold a Teaching Assistantship, will be required to take the AEOCPT (American English Oral Communicative Proficiency Test) prior to entering the classroom. The AEOCPT is given at the beginning of fall and spring semesters. All international students are required to pre-register for this test. This test is administered at the University Park campus, thus students from the Hershey campus are required to take the test at the University Park campus. Below is the course of action for the score ranges:

* At the end of this course, students are re-tested. Based upon these test results, students are either approved for teaching, placed in a subsequent ESL course, or asked to retake the course. Students, who are required to enroll in ESL courses, must complete the ESL requirement by the end of the second semester of residency. As noted above, the ESL courses are taught at the University Park campus, thus students from the Hershey campus must attend these courses at the University Park campus, or receive suitable coursework at Hershey, if available. Students who fail to satisfy this requirement may be terminated from the IGDP in MT program, at the discretion of the Co-Chairs.

Program Requirements


M.S. or Ph.D. degrees

  1. Foundation of basic knowledge in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular toxicology. The IGDP in MT requires at least 9 credits in one or more of these disciplines, taken either as an undergraduate or as a part of the graduate curriculum. The following courses are requirements for respective campuses.

University Park students

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (B M B)
400. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE GENE (3 credits)

VETERINARY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (VB SC)
433. MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR TOXICOLOGY (3 credits)

VETERINARY SCIENCE (V SC)
V SC/IBIOS 530. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION (2 credits)

Hershey Medical Center Students

CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (CMBIO)
502. CORE BIOCHEMISTRY (3 credits)
503. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3 credits)

PHARMACOLOGY (PHARM)
520. PRINCIPLES OF DRUG ACTION (2 credits)

In addition to these required courses, electives must also be taken to fulfill the required number of academic credits for either an M.S. or Ph.D. degrees.

  1. IBIOS 570 MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY SEMINAR (2 credits, 1 per semester during any of the first four semesters in residence), a monthly colloquium that will present molecular toxicology topics of general interest to all faculty and graduate students in the IGDP in MT.
  2. IBIOS 590 COLLOQUIUM (2 credits) All students are required to enroll for 4 credits of Colloquium. Students typically take this course in the Fall and Spring semesters of their first year. In Colloquium, students are introduced to a wide variety of topics of contemporary and future importance in the life sciences. A particular focus is placed on topics where science is likely to impact on society (and society on science). Topics are drawn from the area introduced by the speaker and can span the entire spectrum from basic research to the social, legal, moral and ethical implications of the science. A significant challenge in Colloquium is to organize and coordinate a presentation using contemporary presentation software, such as PowerPoint, in an environment in which part of the audience is present at a remote site. Students are required to attend the lectures and the dinners following the lectures. Students also participate in the group presentations during discussion sessions and submit written reports. Reports may be submitted to the co-chairs of the IGDP who may add them to the student's permanent record. Students receive A-F quality grades.
  3. IBIOS 591. ETHICS IN THE LIFE SCIENCES (1 credit) Usually taken the Fall semester of their second year, students exam integrity and misconduct in life sciences research, including issues of data collection, publication, authorship, and peer review. Students receive A-F quality grades.
  4. IBIOS 595. INTERNSHIP (1 credit, optional) For students interested in exploring academic, government, medical, law, or business corporate approaches to research. This is an external work assignment relevant to individual research or career goals. Students receive an R (satisfactory/passing) or U (unsatisfactory/failing). Only R credits are counted for credit totals. Students typically participate in an internship the summer of their first or second year. Contacts, positions, applications, course registration, course requirements, and grading are processed through the Eberly College of Science Cooperative Education Program (814-865-5000). Additional credits of IBIOS 595 are at the expense of the student. Interested graduate students are to discuss the opportunity with the IGDP in MT chair and/or their faculty advisor.
  5. IBIOS 596. INDEPENDENT STUDIES: LABORATORY ROTATIONS (1-3 credits per semester) For students exploring potential Ph.D. projects and faculty advisors. Students receive a R (satisfactory/passing) or F (unsatisfactory/failing). Only R credits are counted for credit totals.
  6. IBIOS 597(optional, variable credits) SPECIAL TOPICS
  7. IBIOS 600. THESIS RESEARCH (1-9 per semester) For students who have been matched with a faculty advisor AND have not taken/passed their comprehensive exams. Students may receive A-F grades or R/F grades at any time. By the time a student passes his/her comprehensive exam, up to 12 credits worth of IBIOS 600 may have the A-F quality grade.
  8. IBIOS 601. THESIS PREPARATION (0 per semester) For those students who passed their comprehensive exams. This course appears on the transcript but does not have any grade or credit associated with it.
  9. V SC 602/IBIOS 602. SUPERVISED EXPERIENCE IN COLLEGE TEACHING (1 credit, optional) All students are strongly encouraged to enroll for 1 credit (or the equivalent) of Supervised Experience in College Teaching before the beginning of their third year. Students typically take this course during the Fall semester of their second year. To encourage teaching experience in toxicological sciences, students will be encouraged to enroll in VSC 602 for supervised experience in college teaching for a toxicology-related courses (VSC 433, VSC 430, ERM 431). As an alternative, after consulting with their respective advisor, students may elect to enroll in IBIOS 602. Teaching at Hershey is arranged by the Co-Chairs of the IGDP and Co-Director of Graduate Education for the IBIOS program. Students receive A-F grades on their transcripts but these grades are not computed in with the overall GPA. International fellows must pass an English proficiency exam before any teaching duties are assigned.
  10. The Graduate School requires all graduate students to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average.

M.S. Degree Requirements

Masters students must have a minimum of 30 credits and a 3.0 overall GPA. If pursuing a masters thesis option, up to 6 IBIOS 600 credits may be A-F graded. Eighteen credits must be at the 500-600 level, and a minimum of 12 credits need to be in the major at the 400-600 level (excluding IBIOS 600). The student selects a thesis committee (upon consultation with faculty advisor), writes a thesis, and defends his/her work. If pursuing a masters non-thesis option, the student must have a first authored manuscript (based on his/her research) that has been either accepted and/or published in a peer reviewed journal. Additionally, if pursuing a masters nonthesis option, 18 credits need to be in the major at the 500 level. The manuscript is given to at least the faculty advisor and the IGDP Chair for evaluation. IBIOS 595 (Internship) and 596 (Rotations) credits count toward the 30 credits. However, the 602 (Teaching) optional credits do not count toward the 30 credits. All IGDP in Molecular Toxicology graduate students must successfully take the following list of required courses and/or electives during the first two years of their graduate education. If all course credits and requirements are met, students do not have to be registered for classes while writing and/or defending his/her work.

Year 1-Fall Semester
University Park Hershey
Course
Credits
Course
Credits
B M B 400 Molecular Biology of the Gene
3
CMBIO 502 Core Biochemistry
3
IBIOS 570 Molecular Toxicology Seminar
2
PHARM 590 Pharmacology Colloquium
1
IBIOS 590 Colloquium
2
IBIOS 590 Colloquium
2
IBIOS 596 Independent Studies, Laboratory Rotations
1-2
IBIOS 596 Independent Studies, Laboratory Rotations
1-2
VB SC 430 Principles of Toxicology
3
PHARM 520 Principles of Drug Action
2
Graduate Elective
2-4
Graduate Elective
2-4
Year 1-Spring Semester
University Park Hershey
Course
Credits
Course
Credits
V SC/IBIOS 530 Regulation of Gene Expression
2
CMBIO 503 Molecular Biology
3
IBIOS 570 Molecular Toxicology Seminar
2
PHARM 590 Pharmacology Colloquium
1
IBIOS 590 Colloquium
2
IBIOS 590 Colloquium
2
IBIOS 600 Thesis Research
1-2
IBIOS 600 Thesis Research
1-2
VB SC 433 Molecular and Cellular Toxicology
3
Graduate Elective
3-6
Graduate Elective
3-6
Year 2-Fall Semester
University Park Hershey
Course
Credits
Course
Credits
IBIOS 570 Molecular Toxicology Seminar
2
PHARM 590 Pharmacology Colloquium
1
IBIOS 591 Ethics in Life Sciences
1
IBIOS 591 Ethics in Life Sciences
1
IBIOS 600 Thesis Research
3-6
IBIOS 600 Thesis Research
3-6
IBIOS/V SC 602* Supervised Teaching
1
IBIOS 602* Supervised Teaching
1
Graduate Electives
3-6
Graduate Electives
3-6
 
Year 2-Spring Semester
University Park Hershey
Course
Credits
Course
Credits
IBIOS 570 Molecular Toxicology Seminar
2
PHARM 590 Pharmacology Colloquium
1
IBIOS 600 Thesis Research
3-6
IBIOS 600 Thesis Research
3-6
Graduate Electives
3-6
Graduate Electives
3-6

*Optional

Students must present their thesis in accordance with the Penn State guidelines as described in the THESIS GUIDE Requirements for the Preparation of Master's and Doctoral Theses. Current copies may be obtained from web site: http://www.gradsch.psu.edu/current/thesis/guide.html, or from the Thesis Office, 115 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802; 814-865-5448.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Ph.D. students must have a minimum of 30 credits and a 3.0 overall GPA. If pursuing a masters thesis option, up to 6 IBIOS 600 credits may be A-F graded and 12 credits need to be in the major at the 400-600 level (excluding IBIOS 600). The course requirements are essentially the same as that required for the M.S. degree listed above, with some discretion left to the student and advisor.

Grade Point Average/Unsatisfactory Scholarship

Students are required to maintain an overall 3.0 GPA throughout the program, and, in particular, must have a 3.0 to take the doctoral candidacy, the comprehensive examination, and the final oral examination. One or more failing grades or a cumulative grade-point average below 3.0 may be considered evidence of unsatisfactory scholarship and may be grounds for dismissal from the IGDP in MT.

English competence

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy for the IGDP in MT is required to demonstrate a high-level competence in the use of the English language, including reading, writing and speaking, as part of the language and communication requirements for the Ph.D. Programs are expected to establish mechanisms for assessing and improving competence of both domestic and international students. Towards this goal, all students must participate in the IBIOS 590 colloquium, which includes assessment of reading, original writing and speaking skills. International students must also demonstrate proficiency of the English language as part of the Additional English Requirement for teaching described above. During the coursework prior to the candidacy examination, candidates will be assessed for communicative competence in reading, writing and speaking English. Should a higher level of competence be required, the candidate will be directed to the appropriate resources. International students are advised that the passage of the minimum TOEFL requirements does not demonstrate the level of competence required for completion of the Ph.D. program. English competence must be demonstrated before the doctoral comprehensive examination is scheduled. Besides coursework, research, and teaching, IGDP Molecular Toxicology doctoral students participate in the following:

Candidacy Exam

The Candidacy Exam is uniquely designed for each student. The exam should be taken by the end or during the student's third semester in the Integrative Biosciences Graduate Program. The student will be assigned a scientific paper from the Biochemical literature to read and analyze; the paper will be selected based upon the student's background and coursework. The analysis should involve exploring the relevant literature as well as the fundamental issues in toxicology, biochemistry and biology. The student will be given 10 days to write a 3 page single space review. At the same time as the paper is assigned a meeting of the committee should be arranged for a 60-90 min oral exam by the committee to review the written assignment and discuss other issues. The committee meeting shall be within 21 days of the original assignment of the paper. The student is not required to make a formal oral presentation, but should have overheads of the data for discussion purposes. The student should be able to integrate knowledge about chemical and biological aspects of the paper and understand and evaluate the experimental design, rationale, results, and the authors' interpretation of their work. In the event that the student does not pass this exam, the student's committee will make a recommendation as to whether to offer another opportunity or to terminate the student's enrollment in the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Evaluation via the Doctoral Committee to determine the feasibility of proposed research and the preparedness of the student. Students must be registered for classes (typically IBIOS 600) the semester they take this exam.

Doctoral Committee

Upon successful completion of the Candidacy Examination, the student in consultation with the advisor will, as soon as possible, select a doctoral committee. The committee will consist of the advisor, two members of the IGDP in MT and up to two faculty members who are not a member of the IGDP in MT. If the student has selected the option of having dual advisors, then both of the advisors will be on the doctoral committee, along with two members of the IGDP in MT and one faculty member who is not a member of the IGDP in MT. If the faculty members from the IGDP in MT on the committee are also members of the same department, the one faculty member who is not a member of the IGDP in MT must be from a different department. This committee is responsible for supervising the academic program and monitoring the progress of the student towards his/her degree. Doctoral Thesis Committee Composition is based on the 04-06 Graduate Degree Programs Bulletin prepared by the Graduate
School regarding Doctoral Committees (http://www.psu.edu/bulletins/whitebook/$gradreqs.htm) and requires:

Ph.D. Defense

Evaluation via the Doctoral Committee of the thesis research. Students must present their thesis in accordance with the Penn State guidelines as described in the THESIS GUIDE Requirements for the Preparation of Master's and Doctoral Theses. Current copies may be obtained from web site: http://www.gradsch.psu.edu/current/thesis/guide.html, or from the Thesis Office, 115 Kern Building, University Park, PA 16802; 814-865-5448.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (B M B) course list

CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (CMBIO) course list

INTEGRATED BIOSCIENCES (IBIOS) course list

PHARMACOLOGY (PHARM) course list

VETERINARY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (VB SC) course list

VETERINARY SCIENCE (V SC) course list

COURSE ADDS

35-02-126 AERSP 603
Foreign Academic Experience
FOREIGN ACAD EXP (1-12)
Foreign study and/or research constituting progress toward the degree at a foreign university.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

35-02-127 BUSAD 519
Developing Creative High Performance Organizations
DEVELOPCREATIVORGS (3)
This course focuses on how to create high performing organizations based on models provided by business, science and the arts.
PREREQUISITE: 6 graduate credits in business
CROSS LIST: LEAD 519
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-128 EGEE 603
Foreign Academic Experience
FOREIGN ACAD EXP (1-12)
Foreign study and/or research constituting progress toward the degree at a foreign university.
PROPOSED START: FA2006

35-02-129 LEAD 519
Developing Creative High Performance Organizations
DEVELOPCREATIVORGS (3)
This course focuses on how to create high performing organizations based on models provided by business, science and the arts.
PREREQUISITE: 6 graduate credits in business
CROSS LIST: BUSAD 519
PROPOSED START: SP2007

APPENDIX D
Dickinson School of Law

COURSE ADDS

35-02-130 INTER 951
Introduction to Transnational Law and Legal Issues
INTRO TRANNTL LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This is the introductory course to the issues and analysis in transnational law, that is of legal issues crossing borders.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-131 LABOR 962
Employment Law Survey Part II - Privacy, Wage, ERISA, Anti-Discrimination Law Employment Law Survey Part I - Basic Common Law and Workplace Health and Safety
EMPLOYMENT LAW II (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course surveys workplace privacy, wage laws, anti-discrimination law, and employment benefits.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-132 LABOR 963
Employment Law Survey Part I - Basic Common Law and Workplace Health and Safety Employment Law Survey Part II - Privacy, Wage, ERISA, Anti-Discrimination Law
EMPLOYMENT LAW II (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course surveys at-will employment, covenants not to compete, trade secrets, and workplace health and safety.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
35-02-133 CCLAW 961
Debtor and Creditor Law
DEBTOR/CREDITOR LW (2-3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
The rights, duties, and remedies of both debtor and creditor are examined. The course covers the collection process, enforcement of money judgments and insolvency proceedings. Federal bankruptcy law is emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: CCLAW 952
APPROVED START: FA2005

NEW
REMOVE PREREQUISITE
PROPOSED START: FA2006

OLD
35-02-134 CCLAW 976
Lawyering and Ethics for the Business Attorney Seminar
BUSINESS LAW ETHIC (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This Seminar focuses on the special ethical and professional responsibility issues that confront attorneys who represent business entities.
PREREQUISITE: CORE 934 and CCLAW 963
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 931
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-135 CL&CR 955
Citizenship Seminar: U.S. & International Perspectives
CITIZENSHIP SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar will closely examine the concept of citizenship, both as a legal status and as a normative concern, from both U.S. and international perspectives.
APPROVED START: S12004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 904
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-136 CL&CR 975
Protection of Individual Rights Under State Constitutions Seminar
STATE CONSTL RTS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
With the perception that the federal judiciary is increasingly hostile to constitutional claims, individuals have turned to state constitutions as an independent source of rights in civil and criminal litigation. This course will explore the unique procedures and methods of state constitutional rights interpretation. In lieu of an examination, persons enrolled in the course will brief and argue questions of state constitutional law in an arena where the United States Constitution fails to afford protection. (Offered in alternate years.)
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 933
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-137 CL&CR 990
Religious Liberty Seminar
RELIGIOUS LIBERTY (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The basic vehicle for this seminar will be recent court decisions, especially those of the United States Supreme Court. These decisions will compel students to see the interplay between the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses and concepts of due process, equal protection, and privacy. The relevance of the factual record and procedural history and posture is explored.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 935
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-138 FMEST 961
Elder Law Seminar
ELDER LAW SEMINAR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course presents students with opportunities for advanced research and writing in elder law, allowing them to draw on their experiences in other classes, including the Elder Law Clinic and the Elder Law Workshop. Students are required to write a paper and to make a presentation in class.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 912
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-139 GOVMT 953
Education Law Seminar
EDUCATION LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course covers the basic premises of compulsory education; issues concerning exclusion of students; school control of student behavior and curriculum; teacher employment problems; and issues of funding, minority rights, and school liability.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 911
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-140 GOVMT 967
Federal Regulatory and Legislative Practice Seminar
FED REG & LEG SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
A seminar devoted to exploring the details of federal regulatory and legislative practice in Washington, D.C.
APPROVED START: FA2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 914
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-141 GOVMT 972
Military Law Seminar
MILITARY LAW SMNR (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
A study of the various rules of domestic and international law that affect the United States Armed Forces as to both the internal and external operations of the military services. Coverage will include an introduction to the special rules of criminal law applicable to military personnel and the rules concerning membership in the Armed Forces. The course will also cover issues related to the tort liability of the Armed Forces and the rights and obligations of the Armed Forces as purchasers of goods and services and as owners of property. Finally, the course will examine the impact of treaties and conventions upon the operations of the Armed Forces.
APPROVED START: FA2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 932
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-142 GOVMT 998
The Supreme Court Seminar
THE SUPREME COURT (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The Supreme Court, including procedure and practice, principles of adjudication, and history, as well as the topics of the current term are studied. Students are required to present analyses of current cases as well as an analytical paper on approved topics of constitutional law.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 938
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-143 HLTHL 962
Food and Drug Law Seminar
FOOD & DRUG LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will deal with federal regulations covering the processing and distribution of food and drugs. It will treat enforcement procedures and liability for violation of the statutes as well as incidental treatment of federal interface with state regulations.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 915
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-144 HLTHL 970
Law and Individuals with Disabilities Seminar
DISABILITIES LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
Major issues and concepts in law and social policy regarding individuals with handicaps are introduced. Topics include: income maintenance programs, special education, federal and state anti-discrimination laws, accessibility, special health issues, institutionalization and deinstitutionalization.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 926
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-145 HLTHL 976
Health Law Seminar
HEALTH LAW SMNR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar gives students an opportunity to study in depth one or two topics in health law to give them experience in delving deeply into a health law topic as they would in practice and to supplement the introductory health law courses. The topic(s) studied in any iteration of the seminar would change from year to year depending upon what is current or of particular interest to the participants.
APPROVED START: S12002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 919
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-146 INTER 955
Comparative Commercial Law Seminar
CMPRTVE COMM LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course contrasts principal European systems and their American analogues with emphasis on marketing rules prevailing in civilian and common law systems. It trains participants to deal with lawyers and clients in international transactions involving both the civilian and common law. The historical roots of the civil law system are also covered. Materials on private foreign investments and international commercial law are considered. Principal international trade controls, such as the UNCITRAL Convention on International Sales of Goods and the Uniform Customs and Practices for letters of credit of the International Chamber of Commerce are addressed. (Offered in alternate years.)
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 906
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-147 INTER 956
Comparative Law Seminar
COMPARATIVE LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
An introduction to civil law tradition and to the modern legal systems in Europe, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia that have grown out of or have been substantially influenced by it. This course provides a foundation for subsequent study of international business transactions, East European law, private international law, and the law of such international organizations as the European Community, the Central American Common Market, and the Andean Pact. Emphasis will be given to procedural problems faced by domestic courts when they have to decide cases involving foreign law and the fundamental differences in approach and method between common law and civil law. (Offered in alternate years.)
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 908
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-148 INTER 960
Cross-Border Legal Practice Seminar
CRS-BORDR LEGAL PR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar will focus on two different themes. It will explore what it means to be a lawyer in the United States in comparison with what it means to be a lawyer in other countries. Among other things, participants will discuss the lawyer's role in society and the type of conduct that is regulated. This course will also examine the cross-border practice regulation that has emerged in response to the increasingly common circumstance of lawyers who handle a matter in a country other than their own.
PREREQUISITE: (for J.D. students): CORE 934
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 910
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-149 INTER 963
European Union Law Seminar
EUROPEAN UNION LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines basic principles of the Union legal system, such as free movement of goods, persons, services, and capital, the right of establishment, common commercial policy, and foreign policy. It also examines the organization and functions of the Union's institutions and contrasts the United States federal experience. The relationship between Union law and the legal systems of member states will be addressed along with the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice. The relevance of the Union experience to the evolution of other common markets in North and South America and Asia will also be addressed.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 913
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-150 INTER 967
International Commercial Arbitration Seminar
INTL COMM ARB SEM (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This seminar addresses the necessity and function of arbitration in global commerce, focusing primarily upon enforcement of arbitral agreements and awards.
APPROVED START: FA2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 920
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-151 INTER 970
International Environmental Law Seminar
INTL ENVIRON LAW (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines how international law addresses global and regional environmental problems, including transboundary air pollution, climate change, ozone depletion, marine pollution, and the loss of biological diversity. It also looks at the potential conflicts between international trade agreements and environmental laws.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 921
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-152 INTER 972
International Protection of Human Rights Seminar
INTL HUMAN RIGHTS (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar provides an introduction to international human rights law and procedures. It examines what are "human rights" and explores the law of treaty interpretation, how human rights law is incorporated into domestic legal systems, and the role of international governmental organizations, international and regional courts, and non-governmental organizations in protecting human rights. Students also learn how to research international law and how to write legal analysis based on international law.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 922
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-153 INTER 980
"The United Nations and International Law Seminar"
U.N. SEMINAR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
An examination of the history, structure, and operating philosophy of, and legal issues confronting, the United Nations.
APPROVED START: S12004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 941
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-154 INTER 982
International Refugee Law
REFUGEE LAW SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course is intended to provide an introduction to the basic framework of international refugee law. It begins by laying out the historical political and philosophical background to the development of the concept of "refugee" in the twentieth century. It examines this legal framework within the context of the broader human rights system. The cradinal provisions of the principal international instruments establishing this framework--in particular the 1951 UN Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol thereto - are examined against the domestic legal regime establishing the substantive, procedural and evidentiary requirements for making a claim for asylum under U.S. law.
APPROVED START: S12006

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 923
CHANGE LONG TITLE: International Refugee Law Seminar
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-155 INTPR 970
Law of Artistic Persons and Properties Seminar
LAW & THE ARTS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The objectives of this course include an examination of the interface between law and the arts with an eye to both theoretical and practical implications and a striving to identify creative and serviceable solutions to the problems that have frustrated the growth and harvest of the creative effort. The investigation will be directed toward subject areas that reflect functional divisions within the arts; i.e., the visual arts, dance, music, the literary arts, and areas such as television and film. The course includes a mandatory field trip to New York City at the student's expense.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 927
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-156 PERSP 950
Anglo-American Legal History Seminar
ANGLO-AMER LEG HIS (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will examine various British and American legal institutions and issues through a historical perspective. Topics likely to be covered include: (1) the development of Anglo-Saxon Common Law; (2) leading Anglo-American judges, commentators, and historians; (3) political/legal conflicts; (4) problems of wealth, poverty, and race; and (5) the legal profession and legal education. This course will attempt to develop greater awareness of the antecedents of modern legal doctrine and of long-term trends such as the expanding role of government and the "nationalization" of law and legal institutions.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 902
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-157 PERSP 967
Gender and the Law Seminar
GENDER & THE LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The role of gender in the development of modern law is considered in a variety of contexts. Among the topics are discrimination in pay and conditions of employment, psychological and sociological criminal defenses, pornography, spousal abuse, reproductive rights, and issues of child custody, support, and property division.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 917
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-158 PERSP 968
Gender, Culture and International Human Rights Seminar
CULTURE/HUMAN RTS (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This Seminar examines issues in international human rights law raised by gender and cultural difference.
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 918
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-159 PERSP 970
Jurisprudence Seminar
JURISPRUDENCE SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar investigates myriad theories about law. It is an aim of this offering to afford students a vehicle whereby they might test and place in perspective many of the theories of law gleaned from classroom work and personal experience.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 925
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-160 PERSP 974
Law, Science, and Policy Seminar
LAW SCI&POL SMNR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course will identify diverse areas in which advances in technology have posed challenges to society and law and will study select topics within those areas in order to ground the participants in the relevant legal, scientific, and ethical principles and jurisprudential and social theories. Subjects addressed include issues in biotechnology, such as cloning, transgenics, xenotransplantation, and pharmaceutical development; the ownership of biotechnological products; experimentation with humans and animals; human and animal rights concerns; environmental bioremediation; and non-lethal defense
technologies.
APPROVED START: SP2002

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 930
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-161 PERSP 980
The Theory of Property Rights Seminar
PROPERTY RTS SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar considers the theoretical foundations of property rights regimes from sociological, historical, political, philosophical, and economic perspectives.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 940
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-162 PERSP 985
Race, Racism, and American Law Seminar
RACE & AMER LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
The purpose of this seminar is to facilitate discussion and understanding of the role law has played in both the subordination and promotion of the rights of people of color in America.
APPROVED START: FA1998

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 934
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-163 PERSP 986
Sexual Orientation and the Law Seminar
SEXUAL ORIENTATION (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar explores the ways in which the law and social policy regulates and accounts for sexual orientation.
APPROVED START: FA2003

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 936
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-164 PERSP 998
Special Topics Seminar
SPECIAL SEMINAR (2-3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
No description.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 900
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Advanced Corporate Tax Seminar
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: This seminar will cover two main topics: Taxation of Executive Compensation and Corporate Mergers & Acquisitions.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-165 RP&EL 989
International Trade and the Environment Seminar
TRADE/ENVIRON SEM (2-3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
Coverage of the conflicts between international trade law and environmental protection.
APPROVED START: FA2005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 924
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-166 RP&EL 990
Wildlife Law Seminar
WILDLIFE SEMINAR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar examines domestic and international law on the protection of wildlife.
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 942
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-167 SKILS 956
Advanced Evidence Seminar
ADV EVIDENCE SEM (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
An advanced investigation of topics in the law of evidence.
PREREQUISITE: CORE 933
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 901
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-168 SKILS 961
Conflict Resolution Theory Seminar
CONFLICT THEORY (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This seminar is a capstone offering available to students about to complete the certificate program in Dispute Resolution and Advocacy and to other students to the extent that space is available. The seminar will examine theories of conflict and conflict resolution, including game theory, economic theories, psychological and cognitive theories, and persuasion theory, procedural justice issues, and social and literary phenomena relating to conflict. The seminar will draw heavily on sources in the social sciences and humanities, as well as on legal sources. The precise content of the seminar will vary from year to year depending upon the interests of the instructor, the interests of the students, and recent contributions to scholarships in the field.
PREREQUISITE: SKILS 950, SKILS 960, and one of , SKILS 962, INTER 967, or SKILS 959 which may be taken concurrently
APPROVED START: SP2004

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 909
PROPOSED START: SP2007

OLD
35-02-169 TAX 990
Tax Policy Seminar
TAX POLICY SMNR (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course examines the fundamental issues in tax policy, focusing on trends and on current legislative proposals. Specific subjects include the underpinnings of the various tax systems, the tax legislative process, the use of tax structure and incentives to implement social and economic objectives, the legal methodology of controlling tax abuse, and similar subjects.
APPROVED START: S11999

NEW
CHANGE COURSE ABBREVIATION: SEM
CHANGE COURSE NUMBER: 939
PROPOSED START: SP2007

COURSE DROPS

35-02-170 LABOR 960
Employment Legislation
EMPLOYMENT LEGIS (3) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
State and federal statutory schemes regulating employment and workplaces including compensation for workplace injuries and diseases, occupational health and safety, unemployment compensation, wage and hour legislation, and employee benefit plans are examined.
PROPOSED START: SP2007

35-02-171 LABOR 961
The Employment Relationship
EMPLOYMENT LAW (2) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: Y
This course covers the legal regulation of the non-union employment relationship through common law theories and discrete statutes. The course is divided into five parts. First, the course considers the social and economic meaning of work and the historical foundations of legal regulation through contract law. Second, the course surveys the obligations that employers owe to third parties with regard to the conduct of their employees. Third, the course examines the obligations that third parties owe employers and employees, specifically the duty not to interfere with the employment relationship. Fourth, the course is principally concerned with the employer's obligations to its employees, principally in the areas of privacy and the limits on the ability to terminate employment. Finally, the course reviews the obligations that employees owe to their employers, both during the employment relationship and after termination.
PROPOSED START: SP2007