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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Arts and Architecture

40-02-001 Drop. Drop Digital Arts and Information Sciences and Technology Minor.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Digital Arts and Information Sciences and Technology Minor

University Park, College of Arts and Architecture (DGAIS)
University Park, College of Information Sciences and Technology

Information management skills are becoming an integral part of our lives and practices, including those who practice in the arts. The arts are becoming increasingly dependent upon electronic technologies that enable greater interactivity, rapid experimentation and dissemination, and new possibilities for creative expression through such mediums as computer modeling, digital imaging, animation and digital audio and video. The College of Arts and Architecture/IST minor provides students with a basic introduction to the core curriculum of the School of Information Sciences and Technology combined with a selection of interdisciplinary digital media courses in the arts. The Digital Arts/IST minor will focus on the creative and critical uses of the new technologies to produce digital graphic images, two and three dimensional models and rendering and moving animation and audio processing. As a result, students in both the arts and information science will be better prepared for personal and professional advancement by learning to explore digital media as fine art tools that engage them in critical and creative ways beyond the technical mastery of software and hardware.

Students must apply to the minor no later than the beginning of their 5th semester. A one-time tuition surcharge will be applied to all students enrolled in the minor. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in this minor.

Scheduling Recommendations by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENT FOR THE MINOR: 25 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (13 credits)
IST 110 GS(3), IST 210(4), IST 220(3) (Sem: 1-6)
LARCH 410(3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following list with at least 3 credits at the 400 level (Sem: 3-8)
ART 002 GA(3), ART 003 GA(3), ART 191(3), ART 201(3), ART 270(3), ART 314(4), ART 491(4), INART 258A GA(3), PHOTO 400(4)

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Smeal College of Business

40-02-001A Drop. Drop B.S. in Actuarial Science

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Actuarial Science

University Park, Smeal College of Business (ACTSC)

PROFESSOR AUSTIN JAFFE, Chair of the Department of Insurance and Real Estate

An actuary is a business professional who uses mathematical skills to define, analyze, and solve business and social problems. Actuaries generally are employed in life, health, and casualty insurance companies, consulting firms, and government.

The courses in the Actuarial Science major stress the application of mathematical and statistical concepts to the measurement of life and other contingencies, while at the same time giving the student a broad understanding of the business environment.

Actuarial Science majors are encouraged to begin the series of professional examinations leading to Associateship and Fellowship in either the Society of Actuaries (A.S.A./F.S.A.) or the Casualty Actuarial Society (A.C.A.S./F.C.A.S.). Graduating students will have studied four of the six subjects that must be passed to qualify as an A.S.A. and four of the seven subjects needed to qualify as an A.C.A.S. They commonly have passed at least the first two parts of these professional examinations by the time they graduate.

Entrance Requirement: To be eligible for entrance into the Actuarial Science (ACTSC) major, a degree candidate must be enrolled in the Smeal College of Business or the Division of Undergraduate Studies and satisfy requirements for entrance to the major.

Specific entrance requirements include:

  1. The degree candidate must be taking, or have taken, a program appropriate for entry to the major as shown in the bulletin, including approximately 60 credits of course work.
  2. Complete the following entrance to major requirements: ACCTG 211(4)[1]; ECON 102 GS(3); SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1]; ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3); MATH 140 GQ(4)[1]; and MATH 141(4)[1], FIN 301(3)[1]; MGMT 301(3)[1]; and MKTG 301(3)[1]. These courses must be completed by the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.
  3. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 prior to and through to the end of the semester during which the entrance to major process is carried out.

For the B.S. degree in Actuarial Science, a minimum of 130 credits is required with at least 15 credits at the 400 level.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 8 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 89 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses.)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (78 credits)
MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
ACCTG 211(4)[1], ECON 102 GS(3), FIN 301(3)[1], MGMT 301(3)[1], MKTG 301(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
B A 342(3), B A 411(3), B LAW 341(3), ECON 104 GS(3), MIS 204(3), SCM 301(3), ENGL 202D GWS(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 230(4), STAT 414(3), STAT 415(3)
INS 310W(3)[1], R M 302(3), R M 401(3)[1], R M 410(3)[1], R M 411(3)[1], R M 412(3)[1], R M 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (4 credits)
SCM 200 GQ(4)[1] or STAT 200 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (7 credits)
Select 4 credits: Attainment of 12th credit level proficiency in a single foreign language. Proficiency must be demonstrated by either examination or course work (credits count in Electives) (Sem: 1-4)
Select 3 credits of supporting coursework. See Department List. (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

 

 

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

40-02-002 Add. New Electrochemical Engineering Minor.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Electrochemical Engineering Minor

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

The electrochemical engineering minor is designed to equip students with the knowledge necessary to achieve the following educational objectives: become valuable contributors in addressing society’s clean energy needs and demands especially in the electrochemical power generation sector; and educators, practicing engineers, and national leaders in electrochemical energy conversion and storage. The minor integrates skill sets in fundamentals of electrochemistry (e.g. chemistry, physics, mathematics, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics) and electrochemical engineering applications (batteries, solar, flow and fuel cells, electrochemical synthesis and corrosion) to ensure successful career opportunities and growth within electrochemical power generation industries, government agencies, and academia. The curriculum should allow students in energy related programs such as chemical, civil, electrical, environmental, mechanical, and materials science and engineering to readily take advantage of the minor and be better prepared for careers in clean power generation and future green technologies.

The integration of knowledge and skills acquired through the inquiry-based teaching methods should enable students of the program to achieve the following student educational outcomes:

- solve problems relating to the production, storage, distribution and utilization of electrochemical energy and the associated environmental issues
- design and conduct experiments, acquire data, define, analyze, and interpret data, and solve practical, complex problems on a variety of electrochemical technologies such as batteries, solar cells, flow and fuel cells, electrolyzers, and supercapacitors
- integrate professional, ethical, social and environmental factors in electrochemical engineering design and problem solving and understand the impact of these factors on global energy issues
- develop the ability to communicate effectively in writing and orally and build teamwork
- acquire the desire for lifelong learning to maintain technical competence and keep abreast of new developments in the field.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

For the minor in Electrochemical Engineering, a minimum of 18 credits is required.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 18 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
E SC 455(3), EGEE 441(3), MATSE 421 (3) (Sem: 7-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (9 Credits)
Select 9 credits from EGEE 420(3), EGEE 436(3), EGEE 437(3), EME 407(3), M E 403(3) (Sem: 7-8)

40-02-003 Change. Add General Option, Human Geography Option, Nature-Society Geography Option; Increase number of credits required for major from 33 to 52 credits; Decrease number of credits required for degree from 124 to 120; Revise program description; Add GEOG 120, 122, 123, 124, 126, 128, 130, 310W, 311, 313, 333, 411, 411W, 412W, 417, 420Y, 423Y, 424, 425, 426Y, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 434, 436, 438W, 439, 462W, 463, 464, 467, 468, 493, 494, 495; Move Additional Course from Major to Additional Courses in various options; Remove GEOG 401W; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Geography

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (GEOBA)

PROFESSOR KARL S. ZIMMERER, Head

Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences offers a strong mix of human, physical, and technical components that comprise the core of the geography major. Undergraduate degrees in geography are offered in the Bachelor of Science (BS) and in the Bachelor of Arts (BA). Both programs offer an integrated course of study in which students learn fundamental concepts in physical and human geography while developing technical proficiency.

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) stresses the social and behavioral aspects of geography; the Bachelor of Science (BS) major stresses the discipline's environmental and technical perspectives. Both majors provide training in descriptive and analytical skills such as mapping and spatial analysis. Substantive course work in the Bachelor of Arts major focuses on the ways people have arranged themselves and their economic, social and political activities on the surface of the Earth. Combining geography with other areas of study allows students to choose from a broad range of topics in order to suit their individual interests. The BA Geography major is especially appropriate for students seeking a deeper understanding of the human experience and for students intending to pursue post-graduate work in geography or related disciplines.

Bachelor's degree program graduates may find employment in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies or in private firms that specialize in marketing and environmental research. Geographers make careers doing planning, environmental consulting, policy analysis, demographics, cartography, remote sensing, and geovisualization. They work for government agencies, non-profit and educational institutions, and industry.

Those students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in Geography may choose one of three areas of concentration:

GENERAL OPTION: This option is designed to serve the needs of students who want to learn about the various topics and perspectives that comprise the discipline of geography, with emphasis on social and behavioral components. The General option is appropriate both for students who intend to pursue postgraduate degrees and for students who want to emphasize a topic for which no option exists.

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY OPTION: This option offers a program for students interested in a well-rounded education in geography that stresses the social and behavioral aspects of the discipline, including economic geography and political economy; urban/regional development and planning; and cultural/historical geography. The Human Geography option is appropriate both for students who intend to pursue postgraduate degrees and for students who wish to enter careers related to planning, policy, and development.

NATURE-SOCIETY GEOGRAPHY OPTION: This option offers a program for students interested in the interactions between people and their environment that emphasized the complex linkages and multi-scalar processes between the biophysical environment and human societies. The Nature-Society Geography option is appropriate both for students who intend to pursue postgraduate degrees and for students who wish to enter careers related to environmental governance, human dimensions of global change, including climate change, livelihood and ecological sustainability, and ecosystem service provision.

For the B.A. degree in Geography, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 9 credits

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits
(3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)
(See description of Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements in this bulletin.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 52 credits[1]
(This includes 10 credits of General Education courses: 4 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 31 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (25 credits)
EM SC 100S GWS(3)[71] (Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 010 GN(3), GEOG 020 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 030 GS;IL(3), GEOG 160 GS(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 301(3), GEOG 364(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (6 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 493(3), GEOG 494(3), or GEOG 495(3) (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 21 credits

GENERAL OPTION: (21 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 111 GN(3), GEOG 115 GN(3),GEOG 310W(3), GEOG 311(3), GEOG 313(3), or GEOG 333(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 411(3), GEOG 411W(3), GEOG 412W(3), or GEOG 417(3) (Sem: 5-8)

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from GEOG 120 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 122 GH;US(3), GEOG 123 GS;IL(3), GEOG 124 GS;IL(3), GEOG 126 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 128 GS;IL(3), or GEOG 130 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 420Y US;IL(3),GEOG 423Y US(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 425 US(3), GEOG 426Y US;IL(3), GEOG 427 US;IL(3), GEOG 428 US(3), GEOG 429 US;IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

NATURE-SOCIETY GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOG 434(3), GEOG 436(3), GEOG 438W(3), GEOG 439(3), GEOG 444(3) (Sem: 5-8)

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
Select 3 credits from GEOG 361(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 363(3), GEOG 364(3)
(Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits from GEOG 461W(3), GEOG 463(3), GEOG 464(3), GEOG 467(3), GEOG 468(3) (Sem: 5-8)

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY OPTION: (21 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (21 credits)
Select 9 credits from GEOG 120 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 122 GH;US(3), GEOG 123 GS;IL(3), GEOG 124 GS;IL(3), GEOG 126 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 128 GS;IL(3), or GEOG 130 GS(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 12 credits from GEOG 420Y US;IL(3), GEOG 423Y US(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 425 US(3), GEOG 426Y US;IL(3), GEOG 427 US;IL(3), GEOG 428 US(3), or GEOG 429 US(3) (Sem: 5-8)

NATURE-SOCIETY GEOGRAPHY OPTION: (21 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
GEOG 130 GS(3), GEOG 333(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GEOG 430(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from GEOG 431(3), GEOG 434(3), GEOG 436(3), GEOG 438W(3), GEOG 439(3), GEOG 444(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

40-02-004 Change. Drop Human Geography Option; Increase number of credits required for major from 76 to 77 credits; Revise program description;Add GEOG 120, 126, 130, 361, 362, 363, 493, 494, 495, 495B, 495G MATH 083 to courses for the major; Remove EM SC 300, MATH 017, 018, 021, 022, 026, 040, 041, 111, 140A, 141, GEOG 040,130, 495 from courses for the major; Add/Move GEOG 310W, 311, 313, 333, 361, 362, 363, 411, 411W, 412W, 417, 424, 425, 427, 428, 430, 434, 436, 438W, 439, 444, 461W, 463, 467, 468, 485, 493, 495, 495B, 495G, GEOSC 340 within options; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Geography

University Park, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (GEOBS)

PROFESSOR KARL S. ZIMMERER, Head 

Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences offers a strong mix of human, physical, and technical components that comprise the core of the geography major. Combining geography with other areas of study allows students to choose from a broad range of topics in order to suit their individual interests. Undergraduate degrees in geography are offered in the Bachelor of Science (BS) and in the Bachelor of Arts (BA). Both programs offer an integrated course of study in which students learn fundamental concepts in physical and human geography while developing technical proficiency.

The Bachelor of Science (BS) major stresses the discipline's environmental perspectives, while the Bachelor of Arts (BA) stresses the social and behavioral aspects of geography. Both majors provide training in descriptive and analytical skills such as map reading, cartography, and statistics. Substantive course work in the Bachelor of Science major focuses on the ways people use environmental resources and how they arrange themselves and their economic, social, and political activities on the Earth's surface. The Geography major can provide preparation for a career in business, industry, or government. Geographers with bachelor's degrees are currently being placed in federal, state, and local administrative and planning agencies and in private firms that specialize in planning and development or in environmental and socioeconomic analysis.

Those students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree have a choice of one of three areas of concentration:

GENERAL OPTION: This option is designed to serve the needs of students who want to learn about the various topics and perspectives that comprise the discipline of geography. The General option is appropriate both for students who intend to pursue postgraduate degrees and for students who want to emphasize a topic for which no option exists.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE OPTION: This option helps prepare students for entry-level positions in public and private mapping/remote sensing agencies and firms. The student may specialize in one or all of the areas covered in the option. This option is appropriate for students intending to pursue advanced degrees with specialization in these fields.

PHYSICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY OPTION: This option is appropriate for students who want a broad understanding of the earth and environmental sciences in preparation for careers in industry, commerce, and government. The option is designed to develop competence in description, analysis, explanation, and management of problems arising from human use of natural resources and natural systems.

Geography courses satisfying the United States Cultures and International Cultures requirement: GEOG 020 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 040 GS;IL(3), GEOG 120 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 123 GS;IL(3), GEOG 124 GS;IL(3), GEOG 126 GS;US;IL(3), GEOG 128 GS;IL(3), GEOG 420Y US;IL(3), GEOG 424Y US;IL(3), GEOG 426 IL(3), and GEOG 427 US;IL(3).

Geography courses satisfying the Writing requirement: GEOG 310W(3), GEOG 411W(3), GEOG 412W(3), GEOG 420Y US(3), GEOG 423Y US;IL(3), GEOG 424Y US;IL(3), GEOG 438W(3), and GEOG 461W(3). All students must satisfactorily complete at least one writing-intensive course in Geography.

For the B.S. degree in Geography, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in this bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in ELECTIVES, GENERAL EDUCATION course selection, or REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

ELECTIVES: 10 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 77 credits
(This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 47 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (28 credits)
EM SC 100S GWS(3)[71] (Sem: 1-2)
GEOG 010 GN(3)[1], GEOG 020 GS;US;IL(3)[1], GEOG 030 GS;IL(3)[1], GEOG 130 GS(3)[1], GEOG 160 GS(3), STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)
GEOG 301(3), GEOG 364(3) (Sem: 5-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (19 credits)
ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1-2)
Select 4 credits from: MATH 083 GQ(4), MATH 110 GQ(4), or MATH 140 GQ(4) (Sem: 1-4)

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from: GEOG 110 GN(3)[1], GEOG 111 GN(3)[1], or GEOG 115 GN(3)[1] (Sem: 3-6)

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from: GEOG 120 GS;US;IL(3)[1], GEOG 122 GH;US(3), GEOG 123 GS;IL(3), GEOG 124 GS;IL(3), GEOG 126 GS;US;IL(3)[1], or GEOG 128 GS;IL(3) (Sem: 3-6)

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
Select 3 credits from GEOG 361(3), GEOG 362(3), or GEOG 363(3)
(Sem: 3-6)

PROFESSIONALISM
Select 3 credits from : GEOG 493(3)[1], GEOG 494(3)[1], GEOG 495(3)[1], GEOG 495B(3)[1], or GEOG 495G(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 30 credits [1]

GENERAL OPTION: (30 credits) [1]

ADDITIONAL COURSES (30 credits)
Select 12 credits of 400-level courses from the following categories in the option

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from GEOG 310W(3), GEOG 311(3), GEOG 313(3), GEOG 411(3), GEOG 411W(3), GEOG 412W(3), or GEOG 417(3) (Sem: 5-8)

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from GEOG 420Y US;IL(3), GEOG 423Y US(3), GEOG 424 US;IL(3), GEOG 425(3),GEOG 426 US;IL(3), GEOG 427 U;IL(3), GEOG 428 US(3), or GEOG 429 US;IL(3) (Sem: 5-8)

NATURE-SOCIETY GEOGRAPHY
Select 3 credits from GEOG 333(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 434(3), GEOG 436(3), GEOG 438W(3), GEOG 439(3), or GEOG 444(3) (Sem: 5-8)

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE
Select 3 credits from GEOG 361(3), GEOG 362(3), or GEOG 363(3) (Sem: 3-6)

Select 15 credits from all remaining 300- and 400-level GEOG courses (Sem: 5-8)

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE OPTION: (30 credits)[1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (12 credits)
GEOG 361(3), GEOG 362(3), GEOG 363(3) (Sem: 3-6)
GEOG 464(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from GEOG 313(3), GEOG 417(3), GEOG 461W, GEOG 463(3), GEOG 467(3), GEOG 468(3), GEOG 485(3), or GEOG 495G(3) (Sem: 5-8)

PHYSICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY OPTION: (30 credits) [1]

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
GEOG 313(3) (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (27 credits)
Select 6 credits from GEOG 110 GN(3), GEOG 111 GN(3), or GEOG 115 GN(3) (Sem: 3-6)
Select 9 credits from GEOG 310W(30, GEOG 311(3), GEOG 333(3), or GEOSC 340(3) (Sem: 5-8)
Select 12 credits from GEOG 411(3), GEOG 412W(3), GEOG 417(3), GEOG 430(3), GEOG 431(3), GEOG 434(3), GEOG 438W(3), or GEOG 493(3) (Sem: 5-8)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.
[71] The following substitutions are allowed for students attending campuses where the indicated course is not offered: CAS 100 GWS or ENGL 202C GWS can be substituted for EM SC 100S GWS.

COURSE ADDS

40-02-005 EME 407
Electrochemical Energy Storage
ELECTROC ENER STOR (3)
Electrochemical concepts in energy storage devices, cell construction and materials involved in batteries and capacitors, electrochemical testing methods and applications.
PREREQUISITE: EME 301 or M E 300 or CH E 220 and EME 303 or M E 320 or CH E 330 or their equivalent
PROPOSED START: SP2012

40-02-006 MATSE 202
Introduction to Polymer Materials
INTRO POL MAT (3)
The materials science of organic or soft materials with an emphasis on synthetic and natural polymer.
PREREQUISITE: CHEM 013, MATH 231
PROPOSED START: SP2012

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-02-007 EGEE 441
Electrochemical Energy Conversion
ELCTROCHM ENER CON (3)
Course covers fundamental principles of electrochemistry, including electrochemical thermodynamics, kinetics, catalysis, and corrosion and focuses on applications such as fuel cells, batteries, and photovoltaics. Each application covers: principles of method, criteria determining performance, present state of development, and advantages/disadvantages. Laboratory demonstration of the performance (current-voltage) measurements of an electrochemical converter is scheduled in this course.
PREREQUISITE: EME 301, EGEE 302
APPROVED START: FA2009

NEW
CHANGE LONG TITLE: Electrochemical Engineering Fundamentals
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: EME 301 and EME 303 or CH E 220 and CH E 330 or M E 300 and M E 320, or MATSE 401 and MATSE 402
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
College of Health and Human Development

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-02-008 CSD 269 (US;IL)
Deafness and Society
DEAFNESS & SOCIETY (3)
Explores the economic, social, psychological, and political aspects of the deaf culture and its interaction with the majority hearing culture.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Deaf Culture (DEAF CULTURE)
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE
Intercollege

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-02-009 HONOR 401H
Honors Seminar
HONORS SEMINAR (3-6 per semester/maximum of 6)
In-depth honors-level exploration of a topic or theme that crosses disciplinary boundaries; may be repeated for credit.
PREREQUISITE: admission to an honors program belonging to the Penn State Honors Consortium.
APPROVED START: FA2010

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 1-6 per semester/maximum of 6)
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: admission to an honors program belonging to the Penn State Honors Consortium or approval from the Schreyer Honors College
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

College of the Liberal Arts

COURSE ADDS

40-02-010 CHNS 404
Level Four Chinese B
CHNS404 (4)
Continuation of CHNS 403W. Aims to improve students' proficiency in all four language skills through content-based language learning.
PREREQUISITE: CHNS 403W
PROPOSED START: SP2012

40-02-011 J ST 106 (GH;IL)
Mysticism
MYSTICISM (3)
A survey of the history, philosophy, and cultural impact of various mystical traditions in relation to world religions.
CROSS LIST: RL ST 106
PROPOSED START: SP2012

40-02-012 J ST 137 (GH;US;IL)
Women and Religion
WOMEN & RELIG (3)
Jewish and Christian religious views on womanhood; thought and lives of important religious women; and feminist understandings of these.
PREREQUISITE: third-semester standing
CROSS LIST: RL ST 137 WMNST 137
PROPOSED START: FA2012

40-02-013 LER 485
The Business Side of Human Resources
BUSINESS SIDE HR (3)
Students will examine the interface between HR, the business model, and other aspects of the business organization.
PREREQUISITE: 6th semester standing and 6 credits of Labor Studies and Employment Relations
PROPOSED START: SP2012

40-02-014 SOC 445
U.S. Immigration
IMMIGRATION (3)
This class examines theories of U.S. immigration and immigrant adaptation, effects of immigration, and policy.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits in Sociology
PROPOSED START: SP2012

40-02-014A SUST 200 (GS)
Foundations of Leadership in Sustainability
LDRSHP SUST (3)
Science, ethics, and leadership in social, environmental, and economic sustainability.
PROPOSED START: FA2011

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-02-015 AAA S 110 (GS;IL)
Introduction to Contemporary Africa
INT CONTEMP AFRICA (3:3:0)
Consideration of influences and forces shaping modern African society; analysis of current local and global problems and issues facing Africa.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-016 AAA S 150 (GH;IL)
Africa in Cinema
AFRICA IN CINEMA (3:3:0)
The study of the image of Africa as seen in fiction and non-fictional feature length films, ethnographic and documentary films.
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-017 AAA S 191 (GH;IL)
Early African History
EARLY AF HIST (3)
Explores important economic and cultural transformations in the making of early African empires from 1 MBC to 1750.
CROSS LIST: HIST 191
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-018 AAA S 192 (GH;IL)
Modern African History
MODERN AF HIST (3)
Impact of the slave trade, expansion of Islam, colonial conquest, social and cultural transformations, resistance, nationalism, and independence.
CROSS LIST: HIST 192
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-019 AAA S 197
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: SP1995

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-020 AAA S 199 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-021 AAA S 202 (GS;IL)
Gender Dynamics in Africa
GEND DYN IN AFR (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of multidisciplinary research on relations between men and women in Africa and critique of Western feminist theories.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 202
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-022 AAA S 294
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: S11994

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-023 AAA S 297
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in-depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-024 AAA S 299 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-025 AAA S 395
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
APPROVED START: S11996

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-026 AAA S 399 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-027 AAA S 403
South Africa Today
S AFR TODAY (3:3:0)
A course examining the South African government's policy of apartheid: its history, why it exists, how it works, and the prospects for change.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 110
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-028 AAA S 405
African Studies Methodologies
AF STUDIES MTHDS (3)
Multidisciplinary research techniques for studying in and about Africa.
APPROVED START: SP1997

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-029 AAA S 434 (IL)
War and Development in Africa
WAR & DEV AFRICA (3)
This course will examine the relationship between war and development in sub-Saharan Africa in the post colonial era.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 114 or PL SC 003 or AAA S 110
CROSS LIST: PL SC 434
APPROVED START: S12006

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-030 AAA S 443 (IL)
Ethnic Conflict in Africa
ETHNIC CONF AFRICA (3:3:0)
This course explores the various causes and impacts of ethnic conflicts in the African context.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, AAA S 110, PL SC 001, PL SC 003, PL SC 007, PL SC 014, PL SC 017, PL SC 020, or AFRAS 301
CROSS LIST: PL SC 443
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-031 AAA S 454 (IL)
Government and Politics of Africa
GVMT & POL AFRICA (3:3:0)
Contemporary African Politics, institutions, and ideologies; patterns of change, social forces, and nation building in selected African states.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits from: AAA S 110, PL SC 003, PL SC 020, or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: PL SC 454
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-032 AAA S 464 (IL)
Globalization, Extractive Industries, and Conflict in Africa
RES WARS AFRICA (3)
Socioeconomic and environmental impacts of extractive industries in Africa.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 110 or at least one of the following: PL SC 003 or PL SC 014 or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: PL SC 464
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-033 AAA S 494H
Research Project
RESEARCH PROJECT (1-12)
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
APPROVED START: FA2007

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-034 AAA S 495
Internship
INTERNSHIP (1-18)
Supervised off-campus, nongroup instruction including field experiences, practica, or internships. Written and oral critique of activity required.
PREREQUISITE: prior approval of proposed assignment by instructor
APPROVED START: FA2001

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-035 AAA S 496
Independent Studies
INDEP STUDIES (1-18)
Creative projects, including research and design, which are supervised on an individual basis and which fall outside the scope of formal courses.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-036 AAA S 497
Special Topics
SPECIAL TOPICS (1-9)
Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.
APPROVED START: SP1994

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-037 AAA S 499 (IL)
Foreign Studies
FOREIGN STUDIES (1-12)
Courses offered in foreign countries by individual or group instruction.
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE ABBREVIATION: AFR
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-038 ASIA 100 (GH;IL)
What is Asia?
WHAT IS ASIA? (3-6 per semester/maximum of 6)
An introduction to the history, literatures, politics, and cultures of Asia.
APPROVED START: FA2009

NEW
CHANGE CREDITS: 3
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-039 CHNS 403W
Practical Written Communication: Chinese for Professional and Academic Purposes
WRITTEN COMM I (3)
Discussions, presentations, readings, and compositions emphasizing written styles used in newspapers, magazines, business reports, academic writing,
and other texts.
PREREQUISITE: CHNS 401
APPROVED START: SP2010

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Level Four Chinese A (LVL 4 CHNS A)
CHANGE CREDITS: 4
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Continuation of CHNS 402. Aims to improve students' proficiency in all four language skills, with a special emphasis on writing.
CHANGE PREREQUISITE: CHNS 402
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-040 GER 001
Elementary German I
ELEM GERMAN I (4:4:0)
Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on the first two skills; cultural aspects through readings and videos.
APPROVED START: S11994

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on the first two skills; cultural aspects through readings and videos. Students who have received high school credit for two or more years of German may not schedule this course for credit, without the permission of the department.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-041 GER 002
Elementary German II
ELEM GERMAN II (4:4:0)
Continuation of GER 001; further introduction of basic structures, culture, and development of four basic skills stressing aural-oral aspects.
PREREQUISITE: GER 001
APPROVED START: S11994

NEW
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Continuation of GER 001; further introduction of basic structures, culture, and development of four basic skills stressing aural-oral aspects. Students who have received high school credit for four or more years of German may not schedule this course for credit, without the permission of the department.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-042 HIST 191 (GH;IL)
Early African History
EARLY AF HIST (3)
Explores important economic and cultural transformations in the making of early African empires from 1 MBC to 1750.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 191
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 191
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-043 HIST 192 (GH;IL)
Modern African History
MODERN AF HIST (3)
Impact of the slave trade, expansion of Islam, colonial conquest, social and cultural transformations, resistance, nationalism, and independence.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 192
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 192
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-044 JAPNS 403Y (IL)
Practical Written Communication: Japanese for Professional and Academic Purposes I
WRITTEN COMM I (3:3:0)
Discussions, presentations, readings, and compositions emphasizing written styles used in newspapers, magazines, business reports, academic writing, and other texts.
PREREQUISITE: JAPNS 402
APPROVED START: SP2010

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Level Four Japanese A (LEVEL 4 A)
CHANGE CREDITS: 4
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Continuation of JAPNS 402. Aims to improve students' proficiency in all four language skills, with a special emphasis on writing.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-045 JAPNS 404 (IL)
Practical Written Communication: Japanese for Professional and Academic Purposes II
WRITTEN COMM II (3)
Continuation of emphasis on written styles used in newspapers, magazines, business reports, academic writing, and other texts; aspects of translation.
PREREQUISITE: JAPNS 403Y
APPROVED START: SP2010

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Level Four Japanese B (LVL 4 JAPNS B)
CHANGE DESCRIPTION: Continuation of JAPNS 403Y. Aims to improve students' proficiency in all four language skills through content-based language learning.
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-046 PL SC 434 (IL)
War and Development in Africa
WAR & DEV AFRICA (3)
This course will examine the relationship between war and development in sub-Saharan Africa in the post colonial era.
PREREQUISITE: PL SC 114, PL SC 003, AAA S 110
CROSS LIST: AAA S 434
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 434
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-047 PL SC 443 (IL)
Ethnic Conflict in Africa
ETHNIC CONF AFRICA (3:3:0)
This course explores the various causes and impacts of ethnic conflicts in the African context.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 100, AAA S 110, PL SC 001, PL SC 003, PL SC 007, PL SC 014, PL SC 017, PL SC 020, or AFRAS 301
CROSS LIST: AAA S 443
APPROVED START: SP2008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 443
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-048 PL SC 454 (IL)
Government and Politics of Africa
GOVT & POL AFRICA (3:3:0)
Contemporary African politics, institutions, and ideologies; patterns of change, social forces, and nation building in selected African states.
PREREQUISITE: 3 credits from: AAA S 110, PL SC 003, PL SC 020, or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: AAA S 454
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 454
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-049 PL SC 464 (IL)
Globalization, Extractive Industries, and Conflict in Africa
RES WARS AFRICA (3)
Socioeconomic and environmental impacts of extractive industries in Africa.
PREREQUISITE: AAA S 110 or at least one of the following: PL SC 003 or PL SC 014 or PL SC 022
CROSS LIST: AAA S 464
APPROVED START: S12008

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 464
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-050 RL ST 106 (GH;IL)
Mysticism
MYSTICISM (3:3:0)
A survey of the history, philosophy, and cultural impact of various mystical traditions in relation to world religions.
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
ADD CROSS LIST: J ST 106
PROPOSED START: SP2012

OLD
40-02-051 RL ST 137 (GH;US;IL)
Women and Religion
WOMEN & RELIG (3:3:0)
Jewish and Christian religious views on womanhood; thought and lives of important religious women; and feminist understandings of these.
PREREQUISITE: third-semester standing
CROSS LIST: WMNST 137
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: WMNST 137 J ST 137
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-052 WMNST 137 (GH;USI)
Women and Religion
WOMEN AND RELIGION (3:3:0)
Jewish and Christian religious views on womanhood; thought and lives of important religious women; and feminist understandings of these.
PREREQUISITE: third-semester standing
CROSS LIST: RL ST 137
APPROVED START: SP2006

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: RL ST 137 J ST 137
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-053 WMNST 202 (GS;IL)
Gender Dynamics in Africa
GEND DYN IN AFR (3:3:0)
Critical analysis of multidisciplinary research on relations between men and women in Africa and critique of Western feminist theories.
CROSS LIST: AAA S 202
APPROVED START: S12005

NEW
CHANGE CROSS LIST: AFR 202
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

Eberly College of Science

40-02-054 Change. Add new Computation Option and Nanotechnology/Materials Option; Remove Acoustics Option and Teaching Option; Decrease number of credits required for degree from 122 to 120 credits; Decrease number of credits required for the major from 96-117 credits to 96-96 credits; Decrease number of credits required for the option from 27-51 credits to 24-27 credits; Revise program description; Remove MATH 405, 406 from major requirements; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Physics

University Park, Eberly College of Science (PHYS)

PROFESSOR NITIN SAMARTH, Head of the Department

This major provides a sound program of technical and general education for students planning a career in physics and related fields. The General option provides broad coverage with the most physics and mathematics course requirements and is useful for students intending to pursue graduate study in Physics or similar disciplines. The Medical and Electronics options incorporate coursework in support of the application of physics and mathematics in various life-science or engineering related fields. A Computation option provides background in the application of physical principles and mathematical methods in the solution of scientific problems, simulations, or visualizations using computer and numerical techniques. The Nanotechnology/Material Science option provides students with background in the understanding of condensed matter physics at either the nano- or micro/macro- levels.

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Physics major, a student must have: 1) attained at least a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average; 2) completed CHEM 110 GN(3), MATH 140 GQ(4), MATH 141 GQ(4), PHYS 211 GN(4), and PHYS 212 GN(4), and earned a grade of C or better in each of these courses.

TO VIEW THE Physics Minor (PHYS)

For the B.S. degree in Physics, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

GENERAL EDUCATION: 45 credits
(18 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)
(See description of General Education in front of Bulletin.)

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

UNITED STATES CULTURES AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES:
(Included in GENERAL EDUCATION course selection)

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM:
(Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR: 93-96 credits
(This includes 18 credits of General Education courses: 9 credits of GN courses; 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GWS courses.)

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (ALL OPTIONS): 69 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (59 credits)
CHEM 110 GN(3)[1], CHEM 111 GN(1), CHEM 112 GN(3), CHEM 113 GN(1), MATH 140 GQ(4)[1], MATH 141 GQ(4)[1] (Sem: 1-2)
PHYS 211 GN(4)[1], PHYS 212 GN(4)[1], PHYS 213 GN(2)[1], PHYS 214 GN(2)[1], PHYS 237(3)[1] (Sem: 1-4)
ENGL 202C GWS(3), MATH 220 GQ(2), MATH 251(4) (Sem: 3-4)
PHYS 400(4)[1], PHYS 410(4)[1], PHYS 419(3)[1], PHYS 420(3), PHYS 444(2)[1], PHYS 457W(3)[1] (Sem: 5-8)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (7 credits)
MATH 230(4), or MATH 231(2) and MATH 232(2) (Sem: 3-4)
CMPSC 101 GQ(3) or CMPSC 121 GQ(3) or CMPSC 200 GQ(3) or CMPSC 201 GQ(3) or CMPSC 202 GQ(3) (Sem: 3-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (3 credits)
Take 3 credits of 400-level MATH from departmental list (Sem: 7-8)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE OPTION: 24-27 credits

COMPUTATION OPTION: (24 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (9 credits)
CMPSC 122(3) (Sem: 3-4) (Note: CMPSC 122 has CMPSC 121 as a pre-requisite, so care should be taken when choosing the 'programming requirement' under the Common Requirements for the major.)
MATH 455(3), MATH 456(3)
(Sem: 5-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 6 credits from program list (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits of natural science (GN) courses that are not listed in the major (Sem: 5-6)
Take a total of 6 credits from MATH 4XX from departmental list or STAT 4XX or CMPSC 3XX/4XX (Sem: 5-8)

ELECTRONICS OPTION: (27 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (4 credits)
E E 210(4) (Sem: 3-6)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (8 credits)
Select 2 of the following 3: E E 310(4), E E 350(4), CMPEN 270(4) (Sem: 4-6)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 6 credits from program list (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits of natural science (GN) courses that are not listed in the major (Sem: 5-6)
Take 6 credits of E E 3XX or 4XX level courses (Sem: 5-8)

GENERAL PHYSICS OPTION: (25-26 credits)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (10-11 credits)
Select 6-7 credits from items a, b, and/or c (Sem: 7-8)
a. PHYS 406(3), PHYS 411(3), PHYS 412(3), PHYS 413(3), PHYS 443(3), PHYS 461(3), PHYS 479(3), PHYS 496(3) or PHYS 497(3)
b. PHYS 402(4) or PHYS 458(4) (the course not selected below may be used)
c. ASTRO 410(3), ASTRO 440(3), or ASTRO 485(3) (only 3 credits of ASTRO courses may be used)
Select 4 credits from PHYS 402(4) or PHYS 458(4) (Sem: 7-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (15 credits)
Select 3 credits of natural science (GN) courses that are not listed in the major (Sem: 3-8)
Select 9 credits from program list; a maximum of 6 of the 12 credits may be from PHYS 496(1-18), SC 295(1-9), SC 395(1-9), or SC 495(1-9) (Sem: 3-8)
Select 3 credits of 4XX-level MATH from program list (Sem: 7-8)

MEDICAL PHYSICS OPTION: (24-25 credits)

This option prepares students for graduate study in medical physics, medical school, or bioengineering. The courses in option (b) below help satisfy the requirements for a minor in Bioengineering. Application for the BIOE minor must be made to the Department of Bioengineering.

ADDITIONAL COURSES (15-16 credits)
Select from the following two sets of courses:

(a) BIOL 110 GN(4), and BIOL 240W GN(4), CHEM 210(2), CHEM 211(3), CHEM 213(3) (Sem: 3-8)
(b) B M B 251(3) or BIOL 230W GN(4) or BIOE 201(3); BIOL 141 GN(3) or BIOL 472(3); 9 credits of BIOE at the 300 or 400 level (Sem: 3-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from program list; a maximum of 6 of the 9 credits may be from PHYS 496(1-18), SC 295(1-9), SC 395(1-9) or SC 495(1-9) (Sem: 5-8)

NANOTECHNOLOGY/MATERIAL SCIENCE OPTION: (24-25 credits)

PRESCRIBED COURSES (3 credits)
PHYS 412(3)
(Sem: 7)

ADDITIONAL COURSES (12-13 credits)
The courses in option (a) help satisfy the requirements for the Nanotechnology minor.
Select from the following two sets of courses:
(a) E SC 312(3), E SC 313(3) and select 6 credits from E SC 400-level courses
(b) MATH 460(1), MATSE 201(3), MATSE 430(3), MATSE 460(1); MATSE 402(3) or MATSE 436(3); select 3 credits from MATSE 400-level courses (Sem: 5-8)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9 credits)
Select 6 credits from program list (Sem: 3-6)
Select 3 credits of natural science (GN) courses that are not listed in the major (Sem: 5-6)

[1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

40-02-055 Change. Decrease number of credits required for minor from 24-26 to 24-27 credits; Revise program description; Add Supporting Course Area; Remove E E 330, PHYS 400, 410, 419; Change credits as indicated by underlining.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2012

Physics Minor

University Park, Eberly College of Science (PHYS)

The Department of Physics offers a minor for students who wish to expand upon their study in this fundamental discipline, beyond the introductory courses (PHYS 211, PHYS 212, PHYS 213, PHYS 214). In addition to an additional course in modern physics (which includes introductions to relativity and quantum theory, as well as applications), students take three 400-level PHYS courses for a total of 9-12 credits.The Physics minor is useful for students in many science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their studies in this fundamental field, as a background for graduate study or work in a variety of technical fields.

A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1-2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR: 24-27 credits

PRESCRIBED COURSES (15 credits)
PHYS 211 GN(4), PHYS 212 GN(4), PHYS 213 GN(2), PHYS 214 GN(2), PHYS 237(3) (Sem: 1-4)

SUPPORTING COURSES AND RELATED AREAS (9-12 credits)
Select three 400-level PHYS courses, except PHYS 421W, 444, 445, 446, 494, 494H, 495, 496 or 496H (E E 330(4) may be used if PHYS 400(4) is not) (Sem: 5-8)

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APPENDIX A
UNDERGRADUATE

University College

COURSE ADDS

40-02-056 P T 100S
Physical Therapist Assistant-Introduction
INTRO TO PTA-FYS (3)
Orientation to the field of physical therapy, historical background of the profession, professional ethics, medical terminology, and patient care techniques with First Year Seminar requirements.
PREREQUISITE: a grade of C or better in BIOL 129
PROPOSED START: SP2012

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APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-02-057 HIST 516
Topics in Gender History
GENDER HISTORY (3)
A critical analysis of gender and theories of gender in selected historical contexts.
CROSS LIST: WMNST 516
APPROVED START: S11992

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: US Women's and Gender History (US WOMEN GEND HIST)
PROPOSED START: FA2012

OLD
40-02-058 WMNST 516
Topics in Gender History
GENDER HISTORY (3)
A critical analysis of gender and theories of gender in selected historical contexts.
CROSS LIST: HIST 516
APPROVED START: S11992

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: US Women's and Gender History (US WOMEN GEND HIST)
PROPOSED START: FA2012

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APPENDIX B
GRADUATE

Post-Baccalaureate Credit Certificate Programs

40-02-059 Drop. Drop Bioterrorism Preparedness Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Bioterrorism Preparedness

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Robert A. Cherry MD, FACS
Penn State College of Medicine, MC H075
500 University Drive
Hershey, PA 17033
Phone: 717-531-6066
Fax: 717-531-0321
E-mail: rcherry@psu.edu

This postbaccalaureate certificate program is designed to provide nonscience students with broad training in the field of homeland security. A distance education format is used to accommodate the needs of professionals already active in this area.

The certificate program is an attractive option for those who desire advanced graduate training but do not require the full master's degree program. It is also ideal for students who wish to move into the degree program once all admissions requirements are fulfilled (e.g., GRE).

The core curriculum consists of Public Health Preparedness for Disaster and Bioterrorism Emergencies I and II (6 credits). Students then enroll in one of the following option tracks, each of which constitutes an additional 9 credits: The Bioterrorism Preparedness Certificate (Agricultural Biosecurity, Disaster Epidemiology, Critical Infrastructure Protection), or The Disaster Preparedness Certificate (Critical Infrastructure Protection, Disaster Psychology, Natural Disasters).

Admission Requirements

Applicants must present a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and are expected to have a 3.0 or higher undergraduate grade-point average. Applicants whose native language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency in English with a minimum TOEFL score of 550 (paper-based test) or 220 (computer-based test). Special backgrounds, abilities, and interests related to homeland security are desirable.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

GEOSCIENCES (GEOSC)

HOMELAND SECURITY (HLS)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

40-02-060 Drop. Drop Disaster Preparedness Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Disaster Preparedness

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Robert A. Cherry MD, FACS
Penn State College of Medicine, MC H075
500 University Drive
Hershey, PA 17033
Phone: 717-531-6066
Fax: 717-531-0321
E-mail: rcherry@psu.edu

This postbaccalaureate certificate program is designed to provide nonscience students with broad training in the field of homeland security. A distance education format is used to accommodate the needs of professionals already active in this area.

The certificate program is an attractive option for those who desire advanced graduate training but do not require the full master's degree program. It is also ideal for students who wish to move into the degree program once all admission requirements are fulfilled (e.g., GRE).

The core curriculum consists of Public Health Preparedness for Disaster and Bioterrorism Emergencies I and II (6 credits). Students then enroll in one of the following option tracks, each of which constitutes an additional 9 credits: The Bioterrorism Preparedness Certificate (Agricultural Biosecurity, Disaster Epidemiology, Critical Infrastructure Protection), or The Disaster Preparedness Certificate (Critical Infrastructure Protection, Disaster Psychology, Natural Disasters).

Admission Requirements

Applicants must present a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and are expected to have a 3.0 or higher undergraduate grade-point average. Applicants whose native language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency in English with a minimum TOEFL score of 550 (paper-based test) or 220 (computer-based test). Special backgrounds, abilities, and interests related to homeland security are desirable.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

GEOSCIENCES (GEOSC)

HOMELAND SECURITY (HLS)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

40-02-061 Change. Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Medical Adult Education

Graduate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Elizabeth Tisdell
Dr. Edward W. Taylor
W330 Olmsted, Penn State Harrisburg
Phone: 717-948-6640
Fax: 717-948-6064
E-mail: ejt11@psu.edu; ewt1@psu.edu

The primary goal of the Graduate Certificate in Medical Adult Education is to assist medical/health professionals in increasing their knowledge and competence in educating adult learners in medical education/health science settings.                  

The objectives are to promote: awareness of how learning theory informs practice; effective methods for teaching adults; development of a reflective practice; understanding of program/instructional design

Candidates are required to take 12 graduate credits, including the 9-credit core of three required classes and one other advisor-approved 3-credit graduate course related to the candidate’s specific area of interest.  The required classes, in which assignments will relate to health/medical education issues, are

ADTED 460:  Introduction to Adult Education
ADTED 501:  Foundations of Medical Education
ADTED 505: Teaching of Adults
The 3-credit graduate elective will be related to the candidate’s specific interest in medical/health education.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

U.S. applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution. International applicants must have a tertiary (post secondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year U.S. bachelor's degree. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates. Additionally, all international applicants must meet the Graduate School's English proficiency requirements.

Applicants must submit the following materials:
* A one-page resume
* A statement describing professional goals, experience, and responsibilities (2 pages maximum)
* One letter of recommendation
*  Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate programs previously attended.

LIST OF COURSES INCLUDED IN THE CERTIFICATE

The three required classes include the following and assumes that the candidate would relate a part of their papers or assignments to the areas of health or medical education : 
ADTED 460:  Introduction to Adult Education
ADTED 501:  Foundations of Medical Education
ADTED 505: Teaching of Adults
The 3-credit graduate elective will be related to the candidate’s particular interest related to health or medical education, and could include other graduate courses in the Adult Education Program or another related area.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2010
Expiration Date: Spring Semester 2015

40-02-062 Drop. Drop Professional Development for School Nurses Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program.

Proposed effective date: Spring Semester 2012

Professional Development for School Nurses

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Madeline F. Mattern, MS, CRNP
Coordinator, Outreach Program
College of Health and Human Development
PSU School of Nursing
204 Health and Human Development East
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone:  (814) 865-8469
Fax: (814) 865-3779
Email:  mfm107@psu.edu

The primary goal of the program is to prepare nurses certified as School Nurses to acquire advanced nursing care skills needed in school settings. The curriculum is designed to increase skill development in emergency care, advanced physical assessment, the use of technology, the planning and financing of care for aggregate groups, and the understanding of political issues that impact health care.

Objectives:

  1. Describe how societal issues have impacted health promotion and wellness, focusing on school-age populations.
  2. Demonstrate first aid techniques utilized to provide assistance and aid to school-age populations.
  3. Analyze the effects of health policy and economics on the health of school-age populations to identify barriers to problem resolution.
  4. Evaluate the impact of technology on the delivery of information to classroom to expand teaching strategies.
  5. Analyze the physical, psychosocial and developmental needs of vulnerable school-age populations.
  6. Design strategies and programs for school populations that meet the needs of diverse, vulnerable, and underserved groups.

All candidates are required to take the 15-credit, five-course series to receive the certificate.

Admission Requirement

A minimum of a baccalaureate degree in nursing and current RN licensure, or completion of accredited RN program, current licensure and permission of School of Nursing Coordinator-in-Charge of Outreach. Ordinarily the student will have completed a nursing baccalaureate or master's degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State and completed all course work in a satisfactory manner.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

NURSING (NURS)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

NURSING (NURS) course list

Effective Date: Fall Semester 2003
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2008

40-02-063 Add. New graduate credit certificate in Public Health Preparedness: Disaster and Bioterrorism.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Public Health Preparedness: Disaster and Bioterrorism

Graduate Certificate Program

Eugene J. Lengerich, VMD, MS
Penn State College of Medicine
MC H170
500 University Drive
Hershey, PA 17033
717-531-0003 ext. 285655
FAX 717-531-0786
E-MAIL elengeri@hes.psu.edu

This graduate certificate program is designed to provide non-science students with broad training in the field of public health preparedness. A distance education format is used to accommodate the needs of professionals already active in this area.

The certificate program is an attractive option for those who desire advanced graduate training but do not require the full Master Degree program. It is also ideal for students who wish to move into the degree program once all admissions requirements are fulfilled (e.g., GRE).

The curriculum consists of Public Health Preparedness for Disaster and Bioterrorism Emergencies I and II (PHP 410 and PHP 510; 6 credits), Public Health Evaluation of Disasters and Bioterrorism (PHP 527; 3 credits), and Critical Infrastructure Protection of Health Care Delivery systems (PHP 530; 3 credits).

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

All applicants must have received from a regionally accredited institution a baccalaureate degree earned under residence and credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State. All applicants are expected to have a 3.0 or higher undergraduate grade point average. Applicants whose native language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency in English with a minimum TOEFL score of 550 for the paper-based test, 213 for the computer-based test, or a total score of 80 with a 19 on the speaking section for the internet-based test. Three letters of recommendation are required. Special backgrounds, abilities, and interests related to homeland security are desirable.

COURSES

PUBLIC HEALTH (PHP)

PHP 410. Public Health Preparedness for Disaster and Bioterrorism Emergencies I (3)
PHP 510. Public Health Preparedness for Disaster and Bioterrorism Emergencies II (3)
PHP 527. Public Health Evaluation of Disasters and Bioterrorism (3)
PHP 530. Critical Infrastructure Protection of Health Care Delivery Systems (3)

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2016

40-02-064 - number not assigned

40-02-065 - number not assigned

40-02-066 -number not assigned

40-02-067 - number not assigned

40-02-068 Renewal. Renew certificate; Change name from Long-Term Care to Long-Term Care Administration and Policy; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Long-Term Care Administration and Policy

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Cynthia Massie Mara
School of Public Affairs
Penn State Harrisburg
777 West Harrisburg Pike
Middletown, PA 17057-4898
Phone: 717-948-6226
Fax: 717-948-6320
E-mail: czm10@psu.edu

The Master of Health Administration program at Penn State Harrisburg offers a Long-Term Care Administration and Policy certificate program. This certificate program is designed for working long-term care administrators, professionals, and policymakers in for-profit, not-for-profit, and public organizations who need more knowledge and skills in long-term care administration and policy, as well as in long-term care systems and their relationship to and integration with health-care systems. Persons completing the program will receive a certificate from Penn State attesting to their accomplishment.

The Long-Term Care Administration and Policy certificate program consists of four graduate-level courses (12 credits).

Admission Requirements

Applicants for the certificate program must hold at least a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university and must have at least three years of professional experience.

To apply for the certificate program, all applicants must complete an application for nondegree admission to Penn State Harrisburg. Copies of all undergraduate and graduate degree transcripts must accompany the application.

Applicants admitted into the certificate program must have a master's degree or a 3.0 grade-point average in the last two years of undergraduate work. This requirement may be waived in exceptional circumstances. All courses must be taken for a letter grade. A 3.0 grade-point average in the certificate program courses is needed for the awarding of the certificate.

The courses for the certificate program must be taken at Penn State Harrisburg. If an applicant to the certificate program already holds a graduate degree in health care administration or a related field and has taken graduate courses that duplicate courses in the certificate program, he or she may, in conjunction with the certificate program coordinator, substitute other courses in the M.H.A. curriculum for those redundant courses.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (H ADM)

ELECTIVE COURSES (select one)

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (H ADM)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2016

40-02-069 Renewal. Renew certificate; Revise program description; Add P ADM 550.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Nonprofit Administration

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Triparna Vasavada
School of Public Affairs
Penn State Harrisburg
777 West Harrisburg Pike
Middletown, PA 17057-4898
Telephone: 717-948-6363
Fax: 717-948-6320
E-mail: tbv1@psu.edu

The purpose of the certificate is to provide comprehensive knowledge of the dynamics of conceptualizing, managing, and leading the nonprofit sector. It consists of four graduate courses (12 credits).One course is at the 500 level, and all courses have been approved by the School of Public Affairs and the Academic Affairs Committee.

Admission Requirements

An applicant must have received, from a regionally accredited institution, a baccalaureate degree under credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State, with a grade-point average equivalent to that required by the M.P.A. Program.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (P ADM)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800-899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2016

40-02-070 Renewal. Renew certificate; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Policy Analysis and Evaluation

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Goktug Morcol
School of Public Affairs
Penn State Harrisburg
777 West Harrisburg Pike
Middletown, PA 17057-4898
Phone: 717-948-6126
Fax: 717-948-6320
E-mail: gxm27@psu.edu

The primary goal of the program is to educate the current and future policy analysts and policy/program evaluation specialists in the public and nonprofit sectors about the basics principles and methods of policy analysis and evaluation. The program also helps them gain an understanding about a substantive public policy area of their choice. The certificate program consists of four graduate courses (12 credits). All courses are at the 500 level and have been approved by the School of Public Affairs and the Academic Affairs Committee.

Admission Requirements

An applicant must have received, from a regionally accredited institution, a baccalaureate degree under credit conditions substantially equivalent to those required by Penn State with a grade-point average equivalent to that required by the MPA program. An applicant also must have taken at least one graduate course in basic research methods/statistics or a recent undergraduate research methods/statistic course. The research methods/statistics course may be PADM 503: RESEARCH METHODS, which is currently offered in the MPA program, or its equivalent. If the course a student has taken is not PADM 503, then the student must obtain the approval of the person in charge of the certificate.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (P ADM)

One substantive public policy course (3 credits) must also be taken. This course may be at the 400, 500 or 800 level. It must be approved by the person in charge of the certificate program.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2016

40-02-071 Renewal. Renew certificate; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Public Budgeting and Financial Management

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Odd Stalebrink
School of Public Affairs
Penn State Harrisburg
777 West Harrisburg Pike
Middletown, PA 17057-4898
Phone: 717-948-6319
Fax: 717-948-6320
E-mail: ojs10@psu.edu

The certificate program in Public Budgeting and Financial Management is offered by the Master of Public Administration program at Penn State Harrisburg, which is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.

The certificate is designed for administrators and professionals in government and not-for-profit organizations who need to acquire additional knowledge and skills in the following areas:

Participants earn a certificate in Public Budgeting and Financial Management from Penn State Harrisburg upon completion of the three required courses (9 credits). All courses must be taken for a letter grade with at least a 3.0 average maintained.

Admission Requirements

Individuals who have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university and at least two years of managerial or administrative experience requiring significant work with budgets and other financial activities may enroll in this certificate program.

Participants will register for these courses as non-degree students and will receive the certificate upon successful completion of all three courses.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (P ADM)

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2016

40-02-072 Renewal. Renew certificate; Revise program description.

Proposed effective date: Summer Session 2011

Public Sector Human Resources Management

Postbaccalaureate Credit Certificate Program

Dr. Bing Ran
School of Public Affairs
Penn State Harrisburg
777 W. Harrisburg Pike
Middletown, PA 17057-4898
Phone: 717-948-6057
Fax: 717-948-6320
E-mail: bur12@psu.edu

The certificate program in Public Sector Human Resources Management is offered by the Master of Public Administration program at Penn State Harrisburg. The M.P.A. program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.

The certificate is designed for administrators and other professionals in government and not-for-profit organizations who need to acquire additional knowledge and skills in the following areas:

The certificate program in Public Sector Human Resources Management requires taking four courses (12 credits) -- two required and two elective courses.

Admission Requirements

Individuals who have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university may apply for the certificate program. An application for non-degree admission to Penn State Harrisburg must be completed and submitted with copies of all undergraduate degree transcripts.

Applicants must have a 3.0 grade-point average in the last two years of undergraduate work. This requirement may be waived in exceptional circumstances.

Applicants who have graduate degrees in public administration or a related field, and who have taken graduate courses that duplicate courses in the certificate program, may substitute other courses in the M.P.A. curriculum for those courses. Graduate transcripts will be needed for this evaluation process. M.P.A. program certificate courses may be used toward completion of the master's degrees in Public Administration and in Health Administration but completion of a certificate neither implies nor guarantees acceptance into a graduate degree program. Please contact certificate coordinators.

PRESCRIBED COURSES

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (P ADM)

ELECTIVE COURSES (select two)

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (P ADM)

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT (TRDEV)

*Note: MNGMT 505, MNGMT 510 or H ADM 510, and MNGMT 515 may be substituted for these courses.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate courses numbered between 400 and 499 may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.

Effective Date: Summer Session 2011
Expiration Date: Summer Session 2016

gold line

APPENDIX D
Dickinson School of Law

COURSE CHANGES

OLD
40-02-073 IHELD 995A
In-House Clinic--Elder Law and Consumer Protection
ELD L & CONS PROT (4 per semester/maximum of 8) CRDT ONLY: N ANON GR: N
This course is supervised by Law School faculty and experienced practitioners, using a clinical model of learning, with students serving as "certified legal
interns" providing legal advice and courtroom representation for clients aged 60 and over. Regular travel to downtown Harrisburg and throughout central
Pennsylvania is required. The students are required to work at least 16 hours per week.
PREREQUISITE: faculty approval required
APPROVED START: S12011

NEW
CHANGE TITLES: Elder Protection Clinic (ELDER PROTECT CLNC)
PROPOSED START: FA2012