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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

T H E S E N A T E R E C O R D

Volume 32-----FEBRUARY 2, 1999-----Number 4

The Senate Record is the official publication of the University Faculty Senate of The Pennsylvania State University, as provided for in Article I, Section 9 of the Standing Rules of the Senate and contained in the Constitution, Bylaws, and Standing Rules of the University Faculty Senate, The Pennsylvania State University 1998-99.

The publication is issued by the Senate Office, Birch Cottage, University Park, PA 16802 (Telephone 814-863-0221). The Record is distributed to all Libraries across the Penn State system. Copies are made available to faculty and other University personnel on request.

Except for items specified in the applicable Standing Rules, decisions on the responsibility for inclusion of matters in the publication are those of the Chair of the University Faculty Senate.

When existing communication channels seem inappropriate, Senators are encouraged to submit brief letters relevant to the Senate's function as a legislative, advisory and forensic body to the Chair for possible inclusion in The Senate Record.

Reports which have appeared in the Agenda of the Meeting are not included in The Record unless they have been changed substantially during the Meeting or are considered to be of major importance. Remarks and discussion are abbreviated in most instances. A complete transcript and tape of the meeting is on file.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Final Agenda for February 2, 1999

A. Summary of Agenda Actions

B. Minutes and Summaries of Remarks

II. Enumeration of Documents

  1. Documents Distributed Prior to February 2, 1999

  2. Attached

Corrected Copy - Student Life - Resolution

Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic

Dance Marathon

Corrected Copy - Senate Council - Faculty

Census Report - 1999/2000

Attendance

III. Tentative Agenda for March 2, 1999

FINAL AGENDA FOR FEBRUARY 2, 1999

A. MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING - Minutes of the December 8, 1998, Meeting in The Senate Record 32:3

B. COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE - Senate Curriculum Report
(Blue Sheets) of January 12, 1999

C. REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL - Meeting of January 19, 1999

D. ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR -

E. COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY -

F. FORENSIC BUSINESS -

G. UNFINISHED LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

H. LEGISLATIVE REPORTS -

Committees and Rules

Revision of Standing Rules, Article II: Senate Committee Structure

Student Life

Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon

I. ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS -

J. INFORMATIONAL REPORTS -

Curricular Affairs

The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Descriptions

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities

Annual Report for 1997-98

General Education Implementation Committee

Intercultural and International Competence Requirement(Recommendation #7)

Senate Council

Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

K. NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS -

L. COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY -

M. ADJOURNMENT -

SUMMARY OF AGENDA ACTIONS

The Senate passed one Legislative Report:

Committees and Rules - "Revision of Standing Rules, Article II: Senate Committee Structure." This report provides for the addition of the President of Academic Assembly (as a voting member) and the Dean of the Schreyer Honors College (as a non-voting member) to the membership of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Education. (See Record, page(s) 5-6 and Agenda Appendix "B.")

The Senate passed one Resolution:

Student Life - "Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon." The resolution commends the Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic for their efforts with the Four Diamonds Dance Marathon over the years. (See Record, page(s) 6-8 and Corrected Copy Record Appendix II.)

The Senate received four Informational Reports:

Curricular Affairs - "The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Descriptions." This report sets the parameter for the submission of First-Year Seminars. (See Record, page(s) 8-9 and Agenda Appendix "C.")

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities - "Annual Report for 1997-98." This report illustrates the caseload of this committee in the 1997-98 Senate year. (See Record, page(s) 9-10 and Agenda Appendix "D.")

General Education Implementation Committee - "Intercultural and International Competence Requirement (Recommendation #7)." This report characterizes the implementation of the next step in the development of the diversity requirement at the University. (See Record, page(s) 10-11 and Agenda Appendix "E.")

Senate Council - "Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000." This document reports the results of the November Census, and thus, dictates the representative distribution over the voting units of the Senate. (See Record, page(s) 11-12, Agenda Appendix "F," and Corrected Copy Record Appendix III.)

The University Faculty Senate met on Tuesday, February 2, 1999, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 112 Kern Building with Leonard J. Berkowitz, Chair, presiding. One hundred and sixty-five Senators signed the roster.

Chair Berkowitz: It is time to begin.

MINUTES OF THE PRECEDING MEETING

Moving to the minutes of the preceding meeting, The Senate Record, providing a full transcription of the proceedings of the December 8, 1998 meeting, was sent to all University Libraries and is posted on the Faculty Senate web page. Are there any corrections or additions to this document? All those in favor of accepting the minutes, please signify by saying, "aye."

Senators: Aye.

Chair Berkowitz: Opposed? The minutes are accepted. Thank you.

COMMUNICATIONS TO THE SENATE

You have received the Senate Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets) for January 12, 1999. This document is posted on the University Faculty Senate's web page.

REPORT OF SENATE COUNCIL

Also, you should have received the Report of the Senate Council for the meeting of January 19. This is an attachment in The Senate Agenda for today’s meeting.

ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE CHAIR

Chair Berkowitz: I refer you to my remarks to Senate Council that are contained in the minutes attached to today's Agenda.

The Faculty Advisory Committee to the President met on January 20, 1999, and discussed the following topics: Promotion and Tenure Committee structure of the College of Medicine; the senior administrative searches; the administrative review procedure also known as AD-14; general education implementation; redesign of the university course master file; printing of university materials; and faculty access to computers. The next FAC meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, February 16, 1999. If anyone has any items that they would like us to raise with the president and provost, please contact any one of the Senate Officers or any of the three elected representatives to the Faculty Advisory Committee. You recall those are Peter Deines, George Franz and Linda Miller.

My second item is about the Senate Officers' visits to University Park colleges. We've begun those. We visited the College of Engineering on January 26 and Earth and Mineral Sciences on January 27. We will be visiting, before our next Senate meeting, the College of Agricultural Sciences, on February 9; the College of Education, on February 10; and the Division of Undergraduate Studies, on February 18.

The third item involves an action I asked Senate Council to take. As many of you already know, Ken Thigpen has left the university to take a dean position in Florida. Now, Ken was the Liberal Arts representative to the Curricular Affairs Committee. The Liberal Arts caucus of senators requested that Dennis Gouran fill this position on Curricular Affairs for the remainder of this year. The problem is that Dennis is also the Liberal Arts representative to Senate Council and our standing rules dictate that an elected Senate Counselor cannot serve on council plus a standing committee. However, that section also allows for an exception to this rule, and that requires a two-thirds vote of the Senate. However, waiting for a Senate meeting--which would have been today--would have left Liberal Arts without any representation on Curricular Affairs at this morning's meeting. We didn't think that was a really wise idea either. So what I did was, I invoked the Bylaws, Article II, Section I. This section allows the Senate Chair to declare a situation of concern--I was concerned--and allows Senate Council to act on behalf of the entire Senate. So we polled the members of Senate Council to allow this exception and act on behalf of the Senate. And with the exception of one counselor, all members of council voted to grant that exception. Now, when we made the survey, counselors were informed that I would make this announcement to the full Senate today, and unless there are objections here today, Dennis Gouran will serve both on Senate Council and Curricular Affairs. Are there objections? Congratulations, and I'm sorry, Dennis, you're stuck with it. That concludes my announcements.

COMMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY

Chair Berkowitz: We move next to comments by the president of the university. President Spanier is here today, and we are very grateful for that, because we know how difficult it is to get a president to appear before a Senate and answer questions these days.

Senators: Laughter.

Graham B. Spanier, President: You are on a role, Len. I just hate to see what you're going to say after I speak. So, let the video tape begin. I want to begin my report with a further observation about the decision not to implement same-sex domestic partner health benefits at this time. I continue to regret very much being in the position of not being able to follow through on a Faculty Senate recommendation, and this is why I took the extraordinary step of writing to each of you individually to explain the context for this decision. I want to reiterate my commitment to improving the environment for working and learning, the quality of life, employee benefits and the humanity of this university for all employees. Lest there be any doubt, this decision is not intended to represent any erosion in our commitment to the university's existing policy of non-discrimination. Let me also say that some representatives of the gay and lesbian community have reported to me their growing feelings of fear and discrimination, in part, I am sure, because of the current dilemma surrounding domestic partner health benefits, the public attention brought to such discussions, and the daily manifestation of attitudes that permeate our society. Our colleagues and our students deserve respect, understanding and dignity, and I thank you for your understanding.

The governor today proposed a 2.5 percent increase in our base funding as a part of his state appropriation message to the state, which just concluded about an hour ago. This is lower than the 3.25 percent that was provided to Penn State during the current fiscal year and significantly less than we requested. This increase also is lower than the increase being proposed for the commonwealth budget as a whole. As you can imagine, I am disappointed in this plan for higher education. In addition to an across the board component that would have supported faculty salary increases at a modest level, our operating cost increases, and the other expenses associated with operating a university today, we asked the governor for special funding in three areas: agricultural research and cooperative extension, work-force development, and the new School of Information Sciences and Technology. We have not discovered any support targeted for these initiatives, although there is an item in his budget for the Department of Education, titled Higher Education Technology Grants that appears to include the possibility of some funding for our new school. We will need to learn more about the intent of these grants. I am hopeful about the new funding for technology that Governor Ridge proposes. This could fit in especially well with Penn State's plans to launch a new School of Information Sciences and Technology in the fall 1999. Through our planning during the past year, I believe our new school will be in a unique position to have a significant impact on Pennsylvania's efforts to be a key player in the information technology arena in coming years. I continue to believe, as I am sure most all of you do--I hope all of you--that additional support for Penn State is warranted and will have significant impact on the future of Pennsylvania. Our appropriations hearings will be on February 22 and 23 and I will most certainly be an advocate for the budget approved in September by Penn State's Board of Trustees. And I will share additional information with you at subsequent Senate meetings.

I want to tell you that our enrollment numbers continue to look very good in terms of the current admission cycle for students who would begin at Penn State this coming summer and fall. Students are continuing to vote with their feet. Penn State is one of the most popular universities in the country and we're very pleased to see the level of interest that is out there with respect to admissions to Penn State. We're very optimistic that, with some of the new concepts that we have put into place with regard to enrollment planning, we will be able to keep relatively level enrollment at the University Park campus and follow through on our plans to see increased enrollments at the upper division at most of our other campuses.

I want to report that we have a team on campus visiting Penn State right now. They are conducting a once every, I'm not sure if it's five or ten years, NCAA certification review. That seems to be going very well, and we look forward to our continuing certification there. I know through the Faculty Senate committee that some of you are involved with intercollegiate athletics. Others of you on the staff and administration have been involved for a year in preparing for this review. I want to thank all of you for your efforts--all of you who have been involved in that process. I also want to thank all of you involved and thank the Senate as a whole for your expeditious handling so far of materials expected to be coming through with regard to the new School of Information Sciences and Technology. That is on a fast track and has required the Senate and its committees to be able to handle the materials quickly as they move through the system. That appears to be the case in all circumstances so far, and it is really a marvelous example of how Faculty Senates can move very quickly despite the reputation of Faculty Senates around the country to the contrary. That does not appear to be the case here, certainly not in this situation.

One of my closest colleagues in higher education right now is on his fourth university presidency, and I asked him when he was making the transition from three to four how he managed to survive so long? And one of the things he told me was that he never got involved in parking issues.

Senators: Laughter.

President Spanier: And I have tried to follow that advice but not with much success, because if there are issues out there, you want to try to pay attention to them, whatever they are. I say that reluctantly because I absolutely do not want any more emails about parking from any of you. But I do mention this because, as you know, we are in the midst of a master-planning process at the university which includes a wide range of things--buildings, physical plant, architecture--but also our entire approach to transportation. And I want to tell you that there are a lot of people working very hard on this right now, especially with regard to the University Park campus, and I do expect that we will be announcing some changes and improvements in our overall transportation this spring. So they will be related to issues of the master plan: parking, buses and shuttles, new parking garages, parking lots, and the financing issues surrounding all of these topics, of course. So that is something that will be in the pipeline and will receive more attention as the spring unfolds. There's nothing to report right now, but I thought I'd mention it, because I know from reading my mail how interested all of you are in parking and transportation. Well those are a few things that I wanted to highlight, and now I'd be happy to take your questions.

Cara-Lynne Schengrund, College of Medicine: The Faculty Affairs Committee this morning asked that I indicate that while the committee is disappointed with your decision regarding health benefits for same sex partners, they do understand your reason for not implementing the Senate's request at this time. The committee also would like to offer its support to you for any further efforts in this area.

President Spanier: Thank you, I appreciate that.

Jaime Myers, College of Education: Just to follow that up. What is your strategy for the future implementation of that policy?

President Spanier: I don't think I have a strategy yet. It's something I've been thinking about a lot, obviously. But I'm just not prepared to speculate at this point.

Chair Berkowitz: Are there other questions for the president? Thank you very much. As we begin our discussion of reports, I want to remind you to please identify yourself and the unit you represent before addressing the Senate.

FORENSIC BUSINESS

None

UNFINISHED LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS

None

LEGISLATIVE REPORTS

SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES AND RULES

Revision of Standing Rules, Article II: Senate Committee Structure

Nancy J. Wyatt, Chair, Senate Committee on Committees and Rules

Nancy J. Wyatt, Delaware County Campus: This legislative report is part of our continuing duties to adjust the structure of the Senate to reflect the structure of the university. And so we are adding to the Committee on Undergraduate Education two members: the president of Academic Assembly as a voting member, and the Dean of the Schreyer Honors College as a non-voting member. Academic Assembly is a student group consisting partly of elected student faculty senators and half of the representatives from student councils from colleges and DUS. They also advise the Administrative Council on Undergraduate Education. So now this position will also be a part of our Committee on Undergraduate Education. So, if you have questions, I would try to answer them.

Chair Berkowitz: Are there any questions or comments on the legislation?

John M. Lilley, Penn State Erie - The Behrend College: Just a clarification. Academic Assembly is a University Park organization or a university-wide organization?

Nancy J. Wyatt: It is a University Park organization.

Robert P. Withington, Graduate Student Senator, College of Agricultural Sciences: In your statement that's in here, you state that this is going, "to include the student perspective more directly." I was wondering how adding more administrators is going to add the student perspective more directly? I see how it might...

Nancy J. Wyatt: These are actually two separate issues, and we brought them together at the same time to save you time. I don't think it will, but adding the president of Academic Assembly will. That was the point...

Robert P. Withington: Maybe then the wording should be changed to say, "adding a broader perspective"?

Nancy J. Wyatt: The only thing that changes in the Constitution, Bylaws, and Standing Rules are the Standing Rules. Under rationale, the explanation is for your benefit, but it doesn't go into the Constitution, Bylaws, and Standing Rules.

Chair Berkowitz: All we are voting on is what's under the recommendation. The change is in the Standing Rules. Are there other questions or comments? Seeing none, I believe we can vote on this one today since it is the Standing Rules. All those in favor, signify by saying, "aye."

Senators: Aye.

Chair Berkowitz: Any opposed, "nay"? I believe that does it. We have a second legislative report. This one is a resolution from Student Life, and you'll have to turn back to page two of your Agenda to see the content of that resolution, and Bill Ellis, Chair of Student Life, is here to present that report.

SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE

Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon

Bill Ellis, Chair, Senate Committee on Student Life

Bill Ellis, Hazleton Campus: Thank you very much. I refer you to the text of the resolution in the front of the green sheets and also to the material in the door handout, including--for those of you that came early--this glossy presentation, and for the rest of you the Thon Times which is a newsletter intended for faculty, keeping them up-to-date on the workings of the Dance Marathon. This is a student-based initiative that was brought to the Student Life Committee at the December meeting. The committee members thought that it had considerable merit, and we sent it forward to the Senate floor. At this time, I would like to recognize Kris Krajewski and Jamee Leffler, who are two representatives from the Dance Marathon effort. If you could come forward? Student Life thought this was a timely resolution because the 1999 campaign will soon begin with its kick-off banquet on Thursday, followed by two and a half weeks of intense activity, ending in the marathon itself on February 19 through 21. The handout gives more information about the event itself and also gives some specific ways in which faculty could become involved themselves or involve other faculty members. It also gives the Senate a chance to turn aside for a moment from all of the negative images of student behavior that have occupied us in previous meetings, and for a moment to give due recognition to the activities of the many, many students that are here at this university whose actions make us legitimately Penn State proud. Do we have any questions about the materials or the resolution?

Chair Berkowitz: Are there any questions or comments on the resolution?

Robert P. Withington: I'd just like to suggest a few changes or friendly amendments. In the first paragraph, second line, instead of, "raised over 10.5 million." Change that to, "raise more than 10.5 million." Second paragraph, first line after the trademark, I think you need a comma and remove the "is". Then, the second line of this same paragraph, change it from, "commit over," to "committed more than." And the third paragraph, second line change, "sororities" to a lower case "s". And, fourth paragraph, first line, remove, "that".

Bill Ellis: I have no objections to any of those changes.

Chair Berkowitz: The changes then will be part of the motion.

Tracy A. Frost, Student Senator, College of Engineering: In the third paragraph, which states, "Whereas Thon™ demonstrates Penn State's fraternities' and sororities' commitment to the betterment of humanity," I believe that it fails to represent the other organizations that participate in Thon™.

Bill Ellis: Do you have a suggestion?

Tracy A. Frost: To add something that says, "fraternities', sororities' and other student organizations'."

Bill Ellis: I have no objections to that. So, adding, "and other student organizations" after "sororities'." Any other suggestions or questions for either myself or our student representatives?

Chair Berkowitz: Are we ready then to vote? Are these substantive enough changes that you want me to try to make sure I've got them all right?

Senators: No.

Chair Berkowitz: Thank you, I appreciate your help. All those in favor of the resolution, signify by saying, "aye."

Senators: Aye.

Chair Berkowitz: All opposed, "nay." I thank everyone for their comments and for their help.

Senators: Applause.

Chair Berkowitz: For a while there, I was just afraid Bill was going to dance around the issues. It's going to be a short meeting if you let me get through this. I have to amuse myself somehow.

ADVISORY/CONSULTATIVE REPORTS

None

INFORMATIONAL REPORTS

SENATE COMMITTEE ON CURRICULAR AFFAIRS

The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Descriptions

Peter Deines, Chair, Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs

Peter Deines, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences: Thank you. On September 2, 1997 this body established a new requirement for students. It is the First-Year Seminar. The requirement is that all students complete one credit of First-Year Seminar, and the requirement was cast within the framework of General Education. This requirement will come into effect for students that enter the university this coming academic year, and so it is necessary that the description of the degree programs are correct as far as the requirements for the students are concerned. So the Committee on Curricular Affairs currently is in the process of trying to work through this particular issue. The committee has determined that it can do this most expeditiously--and I mean by this creating the least amount of paperwork for the departments and the colleges--by adopting the particular wording that has been proposed in this report that you have in front of you. I should indicate to you that this is an informational report that you have in front of you. At the end of the day we will not have a vote on this. In preparing this report, the committee did several things. First off, it consulted the legislation that the Senate adopted. Secondly, it looked carefully at the guidelines for implementation of this report that were adopted by this body when it received the reports that were developed by the General Education Implementation Committee. Thirdly, it looked very carefully at how the colleges and departments responded to these implementation reports in developing their specific First-Year Seminars. So, these were the three input items. It also listened very carefully to comments that we received from our colleagues and from the colleges. We consulted with the General Education Implementation Committee. We consulted with the Senate Officers, and the committee consulted with the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education on this matter. And after due deliberation--and we received additional comments just this weekend from the College of the Liberal Arts--the committee has evaluated all of the input that it has received and it reaffirms that it would like to proceed in the matter the way it is represented in our report. The report is brought to you to make you understand that the Curricular Affairs Committee has taken its decision with due deliberation and wide consultation. It is not something that has been done in a very fast way. There was considerable deliberation on this matter. So the committee thought it would be important to bring this matter directly to your attention. Thank you.

Chair Berkowitz: I'd like to remind you that, in general, the Senate has delegated to the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs the responsibility for revising and keeping up to date the Guide to Curricular Procedures, and generally they do so without bringing us special reports about what they've done, just informing those departments and colleges that need to be aware of it. But in this case, this was of such importance and broad interest that we asked the committee to bring it to the Senate as a whole as the best way to keep everybody informed as to how this is being done. Are there any comments or questions for Peter and the committee? Seeing none...

Peter Deines: Thank you!

Chair Berkowitz: Peter, don't hang around too long.

Peter Deines: I think that we just have speeded up the process very much of getting the curriculum straightened up. We will not need a large number of individual proposals, and so that's why I said thank you.

Terry J. Peavler, College of the Liberal Arts: I would just like to say that silence is not concurrence...

Peter Deines: I understand that.

Chair Berkowitz: Thank you very much. Our next report is the annual report from Faculty Rights and Responsibilities, and Lee Stout is here to present that report.

FACULTY RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES COMMITTEE

Annual Report for 1997-98

Leon J. Stout, 1997-98 Chair, Faculty Rights and Responsibilities Committee

Leon J. Stout, University Libraries: I just have a few comments to make. Hopefully the report is self-explanatory. We do see this year again a declining number of cases coming before the committee. I think that we on the committee feel that this is largely do to the success of continuing promotion and tenure workshops that have been offered by the colleges and campuses worked on by Robert Secor of the Vice Provost Office. You will obviously have noticed that we did not recommend any reversals or revisions of outcome in promotion and tenure cases this year. We do not feel that this represents a trend or a tilt in any way. This is the first year in my five years on the committee in which we did not do so, and I fully expect that in this coming year we may well have reversals or other recommendations to make affecting cases. Many of you know I'm the University Archivist. I spent most of this morning reviewing the passage of the promotion and tenure procedures in 1975 in response to an inquiry this morning. And I think one of the things that struck me was the emphasis that was placed in 1975 when we passed what became HR-23, on the fact that the promotion and tenure process is supposed to be a communications process. I think the thing that strikes us in this past year's cases is that the most common feature we saw was that the communications process didn't seem to be working as well as it could have been. We saw too many candidates who ignored the advice that their peers on committees and their administrators were offering them in terms of what they needed to do to have a successful outcome in the promotion and tenure process. We recommend to you all and to all candidates that for advice they seek the counsel of their senior faculty and their administrators, that they read the letters that appear in their dossiers from review committees and administrators, and that they pay attention to the message that's being communicated. I'd be happy to answer any questions.

Chair Berkowitz: Are there any questions or comments for Lee? You people are out after a record aren't you? We can still do it. Our next report is from the General Education Implementation Committee, and will be found in Appendix "E". It's the implementation of Recommendation #7, involving the Intercultural and International Competence Requirement.

GENERAL EDUCATION IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE

Intercultural and International Competence Requirement (Recommendation #7)

John W. Bagby, Chair, General Education Implementation Committee

John W. Moore, Vice-Chair, General Education Implementation Committee

John W. Bagby, Smeal College of Business Administration: Thank you, Len. I bring you good news and bad news, and in fairness I'll start with the good news. The implementation of general education is nearly complete. As you know, there has been a transfer of the responsibility for implementation from GEIC to faculty in units and other groups around this campus, including the Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs, and that process is well along and nearly complete. Indeed, the light is at the end of the tunnel and perhaps after today there may only be two more reports that we bring to you, and that could conceivably happen in the next one to two Senate meetings. The bad news is that there might be two more reports coming to you. I ask you to take a look at Appendix "E," on the Intercultural and International Competence Requirement. The first page shows some recitals and our informational report is contained on pages two through five. I'd like to open this up to questions.

Chair Berkowitz: Are there any questions or any comments on this report?

Jacob De Rooy, Penn State Harrisburg: Just a point of clarification. Note in the minutes of Senate Council, it's stated with respect to the report now being considered that this report will set the standard for new intercultural and international competence requirement. Therefore, it seems to me a statement of curriculum matter, and I beg the indulgence of the parliamentarian and the Chair to indicate why this would not be a legislative item rather than informational? Because it is setting a standard.

Chair Berkowitz: The report we passed from the Special Committee on General Education contained this requirement and was passed by the Senate. The Senate, in passing that, also charged an implementation committee to bring forward the methods of implementing those requirements, and this was one of them. Are there other comments or questions?

Brian B. Tormey, Penn State Altoona: I would just rise to substantiate Jake's point. I think that the Senate as a whole needs to look carefully in the future at this idea of informational reports, because they are really sort of moving toward a legislative function. And I think we need to look at it very carefully before we go forward in this direction too far.

Chair Berkowitz: That is wise advice. Thank you.

Helena Poch, Student Senator, College of Health and Human Development: I was wondering: on the first page, "Criteria for Intercultural and International Competence Courses," number two says, "Identify the main cultural or societal concern(s)... or the main global/international concern(s) on which the course will focus." What if there's more than one? It says, "Identify the main cultural and societal concerns," but if there's more than one main cultural or societal concern, how are you defining "main"? Is there a specific amount of the curriculum that has to be dedicated to that particular society? Are you saying that 50 percent of it has to be, 75 percent? How are you defining it?

John W. Bagby: GEIC has been careful not to specify percentages in that fashion, and main concerns, if there were two or more, could mean the ones at the top of the list.

Chair Berkowitz: Thank you. Are there other comments or questions? Seeing none, we thank you for your report. And hopefully this, like the Curricular Affairs Committee report, will move us closer and closer to realization of the implementation of our general education program. Our next report comes from Senate Council. It's the Faculty Census report for the coming year and Don Fahnline is here to present that report.

SENATE COUNCIL

Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

Donald E. Fahnline, Secretary, University Faculty Senate

Donald E. Fahnline, Penn State Altoona: You have the report before you in Appendix "F". I'll simply ask for questions, if there are any.

Chair Berkowitz: Are there any questions or comments for Don? Thank you, Don. Moving rapidly toward a conclusion.

NEW LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS

None

COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE GOOD OF THE UNIVERSITY

None

ADJOURNMENT

May I have a motion to adjourn? The February 2, 1999 meeting of the University Faculty Senate adjourned at 2:15 PM.

DOCUMENTS DISTRIBUTED PRIOR TO FEBRUARY 2, 1999

Curricular Affairs - Curriculum Report (Blue Sheets) of January 12, 1999

Committees and Rules - Revision of Standing Rules, Article II: Senate Committee Structure (Legislative)

Student Life - Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (Resolution)

Curricular Affairs - The Listing of the First-Year Seminar in Program Descriptions (Informational)

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities - Annual Report for 1997-98 (Informational)

General Education Implementation Committee - Intercultural and International Competence Requirement (Recommendation #7) (Informational)

Senate Council - Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000 (Informational)

C O R R E C T E D C O P Y

SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE

Resolution Supporting the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon

(Resolution)

WHEREAS the Penn State Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic

Dance Marathon, during the past 27 years, has raised more than

10.5 million dollars to support the Four Diamonds Fund benefiting

the families of children with cancer at the Hershey Medical Center,

and

WHEREAS THONTM, recognized as the nation’s largest student-

run philanthropy, recently committing more than five million dollars

over the next five years to create a cancer research facility dedicated

to finding a cure for pediatric cancer, and

WHEREAS THONTM demonstrates Penn State’s fraternities', sororities',

and other student organizations commitment to the betterment of humanity and

contributes to the educational mission of the University by providing

opportunities for students and faculty to give back to society,

BE IT RESOLVED The Pennsylvania State University Faculty Senate commends

the achievements of the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon and

encourages faculty at all locations to support its activities.

C O R R E C T E D C O P Y

The Pennsylvania State University

The University Faculty Senate

Birch Cottage (814) 863-0221

Fax: (814) 863-6012

Date: January 19, 1999

To: The University Faculty Senate - For Your Information

From: Donald E. Fahnline, Chair, Elections Commission

The 1999-2000 Census of the faculty for the University Faculty Senate was conducted in the following manner.

Using an information base provided by the Office of Administrative Systems, a Senate census data base was created which included all personnel falling within the definition of the electorate of the University Faculty Senate as defined in Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution of the University Faculty Senate. This electorate includes all persons who are not candidates for degrees at Penn State, who hold full-time appointments as of 10/30/98, and who fall into one of the following categories: those holding professorial or librarian titles; those who are full-time instructors, senior lecturers and lecturers or assistant librarians; and those holding research rank (excluding non-continuing). These lists were sent to Deans and Directors of Academic Affairs of the various voting units for verification. For the Military Sciences, the list was compiled by the Coordinator of the Combined Departments of the Military Sciences at University Park. Military Sciences faculty at other locations were counted with that voting unit. For Librarians, the list was compiled by the Dean of the University Libraries. The Commonwealth College Librarians were counted with their voting unit.

Both a copy of the verified list together with a letter informing the academic voting unit of the number of its electorate and the number of Senate seats to be filled were sent to each Dean and Director of Academic Affairs as well as to the Coordinator of the Military Sciences and the Dean of University Libraries. A copy of the memo was sent to each Senate Council representative.

The total membership of the 1999-2000 University Faculty Senate will be 2532. This total will include 2110 elected faculty Senators, 21 appointed and ex officio Senators, and 21 student Senators. The student Senators will include: one (1) undergraduate from each of the ten (10) colleges at University Park; one (1) from each of the following locations--Abington, Altoona, Berks-Lehigh Valley, Penn State Erie-The Behrend College, Capital College, College of Medicine, Commonwealth College, The Dickinson School of Law, Division of Undergraduate Studies, the Graduate School, and Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies.

ELECTIONS COMMISSION

Donald E. Fahnline, Chair
Thomas Daubert
Peter Deines
Jacob De Rooy
Louis Geschwindner
Philip Klein
Margaret Lyday
Kenneth Thigpen

Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

For the Purpose of Election of Senators (As of November 1, 1998)

1998-991 9 9 9 - 2 0 0 01999-2000

 

 

 

 

 

ACADEMIC VOTING UNITS

             

Abington

91 5

58

35

3

96 5

-

Agricultural Sciences

279 14

269

8

12

 

289 14

-

Altoona

102 5

86

25

 

4

115 6

+1

Arts & Architecture

153 8

143

12

   

155 8

-

Behrend College

155 8

98

53

4

3

158 8

-

Berks-Lehigh Valley

85 4

58

23

 

4

85 4

-

Business Administration

134 7

115

23

3

 

141 7

-

Capital College

178 9

155

31

 

4

190 9

-

     

32

   

191 10

+1

Commonwealth College

548 27

342

206

 

13

561 28

+1

Communications

51 3

44

10

   

54 3

-

Dickinson School of Law

34 2

24

6

5

 

35 2

-

Earth & Mineral Sciences

154 8

132

14

6

 

152 8

-

Education

123 6

114

11

 

125 6

-

Engineering

483 24

273

9

216

 

498 25

+1

Great Valley

32 2

32

2

 

1

35 2

-

Health & Human Development

268 13

167

90

10

 

267 13

-

Liberal Arts

412 21

362

62

4

 

428 21

-

Libraries

55 3

     

47

47 2

-1

Medicine

403 20

457

17

3

3

480 24

+4

 

429 26

       

-2

Military Sciences

24 1

19

7

   

26 1

-

Science

300 15

238

41

9

 

288 14

-1

TOTAL

4064 205

4090 211

3186

685

686

272

82

  1. 210
  2. 211

+5

-

UNIVERSITY FACULTY SENATE OFFICE

Faculty Census Report - 1999/2000

For the Purpose of Election of Senators (As of November 1, 1999)

1998-991 9 9 9 - 2 0 0 01999-2000

 

 

 

 

LOCATIONS OF THE

COMMONWEALTH COLLEGE

         

Beaver

37

23

13

1

37

Delaware

54

45

11

2

58

DuBois

44

29

18

1

48

Fayette

48

28

18

-

46

Hazleton

54

30

23

1

54

McKeesport

36

23

11

2

36

Mont Alto

55

22

37

1

60

New Kensington

41

27

8

1

36

Shenango Valley

32

19

12

1

32

Wilkes-Barre

38

25

13

1

39

Worthington Scranton

54

36

18

1

55

York

55

35

24

1

60

Subtotal

548

342

206

13

561

THE FOLLOWING SENATORS WERE IN ATTENDANCE AT THE

FEBRUARY 2, 1998 SENATE MEETING

Abromson, Henry
Alexander, Shelton S.
Andaleeb, Syed Saad
Anderson, Albert A.
Arnold, Steven F.
Bagby, John W.
Barbato, Guy F.
Barber, Deanna
Belzner, Jennifer
Berkowitz, Leonard J.
Berland, Kevin
Bernecker, Craig A.
Bettig, Ronald V.
Bise, Christopher J.
Bittner, Eward W.
Blumberg, Melvin
Brannon, S. Diane
Brenneman, Scott S.
Bridges, K. Robert
Brighton, John A.
Browning, Barton W.
Broyles, Michael E.
Burkhart, Keith K.
Cahir, John J.
Campbell, J. Louis III
Carpenter, Lynn A.
Casteel, Mark A.
Cecere, Joseph
Chellman, Alison A.
Chirico, JoAnne
Christy, David P.
Clark, Paul F.
Coraor, Lee D.
Crawford, James P.
Crowe, Mary Beth
Curtis, Wayne R.
Daubert, Thomas E.
DeCastro, Travis
de Hart, Gretchen Kline
de Hart, Steven A.
Deines, Peter
De Jong, Gordon F.
Dempsey, Richard F.
DeRooy, Jacob
Donovan, James M.
Drafall, Lynn
Eckhardt, Caroline D.
Elder, James T.
Ellis, Bill
Engel, Renata S.
Engelder, Terry
Englund, Richard B.
Erickson, Rodney A.
Evensen, Dorothy H.
Fahnline, Donald E.
Farber, Gregory K.
Floros, Joanna
Fosmire, Gary J.
Frank, Thomas A.
Frank, William M.
Franz, George W.
Freeman, Emily K.
Frost, Tracy A.
Galligan, M. Margaret
Georgopulos, Peter D.
Geschwindner, Louis F.
Goldman, Margaret B.
Goldschmidt, Arthur E.
Gouran, Dennis S.
Green, David J.
Gunderman, Charles F.
Haner, William E.
Hanley, Elizabeth A.
Harrison, Terry P.
Hayek, Sabih I.
Hill, Charles W.
Holt, Frieda M.
Jackson, Thomas N.
Jago, Deidre E.
Johnson, Ernest W.
Jones, W. Terrell
Jurs, Peter C.
Kallas, M. Nabil
Kissick, John D.
Klein, Philip A.
Kristine, Frank J.
Kunze, Donald E.
Lasher, William C.
Lesieutre, George A.
Lilley, John M.
Limric, Sean C.
Lindberg, Darla
Lippert, John R.
Lukezic, Felix L.
Lunetta, Vincent N.
Lyday, Margaret M.
Marshall, Louisa J.
Marsico, Salvatore A.
May, Janet A.
McGraw, Kenneth P.
Milakofsky, Louis
Miller, Linda P.
Moore, John W.
Murphy, Dennis J.
Myers, David J.
Myers, Jamie M.
Navin, Michael
Nelson, Murry R.
Nichols, John S.
Nicholson, Mary E.
Ovaert, Timothy C.
Oz, Effy
Ozment, Judy P.
Pangborn, Robert N.
Paster, Amy L.
Patterson, Henry O.
Pauley, Laura L.
Peavler, Terry J.
Pees, Richard C.
Poch, Helena
Power, Barbara L.
Price, Robert G.
Pytel, Jean Landa
Rebane, P. Peter
Richards, David R.
Richards, Robert D.
Richman, Irwin
Richman, M. Susan
Ricketts, Robert D.
Romano, John J.
Romberger, Andrew B.
Romero, Victor C.
Sandler, Karen Wiley
Sandmeyer, Louise E.
Scaroni, Alan W.
Schengrund, Cara-Lynne
Schneider, Donald P.
Secor, Robert
Seybert, Thomas A.
Slobounov, Semyon
Smith, Sandra R.
Snavely, Loanne L.
Spanier, Graham B.
Stoffels, Shelly M.
Strasser, Gerhard F.
Strasser, Joseph C.
Stratton, Valerie N.
Stuart, Jessica L.
Sutton, Jane S.
Testa, Donna M.
Tormey, Brian B.
Tranell, Jeffrey R.
Trevino, Linda Klebe
Turner, Tramble T.
Ventura, Jose A.
Vickers, Anita M.
Wager, J. James
Walters, Robert A.
Ware, Roger P.
Welch, Susan
White, Eric R.
Withington, Robert P.
Wyatt, Nancy J.
Zelis, Robert
Ziegenfus, Ted
OTHERS ATTENDING
FROM SENATE OFFICE
Bugyi, George J.
Cunning, Tineke J.
Hockenberry, Betsy S.
Price, Vickie R.
Simpson, Linda A.
Walk, Sherry F.

151 Total Elected
5 Total Ex Officio
9 Total Appointed
165 Total Attending

TENTATIVE AGENDA FOR MARCH 2, 1999

Undergraduate Education - Revision to Senate Policy 60-40 -- Multiple Major Programs (Legislative)

Faculty Affairs - Addition to the Administrative Guidelines for HR-23 -- Withdrawal of Promotion Dossier (Advisory/Consultative)

Faculty Benefits - Response to July 1998 Report of the Task Force on the Future of Benefits (Advisory/Consultative)

Computing and Information Systems - Year 2000 Computer/Microprocessor Problem (Informational)

Computing and Information Systems - Information Technology Fee Allocation (Informational)

General Education Implementation Committee - Flexible and Creative Approaches in Regard to Curricular Approval, Course Delivery, and Course Substitution (Recommendation #5) (Informational)

Intercollegiate Athletics - Annual Report of Academic Eligibility and Athletic Scholarships for 1997-98 (Informational)

Undergraduate Education - Grade Distribution Report (Informational)