January 22, 1998......Volume 27, Issue 17

News . . . . Arts . . . . Calendars . . . . Letters . . . . Links . . . . Deadlines . . . . Archive

Search the contents of the Intercom archives and
news releases issued by the Department of Public Information.



Paternos donate $3.5 million

Board of Trustees

  New chairman elected
  Board names vice chairman
  Delegate elections set
  Items chosen for shuttle flight
  Diversity plan presented
  Great Valley, Erie projects progress
  Berks plan approved
  Distinguished Alumni chosen
  Sports building plans progress
  Graduate enrollments may grow
  Colloquy emphasizes teaching
  Fellows program update
  Former chair offers insights
Governor releases $3 million
Fayette's $4.7 million tech center
For the Record
Lectures
Awards
25-year Awards
Search for CEO at DuBois
Heaping helping
Institute seeking courses
Private Giving
Obituaries
Book Shelf
Promotions
Appointments
Partings
Leaves of Absence
Faculty/Staff Alerts
Courses
Penn Staters
Research
Penn State news bureau

Lectures

Explore the intellectual
development of adults

K. Warner Schaie, Evan Pugh professor of health and human development and director of the Penn State Gerontology Center, will speak on "Intellectual Development Throughout the Adult Life Span" at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 24, in the Kern Graduate Center auditorium on the University Park campus. The lecture is the third in the 1998 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science series, which this spring deal with the topic "The Human Brain and the Human Mind."

Schaie is well known for his longitudinal studies of intellectual abilities from young adulthood to old age and for advances in research designs for studying human development. He will discuss changes in cognitive function throughout the life span, including the role of intelligence in higher cognitive processes, the methods scientists use to measure changes in intellectual abilities, age-related differences in intellectual performance and whether the process of intellectual aging can be slowed. Schaie also will discuss some public-policy consequences of his research findings.

Designed for the enjoyment and education of central Pennsylvania residents, the free lectures take place on eight consecutive Saturday mornings from 11 a.m. to about 12:30 p.m. in Kern.

Remaining events in the series include:

* Jan. 31: "Genetics of Human Behavior," by Gerald E. McClearn, Evan Pugh professor of health and human development and director of the Penn State Center for Developmental and Health Genetics;

* Feb. 7: "Genetics of Human Diseases," by Ellen Hess, assistant professor of neuroscience and anatomy;

* Feb. 14: "Attention Deficit Disorders," by Robert E. Kennedy, clinical psychologist and neuropsychological consultant at Centre Community Hospital;

* Feb. 21: "Schizophrenia," by Anthony A. Grace, professor of neuroscience and psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh; and

* Feb. 28: "Medicines for the Mind," by Joan M. Lakoski, associate professor of pharmacology and anesthesia.

The Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science are sponsored by the Eberly College of Science. For more information, call (814) 863-8453 or (814) 863-4682, e-mail science@psu.edu or follow the links at http://www.science.psu.edu/ on the Web.

New series looks at lives of
a variety of intriguing people

A new lecture series exploring the lives of astronomers, musicians, justices, kings and other intriguing people continues Jan. 23 with a discussion by Kenneth Silverman on the life of Harry Houdini at 8 p.m. in the Palmer Museum of Art on the University Park campus.

"LIVES!" -- the name of the biography lecture series sponsored by the Institute for the Arts and Humanistic Studies -- begins the spring semester with "Unmasking Houdini." Other talks scheduled for this semester follow:

* Feb. 14-15: "Beethoven's Lives: Interlocking Perspectives," a colloquium and recital presented by Scott Burnham of Princeton University and William Kinderman from Victoria University in Canada. A piano recital on Saturday, Feb. 14, by Kinderman in the Recital Hall of the Music Building is planned, as well as an 8 p.m. talk on "The Four Views of Beethoven: Perspectives from the Memorial Years 1827, 1870, 1927, 1970," by Burnham; and Kinderman's discussion on "Beethoven's Creative Process: The Relationship of Life and Art."

* On Sunday, Feb. 15, a panel discussion on "The Life in Music: Perspectives on Beethoven's Piano Sonata in E Major, Op. 109" will be held at 1 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge of The Nittany Lion Inn.

* Monday, Feb. 23: "Manet's 'Son,'" given by George Mauner, an emeritus Fellow of the institute.

* Monday, March 23: James L. West III, distinguished professor of English at Penn State, Nancy Tischler, professor emerita of English, and Rhoda Sirlin will discuss "Being Boswell: Writing the Life of William Styron," at 8 p.m. in the Palmer Museum of Art.

* Thursday, April 2: At 12:15 p.m. in 102 Weaver building, Laura Knoppers, associate professor of English, will talk about "'Like a King:' The Death and Burial of Oliver Cromwell."

* Thursday, April 30: "Heisenberg: Deception, Self-Deception and Nazi Atomic Bomb," from Paul Lawrence Rose, who holds the Mitrani Professorship in Jewish life and literature in the College of the Liberal Arts.

Anthropologist to discuss
"Blacks in Science" at Erie

Renowned anthropologist, literary critic and linguist Ivan Van Sertima will speak at Penn State Erie, Behrend College, on Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the Reed Union Building Commons. Van Sertima's presentation, "Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern," will explore the expanding awareness of African science before the discovery of the Americas.

Van Sertima is the author of They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America, which was published in 1977 and is now in its 16th printing. In his award-winning work, Van Sertima notes evidence for an African astronomical observatory in existence in 300 B.C. and for African steel production in the fifth century. He cites linguistic and botanical evidence of African journeys to the Americas between 1312 and 1492, and even notes that Columbus himself reported seeing black people among the Native Americans.

As a literary critic, Van Sertima is the author of Caribbean Writers, a collection of critical essays on the Caribbean novel. He was honored for his work in the literary field by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy, which invited him to nominate candidates for the Nobel Prize in Literature from 1976-1980. He was also invited to join UNESCO's International Commission for Rewriting the Scientific and Cultural History of Mankind.

Van Sertima is a professor of African studies at Rutgers University and is also a visiting professor at Princeton University. He is the editor of the Journal of African Civilizations. He holds degrees from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University and the Rutgers Graduate School.

Van Sertima's lecture continues the 1997-98 Penn State-Behrend Speaker Series, which is sponsored by the Penn State-Behrend Office of Student Affairs. His presentation will be broadcast live on the college's radio station, AM 1450/WPSE. For more information, please contact the Penn State-Behrend Office of Student Activities at (814) 898-6171.

Catholic fellowship plans noon talks

The Cardinal Bernardin Catholic Faculty and Staff Fellowship continues this semester with several noontime talks by noted scholars. Held in 212 Eisenhower Chapel on the University Park campus, the talks focus on topics ranging from physician aid in dying to being Jewish. The schedule for the lectures which begin at noon follows:

* Tuesday, Feb. 3: "From the Vatican to the Monastery: Adventures of an Art Historian," by Jeanne Porter, associate professor of art history at Penn State;

* Monday, Feb. 16: "Physician Aid in Dying: A Faith Perspective," given by the Rev. Phil Bender, pastor of Good Shepherd Catholic Church in State College;

* Tuesday, March 3: "Being a Jewish Minority on Campus," presented by Tuvia Abramson, executive director of Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life;

* Monday, March 16: The Rev. James F. Podlesny, associate professor of moral theology at St. Vincent Seminary, School of Theology, will give a talk on a subject yet to be announced;

* Tuesday, March 31: "Conversion and Reconciliation," presented by the Rev. Tom Carapella, associate campus minister at St. Francis College, Loretto, Pa.

* Monday, April 13: A tentatively scheduled talk by Sister Terese from Bethany Retreat House in Frenchville, Pa.

Talk gives perspective on South Africa in past decade

James Stewart, vice provost for educational equity, professor of labor and industrial relations, and professor of African and African American studies, will speak on "South Africa -- 1997 versus 1987: A Personal Perspective" from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, Jan. 23, in 222 Boucke Building on the University Park campus.

The lecture is part of the University Office of International Programs Distinguished International Speakers Colloquium.

Interactive panel discussion planned at Mont Alto

On Jan. 27 at Penn State Mont Alto, an interactive panel discussion, titled "Aging in a Technological, Diverse World," will be held at 7 p.m. in the Multipurpose Room, Multipurpose Activities Center. Panelists include: Doug McCullough, assistant professor of exercise and sports science and recreation, Penn State Mont Alto; Linda Monn, adult student and staff assistant, Penn State Mont Alto; Forest Myers, attorney, Shippensburg; and Jo Searles, professor emeritus, Penn State Altoona. The event is open to the community. Contact Laura Davis at (717) 749-6112 for more information.

National Leadership Forum to be held at Penn Stater

For the second consecutive year, the National Association of Minorities in Communications (NAMIC) has chosen to hold its national Leadership Forum at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel on the University Park campus. The forum will run from Thursday, Jan. 29, through Sunday, Feb. 1.

Developed for presidents and vice presidents of NAMIC chapters throughout the country, the conference will bring together more than 40 leadership specialists, corporate executives, instructional designers and educational experts in the field of telecommunications. Topics will include planning and development, individual and group motivation, finance and budgets, marketing techniques, and chapter management issues. Featured speakers will include: Clayton Banks, NAMIC president and vice president of Sega Channel's eastern region; Linda Williams, human resources development manager for Time Warner Cable's National Division; and Djuna Barnes, marketing manager for BET Pay Per View's Northeast Region.

NAMIC, formed in 1980 to raise awareness, expand opportunities and shape the future for minorities in communications, seeks to educate the industry on marketing approaches, programming interest and operations strategies.

For more information about the forum, contact Joseph Selden, director of Multicultural Affairs for the College of Communications, at (814) 863-6081, or visit the college's Web site at http://www.psu.edu/dept/comm/news.

Schreyer lecture series on learning continues Feb. 5

"Active Learning Environments," the theme of the spring semester lecture series offered by the Schreyer Institute for Innovation in Learning, the Leonhard Center and ECSEL, continues Thursday, Feb. 5, with a talk on interdisciplinary projects by Spiro Stefanou, professor of agricultural economics, and Swami Anantheswaran, associate professor of food science.

The lunchtime talks, known as the VOICE Box series, are held twice a month and allow practitioners to discuss their experience with service learning, project-based learning, problem-based learning, interdisciplinary projects, integrated courses and authentic assessment. The discussions are held in 304 Rider Building II. Participants may bring their lunch and soft drinks are provided. The schedule for this spring follows:

* Feb 5: Spiro Stefanou and Swami Anantheswaran on interdisciplinary projects;

* Feb 19: John Lamancusa, associate professor of mechanical engineering, and a panel will discuss project-based learning;

* March 5: Chris Uhl, professor of biology, on service learning;

* March 20: Ann Hoag in the College of Communications will discuss problem-based learning;

* March 31: James Eisenstein, professor of political science, and Nabil Kallas, assistant professor of engineering, will talk about integrated courses; and

* April 15: Costas Moranas and Larry Duda, professor and department head, chemical engineering, on authentic assessment.

For more information or to have your name added to the e-mail notification list, contact the Schreyer Institute at (814) 865-8681 or inov8@psu.edu.

Thursday Night Madness to showcase competition entries

The Department of Architecture's Thursday Night Madness Series will focus on Penn State entries to the Stewardson Competition at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29, in the Architecture Gallery on the second floor of Engineering Unit C on the University Park campus.

The Stewardson Competition is an annual statewide competition that began in 1898. A prize in excess of $6,500 is awarded as a traveling scholarship to the architecture student whose entry is selected by an independent jury. Penn State students have won top honors four out of the last five years, and the only other student to win received a four-year degree from Penn State before doing graduate work at another school.

The presentation will feature entries from fourth-year, fifth-year and graduate students from Penn State. Only a few of those presented will be forwarded to the jury for the final competition in March, but all submittals will be shown and discussed at the meeting.

Sponsored by Penn State's Department of Architecture, the Thursday Night Madness series is a free, weekly assembly where architecture professionals, academics and related individuals present lectures, critiques, films, discussions and reviews to students, faculty, staff and interested lay people.

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Promotions

Staff

Raquel M. Arredondo, counselor at Penn State Delaware County.

Yakov Bernstein, senior applications programmer/analyst in Office of Budget and Resource Analysis.

Carolyn S. Boswell, director, community recruitment center in Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Enrollment Management and Administration.

Lori-Lynn Bower, staff assistant V in Eberly College of Science.

Lula L. Brydon, staff assistant VII at Penn State Shenango.

Mark B. Crowley, supervisor, stores support in Office of Physical Plant.

Roxanne Daykon, staff assistant VII in Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education.

Edward C. Dumond, computer support specialist in College of Education.

Eldonna C. Eicher, manager, human resources at The Nittany Lion Inn.

Lisa D. Faust, assistant business manager in College of Arts and Architecture.

Amy L. Hensal, development assistant in Division of Development and Alumni Relations.

Ann M. Horvath, lead applications programmer/analyst in Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Enrollment Management and Administration.

Marcella L. Immel, lead applications programmer/analyst in Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Enrollment Management and Administration.

Edwin L. Johnston, business manager in Housing and Food Services.

Beth A. Kennedy, staff assistant V in Eberly College of Science.

Margaret N. Kimble, manager, ad hoc reporting in Office of Budget and Resource Analysis.

Rita M. Kline, administrative assistant III in College of Engineering.

Katherine L. Krinks, manager, assignment office in Housing and Food Services.

Katherine L. Lumley-Sapanski, supervisor, laboratory safety and environmental protection in University Safety.

Jean H. Lundy, research support assistant in College of the Liberal Arts.

Jodi L. Marshall, assistant extension agent in College of Agricultural Sciences.

Donna M. McGahan, training and support specialist in Continuing and Distance Education.

Naomi C. McNulty, administrative assistant I in College of the Liberal Arts.

Mary Alice Miller, manager, systems planning and design in Office of Budget and Resource Analysis.

Rebecca F. Miller, staff assistant VI in Student Affairs.

Brenda J. Wagner, administrative assistant IV in College of Engineering.

Linda J. Wheeland, staff assistant VII in College of Arts and Architecture.

Mark Wherley, instructional designer in College of Earth and Mineral Sciences.

Charles L. Yanoff, advanced engineering aide at Penn State New Kensington.

Glenna R. Young, administrative assistant IV in College of Engineering.

Technical Service

Michael E. Boonie, lead technician-environmental systems in Office of Physical Plant.

Ronald K. Burfield, maintenance worker-utility at Penn State Erie, Behrend College.

Brian E. Butler, residence hall-utility worker in Housing and Food Services.

Todd E. Dobson, dining hall worker A in Housing and Food Services.

Michael C. Edmondson, food preparer A in Housing and Food Services.

Suzanne R. Foltz, dining hall worker A in Housing and Food Services.

Penny L. Grove, janitorial worker in Office of Physical Plant.

Vicki A. Hardy, janitorial worker in Office of Physical Plant.

James E. Harper, farm machinery operator C in College of Agricultural Sciences.

Devereux Hunter, dining hall worker A in Housing and Food Services.

Catherine A. Jury, food preparer B in Housing and Food Services.

Robert E. Lewis, maintenance worker-general B at Penn State Altoona.

Harry R. Loose, area facilities maintenance worker in Housing and Food Services.

Tammy S. Mertiff, residence hall-utility worker in Housing and Food Services.

Kenneth E. Mickley, orchard worker and machine operator A in College of Agricultural Sciences.

Richard F. Shawley, maintenance worker-plumbing and piping in Office of Physical Plant.

John J. Sprankle, dining hall worker A in Housing and Food Services.

Roger A. Walk, maintenance worker-utility in Office of Physical Plant.

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Appointments

College of Agricultural Sciences
adds department heads, directors

Two new department heads and several regional directors for Cooperative Extension have been appointed in the College of Agricultural Sciences.

* Shirley Bixby, interim regional director for the Northeast Region Cooperative Extension, has been appointed director of Penn State Cooperative Extension and Outreach for the Susquehanna Region. She will provide leadership for cooperative extension and coordination for University outreach programs in Bradford, Columbia, Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga and Union counties. She is based at the Susquehanna Region cooperative extension office at Penn State Wilkes-Barre.

After earning her bachelor's degree in home economics education from Penn State in 1967, Bixby served as a caseworker for Bradford County Children and Youth Services in Towanda until 1983, when she joined Cornell Cooperative Extension as a home economics agent in Steuben County, N.Y. She worked in New York's Chenango County from 1986 to 1990, serving as the home economics program leader and family living agent. Bixby joined Penn State Cooperative Extension in 1990 as Columbia County extension director and family living agent. She served as acting assistant to the regional director for the Northeast Region in 1995 and was appointed interim director in 1996. Bixby received a master's degree in adult education and management from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1992.

* Dennis Decoteau, chair of the horticulture department at Clemson University, was named head of the Department of Horticulture.

Decoteau received his bachelor's degree in environmental studies from the University of Maine at Fort Kent, and his master's degree and Ph.D. in plant science/physiology from the University of Massachusetts. After a postdoctoral research position at Purdue University, he moved through the ranks to full professor and department chair at Clemson.

Decoteau has received significant awards for both research and teaching including the L.M. Ware Distinguished Research Award from the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (Southeast Region) and an Outstanding Teacher Award from Clemson.

* Michael McDavid, continuing and distance education area representative at Penn State Erie, Behrend College, has been appointed director of Penn State Cooperative Extension and Outreach for the Northeast Region. He will provide leadership for cooperative extension and coordination for University outreach programs in Carbon, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties.

After graduating from Eastern Kentucky University with a bachelor's degree in physical education in 1972, McDavid started a 20-year career in the U.S. Army. He retired as a lieutenant colonel. McDavid joined continuing and distance education in 1992 as an area representative at Penn State Erie, where he plans and develops programming for business and industry, special events and conferences.

McDavid earned a master's degree in management from Webster University in St. Louis, Mo., and is currently working on a D.Ed. in administration and leadership studies at Indiana University of Pennsylvania

* Michelle Rodgers has been appointed director of Penn State Cooperative Extension and Outreach for the Capital Region. She will provide leadership for cooperative extension and coordination for University outreach programs in Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Lancaster, Lebanon and York counties.

After receiving her bachelor's degree in home economics education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1980, Rodgers spent nine years as a Penn State Cooperative Extension home economics agent in Lancaster and Berks counties. From 1989 until her appointment as regional director, she served a combined eight years as assistant to the regional directors of the Capital and Southeast regions. From July 1994 to April 1995, she was interim regional director for the Capital Region.

Rodgers received her master's degree in rural sociology in 1988 and her Ph.D. in agricultural education with a minor in public administration in 1997, both from Penn State.

* A. Catharine Ross, professor of nutrition and Dorothy Foehr Huck chair in the Department of Nutrition, has been named head of the Department of Veterinary Science. Ross previously held appointments as professor of biochemistry and professor of nutrition at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. She is a member of the steering committee for the Life Sciences Consortium and co-director of the consortium's graduate option in nutrition.

Ross received her bachelor's degree in zoology from the University of California at Davis, and her master's degree in nutritional sciences and Ph.D. in molecular and cell biology from Cornell University.

She has received the Research and Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health and the Mead-Johnson Award from the American Institute of Nutrition. She is the recipient of the Pattishall Award for Excellence in Research from the College of Health and Human Development.

* David Rynd, interim regional director for the Western Region, has been named director of Penn State Cooperative Extension and Outreach for the Northwest Region. He will provide leadership for cooperative extension and coordination for University outreach programs in Crawford, Clarion, Erie, Forest, Lawrence, Mercer, Venango and Warren counties.

He received a bachelor's degree in agronomy in 1971 and a master's degree in agricultural and extension education in 1980, both from Penn State. He began his career as an agricultural extension agent in Lawrence county in 1971 and was promoted to regional agricultural program leader in 1983, supervising agricultural programs in 17 counties. He was assistant to the regional director for the Western Region from 1988-95, and was named acting regional director for the Western Region and then became interim regional director in 1995.

Associate dean comes on board

Paul Backman, director of the Biological Control Institute at Auburn University since 1993, has been named associate dean for research and graduate education and director of the Agricultural Experiment Station in the College of Agricultural Sciences.

As the Biological Control Institute director, Backman was responsible for developing ecologically sound alternatives to pesticides while supervising the activities of 27 faculty members in three colleges and five departments. He also developed funding sources within the university and from outside agencies and industries, and organized faculty research teams to address specific issues. He administered more than $2 million in funds for institute projects. He also served as the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station Integrated Pest Management (IPM) coordinator.

Backman has been instrumental in attracting top graduate students to the Biological Control Institute and also has worked extensively with graduate students on his own research projects. He has extensive international experience, serving as a researcher at the European Biological Control Laboratory in 1997 and making numerous research trips to Central and South America, Europe and the Pacific Rim. He also served as a consultant for the International Atomic Energy Agency of the United Nations from 1989 to 1991. In addition, he worked as a senior plant pathologist for the United Nations in Uruguay in 1978 and 1979.

He has published more than 100 articles in journals and professional publications and also served on the board of directors of the Alabama Center for Biotechnology from 1994 to 1995. Backman joined the Auburn faculty in 1971 as an assistant professor and moved up the academic ranks to full professor by 1983. He has served on numerous professional and university committees throughout his career. He teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses.

He earned his A.A. in biological sciences from Yuba College in Marysville, Calif., in 1964 and went on to receive a B.S. and a doctorate in plant pathology in 1966 and 1970, respectively, from the University of California, Davis.

Penn State Beaver adds
three to admissions staff

Three familiar faces have recently joined the Penn State Beaver admissions staff.

Hired as full-time admissions counselors were Tiffany MacQuarrie and Kenny Williams.

MacQuarrie, who has worked at Penn State Beaver for five years, was a member of the Residence Life staff.

Williams has been employed at the campus for three years. He was the program coordinator for the Housing and Urban Development Drug Elimination grant.

Rocco R. DeMaiolo was named the new admissions coordinator at Beaver, responsible for overseeing the admissions operation. DeMaiolo, a 27-year campus employee, also will retain his position as the Division of Undergraduate Studies program coordinator.

The three will work along with the existing staff to recruit new students to the campus.

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Partings

Hazleton associate professor
retires after 31 years of service

As the the spring 1998 semester begins, one of Penn State Hazleton's most enduring and respected figures is at home making plans for fly-fishing rather than in his office devising ideas for term paper assignments.

After 31 years of service to the campus and the University, Michael A. Santulli, associate professor of philosophy, has retired. An avid fisherman, Santulli will no doubt relish the added time retirement will allow him to spend casting his line for a fresh catch.

After receiving a bachelor's degree in chemistry from St. Francis College, Brooklyn, N.Y., and a master's in philosophy from Fordham University, Santulli joined the Penn State Hazleton faculty as an assistant professor in 1962. He earned his doctorate from Penn State and returned to the local campus in 1972. Since then he has enjoyed a tenure filled with honors, accolades and achievements.

The fact that students have voted him Teacher of the Year nine times, including four out of the last five years, is indicative of his popularity on the campus. In 1987, he won the AMOCO Foundation Outstanding Teaching Award. He donated the $1,500 award honorarium to Penn State Hazleton's fund for a new academic center, the Graham Academic Building.

Chair of the Penn State Hazleton philosophy department, Santulli has served on more than a dozen campus and University committees, and been active in several community and civic groups. He authored the book The Artist and the Audience, and has either written or contributed to a number of diverse publications, as well as several instructional video and audio tapes. He will return to Penn State Hazleton in the spring as the main speaker at the campus' annual Honors Convocation.

A New York native, Santulli currently resides in Mountaintop with his wife, Odile. About teaching, Santulli said, "I've always been impressed by teachers who have the vision and commitment to overcome enormous obstacles to realize the promise and potential that young people have, and live with the frustrations and joys such an enterprise entails."

Distinguished professor
to continue research

Hubert L. Barnes, distinguished professor of geochemistry and director of the Ore Deposits Research Section of the Department of Geosciences, has retired from the faculty after 37 years of service.

Barnes is known internationally for his research into the geochemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrothermal processes, particularly the formation of ore deposits and the characteristics of geothermal systems. He developed an experimental system for measuring hydrothermal kinetics and a theory for interpreting the data for geochemical purposes.

Barnes has published about 150 articles and books on his research, and edited Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Ore Deposits, published by John Wiley & Sons, which is the standard text in the field. He holds several patents.

Barnes received a B.S. in geology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1950 and his Ph.D. in economic geology from Columbia University in 1958. He served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1956 to 1960, when he joined Penn State as an assistant professor of geochemistry. He was promoted to associate professor in 1963, professor in 1966 and, in 1990, distinguished professor of geochemistry. In 1969, he was appointed director of the Ore Deposits Research Section. He has been honored with a Senior Humboldt Prize and as a Guggenheim Fellow. He has served as a National Academy of Sciences exchange scientist and as a visiting professor at universities in China, Australia, Europe, Japan, India and the Soviet Union, and as distinguished lecturer at many institutions around the world.

In 1996 he was appointed honorary professor and distinguished visiting Fellow of the University of Wales, that institution's highest honor. Barnes has served on a number of National Research Council committees for the geosciences including appointments as chairman of the U. S. National Committee for Geochemistry, as a member of the governing board of the American Geological Institute and charter member of the Geochemical Society. In addition, he has chaired N.A.T.O. and National Science Foundation Advanced Study institutes in Spain and Brazil.

He is continuing his extensive research program in retirement.

Several are honored
with emeritus status

The following individuals have earned emeritus rank from the University for their longstanding and productive years of service:

Alan Davis, professor of geology in College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, from Jan. 1, 1973, to Nov. 1, 1997.

David P. Gold, professor of geology in College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, from July 1, 1964, to Jan. 1.

Shirley Marchalonis, professor of English and women's studies at Penn State Berks-Lehigh Valley, from Sept. 1, 1974, to Jan. 1.

Albert N. Skomra, campus executive officer/associate professor of English at Penn State Shenango, from Sept. 1, 1966, to Nov. 15, 1997.

Longstanding employees depart

Joel D. Carter, associate director for administration and utilization in Continuing and Distance Education, from July 14, 1969, to Sept. 1, 1997.

John D. Connor, professor of pharmacology at The Hershey Medical Center, from June 1, 1969, to Dec. 1, 1997.

Gale G. Gregory, assistant professor of English at Penn State Wilkes Barre, from Sept. 1, 1965, to June 30, 1997.

John N. Grode, assistant professor of engineering at Penn State Erie, Behrend College, from Sept. 16, 1966, to June 30, 1997.

Thomas D. Hewitt, admissions officer at Penn State DuBois, from Feb. 19, 1968, to July 1, 1997.

Edith A. Johnson, staff assistant VIII in College of Education, from July 1, 1967, to June 30, 1997.

Donald L. Leaphart, assistant professor of business at Penn State Fayette, from Sept. 1, 1966, to June 30, 1997.

Lorraine Mrackoski, financial aide and veteran's aide at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, from March 6, 1967, to July 1, 1997.

Mary Ann Mudrow, staff assistant IV in University Libraries, from Oct. 11, 1966, to June 30, 1997.

Robert S. Paranich, assistant professor of engineering at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, from Sept. 1, 1966, to July 1, 1997.

John J. Parnay, community service officer in University Safety, from April 13, 1970, to June 30, 1997.

Ronald A. Petak, campus Registrar at Penn State Altoona, from Aug. 1, 1968, to Aug. 30, 1997.

Franklin Platts, associate professor of general engineering at Penn State Schuylkill, from Sept. 1, 1957, to June 30, 1997.

Lynn A. Poole, research associate in Applied Research Laboratory, from Aug. 1, 1967, to June 28, 1997.

Charles R. Poust, service desk coordinator in Office of Physical Plant, from Dec. 9, 1970, to June 28, 1997.

Sandra M. Ranio, administrative assistant I in College of the Liberal Arts, from Dec. 1, 1962, to June 30, 1997.

Ruth E. Raycroft, assistant professor of microbiology in CES Central, from Sept. 1, 1963, to June 30, 1997.

Richard F. Reynolds, assistant professor of mathematics at Penn State McKeesport, from Sept. 1, 1966, to June 28, 1997.

Delores Rockey, food service worker in Housing and Food Service, from Feb. 14, 1969, to May 13, 1997.

Charlotte L. Saylor, staff assistant VII in Office of the Corporate Controller, from Oct. 1, 1967, to June 30, 1997.

Rebecca Schreffler, staff assistant VI in College of the Liberal Arts, from Sept. 1, 1963, to June 30, 1997.

Wayne C. Smith, electronic technician A in University Libraries, from Oct. 1, 1967, to June 30, 1997.

Janet S. Snyder, administrative assistant II in Research and Graduate Studies, from Jan. 19, 1970, to June 28, 1997.

Eileen M. Spotts, staff assistant VIII in Eberly College of Science, from Aug. 14, 1967, to Oct. 1, 1997.

Paul E. Stamm, police services officer in University Safety, from June 7, 1971, to June 30, 1997.

Leonard L. Szpara, advising program coordinator at Penn State Worthington Scranton, from Sept. 1, 1968, to July 1, 1997.

Kandiah K. Thanigsalam, assistant professor of mathematics at Penn State Beaver, from Sept. 1, 1971, to June 30, 1997.

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