Private Giving
Penn State Intercom......March 2, 2001

Leading the Way

The Faculty and Staff Campaign 2001

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"I've designed many University publications while listening to WPSU's music programming -- especially their classical music program, which is broadcast during our regular working hours. WPSU has actually enhanced the creative work environment here in Publications' design room. Over the years, it became evident to me that the time for me to give back to the radio station was long overdue. So I took advantage of payroll deduction, and I've been making monthly contributions to WPSU. And although this may sound hard to believe, I really get a kick out of annually raising my contribution as my ability to give increases. Giving to Penn State's radio station just makes listening to it all the more enjoyable."

-- Larry Krezo,
graphic designer
Department of University Publications.

For information on the campaign, check the Web at http://www.development.psu.edu/WaysToGive/AnnualFund/facultystaff.asp

Mechanical engineering
professorship established by alumni

Penn State alumni William P. and Marilyn Guillet Ott of Ballston Spa, N.Y., have established the George L. Guillet Professorship in Mechanical Engineering.

The professorship honors former Penn State faculty member George Guillet, professor of mechanical engineering from 1924 to 1944. Guillet's daughter, Marilyn Guillet Ott, says creating the professorship is an excellent way to both honor her father's memory and thank the University. Guillet , 56, died in 1944.

Guillet graduated in 1908 from McGill University in Montreal with a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering with high honors and received the British Association Medal for excellence in engineering. He earned his master's degree the following year. He began his career teaching at his alma mater and at Queens University in Ottawa.

Guillet joined the Penn State faculty in 1924, teaching courses in the design of engines and kinematics.

He published a text titled Kinematics of Machines, and the book's Spanish edition earns royalties to this day. He also co-authored a second text, Kinematics and Machine Design.

The University invests endowed gifts and uses part of the income to support the program designated by the donor. Remaining income is returned to the principal, to further its growth and protect it from inflation. Professorships require a minimum of $500,000.

Gift of $1 million to benefit
College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

Cathleen McFarlane-Ross, longtime friend of Penn State, has pledged $1 million that will establish two endowments to benefit students and faculty of the Materials Science and Engineering Department in the University's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences.

McFarlane-Ross's gift honors her late husband, industrialist and alumnus Norris "Mac" McFarlane. He graduated from Penn State in 1934 with a bachelor's degree in metallurgy. After holding executive positions with Pittsburgh Metallurgical Co. and Airo Inc., he served as president and owner of Macalloy Corp. in Charleston, S.C., the single-largest ferrochrome producer in the United States.

A member of the American Iron and Steel Institute, McFarlane received many awards during his lifetime, including the David Ford McFarland Award for Achievement in Metallurgy from Penn State in 1990.

McFarlane-Ross resides in West Palm Beach, Fla. The two new endowments she has created are:

* The Norris B. McFarlane Faculty Career Development Professorship in Materials Science and Engineering, which will provide critical financial support and encouragement to junior faculty members beginning their careers. The fund will allow young faculty members to direct initial energies to the classroom, will provide start-up funds for new areas of research and teaching laboratories and will offer early recognition for outstanding accomplishments.

* The Norris B. McFarlane Scholarship Fund, which will provide financial support to deserving undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in materials science and engineering.

The gift is part of the Grand Destiny campaign, a seven-year effort to raise
$1 billion in private support to strengthen the University's mission of teaching, research and service. The campaign involves all 24 University locations and is scheduled to end June 30, 2003.

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