SITE Stories: TA for a Day

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At SITE, we're always interested in innovative teaching practices. So when a couple of people mentioned Jennifer Chang Coupland's "TA for a Day" activity, we wanted to learn more. Below is a description of the activity and its pedagogical benefits, written by Professor Chang Coupland, a clinical associate professor of marketing.

I have found over the years that students can often provide outstanding insights when it comes to teaching material. I teach marketing, which is a topic that has definite theories, frameworks and strategies, but the content is dynamic. Every semester (or minute!) consumer preferences change, buying habits alter, the economy shifts, brands and media move through trends and macro forces in the environment. When I started teaching 15 years ago, the examples I used were fairly relatable to students as we were close enough in age and marketing-related interests. As I've aged and my students haven't, I find myself grasping for relatable, timely examples. 

In my honors marketing seminar a couple years ago, I had students volunteer to "teach" the class for 10 minutes at the end of the semester. They could choose any topic covered in the course but discuss the topic in their own way with their own examples. I found that this provided me with many great ideas for future semesters.   

I wondered if I could take this "teacher" concept to my large Principles of Marketing course in the Forum, which seats 350 students. I like the idea that students are at once "students" who learn the basic course content, "consumers" who know about the real-world of brands and media and what it's like to sit in the large classroom setting, and "teachers" who can marry these concepts together.   

So, after consulting with my TAs and some undergraduates, I came up with a concept called "TA for a Day," which is an optional extra credit assignment due at the end of the semester. Students can earn up to 1% extra credit to their final course grade. Below are the instructions:  

"You may submit your own original ideas for in-class activities (include title, materials needed, specific procedures, instructions, expected results, relevant textbook page # or course topic), multiple choice exam questions (be sure to include the correct answer, textbook page #, relevant image), or lesson plan ideas for MKTG 301 in the Angel dropbox, 'TA for a Day Extra Credit.' You may submit this form of extra credit at any time before ___."  

As a result of the submissions, I've obtained a wealth of new content, some very innovative. For example, Jon Slomka came up with an in-class game for a lecture on product quality, entitled "Real of Fake? Test Your Product Wits" in which students try to use product quality lecture objectives to determine which products are real or fake. Greg Newman came up with an elaborate in-class activity to illustrate the personal selling process and a key stage known as "prospecting and qualifying." And many additional students have come up with other great ways to help their classmates learn.

What I like about these activities is that the student has clearly thought not just "about" the lecture material but thought "through" it. Not only do I learn from the students, but they themselves learn by doing. They come up with their own specific examples and creatively apply the content. I believe students are more likely to fundamentally remember marketing in a useful way through this exercise. Future students also benefit from a novel, relatable idea.      

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I think that this is an exciting teaching practice. As a graduate student, I have been a part of small classes which consisted of only 5 students as well as big lecture classes. Sometimes, students may come into a large class with certain per-conceived expectations. Perhaps, they expect an impersonal and strictly PowerPoint lecture and multiple choice tests type of class. As instructors, we are always trying to find ways to engage students regardless of class size. It seems that the "TA for a Day" activity provides an opportunity for the students to feel like they are investing a part of themselves in their learning experience. In turn, they are motivated to really "think" about the material they are encountering in class. Students may be challenged in not just understanding the material for themselves but also in thinking how they may present it to their classmates. Such communicative skills may come in handy once they enter their careers. Also, as students work together to help each other and share ideas with each other, it provides an enriching experience for both instructors and students. Shared, constructed knowledge may be powerful in creating a memorable and effective learning experience. Above all, making learning "fun" is always a welcoming and attractive option--who doesn't want to have fun? I think Professor Coupland's "TA for a Day" activity is one to keep on the books.

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